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Full text of "CANADIAN STATISTICAL REVIEW, January- December 1936"

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CANADA 

-OetmNTON^BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



JANUARY, 1936 




Published by Authority of the Honourable W. D. Euler, MP. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J. O. PATENAUDE, I.S.O. 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1936 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart or Three Representative Factors 4 

The Business Situation In Canada 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Production, Trade, Transportation, Immigration, 
Labour Factors, Industrial Production in other 
countries 9 

Chart of Economic Conditions 10 

Table 3. Receipts, Visible Supply, Exports and 11 
Cash Price of Canadian Grain 

Table 4. Report of the Bank of Canada 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug. Cigarettes. To- 
bacco snuff. Cigars. Foreign raw leaf tobacco.... 13 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoe* 13 

Table 9. Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, 
Retail Food Prices and Cold Storage Holdings. . 14 

Chart of Economic Ratios 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations 
and Railway Operating Statistics 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries and Cargo Tonnage 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Tren d of Business In the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia— Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc. Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas. Non- 
Metals — Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt. Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime. . . 20 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity In 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Common Stock Prices, Min- 
ing Stock Prices 21 



Page 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
In the Clearing House Centres of Canada and 
total Bank Clearings 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities 23 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices .... 24 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 20 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 
Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 
Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 20 

Chart of Production in 18 Countries 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, 
Foreign Exchange and other Financial Factors. 

Common Stc*ks— Total. Industrials: Total, 
Iron and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, 
Textiles and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, 
Beverages, Miscellaneous. Utilities: Total, Trans- 
portation, Telephone and Telegraph, Power and 
Traction. Companies Abroad: Total, Industrial, 
Utilities, Banks. 

Mining Stocks— Total, Gold and Base Metals. 

Financial Factors — Preferred Stocks, Interest 
Rates, Bond Yields, Shares Traded, New Issues 
of Bonds, Brokers' Loans. Foreign Exchange— New 
YorkFunds, Sterling 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Six Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance, Revenue and 
Expenditure 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 38 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

The Business Situation in Canada (In French) . . 35-38 

List of Current Publications ol the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, JANUARY, 1936 No. 1 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.S.S. (Hon.) 
Business Statistician: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE CURRENT ECONOMIC SITUATION IN CANADA 

While major factors indicating economic conditions averaged slightly lower in December 
than in the preceding month, the reaction was of moderate proportions. The level of common 
stock prices was somewhat higher in December, following two months of marked advance. 
Trading on the Canadian stock exchanges was more active in the last quarter than for some time. 
Wholesale prices receded slightly in December, continuing in the zone of stabilization apparent 
for two years. Bank deposits were practically maintained at the beginning of December, the 
advance of the last eighteen months having resulted in a level somewhat above the post-war 
trend. Government bond prices averaged slightly lower in December than in November and 
were consequently considerably below the extreme levels of December, 1934. The physical 
volume of business was not so high as in November, but after taking the three months' moving 
average for smoothing purposes, the ad/ance during 1935 was practically continuous. 

The shipment of silver to the Mint and to external points reached the extremely high point 
of 4,048,000 ounces, which after seasonal adjustment was slightly more than double the shipments 
of the preceding month. The adjusted gain in gold shipments was 19| per cent. The exports 
of copper increased 16 per cent after seasonal adjustment, while nickel exports showed a decline 
of considerable proportions. Lead production in the latest month for which statistics are 
available recorded a gain, the index moving up from 139 to 146, while zinc exports were down 
about 11 per cent. 

The features in the manufacturing division included the heavy imports of raw cotton by 
the textile industry, an adjusted gain in the exports of lumber and shingles and an acceleration 
in the operations of the primary iron and steel industry. A sharp decline was shown in the 
imports of crude rubber and of crude petroleum. The new business obtained by the construction 
industry reached a low level even for December. The railway freight movement after seasonal 
adjustment indicated by carloadings was nearly maintained, while both divisions of the external 
trade recorded declines. 

The Four Charts 

Attention is drawn to the four charts appearing in this number. The striking feature of 
the chart of three representative factors was the rise in common stock prices in the last quarter 
of 1935 and the steady advance in the physical volume of business throughout the year. Bond 
prices averaged higher than in any year in the post-war period or longer. In the chart of economic 
ratios, the relations between the physical volume of business and wholesale prices is of special 
interest. The advance in business operations in 1935 was contrasted with the relative stability 
of wholesale prices. An even wider gap was shown between notice deposits and current loans 
during the year. Gains in industrial production over the same period of 1934 were shown in 
eighteen out of twenty countries for which statistics are available, France and the Netherlands 
being the only countries in the list in which the depression in this respect was continued. 

Mineral Production 

The extensive prospecting and development work in progress especially prior to 1929 is now 
bearing fruit in high levels of mineral production. During the early years of the depression, the 
gold mining industry with a fixed price for the product, was naturally favoured. The rise in 
the price of gold at the beginning of 1934 to about $35.00 per ounce against $20.67, led to even 
greater expansion, expecially on low-grade properties. A number of the base metal mines of 
Canada are essentially low-cost producers. This is due in part to the favourable combinations 
of metals in the ore such as gold and nickel, with copper, and silver with lead and zinc. The 
metal output has consequently been less affected by the depression than might have been expected. 
In fact the activity displayed by metal mining was one of the factors in alleviating the worst 
phases of the economic dislocation. The mining industry has contributed a constructive influence 
beyond the mere monetary measure of the output. 

Canada's mineral production \alued at $308,165,000 in 1935 showed a gain of 11 p.c. over 
the preceding year. The results were exceeded only by the peak year of 1929, when the produc- 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

tion was valued at $310,850,000. The quantity production of gold, copper, nickel and zinc 
established new records. The recent rise in the price of gold has permitted operating mines to 
treat, at a profit, ores of lower grade; this tended for a time to reduce the amount produced. It 
also intensified the search for gold properties and has resulted in many new finds. As it takes 
from two to three years to bring a raw prospect to the production stage, the real effect was not 
felt until this year when the output from the new producing mines has made up for the drop in 
quantity production by some of the older operators. 

Transportation 

Owing to the marked degree of mutual dependence existing between industries and the 
railways, the operating and financial records. of the latter present a measure of industrial activity. 
Railway traffic in 1935, however, showed only a modest increase over the preceding year. The 
gain in carloadings over 1934 was 1-4 p.c, the total having been 2,351,393 cars against 2,320,050. 
Five of the eleven groups in the traffic classification recorded recessions in this comparison. The 
deficit in the grain movement was 10,218 cars, or 3.2 p.c, and coke recorded a decline of 5.2 p.c. 
Minor recessions were shown in live stock, coal and lumber. An encouraging feature was the 
gain of nearly 24,000 care,' or 4 • 6 p.c, in the movement of miscellaneous commodities. Forestry 
products such as pulpwood, pulp and paper and miscellaneous wood products were moved in 
greater volume. Ore recorded a gain of 80 p.c, and a minor increase was shown in l.c.l. mer- 
chandise. 

The slight gain in railway traffic had its counterpart in the gross operating revenues of the 
two principal systems. The preliminary figures for the first eleven months indicate a gain of 
slightly more than 2 p.c for the Canadian Pacific and for the Canadian lines of the Canadian 
National. The earnings on the internal lines of the Canadian National were reported as 
$132,290,000 against $129,334,000 in the first eleven months of 1934. The decline in the net 
operating revenue of the government-owned railway was 18-4 p.c in the first ten months of 1935 
from the same period of 1934, the total having been $6,311,631 compared with $7,732,042. The 
net operating revenues of the Canadian Pacific were $18,667,823 in the same period, a decline 
of 12 • 6 p.c The drop in the net revenue of all reporting railways to $33,915,308 was 9 • 6 p.c 

Canal traffic was uneven in 1935, the gain in tonnage passing through the St. Lawrence 
canals offsetting in part the decline in tonnage through the Welland. The traffic passing through 
the St. Lawrence was 6,830,056 tons from April to November, 1935, against 6,621,400 tons in 
the same period of 1934. The gain in the traffic through the Canadian and American locks of 
the Sault Ste. Marie was 5,905,000 tons, or 14-1 p.c. 

The net aggregate tonnage of vessels clearing from the six principal ports of Canada was 
27,540,000 during the first ten months of 1935 compared with 27,538,000 in the same period of 
1934, resulting in a gain of -01 p.c. The weight of the cargo shipped from five of the ports, 
the statistics for Montreal being unavailable, was 4,420,000 tons against 4,685,000 tons in the 
first ten months of 1934, a decline of 5-7 p.c 

Employment 

The improvement in general industrial conditions in many leading countries continued 
during 1935 after commencing in 1933 and being strongly in evidence during 1934. In order to 
show the relative fluctuations in the general level of unemployment among industrial workers, 
the International Labour Office constructs an international index of unemployment calculated 
from selected series of statistics on this subject for sixteen of the most important countries of 
the world, with 1929 as the base equalling 100. This index averaged 201 in the first seven 
months of 1935 for which data are now available, while in 1934 the average was 221, in 1933, 
274, in 1932, 291, in 1931, 235, and in 1930, 164. While experience in many countries shows that 
the movements of employment and unemployment do not necessarily synchronize inversely, 
international statistics reveal that the general decline in unemployment during 1935 was 
accompanied by a decidedly upward movement in employment in many countries, notably 
Great Britain, the United States, Germany, Italy and Japan. In Canada, there was also an 
important improvement in the employment situation during the year just passed, when widely 
distributed recovery was indicated. 

The Bureau of Statistics tabulates monthly statements on employment from between 9,000 
and 9,500 of the larger firms throughout the Dominion in eight leading industrial groups — 
manufacturing, logging, mining, transportation, communications, construction and maintenance, 
services and trade. The employes oi the reporting establishments constituted some 45 p.c of 

11365—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

the total number of persons at work in all industries as enumerated in the decennial census taken 
June 1, 1931. During 1935, the co-operating firms reported an average payroll of 933,085 
persons. From Jan. 1 to the beginning of December, there were only two interruptions in the 
general upward movement. The index on Dec. 1 stood at 104-6 or 10-8 p.c. higher than at the 
opening of the year. The average increase during this period in the years 1921 to 1934, was 
between seven and eight p.c, so that the increase during 1935 was unusually great. The index 
of employment, based on the 1926 average as 100, averaged 99-4 in the twelve months, satis- 
factorily comparing with the averages of 96 • in 1934, 83 • 4 in 1933 and 87 • 5 in 1932. However, 
the 1935 average was lower than in 1931 and immediately preceding years. 

All five economic areas shared in the recovery recorded during the year just passed. In 
the Maritime Provinces, there was an increase of 2-7 p.c. in the average index for 1935 as com- 
pared with 1934, in Quebec of 4 p.c, in Ontario of 2 p.c, in the Prairies of 5-8 p.c. and in British 
Columbia of 8 • 1 p.c. Improvement was shown in most industrial groups in each of the economic 
areas during 1935. Manufacturing generally recorded especially marked gains, but many other 
industries also reported heightened activity. 

Separate tabulations are made for eight centres — Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, Ottawa, Hamil- 
ton, "Windsor, Winnipeg and Vancouver, each of which showed a more favourable situation in 
1935 than in 1934. The gains in these cities as a whole, were, in fact, more marked than thope 
elsewhere in the Dominion. As in the provinces, the advances in the cities were of a general 
character. Manufacturing, in particular, showed uniformly greater activity, while the increases 

in trade were also pronounced. 

An analysis of the data by industries shows that the revival of activity in manufacturing 
during 1935 was especially noteworthy. The index, standing at 87-4 on Jan. 1, (the low point 
of the year) rose steadily to 103 • 5 on Nov. 1, as compared with 92 • 8 on the same date in 1934. 
The Nov. 1, 1935, index was higher than in any other month in the last five years. Large seasonal 
losses reduced employment on Dec. 1, but the index, at 101-4, was then 16 p.c. higher than at 
the first of the year. There were marked advances during 1935 in iron and steel and other metal, 
textile, lumber, pulp and paper, food, leather, electrical apparatus, chemical, building material 
and other industries. The gains in iron and steel are of especial significance, not only on account 
of the large number of workers re-employed in an industry in which wages are generally above 
the average, but also because it indicates an increase in the agents of production, thereby reflecting 
a revival of confidence in the business outlook. Among the non-manufacturing industries, 
logging, mining, transportation, communications and trade afforded employment to a larger 
number of persons than in 1934. On the other hand, construction and maintenance was not so 
active, curtailment being indicated in highway work. 

The importance of the recovery recently indicated is emphasized by a comparison of the 
index at the latest date with the low point of the depression as regards employment, viz., Apr. 1, 
1933. The general index at that date stood at 76-0, the minimum since January 1921. Since 
then it has increased by 41-7 p.c, rising gradually to 107-7 at the beginning of No\ ember, 1935, 
when employment reached its highest level since Dec. 1, 1930. The Dec. 1, 1935 index was 
37-6 p.c higher than at the 1933 low. Industrial activity during most of 1927 and in the years 
1928, 1929 and 1930, however, was greater than at present, the index based on returns from 
employers having reached its maximum for the years since 1920, at Aug. 1, 1929, when it stood 
at 127-8, while the 1929 average index was 119-0. 

Unemployment 

The department of Labour maintains a current record of the unemployment existing among 
the members of the trade unions furnishing statistics. These figures show a constant diminution 
in the number registered as out of work between the months of February and September, 1935, 
the percentage of unemployment among the reported membership ha\ing declined from 18-2 
in the former to 13-0 in the latter month. At the end of October, however, it had risen slightly 
to 13-3, and at Nov. 30, the percentage was also 13-3. 

Preliminary statistics prepared by the Dominion Unemployment Relief Commission show 
that the number of heads of families and their dependents and other individuals in receipt of 
direct relief was 883,794 in December, while those assisted by other relief projects numbered 
322,365, a total of 1,206,429. This compared favourably with the total of 1,465,821 in March, 
the highest figure for 1935, and was also lower than in December of 1934, when 1,242,020 
persons had been in receipt of public relief of one kind or another. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Wages 

The Department of Labour reports that, following the rise in 1934, wage rates in 1935 were 
slightly higher as a result of increases in various industries and localities. Short time work was 
also much less prevalent. In logging, wages advanced generally throughout the Maritime 
Provinces and Quebec, whereas in Ontario and British Columbia rates had risen considerably 
in 1934. In coal mining, wages increased appreciably in Nova Scotia and in central and northern 
Alberta, and there were some increases in metal mining. Id manufacturing also there was 
improvement, especially in clothing and furniture factories. In construction, rates were advanced 
in Quebec and Ontario. Steam railway wages showed an advance of about five per cent. Similar 
increases were made on a small number of electric railways. Longshoremen's wages rose in 
most of the ocean ports and in some of the lake ports. 

Prices 

The general level of wholesale prices was well maintained during the last two years following 
the sharp rebound from the low point of the depression during 1933. Since January, 1934, a 
Canadian index of wholesale prices has fluctuated within a narrow range about 72 p.c. of 1926 
levels, although a slight gain in the last quarter was sufficient to result in a new high point on 
the recovery. Animal products and non-ferrous metals recorded advances in recent months, 
while several main groups were at a lower level than in the last quarter of 1934. 

Throughout the decline persisting from August, 1929, to the early months of 1933, raw 
material prices had fallen more rapidly than those for finished products and the resultant con- 
traction in primary producers' incomes affected business adversely. Abnormally low prices 
received by primary producers, who represent roughly one-half the occupied population of 
Canada, had greatly diminished purchasing power. This disparity has been greatly reduced 
during 1933 and 1934, and the gain in the prices of raw materials of 5-0 p.c. compared with an 
increase of 0-7 p.c. in manufactured goods, shows that the gap was narrowed further in the 
twelve months ended last November. 
Common Stock Prices 

The higher level of industrial operations and the relative stability of commodity prices 
favoured the revenue prospects of Canadian corporations in the year just ended. Despite the 
diversity of interests among the buyers and sellers of stocks, the present and prospective profits 
of corporations are by far the most important consideration in determining the prices of their 
stocks. Hence stock market trends are significant of the business community's appraisal of 
the future, as well as of the actual tendencies of the present. 

Stock prices in the early months of the year moved into a new high position on the recovery, 
showing a definite lead over the level of 1934. Further marked advance was shown in the last 
quarter, the official index recording in the last week of the year a gain of 25-4 p.c. over the same 
week of 1934. The beverage, oil and miscellaneous stocks participated fully in the advance, 
the gain in the index of 87 industrials being nearly 41 p.c. The modest increase of 6-3 p.c. 
was shown in the index of 16 power and traction stocks. 

Gold stocks declined 6-2 p.c. on the mining exchange, while an advance of nearly 56 p.c. 
was recorded in base metals. 

It is unofficially announced that during 1935 Canadian corporations declared dividends total- 
ling about 213 million dollars against 186 million in 1934 and 193 million in 1933. Recent months 
have witnessed notable progress in the direction of action on accumulated arrears, and bonus 
disbursements contributed to the marked gain in dividend payments during the year just ended. 
Bond Prices 

Government bond prices averaged higher in 1935 than at any time since the pre-war period. 
A marked advance in bonds occurred in the preceding year and the level reached in December 
1934 was maintained during the greater part of the year under review. The setback in September 
last was partly offset by an advance in the last quarter. In the last two years, the available 
idle funds resulting partly from low commodity prices and a moderate level of business operations, 
have found employment in high-grade bonds. The prices of sbort-term bonds have advanced 
even more markedly than the long-term. Internal taxable bonds maturing from six months to 
two years ha\e been sold in 1935 on a basis to yield less than 2 p.c. Long-term bonds of the 
Dominion Government have been sold during the greater part of 1935 to yield between 3 p.c. 
and 3 . 5 p.c. The disparity in the prices of the two classes of bonds was very slight in the period 
from 1925 to 1933. The extremely low yields obtainable on government bonds reflects an easing 
in the credit situation fostering expansion in business operations. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, January 21, 1936. 

11365-2* 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly Average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 1 



Classification 



Physical Volume of Business. . . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mcneral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs. 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production. 

Imports of Textiles 

Raw cotton imports 

Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports 

Automobile production . . . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports.. 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 



1934 



Dec. 



Agricultural Factors— 
GRAIN AND LIVE STOCK 

MARKETINGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings. . . 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings- 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings.. 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

Pork 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



92-4 

91-0 
121-8 
218 



1250 2340 



114 

137-6 

178-2 

330 

69 

91-4 

81-2 

91-8 

91-7 

59 

21 
109 

26-1 
100-3 
126-1 

66-6 
151 
179 

77-1 
118 
128 

98 

73-0 
110-3 
160-3 

64-3 

62 

61 

46 

98 

76-2 

55-2 

27-6 
124 
103-1 
30 

30-8 
29- 



96-1 
123 
65-7 
72-6 
61-6 



36-0 

29-0 

30-5 

48-0 

14-2 

4-5 

4-7 

67-3 

57-6 

115-6 

75-9 

78-6 

111-4 
105-0 
112-6 
115-6 
135-7 
135-7 
219-8 

71-4 
137-3 
110-6 
163-2| 
217-1 

72-3 
162-8! 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec, 



97 5 

97-8 
140-4 
219-8 



991 
247-4 
173-0 
23-7 
67-8 
900 
98-4 
88-9 
75-3 
62 
25 
56 
8-9 
87 
148 
76-2 
180 
157-6 
100 
79 

72-7 
122-1 
101-5 
95-7 
130-7 
591 
620 
78-9 
750 
95 
77-5 
57-1 
73-8 
120-5 
1470 
73-4 
95-5 
18-1 
80-9 
189-7 
97-1 
118-9 
75 

71-3 
701 



30 

19-3 

200 

36-1 

100 

2 5 

6 

81-5 
81 
146 
70-7 
89-0 



127 C 
1491 
154-S 
109 -8 
143-7 
177-7 
234-4 

75-6 
128-9 
106-8 
152-8 
181-4 

96-7 
148-5 



100 6 

101-1 

143-5 

278-1 

317-9 

123 1 

2190 

178-9 

62-8 

61-6 

97-8 

76-5 

92-5 

75-9 

64-4 

27- 

35-5 

14-6 

85-9 

143-7 

73-2 

174-4 

97-2 

103-7 

65-7 

55-3 

94-8 

110-7 

95-2 

123-4 

65-8 

69-2 

70-6 

92-3 

89-6 

65-8 

61-1 

104-6 

117-5 

167-8 

76-9 

83-1 

61 

80-8 
•9 



62-2 

55-2 

59 

67 

22 
1 
90 

93-4 

95-3 
146-5 

75-2 
147-2 

134-8 
150 
228-6 
116-7 
141-2 
200-7 
217-4 

87-3 
135-7 

91-3 
136-7 
187-2 

68-0 
150-7 



94-2 

93 
143 
468 
193-3 
124 
133 
159-5 
56 
55-5 
142 1 
81 3 
86 
72 
64 
32 

27-4 

18-1 

611 

122-8 

72-7 

145- 1 

105-5 

108-3 

81-9 

84-5 

103-4 

60-3 

931 

1290 

701 

54-2 

58-6 

90-2 

78-9 

68-7 

53-6 

105-3 

117-9 

94-3 

51-3 

54-7 

42-8 

80-6 

190 

96 

120-5 
73 

65-6 
73 



65 

57-7 

64-8 

28 

12-1 

1-3 

3-4 

1000 

103-3 

109 

74-4 
241 

124-3 
129-2 
248-0 
110-7 
143 2 
1990 
229 

890 
1270 

90-5 
150 1 
173-6 

80S 
136-3 



98-3 

97 

156 

298 

451 

101 

217 

170 
52 
44-1 

105-2 
77-6 
94- 
82- 
72-2 
34 
631 
25 
74 

124-3 
81 

144 
64-5 

123-6 

101-4 
94-3 

113-1 

134-8 
99-0 

140-3 
670 
51-9 

122-5 
92-2 
99-5 
67-1 
56-3 

102-9 

112-2 

135-3 
37-9 
35-6 
43-5 
80-6 

195-9 

100-0 

121-0 
79-1 
71-5 
81-5 



91 

91 
104 

15-4 

12 
1-4 
6-9 

92-0 

88 

79 

72-2 
299-3 

135-5 
131-3 
344-1 
120-8 
135-8 
125-5 
226-6 
105-3 
122-5 

93-8 
170-9 
169-9 

89-7 
134-4 



103-2 

104-4 
147-6 
361 
208-5 
115-4 
209-0 
200-5 
50-6 
63 
222-4 
81-3 
105-1 
88-2 
76-2 
46-9 
80- 
35-4 
771 
143-5 
73 

174-2 

221-7 

121-5 

68-7 

65-7 

112-7 

68-6 

108-7 

148-8 

81-3 

68-4 

551 

83-2 

100-5 

66-1 

60-8 

87- 

112- 

237- 

38- 

40-9 

310 

80-6 

198-1 

100-5 

121-2 

73-4 

84-0 

84 



86-3 

85-4 

97-9 

6-9 

9-7 

1-7 

11-4 

90-6 

90-3 

88-6 

75-2 

2150 

129-3 
127-9 
285-6 
116-9 
123-2 

81-7 
229-0 
100-0 
120-5 

77-4 
169-6 
161-0 

59-4 
166-7 



99-2 

99-7 
138-4 
399-4 
157-3 
113.0 



88-4 
77-9 

122-0 
75-6 
98-4 
84 

74.0 
61.7 
83-1 
19-9 
48-8 

140-2 
68-7 

170- 
860 

107.8 
99-7 
82-8 
90-3 

193-3 

105-7 

147-5 
70-9 
60-8 

107-4 
79-2 

103-2 
68-9 
53-2 
81-2 

114-2 

204-8 
43 
471 
35 
81 

197-4 
97 

122-6 
70 
74 



106 

112-3 

126-7 
15-0 
27-0 
18-3 
26-3 
78-2 
76-1 

118-6 
64-1 

169-2 

117-5 
125-2 
249-4 
101-2 
125-0 

78-9 
226-9 

96-1 
120-8 

91-4 
155-1 
157-2 

73-1 
147-2 



103 

104.0 

135.3 

339.9 

176.0 

129 

139.3 

175 

62.0 

53.0 

259. 

80. 

101. 

89.6 

79- 

56-8 

81.8 

23.1 

127.7 

134.0 

74.4 

160.6 

77.3 

1C4-3 

112.2 

115.2 

109 1 

97.2 

100.7 

147.2 

58.9 

47 4 

150.5 

86.9 

142.8 

81.3 

53.3 

82.2 

115.3 

2475 

581 

67.7 

34.1 

81.8 

199.4 

100.2 

122.3 

75.0 

79.8 

78.6 



164 
183.4 
206.1 
105.2 

18.7 
9.0 

35. 

80.4 

77.1 
132.8 

71.1 
137.0 

130.2 
132.2 
204.9 
122.5 
114.8 

75.3 
192.7 

86.5 
116.4 

89.2 
173.9 
163.0 

64.1 
157.7 



107 9 

110-3 

165 

418-7 

220 

119-3 

189-4 

220-2 

147-8 

65-0 
325-0 

76 
102-7 

90-0 

94 

52-5 

87-1 

29-9 
120-2 
145 

66-3 
179-5 
177-6 



123-4 

148-3 

111-8 

148-7 

59-9 

76-7 

138-3 

66-5 

133-5 

84-5 

56-0 

49-9 

113-7 

243-8 

69-8 

82-0 

39 

81 

205-2 

101-3 

122-8 

72-1 

80-5 

100-3 



163- 

181-2 

202-5 
27-3 
74-1 
19-5 
57- 
86-6 
83-3 

131-4 
82-8 

110-8 

118-9 
125-7 
162-4 
110-7 
117-0 

82-4 
182-8 

95-2 
114-2 

86-8 
238-1 
174-3 

66-8 
185-1 



101-9 

102 

144 

341 

242-1 

117-4 

121-7 

192- 

59- 

73-9 
181 

84 
100 



70-1 

85-8 

67-1 

98-6 

143-8 

62-1 

178 

116-7 

103-4 

90-2 

84-8 

112-7 

110-9 

103-7 

147-5 

58-4 

57-0 

135-4 

62-2 

161-5 

93-7 

56-0 

34-7 

117-5 

225-3 

52-1 

59-9 

32-7 

81-3 

191-9 

100- 1 

123-6 

69-6 

77-6 

92-7 



114 
119-5 
128-0 
178-0 

39-3 
5-2 

27 



110-6 
115-1 
120-0 
106 



234-3 
169-7 
74-3 
171-0 



107 2 

109-5 

169-6 

472-6 

199-1 

139-1 

280-6 

199-7 

77-6 

68-3 

289-3 

94-4 

105-4 
100-5 

82-6 

67-5 

91-1 

49-4 
123-9 
144-0 

63-2 
178-9 

49-8 

92-6 
107-1 
104-6 
104-0 
121-9 
114-5 
164-8 

58-1 

64-3 
127-7 

76 
150-8 

74- 

73- 

60- 
120- 
224- 

53-6 

59 

37 

81 



100 

122-8 
71-0 
85-4 
88-6 



90- 
148- 
35- 
8- 
32- 



131- 

82- 
93- 

123-5 
121-4 
125-9 
124-8 
119-7 

88-2 
195-7 

79-0 
125-5 

91-8 
216-5 
168-8 

95-7 
191-7 



110 ( 

113-5 
146-3 
264-5 
218-8 
146-2 
140-6 
181-5 
125-1 

72-1 
186-7 

95-4 
118-5 

97-1 

77-3 

62-8 
140-5 

41-3 
117-3 
151-9 

67-4 
188-5 
265-8 

93 1 
106-3 

99-0 
104-9 
142-1 
114-8 
166-8 

68-4 

61-2 
112-8 
114-8 
148-6 
112 

801 
115 
130-2 
271 

391 

39 

37 

81-2 
1990 
100 
124-1 

66-8 

93- 

77-1 



43 3 
36-4 
39 4 

38- 
9-8 
10-7 
11-0 
74-3 
74-3 
135-3 
64-5 
80-6 

103-2 

104-1 
104 -8 
102-5 
1271 

921 
193-7 

86-7 
148-7 
1130 
149-7 
165-2 
104-3 
200-3 



108-0 
109-1 
128-9 
105-5 
133-4 
104-1 
207-2 
100-0 
140-6 
111-9 
123-5 
174-3 
109-6 
194-5 



insult the supplements of the Monthly Review dated Nov. 1932, May 1934 and June 1935 for description and post- 
war data 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Classi fication 



Production- 
Condensed milk output.OOOlbs. 
Evaporated milk output.OOOlbs. 

Creamery butter 000 lbs. 

Newsprint production. .000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

B.C. timber scaled Mil. bd. ft.. 
Pig iron production.. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys production tons 

Steel ingots and cast- 
ings 000 1. tons 

Shipments: — 

Gold 000 oz. 

Gold bullion, n.o.p., 000 oz. 
exports. $000 

Silver . 000 oz. 

Passenger automobile pro- 
duction No. 

Truck production No 

Total cars and trucks No. 

Coke production 000 tons 

Coal available 000 tons 

Gasoline sales 000 gal. 

Trade- 
Imports: — 

Cotton, raw 000 lbs 

Rubber, crude 000 lbs 

Wool, raw 000 lbs 

Petroleum, crude.. 000,000 eal 

Bauxite 000 lbs. 

Exports:— 

Fish 000 lbs 

Fish $000 

Cheese exports 000 lbs. 

Canned salmon .cwt 

Planks and boards . . .mil. ft. 

Wood pulp 000 cwt 

Shirgles squares 

Auto complete or chassis. No 

Copper 000 lbs 

Nickel 000 lbs 

Zinc 000 lbs 

Transportation — 

Canal Cargo Traffic:— 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 tons 

Welland 000 tons 

St. Lawrence 000 tons 

Immigration- 
Total 

Returned Canadians from U.S. 



1934 



Dec. 



Labour Factors- 
Percentage unemployment in 

trade unions _ p.c. 

Employment: Applications. No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements.. No. 
Strikes and Lockouts: — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days 

Industrial Production^ [1929= 
100]— 

Canada 

United Kingdom: Board of 

Trade, Quarterly. 

Economist 

United States 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Japan 

Austria 

Belgium 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Sweden 

Norway 

Chile 



601 
2,482 
9,032 
239-83 
254-97 
30-34 
161 
42-36 
3,641 

58-60 

234-4 
194 

6.673 
532 

1,953 
779 

2,732 
200 

2.015 
34,695 



18,800 

6,381 

812 

47 

11,707 

34,590 
2,039 
2,927 

59.672 
98-24 
1,116 

106,219 
611 

21,545 
7,117 

24,83 



625 



180 
47,746 
32,165 
30,513 



340 
1,875 



71-4 



98-7 

71-4 

66-7 

83-1 

82-2 

145-4 

76-3 

67-1 

65-2 

65-0 

103-6 

103-2 

113-1 



1935 



Jan. 



581 
2,654 
7,755 
201-96 
180 03 
51-93 
63 
44-42 
2,807 

59-53 

281-1 

311 

10,835 

387 

8,269 
2,338 

10,60' 

201 

1,964 

26,415 



11,068 

5 

1 

59-95 
11,401 

29,279 

1,830 

2,872 

43,195 

75 19 

932 

102,949 

1,585 

21,121 

10,736 

28,105 



568 
453 



18-1 
54,190 
29,467 
28,131 



4,792 
21,429 



Feb. Mar. April May I June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



487 
2,715 
7,168 
180-31 
160-86 
71 36 
92- 
37-26 
2,700 

56-01 

245-8 

194 

6,761 

1,007 

13,885 
4,229 

18,114 

181 

1,464 

24,058 



6,193 
3,491 
1,378 
53-58 
11.201 



18-2 
41,487 
25,453 
24,138 

7 
1.545 
16,116 



4,812 
8,735 
205-68 
198-57 
78-40 
181-3 
44-73 
2,715 

57-84 

246 

267 
9,322 
1,278 

18,179 
3,796 

21,975 

198 

1,536 

28,184 



11,242 
6,071 
1,135 
43-65 

21,321 

23.392 
1,754 
3.664 

29,253 

100 12 
1.296 

129,143 
355 

45,838 
645 

22,228 



623 



16-7 
46,014 
24,788 
23,231 

13 
3,276 
12,043 



76-8 79-4 73-2 





105-4 


98 7 


99-1 


76-5 


74-8 


66-7 


66-7 


83-8 


84-8 


84-7 


89-0 


131-6 


130-9 


75-5 


73-0 


66-9 


65-6 


59-8 


62-6 


64-6 


64-9 


105-5 


106-4 


98-3 


108-6 


109-4 


117-9 



97-8 

74-0 

66-7 

90-72 

95-3 

142-7 

73-0 

66-9 

64-9 

64-9 

109-1 

101-3 

115-9 



837 
7,379 
13,329 
222-24 
237-00 
63-55 
231-4 
43-39 
5,147 

68-53 

214-2 

279 
9,739 



20, 
3,435 
24,123 
180 
,521 
39,052 



8,836 
2,380 
1,865 
40-45 
9,211 

13,505 
1,020 
2,485 
15,802 
63-87 
769 
171,299 
6,356 
16,259 
11,895 
18,438 



830 



17-0 
52.397 
27,183 
24,641 



745 

7,913 
23,140 
242-69 
251-01 
55-21 
252-4 
45-43 
4,978 

72-81 

278-7 

97 

3,398 

831 

17,093 
3,672 

20,765 

185 

2,386 

50,770 



6,316 

8,801 

902 

11313 

25,909 

19,061 

1,326 

1,204 

19,305 

129-52 

1,227 

135,974 

6,499 

34,597 

10,238 

26,337 



5,985 

1,122 

919 



1,030 
676 



15-9 
52,251 
30,847 
28,672 



11 22 
2,952 5,189 
14,900 32,357 



76-7 81-9 78-3 



36,602 
232-02 
228-20 

57-77 

259 

44-56 

3,845 

73-45 

257-0 

190 

6,636 

1,428 

12,276 

3 

15.745 
186 

2,398 
59,184 



7,397 
3,215 
2,498 

131-87 

15, 

15,184 
1,578 
1,735 
9.103 

129-80 
1,209 

251,267 
4,829 

37,746 
9,951 

15,201 



7,058 
1,072 



:,06i 

601 



15-4 
51,129 
27,721 
25,889 

14 

4,997 
57,081 



834 

7,230 

37,116 

234-27 

226-45 

65-71 

211-2 

50-51 

7,269 

86- 1 

270-5 

202 

7,047 

1,263 

9,471 
3,598 

13,069 

176 

2,358 

67,159 



9,913 
2,955 
1,161 
133-65 
26,792 

22,697 

2,096 

5,361 

27,297 

101-93 

968 

355,601 

5,070 

33,543 

12,222 

25,358 



7,503 
1,128 
1,007 



1,050 
521 



151 

55,778 
35,168 
33,043 

25 
7,355 

67; 888 



81-6 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
93-4 
97-8 
143-0 
73-8 
71-8 
66-7 
66-1 
107-3 
103-4 
118-5 



103-9 
101-3 
71-4 
66-0 
95-2 
104-1 
143-1 
77-1 
72-8 
65-2 
68-2 
109-1 
105-5 
119-6 



101- 
72- 
6fr 
92- 



137 
73 

70-0 
67-9 
68-0 



110-9 
123-8 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
94-3 
85-0 

141-7 
79-6 
69-3 
65-7 
67-4 



86-0 
117-3 



655 

,820 

33,157 

235-57 

225-74 

75-31 

241-5 

54-41 

3,893 

82-49 

301-3 
142 

4,939 
2,999 

5,524 
2,168 
7,692 
175 
2,467 
64,428 



7,027 

6,304 

1,569 

126-73 

41,897 

27,171 
2,370 
6,480 
38,476 
164-45 
1,073 
339,300 
5,995 
42,408 
14,102 
28,481 



7,731 
1,334 
1,024 



1,324 
523 



14 2 

60,363 
40,164 
37,566 

20 

7,573 

49,429 



103-2 
100-9 
73-1 
66-7 
95-2 
87-2 
139-9 
85-3 
70-7 
67-1 
68-1 



755 

6,287 

27,598 

223-89 

225-40 

73- 

241-4 

54-36 

4,513 

90-95 



364 
12,694 
1, 

3,8ic 

1,504 

5,323 

180 

2,517 



5,857 

3,594 

1,053 

12702 

26,409 

27,770 
2,591 
15,950 
63,571 
112-41 
1,113 
319,633 
4,777 
33,924 
14,265 
19,477 



7,148 

1,180 

983 



[,160 
485 



13-0 
60,496 
38,410 
35,775 

18 
5,691 
48,351 



100-3 
117-4 



103-1 
74-0 
67-4 

101-4 



81-2 
72-8 
69-2 
72-6 



110-6 
121-5 



847 
5,267 
20,745 
266-52 
266-68 
73-58 
264-7 
45-52 
9,653 

95-02 

294 

160 
5,574 
1,483 

7,128 
1,185 
8,313 
205 
2,933 



10,770 

1,819 

1, 

133-73 

30,288 

42,060 

2,733 

13,050 

98,585 

138-12 

1,093 

340,354 

3,931 

48,089 

13,568 

30,417 



7,454 

1,151 

992 



13-3 
65,300 
35,464 
33,737 

19 
3,566 
35,279 



773 
3, 

13,479 
262-85 
285-18 

50- 

239-3 

64-56 

4, 

94-07 

274 

296 
10,369 
2,120 

12,020 
1,454 

13,496 

206 

2, 



13,814 

9,832 

1,857 

137-40 

20,896 

53,702 

3,372 

8,654 

87,939 

121-44 

1,338 

252,451 

5,576 

26,788 

14,857 

24,236 



4,087 

1,313 

865 



13-3 

51,983 
29,713 
28,144 

13 
2,133 

24,733 



1 89-1 



502 
2,930 
10,327 
244-73 
265-23 
30-14 
182-9 
70-65 
4,688 



285-4 

246 

8,681 

4,048 

11,370 
2,405 

13,775 

216 

2. ,087 



22,187 
5,746 
1,618 
55-64 

13,421 

35,183 

1,958 

2,070 

39,525 

111-52 

1,317 

261,189 

5,515 

30,202 

10,498 

22,640 



440 
167 
44 



8 
1,745 
5,718 



103-1 
79-0 
68-1 



76-9 
68-7 



110-9 
129-9 



103-1 



1 Source: Monthly Bulletin League of Nations, unless otherwise stated. 

2 Since March 1935 includes Saar. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 






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/9/9 J 20 J 2/ J 22 J 23 J 24 & ^ ^7 *28 J 2J $0 \3/ $2 ^33 34'3S 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 3. Receipts 


and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain. Tl 


iousan 


d Bushels. 






1934 


1935 




Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Receipts Country 
Elevators and 
Platform 
Loadings- 
Wheat 


12,514 

2,955 

771 

17 

50 

257,724 

16,796 

13,096 

440 

3,934 

17,336 
1,769 
2,468 


3,873 

1,203 

279 

7 

14 

245,853 

15,490 

12,378 

414 

3,928 

5,380 

1,131 

396 

3 

•790 
•442 
•503 

1-426 
•543 


8,815 

2,734 

498 

13 

11 

240,802 

15,368 

11,502 

407 

3,878 

7,207 

1,012 

305 

2 

1 

•791 
•427 
•468 

1-422 
•506 


8,427 

2,881 

440 

14 

9 

229,752 

13,576 

10,322 

413 

3,794 

8,906 

741 

223 

4 

17 

•818 
•411 
•480 

1-425 
•490 


6,280 

2,096 

333 

19 

8 

214,255 

9,447 

8,570 

409 

3,777 

5,027 

348 

312 

39 

20 

•876 
•422 
•458 

1-408 
•516 


5,626 

1,532 

329 

17 

11 

202,120 

7,126 

6,608 

373 

3,659 

11,990 
1,593 
1,380 


9,334 

1,510 

243 

28 

14 

197,183 

5,772 

5,268 

288 

3,432 

6,494 

1,475 

970 


13,347 

1,296 

156 

31 

9 

196,984 

5,986 

3,856 

282 

2,946 

9,158 
1,070 
1,098 


12,494 

808 

1,123 

17 

368 

194,890 

5,750 

3,834 

197 

3,301 

21,698 
651 

721 


73,178 

6,211 

4,496 

169 

698 

246,109 

11,407 

8,719 

396 

3,913 

17,272 
820 
241 


60,000 

6,406 

2,913 

466 

538 

270,749 

13,925 

10,308 

795 

4,459 

28,919 

1,386 

159 

1 
9 

•907 
•340 
•338 

1-411 

•422 


21,043 

2,215 

1,080 

84 

230 

265,823 

12,485 

9,054 

626 

4,585 

26,575 

2,961 

1,028 

4 

17 

•857 
•318 
•332 

1-411 
•411 


14,217 


Oats 


1,679 




629 


Flax 


34 


Rye 


127 


Visible Supply 1 — 
Wheat 


260,746 


Oats 


12,433 




9,179 


Flax 


474 


Rye 


4,688 


Exports- 
Wheat 


17,044 


Oats 


1,184 




486 


Flax 


7 


Rye 


61 

•791 
•442 
•548 

1-401 
•590 


17 

•857 
•408 
•422 

1-340 
•460 


252 

•817 
•397 
•391 

1-213 
•411 


215 

•813 
•428 
•355 

1-226 
•361 


75 

•845 

•363 
•338 

1-237 

•365 


52 

•902 
•360 
•357 

1-363 
•905 


28 


Average Cash Price, 
dollars per bush. 

Wheat, No. 1 Nor. 

Oats, No. 2C.W.. 

Barley, No.3,C.W. 

Flax, 
No. 1 N.W.C.... 

Rye, No. 1 C.W... 


•846 
•297 
•338 

1-457 
•416 



First of following month. 



Table 4. Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Bank of Canada, 1935-: 


L936. 


Classification of Accounts 


Dec. 4 


Dec. 11 


Dec. 18 


Dec. 24 


Dec. 31 


Jan. 8 


Liabilities— 


$ 
5,000,000 


5,000,000 


$ 
5,000,000 


$ 
5,000,000 


$ 
5,000,000 


% 
5,000,000 


2. Rest fund 




94,696,302 
28,002,890 


92,537,929 
31,290,027 


95,102,316 
32,799,842 


98,654,683 
34,552,705 


99,677,229 
17,916,660 


97,145,263 
27,469,938 


4. Deposits— 


(b) Provincial Governments 




189,513,096 
1,186,708 


186,587,376 
1,192,957 


183,734,113 
1,087,916 


180,265,690 
1,190,912 


181,636,034 
766,255 


178,516,362 
599,404 


(d) Other 




Total 

5. Sundry liabilities 


218,702,694 


219,070,360 


217,621,871 


216,009,307 


200,318,949 


206,585,704 




1,856,764 


965,862 


250,146 


94,131 


2,658,974 


1,052,288 




Total 


320,255,760 


317,574,151 


317,974,333 


319,758,121 


307,655,152 


309,783,255 


Assets— 

1. Reserve-^ 


181,409,294 

1,703,650 

146,573 

8,275,212 

9,306 


181,354,099 

1,465,249 

868,340 

10,520,342 

11,508 


181,164,440 
1,480,389 
2,805,024 
9,568,028 

8,441 


180,824,115 
1,318,892 
5,654,746 
8,624,113 

11,656 


180,509,343 

1,638,366 

219,235 

4,003,866 

9,215 






180,067,787 




1,638,366 




219,242 


Reserve in funds of other countries 


8,552,100 




3,673 


Total 


191,544,034 


194,219,537 


195,026,322 


196,433,522 


186,380,025 


190,481,168 




256,836 


250,646 


209,050 


133,875 


128,778 


142,665 


3. Bills discounted 


4. Advances to — 

(a) Dominion Government. 


2,224,063 


2,223,375 


2,219,938 


2,220,625 


3,465,813 


2,205,500 


(b) Provincial Governments 


(c ) Chartered Banks 














Total 


2,224,063 


2,223,375 


2.219,938 


2,220,625 


3,465,813 


2,205.500 


5. Bills bought except treasury bills 














6. Investments — 

(a) Dom. Govt, short securities 

(b ) Prov. Govt, short securities 


37,175,297 


35,020,668 


35,062,940 


35,091,074 


30,873,169 


30,886,669 


(c) Other Dom. Govt, securities 

(d ) Other Prov. Govt, securities 


83,404,132 


83,404,132 


83,404,132 


83,404,132 


83,409,676 


83,153,331 


(e) U.K., other British Dominions 
or U.S.A. securities more than 
three months 














Total 


120,579,428 


118,424,800 


118,467,072 


118,495,205 


114,282,844 


114,040,000 




7. Bank Premises 


128,114 
5,523,285 


128,160 
2,327,632 


128,449 
1,923,503 


128,449 
2,346,445 


111,911 
3,285,780 


111,927 
2,801,996 


8. All Other Assets 




Total 


320,255,760 


317,574,151 


317,974,333 


319,758,121 


307,655,152 


309,783,255 




Ratio of Net Reserve (Item 1 of Assets less 
Item 5 of Liabilities) to Notes and 
Liabilities 


p.c. 
61-11 


p.c. 
62-32 


p.c. 
62-36 


p.c. 

62-42 


p.c. 

62-12 


p.c. 
62-71 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 





Mill grindings 


Mill production 


Year 

and 

month 


Wheat 


Oats 


Corn 


Barley 


Mixed 
grain 


Wheat flour 


Oatmeal 


Rolled 
oats 


Corn 

flour and 
meal 


Wheat 

flour 

exported 


Percent- 
age of 
operation 


Quan- 
tity 


1933 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November. . . . 
December 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.... 

October 

November. . . . 
December .... 

1935 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 


Bushels 

5,863.896 
6.401,501 
6,179.626 
7.345,792 
8,158,446 
4,327,524 

4,676,474 
4,887.102 
4.740,844 
4,866,537 
5,258,707 
5,066,622 
4,815,792 
5,749,909 
6,202,164 
7.426,566 
7,659,805 
4,360,882 

4,622,088 
4,220,917 
4,675,022 
4,313,600 
5,188,296 
4,431.823 
4,460.608 
5,230,795 
6,932,568 
8,261,087 
7,262,558 


Bushels 

746,019 
854,309 
900,766 
1.153,701 
1,262,294 
631,497 

844.482 

786,180 

694,721 

681.909 

578,306 

713,298 

782,307 

783.208 

1,024.845 

1.260,471 

1,162,272 

715,529 

754,909 

744,621 

618,422 

621,952 

699,498 

823,174 

656.006 

733,282 

1,151,068 

1,543,665 

1,513,259 


Bushels 

199,769 
200,995 
151,413 
153,862 
168,662 
124,216 

143,794 
157.303 
156,800 
152,057 
144,344 
189.875 
225.727 
235,382 
156.337 
152,965 
149,553 
111,141 

120,984 
172,875 
166,872 
148,932 
241,095 
204,197 
235,119 
229,976 
218,914 
218,229 
166,813 


Bushels 

36,870 
40,304 
62,141 
74,011 
81,383 
59,925 

78,195 
99,837 
80,562 
62,432 
47,978 
43,865 
47,291 
51.325 
71.113 
75,673 
60,079 
62,243 

73,467 
74,196 
55,325 
57,588 
44.710 
42,455 
47.758 
59,523 
68,880 
99,278 
128,150 


Bushels 

659,023 
753,304 
1.127.286 
1,353.384 
1.588,189 
1,501,845 

1,259,377 

1,379,894 

1,154,072 

1,092,036 

726,298 

552,371 

490,552 

713,438 

1.035.672 

1,330,138 

1.473,878 

1,636,179 

1,512,919 

1,937.664 

1,355,148 

1,401,247 

1,066,167 

793.098 

736,232 

913,719 

1,134,815 

1,627,948 

1,778,718 


48-3 
50-6 
50-6 
62-2 
68-8 
37-7 

39-5 
47-0 
42-4 
47-4 
47-9 
47-7 
45-1 
53-3 
61-7 
66-8 
68-7 
41-2 

42-4 
41-7 
43-5 
41-2 
48-4 
44-7 
41-9 
48-9 
68-3 
750 
68-3 


Barrels 

1,322,923 
1,443.692 
1,392,683 
1,650,557 
1.827,340 
967,284 

1,042,505 
1,102,043 
1,064,428 
1,088,785 
1,175,433 
1,127,477 
1,072,747 
1,282,214 
1,383,205 
1,654,189 
1,703,831 
969,482 

1,024,958 

941,417 

1,046,087 

965,765 

1,164,322 

991,559 

992.340 

1,161,389 

1,535,189 

1,824,754 

1,603,803 


Pounds 

378,005 
648,373 
598,044 
751,566 
927,171 
441,557 

803,504 
558.853 
569,533 
629.032 
614.693 
319.089 
553.201 
416,383 
717,964 
1,065,990 
1,119,776 
458,890 

649,896 
636,312 
533,046 
531,438 
816,112 
871,222 
491,472 
493,528 
902,388 
1,700,720 
1,549,038 


Pounds 

10,030,017 
11,258.685 
12.093.243 
15.676,287 
16,416,025 
7,468,493 

10,261.459 
9,338,950 
7.866,835 
6,397,869 
6,132,154 
9,556,820 
10,292,971 
10,644,925 
13.521,725 
16,697,250 
14,345,997 
7,587,664 

8,379,451 
8,739,753 
6,424,542 
6,513,572 
7,538,950 
9.223,425 
7,650,617 
7,977,920 
13,911,445 
19,488,481 
17,448,402 


Pounds 

1,633,596 
1.514,590 
1.320.404 
2,153,041 
2,109,060 
1,347,928 

1,428,968 
1447,127 
881,990 
1,141,966 
1,398.166 
1,726,506 
1,748,106 
2.215,458 
1,894,880 
1.725,600 
1,570.810 
1,036,210 

894,306 
1,491,528 
1,560,504 
1,448,836 
2,013,518 
1,914,815 
2,182,370 
2,321,082 
2,312,180 
2,842,570 
1,944,746 


Barrels 

492,765 
480,288 
552,556 
514,368 
547,602 
418.183 

448,498 
328,376 
493,327 
340,621 
481,725 
441,064 
408,028 
412.089 
369.320 
485,549 
504.384 
340,751 

346,099 
309,729 
497,468 
276,907 
383,221 
429,561 
395,232 
376,562 
395,640 
501,442 
525,368 



Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



4-week period 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



Re- 
ceipts 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
ofperiod 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



Manu 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



1933 

July 15 

August 12 

September 9 

October 7 

November 4 

December 2 

December 30 

1934 

January 27 

February 24 

March 24 

April 21 

May 19 

June 16 

July 14 

August 11 

September 8 

October 6, 

November 3 

December 1 

December 31. 

1935 

January 26 

February 23, 

March 23 

April 20, 

May 18, 

June 15 

July 13. 

August 10. 

September 7 , 

October 5 , 

November 2. 

November 30. 



150,524 
132,670 
106,943 
102,398 
132,530 
130,616 
91,959 

84,383 

82,635 
103,160 

91,390 
101,951 
124,747 
131,708 
121,490 
105,652 
103,510 

84,266 
102,119 
126.718 

132,212 
119,318 
141,712 
150,238 
117,702 
145,413 
115,797 
146,970 
113,989 
102,057 
97,747 
85,022 



39,394 
70,202 
58,725 
106,990 
63,618 
55,801 
26,830 



40,595 
10,714 
57,294 
65,605 
97,455 
72,327 
84,535 
88.921 
68.649 
106,111 
83,713 
53.971 



43.027 
35,548 
19,998 

107,883 
63,993 

122,344 
66.816 
62,292 
69.367 
73,374 
98,491 



57,248 
95,928 
63,270 
76,858 
65,532 
94,458 
34,406 

16,621 
20,070 
22,484 
46,733 
42,809 
90,495 
82,544 
100,373 
91,064 
87,893 
88,258 
59,114 
48.476 

17,134 
20,633 
27,020 
52,534 

80,171 
93,608 
91.171 
99,798 
74,223 
73,677 
86,100 
97,102 



133,186 
113,120 
118,079 
194,558 
194,558 
194,558 
207,044 

214,486 
189,945 
161,406 
135,848 
135,013 
114,921 
113,663 
102,391 
109.420 
214,486 
214,486 
214,486 
173,898 

173.253 
156,031 
129,023 
105,374 
94,349 
103,253 
122,289 
116,100 
117.050 
173,253 
173,253 
173,253 



51,081 
81,103 
53,386 
75,909 
105,177 
126,137 
50,117 

20,545 
17,269 
18,407 
35,730 
34,371 
70,923 
72,892 
85,557 
78,190 
76,926 
109,378 
94,646 
47,231 

25,546 
22,631 
21,094 
42,156 
68,455 
77,490 
78,964 
85,009 
65,085 
63,827 
116,294 
122,616 



6,251 
6,987 
6,991 

11,708 
7,356 

12,864 
6.852 

2,112 

2,575 

2,953 

7,575 

7,260 

13,142 

10,652 

9,484 

10,489 

10,008 

17.044 

10,660 

8,646 

4,255 

3.048 

3.321 

7,457 

9,065 

9.874 

11,012 

10,065 

6,098 

10,230 

13,531 

14,823 



57,332 
88,089 
60,378 
87,617 
112,533 
139,001 
56,968 

22,657 
19,845 
21,360 
43,305 
41,631 
84,064 
83,544 
95,042 
88,679 
86,934 
126,422 
105,306 
55.877 

29,801 
25,679 
24,415 
49,613 
77.520 
87,364 
89.976 
95.074 
71,183 
74.056 
129,825 
137,440 



75,234 
79,961 
79,103 
83,186 
63,462 
70,342 
48,728 

46,593 
47,686 
46,246 
43,000 
60,349 
84,018 
93,754 
86,828 
95,281 
97,025 
78,247 
64,997 
56.114 

46,756 
52,531 
47,758 
60,443 
68,377 
67,676 
95,670 
93.131 
81,727 
109,879 
87, 194 
87,756 



70,842 
76.913 
74,992 
78,669 
59,040 
62,004 
43,021 

41,336 
42,370 
40,730 
37,980 
54,434 
76,550 
86.799 
81,038 
88,784 
86,729 
68,057 
55,572 
48.674 

41,561 
45,916 
41,097 
52,772 
60,511 
60,817 
88,151 
87,671 
76,010 
99,353 
77,298 
73,417 



6,556 
6,217 
8,360 
9,237 
7.720 
10,541 
6,505 

5,862 
6,014 
6, 
6.164 
7.407 
8,822 
8,018 
6,977 
9,749 
12,634 
11,099 
10.273 
7,847 

5,462 
6,816 
7,036 
7,867 
8,106 
7,515 
8,014 
6,454 
8,313 
11,641 
11,112 
15,204 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. — Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption 



13 



Year and Month 


Tobacco, 
cut 


Tobacco, 
plug 


Cigarettes 


Tobacco, 
Snuff 


Cigars 


Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 


1933 


Pound 

1,490,955 
1.517,064 
1,599.257 
1.823.454 
1,329,411 
1,473,910 
1,561,675 
1.223,930 

1,156,731 
1,380,982 
1,529,343 
1,456,045 
1,731,922 
1,585.094 
1,495,730 
1,590,786 
1.514,766 
1.702.791 
1,533,982 
1,321,349 

1,324,374 
1,333,114 
1,396,416 
1,438,868 
1,647,792 
1.675,696 
1,644,869 
1,671,995 
1,557,787 
1,586,753 
1,694,618 
1,301,415 


Pound 

408,219 
412,655 
345,055 
397,770 
357,519 
350,617 
364.839 
290,671 

321,339 
306,407 
326,628 
353,109 
415,972 
381,019 
367,317 
380,339 
329.761 
370,555 
338,851 
284,916 

306,664 
285,667 
303,003 
336,628 
351,975 
338,704 
366,413 
323,818 
317,774 
356,978 
299,100 
300,057 


Number 

360,805,660 
437,535,200 
449,784,830 
410,553,620 
401,231,720 
379,614,915 
374,490,820 
355,920,395 

267,435,575 
312,784,585 
325,042,310 
348.658,920 
431,667,650 
468,990,240 
472,025.100 
509.045.040 
429,906.595 
448,758.930 
435,078,600 
373.011,520 

360,016,140 
337,960,370 
342.829,010 
367,428,910 
478,376,670 
479,028,135 
515,995,050 
517,502,390 
486,470,185 
463,276,145 
495,019,898 
461,468,601 


Pound 

60,581 
64,216 
65,224 
72,727 
74,667 
67,643 
68,499 
55,299 

64,245 
55,248 
56,870 
57,078 
74,322 
69,113 
65,246 
74,667 
67,601 
71,610 
67,503 
58,790 

66,773 
56,605 
58,274 
59,742 
67,429 
63,892 
63,881 
71,645 
68,061 
73,172 
67,131 
56, 608 


Number 

9.857,264 
10,998,932 
11,661,814 
11,879,869 
11,506,697 
14,202,255 
13,935,402 

8,721,959 

5,069,775 
4,448,840 
6,711,960 
8,744,376 
10,325,277 
11,510,509 
10,773,621 
12,349,405 
9,890,762 
14.358,520 
15,480.850 
10,014,125 

6,789,935 
6.901,967 
8,378,494 
9,385,800 
11,030.725 
11.098,617 
11,751,025 
11,424,735 
11,504,975 
13,276,725 
13,492,260 
10,389,598 


Pound 
914,839 




1,014,566 


July 


1,012,478 




990,819 




880,042 




838,879 




893,716 




635,474 


1934 


630,982 




621,222 




716,938 




731,018 




869,923 




868,269 


July 


776.670 




817,495 




774,128 




783,839 




744,894 




538.257 




632,502 




545,650 




544,890 




649,987 




684,557 




669,217 




685,684 




660,925 




610,444 




535,015 




544,321 


December 


521,489 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes in Pairs. 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



Nailed, 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



Stitch- 
downs 



Total 



Total footwear 



Men's 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



Women's 



Misses' 

and 
childrens 



Babies' 

and 
infants' 



Total 



1933 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November. . 
December... 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
December... 

1935 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 



234,316 
273,575 
323,774 
368,581 
363,232 
311,182 
257,370 
200,583 
147,622 

172,192 
216,094 
283,532 
263,511 
281,021 
239,527 
243,867 
323,442 
278,570 
242,808 
212,427 
238,238 

272,610 
288,265 
343,710 
346,346 
333,834 
301,746 
335,872 
401,446 
350,264 
331,647 
293,146 



737,483 
846,285 
921,428 
861,664 
007,916 
942,552 
712,195 
470.711 
329.554 

451,121 
685,693 
907,542 
890,772 
022,979 
903,804 
595,268 
980.677 
796.344 
707.633 
416,798 
416,502 

632,884 
821.770 
013,566 
049,365 
041,300 
826,313 
709,529 
007,599 
882,828 
677,857 
509,734 



117,438 
139,933 
167,448 
199,168 
260,289 
227.428 
159,127 
117,437 
88,699 

100,757 
122,254 
116,220 

97.129 
137,581 
135,140 
101,228 
146.229 
164,952 
163,530 
107,421 

90,887 

126,909 
153,222 
171,798 
159, 769 
148,123 
141,613 
159,274 
193,793 
165,558 
170,650 
122,546 



217,809 
315,543 
318,003 
264,433 
210,696 
182,023 
202,590 
195,675 
141.100 

178.045 
201,233 
257,724 
266,910 
292.018 
280.461 
165.815 
161,403 
169,725 
205,207 
166,578 
127,350 

186,101 
207,598 
253,267 
304,889 
316.095 
295,873 
224, 42R 
157,390 
149,349 
185,925 
184,940 



1,354.348 
1,631,358 
1,785,434 
1,746,992 
1,919,069 
1,729,685 
1,388,574 
1,020,654 
731,474 

934,606 
1,257,824 
1.607,076 
1,569,912 
1,778,700 
1,608,131 
1,152,142 
1,672,013 
1,460,998 
1,420,320 
964,078 
911,919 



254,078 
520,012 
844,805 
912,398 
899,077 
619,932 
488,628 
826,595 
604,476 
447,039 
168,136 



368,223 
468.592 
566,993 
634.980 
659.556 
583,038 
484,141 
391,663 
299,534 

294,330 
367,456 
433,720 
414,050 
497, 158 
509,337 
423,022 
541,093 
487,584 
503,290 
405,870 
425,074 

413,686 
465,240 
567,637 
588,324 
577,122 
527,336 
568,016 
619,319 
579,213 
552,372 
501,224 



76,480 
108.270 
120,308 
101,253 
133,747 
138,087 
146,894 
112,024 

59,553 

42,529 
79,586 
75,023 
80,184 
102,058 
85,297 
53,584 
98,513 
111,681 
131,669 
88.522 
67,190 

55,159 
75,213 
98,521 
119,623 
120,009 
104,186 
95,099 
123,479 
115,297 
131,243 
105,951 



709,271 
836.667 
949,938 
909,760 
1,085.425 
1,003,719 
870,948 
572,204 
403,164 

467,609 
637.047 
846.800 
814,106 
929,823 
845,128 
648,401 
980,634 
832,734 
801,952 
536,304 
488,128 

619,293 
759.011 
946,195 
985,026 
984,808 
797,640 
754,084 
1,093,443 
992,901 
863,081 
758,389 



214,202 
250,595 
229,827 
232,910 
263,552 
218,096 
232,164 
203,292 
132,344 

160,666 
160, 198 
232,597 
271,414 
266,661 
204,527 
154,707 
177,839 
189,107 
259,002 
220,878 
143,954 

186,011 
206.465 
243,249 
256,370 
269,737 
250,740 
228,332 
236,522 
218,887 
273,186 
268,495 



73,844 
90,440 
98,581 
95,964 
95,299 
92,585 
99.624 
92,070 
50,221 

65,533 
79,761 
98,095 
72,736 
89,296 
82,240 
54,093 
79,582 
83.571 
86,259 
64,544 
45,664 

55,731 
74.112 
83,198 
77,121 
81,075 
76,402 
82,661 
81,192 
76,153 
91 831 
72 '090 



1,442,020 
1,754,564 
1,965,647 
1,974.867 
2.237,179 
2.035.525 
1.833,771 
1,371,253 
944,816 



030,906 
326,216 
686,235 
652,490 
884,996 
726,526 
333,807 
877,661 
704,677 
782.172 
316.118 
170,010 

329,880 
580.041 
938,800 
026,464 
032.751 
756,304 
728,192 
153,955 
982,451 
911,713 
706,149 



11365—3 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



Sales on Stock Yds: 

(Current month 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep 

Lambs 

Swine 

At. Retail Prices, In 
cents, of Food In 
Canada: 
Beef, chunk... lb. 

Veal, roast " 

Mutton, roast. " 
Pork, fresh.... " 
Bacon, break- 
fast " 

Lard, pure — " 

Eggs, fresh doz. 

Milk qt. 

Butter, cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour " 

Rolled oats... " 

Rice " 

Beans " 

Apples, evap. . " 

Prunes " 

Sugar, gran .. . " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



1934 



1935 



Dec. 


Jan. 


48,723 


59,542 


19,553 


20,531 


90,103 


97,399 


25,554 


17,463 


61.156 


67,716 


24,403 


28.142 


7,555 


4.806 


39,461 


35,642 


294,375 


281,689 


10-3 


10-8 


11-6 


12-1 


18-8 


19-8 


19-1 


19-4 


32-7 


32-3 


14-6 


14-6 


41-4 


371 


10-5 


10-4 


25 1 


25-5 


19-4 


19-4 


5-8 


5-7 


3-4 


3-3 


5-2 


5-2 


8-0 


7-9 


4-9 


5-0 


15-0 


15-0 


12-6 


12-5 


6-5 


6-4 


53-2 


52-9 


37-9 


38-0 


16-0 


16 4 



Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


50,093 


53,440 


64,114 


56,948 


44,195 


58,158 


74,229 


101,949 


122,298 


94,010 


47,000 


21,339 


28,536 


41.444 


40,880 


39.968 


41,840 


33,859 


41,602 


43,075 


35,009 


18,666 


88,679 


65,177 


81,331 


68,159 


57,513 


60,430 


49,536 


50,115 


74,847 


68,228 


72,565 


13,895 


15,312 


23,060 


13,572 


27,163 


43,217 


49,524 


62,488 


95,248 


49,626 


25,746 


53,401 


56.234 


57.189 


63,713 


52,063 


56,047 


66,679 


72,313 


92,844 


88,942 


62,570 


29,947 


49,246 


72,252 


76,381 


65,056 


57,360 


47,505 


46,007 


49,115 


39,515 


26,325 


4,228 


3,474 


42,00'i 


30,630 


13,911 


8,292 


6,799 


8,276 


13,213 


12,943 


8,084 


33,013 


36,458 


1,302 


7,080 


40.097 


65.176 


90,391 


96,807 


157,324 


95,532 


45,744 


254,944 


242,820 


255,666 


244,893 


194,613 


191,088 


175,542 


176,786 


262,599 


256,361 


268,824 


11-2 


11-6 


12-6 


13-4 


14-0 


14-0 


13-2 


12-8 


12-7 


12-3 


121 


12-9 


12 9 


12-7 


12-6 


12 7 


12-8 


12 7 


12-9 


13-4 


13-4 


13-4 


20-7 


20-9 


21-5 


21-6 


21-5 


21-4 


21-1 


20-9 


20-3 


19-9 


20-2 


19-9 


20 


200 


20-4 


21-3 


22-4 


22-6 


231 


22-7 


21-9 


20-8 


31-9 


31-5 


31-2 


30-3 


30-1 


30-1 


30 5 


31-6 


31-6 


31-2 


29-9 


14-9 


15 1 


15-2 


15-2 


15-3 


15-5 


15 9 


17-2 


18-1 


18-3 


18-3 


32-9 


31-4 


24-3 


220 


22-6 


24-7 


27-7 


31-2 


35-8 


41-5 


43-4 


10-4 


10-5 


10-5 


10-5 


10-5 


10-3 


10 3 


10-4 


10-6 


10-6 


10-6 


280 


29-6 


28-1 


28-6 


26-3 


24-8 


250 


25-4 


27-1 


28-6 


30-3 


19-7 


19-9 


20-0 


20-2 


20-0 


19-9 


19-7 


19-6 


19-9 


20-5 


20-5 


5-7 


5-7 


5-7 


5-6 


5-7 


5-7 


5-7 


5-6 


5-7 


5-7 


5-8 


3-3 


3-3 


3-3 


3-4 


3-4 


3-3 


3-3 


3-2 


3-3 


3-5 


3-4 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-2 


5-2 


7-9 


8-0 


7-8 


7-8 


7-9 


7-8 


7 8 


7-9 


7-9 


7-8 


7-9 


5-1 


51 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-4 


5-3 


5-2 


5-3 


5-3 


5-4 


151 


14-9 


15-3 


15-6 


15-9 


16-0 


16-1 


15-7 


15-4 


15-4 


15-7 


12-5 


12-5 


12-3 


12-3 


12-4 


12-3 


12 3 


12-1 


12-0 


11-6 


11-3 


6-5 


6-4 


6-4 


6-4 


6-5 


6-4 


6-4 


6-4 


6-3 


6-2 


6-2 


52-4 


52-3 


51-8 


52-2 


52-0 


51-8 


51-5 


52-4 


51-8 


52-3 


51-9 


38-2 


381 


37-7 


37-3 


37-6 


37-1 


37-5 


371 


37-1 


36-6 


36-7 


16-5 


16-8 


16-9 


16-6 


16-7 


16-3 


27-5 


20-4 


22-1 


22-0 


23-6 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter— 

Creamery 

Dairy 

Totals 

Cheese 

Eggs — 

Cold Storage 

Fresh 

Frozen 

Pork— 

Fresh, frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Cured or in cure 

Totals 

Lard 

Beef— 

Fresh , frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Cured 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Veal — 

Fresh, frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Totals 

Mutton and Lamb— 

Frozen 

Not frozen 

Totals 

Poultry 

Fish— 

Fresh frozen 

Smoked, etc 

Fresh frozen during preced- 
ing month 



Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 

14,749 

290 

15,039 

12,899 


April 

6,833 

263 

7,096 

12.422 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct, 


Nov. 


Dec. 


31,975 
443 

32,418 
17,105 


22.345 

316 

22.661 

15,253 


3,466 

2( e 

3,668 
10,909 


5,785 

153 

5,938 

11,685 


22,344 

285 

22,629 

18,836 


40,129 

540 

40,669 

29,410 


51,271 

868 

52,139 

34,626 


54,820 

362 

55,182 

29,431 


47,474 

367 

47,841 

28,237 


39,236 

437 

39,673 

25,052 


3.474 

251 

2,043 


1,764 

310 

1,532 


562 

266 

1,459 


287 

554 

1,149 


2.238 

655 

1.625 


6,237 

588 

2,785 


7,858 

614 

3,733 


9,797 

355 

4,216 


10.076 

427 

4,221 


9,430 

542 
3,946 


6,458 

243 

3,383 


3,404 

285 

2,994 


10,238 
2,352 
15.500 
28,088 
2.742 


9.967 

3.878 
15,826 
29.671 

2.378 


13,008 
4,088 
16,085 
33,181 
3,195 


14,931 
3,511 
18,191 
36,633 
3,566 


13,661 

2,915 

14,919 

31,495 

2,671 


16,188 
3.27K 
16,449 
35,912 
3,688 


13,501 

2,691 

15,949 

32,141 

3,400 


9,657 
2,586 
14,571 
26,813 
3,699 


6,812 
2,105 
12,964 
21.881 
3,198 


5,181 
1,820 
13,027 
20,028 
3,068 


5,334 
3,159 
14,575 
23,069 
2,435 


7,708 
3,149 
15,168 
26,026 
2.598 


17,823 

4,536 

310 

172 

22,842 


14,507 

6,264 

356 

218 

21,344 


11,226 

5,174 

332 

176 

16,900 


9,170 

5,172 

396 

148 

14,885 


6.722 

5,240 

518 

259 

12,739 


5,631 

5,120 

349 

214 

11,314 


4,200 

4,466 

299 

209 

9,174 


3,331 

4,975 

298 

207 

8,811 


3,968 

5,097 

253 

237 

9.555 


5,700 

6,137 

190 

255 

12,282 


11,611 

7,544 

180 

214 

19,549 


17,377 

6,986 

264 

203 

24,829 


2,259 

277 

2,535 


1,442 

407 

1,850 


945 

337 
1,282 


712 

403 

1,115 


780 

864 

1,644 


1,039 

594 

1,633 


1,294 

550 

1,844 


1,467 

716 

2,183 


1.604 

483 

2.087 


1,992 

562 

2,553 


2,358 
1,033 
3,391 


3,123, 

489 

3,612 


7,196 

282 

7,479 

11,653 


5,841 

249 

6,090 

11,100 


5,168 

288 

5,456 

9,396 


4,708 
202 

4,909 
7,589 


3.103 

203 

3,306 

5,542 


1,539 

208 

1,746 

4,275 


705 

332 

1,037 

3,538 


569 

332 

901 

2,901 


546 

279 

825 

2,213 


1.081 

449 
1,530 
1,983 


3,890 

620 

4,510 

2,630 


5,633 

249 

5,881 

5,941 


18,544 
4,945 


15,984 
4.562 


12,809 
3,721 


6.734 
3,184 


6,807 
3,684 


7,666 
2,649 


9,826 
3,347 


16,301 
4,908 


20,162 
5,356 


21,312 

4.717 


25,913 
5,585 


23,580 
5,516 


1,704 


1,102 


1,971 


900 


1,750 


2,150 


3,833 


8,499 


5,448 


3,950 


5,870 


2,672 



Jan. 



31,751i 

219 

31,970 

23,472 

1,252 

316 

2,543 

12,576 

2,740 

15,120 

30,436 

3,387 

16,719 

4,658 

283 

272 

21,933 

2,615 

244 

2,858 

5,314 

263 

5,577 

12,036 

16,369 
4,826 

1,627 



*This figure includes approximately 392,000 pounds of butter reported by creameries added to the list in the provinces 
of Quebec and Ontario since June 1, 1935. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



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1 1365—3^ 



16 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations and Railway Operating Statistics 



OUTPUT OF CENTRAL 
ELECTRIC STATIONS 
000 KILOWATT HOURS 

Monthly Data 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec , 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

Provincial Consumption- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Total 

Deliveries to Boilers- 
New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 

Total 

Daily Average 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Pittirie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 



RAILWAYS 

Car loadings 000 cars 

Operating Revenues- 
Canadian National .... $000 
Canadian Pacific $000 



Canadian National- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried 

one mile.... 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll $000 

Number of employees. .000 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll $000 

Number of employees .000 
AH Railways- 
Operating Revenues... $000 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000, 000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total payroll $000 

Number of employees.. 000 



2017977 
34,963 
2052940 

57,739 
1114243 
578,876 
132,701 
134,418 

20,243 
14,720 
110,508 

71,161 
880,717 
703,062 
154,222 
133,270 
1942432 

6,842 
429,719 
125,080 
32,127 
459 
594,227 



65,096 

1,128 

66,224 

1,863 
35,943 
18,673 
4,281 
4,336 

653 

475 

3,565 



171- 



11,490 
10,705 



1935 



Feb. 



1772812 
30,634 
1803446 

39, 

962,720 
544,279 
113,686 
112,166 

16,796 
13,838 
109.524 

52,037 
754,543 
644,611 
131,734 
110,998 
1693923 



353,556 
118,017 
,162 
368 
500, 103 



63,315 

1,094 

64,409 

1,427 
34,383 
19,439 
4,060 
4.006 



494 
3,912 



179-89 



Mar. April May 



io,: 



5,667 



1912931 
30,623 
1943554 

43.416 
1032363 
578,285 
125,713 
133,154 

16,632 

13,991 

103,956 

55,561 
808,771 
699,713 
143,840 
131,713 
1839598 

181 

315,157 

122,117 

30,121 

477 

518,053 



61,707 

988 

62,695 

1,401 
33,302 
18.654 
4,055 
4,295 

536 

452 
3,353 

186-68 

11,477 
9,463 



1854252 
26,776 
1881028 

53,065 
1028940 
533,740 
118,689 
119,818 

12,754 
14,022 
97,475 

65,564 
805,219 
661,467 
133,026 
118,27 
1783554 

3,775 

372,817 
114,637 
24,184 
365 
515,778 



61,808 

893 

62,701 

1,769 
34,298 
17,791 

3,956 

3, 

425 

468 

3,249 

184-61 

11,566 
9,957 



1896121 
26,950 
1923071 

57,830 
1061757 
535,894 
113,655 
126,985 

13,143 
13,807 
94,256 

70,173 
835,323 
669,512 
128,295 
125.513 
1828816 

5,867 

383,242 

117,386 

16,934 

493 

523,922 



61,165 

869 

62,034 



34,250 
17,287 
3,666 



424 

445 

3,041 



188-35 



11,696 
9,886 



1788045 
28,205 
1816250 

57,871 
982,233 
530,315 

97,157 
120, 

12,863 

15,342 

107,994 

71,962 
772,604 
633,155 
111,311 
119,224 
1708256 



339,864 

110,351 

5,879 

324 

462,598 



59,601 

941 

60,542 

1,929 

32,741 

17,677 

3,239 

4,015 



429 
512 



185-88 



11,273 
10,162 



July 



1762747 
28,796 
1791543 

56,564 
979,105 
499,736 
102,789 
124,553 

12, 
15, 
93,348 

70,773 
765,661 
621,431 
117,108 
123,222 
1698195 

5,642 

310,078 

96,637 

14,645 

326 

427,328 



56, 

928 
57,792 

1,825 

31,584 

16,121 

3,315 

4,018 

417 

511 

3,011 



194-98 



12,527 
11,119 



Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



1820892 
30,261 
1851153 

49.761 
1003785 
529,590 
107,891 
129,865 

14,154 

16,107 

130,305 

64,160 
766,772 
637,955 
123,618 
128,343 
1720848 

1,892 

304,742 

96,263 

10,903 

338 

414,138 



58,738 

976 

59,714 

1,605 
32,380 
17,084 
3,480 
4,189 

457 

519 

4,203 



196-92 



12,006 
10.924 



1888013 
31,201 
1919214 

44,442 
1045369 
546,865 
124,220 
127,117 

14, 
16,352 
142,177 

59,125 
801,002 
650,675 
140,719 
125,516 
1777037 

1,419 

337,569 

98,356 

21,149 

331 

458,824 



62,934 

1,040 

63,974 

1,481 

34,846 
18,229 
4,141 

4,237 

495 
545 

4,739 



220-58 



13,616 
13,296 



2122992 
39,577 
2162569 

46,811 
1176353 
626,559 
137,698 
135,571 

21,149 
18,428 
146,530 

63,761 
940,676 
717,072 
160,457 
134,073 
2016039 

445 

445,043 

123,501 

30,716 

438 

600,143 



68,484 

1,277 

69,761 

1,510 

37,947 

20,212 

4,442 

4,373 



595 
4,727 



251-08 



15,124 
14,115 



2101951 
41,363 
2143314 

43,977 
1104144 
670,402 
148,888 
134,540 

21,791 
19,572 
112,305 

62,095 
946,489 
717,085 
172,351 
132,989 
2031009 



467,297 
125,129 
43,152 
476 
636,054 



70,065 

1,379 

71,444 

1,466 
36,805 
22,347 
4,963 
4,484 

726 

653 

3,744 



214-09 



12,710 
11,659 



2117404 
39,121 
2156525 

44,149 
1100864 
681,644 
156,681 
134,066 

21,452 
17,669 
112,841 

60,536 
925,483 
745,406 
179,643 
132,616 
2043684 

1,036 
449,528 
132,113 
49,549 
364 
632,590 



68,303 

1,262 

69,565 

1,424 
35,512 

21,988 
5,054 
4,325 

692 
570 



173-53 



12,581 



Nov. 



10,437 
1,377 
2,672 

1,092 
607 

41 

6,840 

63 

7,409 
3,442 
2.481 

970 
465 

43 

4,792 

43 

25,702 

19, 
4,797 
6,685 

2,226 
1,200 



Jan. 



10,944 
l,200i 
2,223 

751 
913 

53 
7,241 



Feb. 



10.440 

4341 

2,333 

823 
849 



6,754 
62 



7,705 7,436 
204 850 
,867 1.908 



49 
5.279 



20,953 

20,475 

419' 

5,659 

1,576 
1,846 



94 115 

12,404 13,340 

113" 116 



682 

45 

4,900 

45 

21,579 

19,676 

937 

5,765 

1,< 

1.696 

1115 

1-2,441 

113 



Mar. April May June July Aug 



10,828 

385 

2,424 

894 



60 

7,022 

65 

8,119 
1,047 
1, 

759 

817 

62 

5,058 

44 

23,847 
20,865 
2,114 
5,836 

1,858 
1,959 

133 

^,928 
116 



10,452 

823 

2,252 



863 



6,716 
59 

8,223 
1,413 
1,958 

743 
624 

53 

5,047 

45 

24,482 

20,563 

2.990 

5,725 

1,797 
1,674 

125 

12.590 

111 



11,433 

16 

2,290 

794 
642 

61 
7,493 



8,419 
1,144 
1,966 

746 
522 

54 

5,527 

49 

24,529 

21,839 

1,781 

5,822 

1,720 
1,332 

124 

13,900 

120 



12, 
1,1 

2,227 

873 
657 

59 

7,459 

67 

8,434 
1.404 



822 
554 

62 

5,423 

49 

24,049 

22,455 

691 

5,796 

1,860 
1,396 

134 

13,749 

123 



11,676 

503 

2.400 

1,002 
792 

74 
7,944 



9,254 
1,526 
2,036 



654 

70 

5,808 

50 

26,187 

22.754 

2,442 

5,975 

2,341 
1,644 

157 

14,682 

127 



11,596 

91 

2,279 

823 
834 

81 

7,970 

70 

10,097 

508 

2,025 

799 
683 

87 

5,884 

51 

25,520 

23,435 

1,134 

5,703 

2,101 
1,741 

185 

14,781 

129 



Sept. 



11,718 
1,615 
2, 

1,250 
620 

60 

7,838 

70 



3,290 
2,663 

1,287 
521 

59 

5,679 

49 

29.585 

23,436 

5,380 

7,031 

2,712 
1,333 

137 

14,388 

127 



Oct. 



12,018 
2,823 
3,382 



50 

8,091 

70 

9,621 
4,249 
3,258 

1,351 

454 

47 

5,737 

48 

32,279 

23,598 

7,730 

8,349 

2,937 
1,150 

119 

4,751 

124 



Nov. 



10,958 
1,406 

2,767 



669 

44 

7,514 

65 



i Dehcit" 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons 



17 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products — 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cotton 

Apples (fresh) 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products . . 
Animal Products— 

Horses 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep , 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mine Products— 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates. . 

Base bullion and matte 

Gravel, sand, stone (crushed). 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products— 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber, timber, box, crate 
and cooperage material 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous — 

Gasoline, petroleum and its 
products 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Iron and steel (bar, sheet, 
structural, pipe) 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone . . . 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos. . 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books. 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products, except meats) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 

, Grand Total, 000 tone. . 



1934 


Oct. 


Nov. 


1.175,453 


893.572 


4,065 


2,322 


99,173 


103,887 


78,921 


59,994 


3,846 


2,800 


2,860 


1,677 


5,807 


2,394 


130,277 


126,982 


83,763 


92,567 


63,334 


77,615 


723 


676 


74,321 


40.779 


5,687 


869 


62,969 


35,059 


18,770 


10,409 


94,858 


134,180 


5,978 


4,249 


68.779 


56, 189 


11,009 


4,708 


13,718 


19,029 


10,129 


10,702 


5,999 


6.597 


3,585 


4,252 


255 


1,101 


911 


778 


3.234 


2,372 


481 


780 


3.873 


4.492 


3.874 


3.698 


3,975 


2.127 


7301578 


657,787 


375,698 


340,049 


77.442 


70,526 


107 


190 


180,890 


142,294 


65,545 


70.629 


286,008 


152,413 


4,434 


4,795 


1.939 


2,046 


10,015 


4,306 


19,189 


19,337 


178.082 


160.695 


245.925 


209,569 


3,215 


1,962 


87,310 


84,671 


227,807 


199,713 


18.673 


16.584 


169.751 


139,784 


20,528 


18,831 


17,356 


16,838 


1,625 


6.491 


21,435 


22,822 


5.331 


4,997 


63,209 


24,931 


16 132 


9.630 


16,458 


14,975 


1,833 


1,522 


3,566 


3,643 


9,395 


5,970 


12,005 


9,746 


2,201 


2,089 


16.270 


16.855 


26,565 


32,528 


153,766 


154,604 


64,720 


58.024 


6,240 


6,961 


17,822 


18,055 


209,420 


194,746 


139,630 


121.173 


5,542 


4.731 



1935 



Mar. Apr. May June July Aug. | Sept. Oct 



361,598 

6,819 

76,468 

21,209 

597 

346 

2,420 

82,567 

81,148 

81,573 

1,068 

18,751 

493 

30,318 

8,687 

16,946 

5,782 
36,525 

1,402 
16,726 

9,066 



32 



9,601 
37,479 

1,594 
16,644 

8,924 



6,757 6,621 



5,236 
656 
710 

1,885 
248 

3,842 

4,270 

1,700 
453,046 
189,042 
66,398 
92 
182,047 
56,051 
23,957 

3,343 

919 

1,834 

14,505 

143,742 

255,674 

1,866 

351,737 

204,305 
18,502 



88,444 
16,101 
8,994 
1,270 

26,566 
4,212 

14,792 
4,612 

14,347 
675 

8,617 
44,223 

5,109 

1,844 
12,980 
61,373 
176,697 
62,143 

6,392 

11.782 

174,179 

141,325 

3,740 



5,032 
353 

1,334 

1, 
362 

4,005 

3,157 

801 
404,213 
111,740 
50,767 
480 
188,904 
53,722 
41,313 

4,870 

1, 

3,732 

17,077 

153,165 

190,289 

3,056 

160,567 

210,628 
15,842 



122,759 
19,266 
12,220 
2,< 

34,869 
5,512 

28,936 
7,231 

18,832 



lOj 

45,056 
9,362 
1,762 

15,457 

77,276 
187,609 

66,785 
3,365 

13,324 

194,378 

149,260 

3,1 



525,595 



78 



3,497 
32,534 

1,055 
15,141 

8,318 

8,: 

5,987 
199 

2,151 

1,684 
498 

5,595 

3,717 

1.12S 

576.742 

55,691 

40,073 

451 

175,263 
57,842 

133,873 

12,198 
1,841 
9,602 

19,622 
186,364 

174,086 

5,525 

128,260 

224,488 
18,881 



165,947 
18,476 
15,115 
20,340 

37,507 
4,796 
46,095 
10,003 
18,510 



8,841 

34,706 

3,786 

1,686 

15,913 

105,313 

160,299 

65,956 

2,355 

13,752 

210,233 

134,897 

3,863 



586,688 

21 

38,178 

17,843 

2,259 

1,624 

1,691 

74,528 

67,053 

9,621 

736 

478 

762 

15,009 

3, 

13,152 

2,337 

23,884 

862 

12,931 

7,401 

6,001 

4,877 
142 

1,678 

3,738 
485 

4,810 

3,370 

1,800 
698,768 
45,593 
43,868 
1,472 
155,342 
,234 
191,999 



1,404 
25,833 
14,509 
167,963 

164,866 

5,011 

127,887 

259,509 
27,063 



154,199 
16,734 
8,455 
11,715 

28,086 
4,387 
55,675 
13,154 
18,044 
3,241 

10,300 

26,110 

1,707 

1,501 

15,919 

23,729 

150,734 

54,378 

2,713 

12,338 

225,027 

123,426 

3,874 



888,457 

466 

59,497 

15,082 

2,724 

2,571 

786 

76,394 

72,263 

4,396 

678 

50 

2,243 

8,005 

5,289 

17,410 

5,075 
29,070 

1,716 
11,157 

8,208 

6,515 

5,287 
85 
1,333 
5,445 
2, 
4,685 

3,802 

1,318 
656,113 
42,051 
48,845 
2,244 
133,447 
59,767 
204,900 

12,557 
1,768 
28,298 
17,622 
189,628 

124,111 

7,521 

136,552 

270,889 
25,524 



175,398 

26,954 

12,326 

9,003 

29,748 
5,186 
53,683 
13,605 
18,826 
2,585 

16,341 

21,093 

1,946 

2,509 

18,908 

14,858 

149,026 

59.388 

2,455 

13,373 

255,524 

123,793 

4,226 



660,405 

1,859 

20,558 

25,372 

3,717 

354 

1, 

81,963 

77,589 

8,630 

495 

1,554 

7,445 

2,352 

9,375 

16,867 

3,707 
42,317 

2,768 
10,745 

7,393 

5,021 

5,669 
150 
864 

4,343 
723 

3,725 

5,484 

2,691 

573,495 

89,157 

40,544 

1,111 

146,004 

59,523 

230,587 

10,172 

1,857 

32,b78 

14,219 

218,253 

147,184 

8,100 

110,042 

251,046 
21,274 



201,074 
21,950 
11,263 
5,529 

32,289 
5,940 
53,383 
16,929 
17,829 
2,720 

11,462 

13,832 

1,395 

2,024 

16,983 

13,580 

148,847 

61,817 

2,779 

12,897 

257,623 

130,939 

4,015 



1,314,096 

2,316 

71,110 

91,860 

11, 

705 

634 

109,849 

100,34? 

15,665 

1,973 

28, 

23,122 

9,911 

13,406 

15.118 

3,253 
53,984 
3,423 
9,734 
8,357 

. 3,864 

5,228 
119 
830 

5,062 
738 

4,407 

4,974 

5,040 

514,687 

203,834 

68,836 

969 

142,815 

66,326 

264,586 

12,288 
3,271 
29,583 
14,088 
205,795 

173,411 

5,114 

109,021 

231,313 
21,111 



187,978 
24,732 
14,177 
2,613 

35,234 
5,558 
58,627 
15,667 
16,665 
3,068 

4,899 
10,009 

2,127 

2,197 
14,230 
20,974 
145,389 
60,314 

3,912 

16,005 

232,527 

130,057 

4,995 



1,573,000 

1,398 

136,969 

88,619 

11,166 

5,042 

2,195 

127,446 

116,863 

15,163 

912 

70,446 

8.933 

37,500 

16,847 

134,878 

2,973 
72,514 

9,518 
13,914 

9,316 

5,173 

6,769 
294 

1,116 

5,576 
965 

4,616 

5,201 

4,740 

655,034 

372,809 

99,990 

1,235 

148,545 

73,874 

325,5/3 

10,862 

2,606 

22,494 

14,259 

259,492 

232,301 

2,398 

91,760 

246,329 
20,372 



168,440 

27,368 

20,036 

6.802 

43,277 
6.401 
58,953 
13,258 
17,090 
4,520 

3,795 
13,717 

5,323 

2,785 

16,826 

30,453 

179,197 

71,798 

6,396 

20,058 

232,519 

137,994 

6,158 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 



100 



Industries — First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products — edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber. 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods. . . . 
Garments and personal fur- 
nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilledand malt liquors. . 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 

Electric light and power 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements. . . 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts. . . 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products. . 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous 

Logging ' 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex- 
cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage. . 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries) . . 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



90 1 
102 9 
78-4 
98-7 
58-4 
45-9 
71-3 
86-9 
31-1 
94-0 
92-4 
79-5 
105 6 
104-8 
90-7 
105 
121-0 
111-1 



93-4 
93-9 

102-5 
79-5 
107-3 
63 -0 
49-8 
72-6 
96-7 
29-9 
90-4 
92-7 
80-8 
107-1 
103-5 
92-7 
111-9 
123-6 
118-4 



102-4 
96-7 
118-9 
114-5 
122-9 
120-2 
128-0 
59-9 
106-9 
106-0 
84-3 

88-4 

87-4 
59-6 
89-4 
156-6 

66-6 
90-0 

67-9 



80-9 
110-2 
126-8 
117-4 
104-3 
117-7 

88-3 
207-2 

78-4 

77-7 

85-4 

75-6 

76-3 

108-3 

69-4 

66-7 

80-2 

45-2 

143-4 

56-9 

111-4 

106-3 

126-7 

116-4 

117-4 

123-5 

103-4 



88 



154 



104 



145 



76 



102-7 
100-8 
134-6 
99-7 
111 
8'- 7 
77 5 
75-9 
99-1 
47-4 
126-4 
98-2 
89-9 
1130 
104-2 
91-2 
112-3 
129-0 
117-9 



121-0 
109-0 
133-5 
107-5 
129-5 

80-6 
118-8 
122-3 

79-7 

100 



52-8 
75-1 
100-1 

58-4 
100-9 

79-1 

87-9 

83-0 
123-2 
141-6 
128-3 

77-7 
128-6 

86-5 
233-0 

112-8 
82-1 
94-2 
78-9 
85-8 
118-3 
75-4 
92-1 
110-9 
63-2 
191-8 
84-5 
127-8 
129-9 
124-0 
125-3 
121-8 
126-8 
110-2 



106-1 
103-3 
124-6 
103-2 
110-1 
79-9 
72-5 
82-0 
101-1 
50-1 
136-2 
98-5 
89-1 
115-9 
105-0 
92-3 
116-9 
131-7 
123-5 



105 

97 
120 
107 
138 
139 
132 

84-5 
119-6 
128-4 

84-7 

112-0 

94-9 
53-0 
79-0 
110 

68-0 
112-1 

83-9 

97-1 

86-4 
125-8 
142-7 
130-2 
115-8 
129-5 

89-0 
230-3 

1131 

82-1 

93-6 

79-0 

86-4 

118-7 

75-8 

94-0 

117-4 

67-2 

213-3 

79-3 

120-5 

117-3 

123-5 

125-1 

123-8 

128-9 

112-2 



Cargo Tonnage 


of Vess 


els Entered and Cleared from Five Canadian Ports 




1935 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


April 

May 


54,017 
38,916 
36,970 
39,434 
51,571 
54,183 
44,082 
48,267 


116,514 
26.700 
21,528 
19,860 
29,183 
25,353 
37,491 
12,355 


73,712 
97.226 
77.013 

100,307 
81,796 
62,555 

130,561 


124,380 
72.837 
31,740 
55.658 
64,160 
54,925 
58,502 


14,823 
131,080 
72,646 
83,660 
144,579 
91,144 
92,492 
124,831 
1,602 


21,583 
92,232 
27,798 
14,867 
21,087 
15.879 
18,172 
69.181 
24,358 


167,182 
387,118 
353,669 
363,215 
337.330 
365,002 
334,955 


16,160 
28,538 
22,152 
30,748 
30.623 
25,792 
21,143 


221,240 
255.452 
274,666 
281,092 
318,651 
298,404 
340,129 
278,738 
256,331 


274,907 
352.984 




180,589 


Julv 


236,554 




215,554 


September 


236,849 




244.024 




288,326 


December 










268,020 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. 



Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 
and Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



1935 



Jan. | Feb. | Mar. | April | May | June | July | Aug. | Sept. I Oct. | Nov. | Dec. 



First of Month 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical instruments , 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products , 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. 

Electric current. 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro 

ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles 
Agricultural implements. . . 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals (except 
coal) 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales— 

1930=100 

Boots and shoes (16) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing, men's (15) 

Clothing, women's (12) 

Departmental (37) 

Drugs (23) 

Dyers and cleaners (8) 

Furniture (7) 

Groceries and meats (34) . . 

Music and radio (9) 

Restaurants (14) 

Variety (9) 

General index (206) 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars— 

Number 

Percentage change 1 

Financing in dollars 5000... 
Percentage change 1 



101 



1 


99-9 


101-0 


990 


97-9 


96 2 


95 9 


96-8 


98-5 


101 1 


103 5 


7 


93-7 


94-4 


950 


951 


95-7 


95-9 


970 


98-1 


100-6 


102-5 


9 


97-0 


101 1 


105 


109-9 


111-0 


104-9 


109-9 


112-3 


109-6 


104-6 


8 


63-1 


68-3 


62-8 


58-9 


57-7 


59-4 


60-5 


61-3 


60-5 


64-6 


8 


71-2 


710 


71-2 


69-4 


71-8 


73-3 


77-5 


78-1 


81-2 


84-5 





31-6 


33-4 


30-6 


29-8 


28-8 


36-9 


43-4 


48-4 


47-9 


47-1 


9 


83-1 


81-4 


83-7 


82-0 


83-5 


84-9 


86-3 


85-9 


87-0 


87-9 


8 


106-9 


106-9 


106-7 


107-7 


109-5 


109-8 


112-2 


112-9 


112-6 


114-6 


3 


103-1 


102-4 


104-3 


104-6 


105-8 


104-5 


105-2 


105-6 


106-0 


105-0 





88-5 


91-1 


90 


90-2 


89-1 


90-5 


88-2 


93-5 


94-8 


98-2 


6 


104-2 


107-8 


109 1 


109-4 


112-3 


112-1 


112-6 


114-8 


116-6 


116-7 


3 


120-6 


123-4 


123-4 


123-1 


127-3 


127-5 


129 -0 


132-2 


131-8 


133-5 


S 


110-9 


113-5 


117 2 


115-8 


117-9 


120-5 


120-1 


120-4 


123-1 


122-9 


5 


67-8 


62-6 


64-0 


70-0 


73-8 


75-5 


76-i 


74-8 


80-2 


76-7 


5 


112-4 


112-3 


112 9 


112-5 


109-6 


109-3 


109-1 


112-1 


114-9 


114-5 


3 


104-7 


104-7 


107-0 


106-5 


109-0 


111-9 


123-5 


123-2 


126-5 


126-9 


5 


79-5 


80-3 


82-6 


83-8 


82-9 


82-2 


80-4 


80-3 


85-6 


89-6 


5 


96-5 


89-6 


85-1 


93-1 


98-2 


100-0 


100-0 


102-0 


112-6 


118-4 


3 


82-8 


85-4 


86-4 


86-6 


90 8 


90-7 


91-2 


91-0 


94-2 


96-4 


4 


51-4 


53 


55-5 


58-4 


591 


57-2 


59-2 


58-3 


59-2 


580 


7 


132-0 


134-0 


134-1 


125-1 


122-3 


124-4 


124-5 


103-2 


115-2 


145-5 


2 


122-8 


121-4 


134-1 


124-0 


117-2 


123-8 


134-1 


115-1 


137-2 


137-0 


7 


118-8 


120-2 


121-2 


119-3 


121-6 


122-9 


126-3 


128-6 


127-3 


128-6 


4 


209-9 


212-2 


214-7 


215-3 


215-2 


219-9 


223-1 


226-9 


224-5 


228-0 


1 


87-4 


88-9 


88-8 


87-3 


88-4 


93-5 


96-6 


102-9 


102-5 


103-9 


n 


77-7 


76-9 


77-0 


75-7 


76-3 


76-8 


771 


77-1 


77-7 


77-6 


9 


80-7 


81-8 


80-9 


83-2 


79-1 


80-7 


82-8 


82-7 


82-1 


80-2 


8 


112-4 


114-3 


114-6 


111-9 


110-2 


112-1 


113-5 


114-5 


113-2 


112-8 





72 1 


73-0 


72-7 


72-9 


71-2 


71-4 


72-9 


73-1 


73-0 


71-3 


7 


84-2 


88-4 


82-7 


98-6 


71-8 


79-2 


84-3 


81-7 


81-4 


77-8 


2 


129-2 


142-5 


119-7 


101-7 


83-9 


79-8 


76 6 


83-2 


92-2 


101-8 


6 


56-5 


58-8 


57-5 


53-2 


53-4 


51-5 


49-8 


50-8 


54-9 


60-0 


3 


390-8 


550-8 


419-3 


318-6 


161-4 


110-9 


99-7 


111-4 


135-4 


169-0 


8 


86-9 


850 


77-7 


62-0 


59-9 


61-2 


60-8 


68-7 


69-6 


68-1 


4 


1110 


120-5 


117-3 


121-5 


111-4 


1070 


109-9 


110-6 


109-2 


118-1 


8 


118-9 


120-7 


120-5 


121-0 


121-2 


122-6 


122-3 


122-8 


123-6 


122-8 


7 


123-9 


126-8 


126-4 


127-8 


128-3 


130-9 


129-6 


130-5 


1310 


129-2 


4 


104-3 


106-2 


106-3 


105-9 


106-7 


106-5 


106-6 


107-8 


108-6 


108-5 


8 


105-0 


102-1 


99-9 


99-4 


100-4 


100-9 


101-0 


102-0 


108-8 


111-2 


7 


95-4 


104-1 


91-6 


92-8 


910 


91-9 


92-2 


94-8 


97-6 


100-0 


8 


104-0 


106-7 


105-1 


103-6 


99-9 


99-9 


99-8 


100-8 


103-8 


104-9 


2 


94-4 


94-1 


96-1 


93-2 


91-8 


91-7 


92-8 


95-4 


98-2 


101-5 


7 


97-8 


98-2 


96-0 


92-8 


94-2 


95-3 


99-9 


100-9 


100-4 


98-4 


7 


88-9 


92-9 


87-7 


87-4 


84-5 


83-7 


83-8 


85-3 


87-3 


87-7 





95-3 


101-3 


97-0 


99-9 


99-6 


96-8 


97-1 


98-6 


95-7 


94-6 


2 


97-1 


98-2 


97-1 


971 


97-8 


97-4 


96-7 


97-0 


98-2 


98-6 


2 


107-6 


108-7 


107-4 


101-9 


98-4 


99-3 


97-8 


98-2 


98-7 


101-6 


7 


88-9 


89-0 


89-3 


900 


92-4 


92-2 


93-4 


93-6 


97-9 


99-2 


3 


107-1 


1180 


139-0 


121-4 


1111 


111-1 


1040 


101-5 


107-9 


121-9 


3 


86-1 


87-3 


87-8 


88-6 


88-5 


89-1 


89-6 


87-3 


87-5 


87-9 


6 


94-4 


94-4 


91-6 


93-1 


96-8 


98-9 


97-4 


100-8 


99-5 


99-3 



4 


106-1 


■4 


104- 


•2 


98-, 


•9 


73- 


■ 8 


87- 


•1 


51- 


•] 


90-, 


•4 


118-, 


•4 


104- 


■7 


99- 


•2 


118- 


•9 


135- 


■2 


130- 


■ 8 


76- 


■3 


116- 


•f. 


120-i 


•5 


92- 


•9 


117- 


•3 


98- 


•3 


65-, 


•2 


171- 


•9 


130- 


•8 


127- 


•0 


232- 


■: 


111- 


•9 


77- 


■9 


80- 


•7 


115- 


•4 


72- 


■8 


80- 


■2 


105- 


■8 


69- 


■2 


198- 


• fi 


71- 


•1 


125- 


•1 


128- 


■3 


135- 


•2 


108- 



110-5 

101-8 

105- 1 
97-3 
99-8 
89-1 
96-4 
97-0 

105 
98-7 

122-0 
89-9 



112-3 
104-3 
109-8 

99-3 
102-7 

92-4 

95-7 
102-0 
110-3 

98-8 
155-8 

90-5 
101-5 



1934 



Nov. 



70-5 

49-2 

86-0 

60-6 

83-1 

71-5 

69-7 

72-3 

71-7 

59-6 

51-2 

83 

74-9 



4,179 
+55-3 

1,488 
448-3 



Dec. 



121-5 
115-4 
94-7 
122-2 
1120 
85-4 
59-1 
79-4 
75-3 
67-4 
53-7 
159-6 
95-2 



2,818 
+40-3 

1,060 
+43 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. 



43-9 
39-8 
44-8 
38-3 
56-3 
721 
51-7 
44-8 
71-7 
37-2 
49-0 
53-2 
58-6 



2,729 
+26-5 

1,164 
+43-0 



36-4 
55-6 
39-6 
39-4 
54-3 
68-9 
44-7 
55-6 
67-6 
36-1 
44-9 
57-7 
56-4 



4,249 

+55-4 
1,984 
+75-8 



61-2 
52-2 
53-2 
51-6 
61-1 
76-8 
64-1 
63-7 
75-2 
39-7 
51-4 
67-5 
64 



7,185 
+38-9 

2,981 
+39-3 



831 
78-9 
84-9 
70-6 
72-3 
71-7 



74-8 
73-9 
35-5 
50-7 
77-9 
72-9 



12,749 
+50-1 
5,373 
+53-7 



80-9 
60-8 
71-4 
60-9 
70 8 
72-0 
93-7 
77-4 
74-8 
430 
51-9 
79-5 
72-4 



14,736 
+24-8 
6,147 
+27-9 



47-1 
75-3 
69-5 
70-8 
70-7 
90-0 
70-8 
71-4 
301 



71-6 



12,821 
+22-2 
4,956 
+16-1 



700 
44-0 
57-7 
56-3 
56-9 
71-4 
77-6 
59-2 
69-9 
26-6 
51-2 
82-8 
63-1 



11,965 

+27-6 
4,641 

+28-0 



62-6 
59-2 
50-3 
50-5 
59-5 
74-2 
75-2 
78-6 
71-6 
35-2 
55-4 
83-7 



9,081 
+21-0 

3,405 
+18-8 



68-7 
52-6 
59-5 
521 
71-8 
69-8 
77-1 
85-0 
69-6 
52-3 
53-0 
77-9 
69-6 



7,285 
+21-9 

2,806 

+ 17-2 



70-7 

57-4 
87-9 
62-1 
88-4 
74-4 
760 
93-6 
77-3 
66-6 
54-3 
90-4 
81-0 



6,323 

+15-7 
2,364 

+ 17-8 



79-6 
52-3 
93-3 
61-0 
87-8 
77-5 
64-9 
84-7 
75-6 
64-0 
52-4 
91-0 
79-8 



5,820 
39-3 

2,286 
53-6 



■To same month in preceding year. 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada — 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . . Number 
Liabilities $000 

Maritime Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures.. Number 

Quebec: — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures .. Number 

Ontario — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 



1934 



Dec. 



6,062 

2,522 

94-4 

3,040 

37,353 

124 

1,602 

579 

66 

99-0 

47-2 

2,456 

7 

2,765 

254 

91-3 

893 

11,271 

67 

2,095 
1,825 
98-0 
1,445 
15,129 



414 
258 
91-2 
518 
5,574 
11 



1371 
2,923 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



10,220 

787 

94-6 

2,682 

32,716 

107 

1,502 

434 

17 

100-1 

43-5 

1,899 

3 

1,772 

114 

89-5 

781 

8.921 



6,578 
459 
100-2 
1,289 
15,672 
24 

555 

83 

89-2 

435 

4,206 

20 



114 

89-6 

132-4 

2,018 

1 



10,672 

3,598 

96-4 

2,089 

28.476 

130 

1,189 

504 

56 

98-6 

36-9 

1.998 



1,485 
521 
91-3 

573 

8,236 

65 

6,792 
2,399 
103-5 
1,064 
12,645 
30 



378 

87-2 

298 

3,575 

26 

911 

245 

91-9 

118-1 

2,022 

1 



8,499 

4,010 

93-4 

2,236 

31,167 

124 

968 

353 

41 

95-S 

39-S 

2,173 

7 

1,319 

248 

85-9 

706 

9,190 

60 

5,273 
1,725 
100-7 
1,061 
13,785 
44 

962 

1,781 

86-9 

296 



216 

91-8 

133-4 

2,183 



11,379 

6,292 

95-2 

2,367 

28,649 

107 

1,685 

795 

116 

97-4 

42-4 

1,849 

7 

2,402 

1,806 

89-7 

656 

8,520 

35 

5,079 
3,518 
101-7 
1,043 
12,646 
40 

2,473 

583 

87-9 

486 

3,312 

18 

630 

270 

92-6 

140-1 

2,322 

7 



16.302 

4,825 

97-6 

3,132 

27,141 

101 

1,295 

1,987 
178 
101-6 
47-5 
1,639 
4 

2,418 
1,688 
93-8 
858 
8,195 
52 

6,166 
2,152 
101-6 
1,360 
11,974 
30 

2,644 

499 

92-2 

730 

3,497 

12 

3,087 
307 
96-6 
136-7 
1,836 
3 



18,521 

5,117 

99-5 

2,710 

31,810 

109 

1,879 

3,447 
154 
106-7 
52-6 
1,762 
6 

3,935 
1,497 
94-8 



50 

8,137 
2,339 
102-7 
1,264 
14,559 
32 

1,347 

541 

96-3 

451 

4.230 

19 

1,656 

586 

99-5 

136-5 

2,239 



18,549 
4,266 
101 1 
2,545 

31,832 

110 

1,638 

1,464 
124 
106-7 
51-5 
1,989 
5 

5,123 

689 

97-2 

740 

9,738 

54 

8,819 
1,610 
102-4 
1,118 
13,385 
38 

2,454 

338 

98-7 

492 

4,454 

11 



1.505 
106-8 
143-7 
2,266 
2 



23,837 
4,293 
102-7 
2,498 

26,639 

94 

1,255 

2,973 
998 
107-0 
48-5 
1,895 



11,314 

331 

99-3 

677 

8,552 

41 

6,763 

2,325 

103-9 

992 

10,841 

30 

1,337 
253 

100-5 
638 

3,341 
13 

1,451 

387 

108-0 

141-9 

2,010 

2 



14,743 
3,322 
106- 1 
2,426 

26,442 

98 

1,565 

1,111 

114 

112-9 

46-7 
1,827 

4 

4,682 
584 

103-1 
702 

7,721 
50 

6,383 

1,616 

108-1 

982 

11,454 

33 

1,828 
714 

102-7 
564 



740 

294 

106-0 

131-4 

2,171 

3 



14,925 
4,020 
107-7 
2,908 

30,184 

115 

1,859 

624 

115 

111-1 

50-7 

1,844 

10 

6,712 
1,257 
105-0 

788 

8,594 

48 

4,967 
2,119 
110-0 
1,102 
13,269 
37 

2,000 
217 

108- 1 
820 

4,: 

18 



313 

101-8 

147-3 

2,209 

2 



8,291 
3,315 
104-6 
3,022 
34,767 



376 

105 

107-5 

62-5 
2,300 



2,231 
519 

103-8 
878 

9,540 



4,063 
2,306 
107-0 
1,301 
15,599 



1,132 
117 

101-3 
630 

4,708 



490 

268 

99-3 

149-9 

2,620 



4,365 

2,390 

99-1 

2,932 

36,134 



305 

32 

108 1 

51-3 
2,761 



1,080 

928 

95-5 

813 

9,836 



1,854 
1,140 
102-7 
1,301 
15,487 



768 

77 

951 

606 

4,995 



358 

213 

92-4 

161-2 

3,055 



Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 



Mineral Production— 

Metals — 

Gold OOOoz. 

Silver OOOoz. 

Nickel tons 

Copper tons 

Lead tons 

Zinc tons 

Fuels — 

Coal 000 tons 

Petroleum 000 bbls. 

Natural Gas 000 M cu. ft 

Non-metals— 

Asbestos tons 

Gypsum 000 tons 

Feldspar tons 

SaJt (commercial) tons 

Structural Materials — 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products .... $ 000 
Lime tons 



1934 



Nov. Dec 



250 
1,535 

6,080 
17,179 
15,786 
13,611 



1,425 
113-2 
1,938 



20,240 

66-6 

1,691 

20,279 



223 

208 

33,990 



261-4 

1,363 
5,357 
15,685 
16,073 
13,842 

1,283 
1171 
2,415 



10,616 

27-7 

1,436 

11,531 



82 
120 

34.020 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug 



238-7 
1,244 
4,695 
16,740 
11,336 
13,086 



1,514 
124-7 
3,243 



10,506 
3-5 
730 

11,136 



53 
80 
28,873 



229-3 

1,019 
4,395 
16,734 
13,689 
10,306 



1,012 
111-5 
2,354 



11,844 
3-3 



10,853 



71 
89 
29,018 



249-5 
1,279 
5,309 
18,914 
15,786 
13,468 



1,034 
120-5 
2,427 



11,816 
4-5 
778 

13,794 



131 
137 
32,616 



245-7 
1,014 
5,918 
19,424 
12,406 
11,806 



113-7 
2,077 



14,702 

26-5 

492 

21.407 



244 

191 

35.149 



269-2 
1,613 
5,665 
17,886 
13,389 
13,694 



926 
123-8 
1,517 



18,562 
58-3 
1,013 

22,748 



260 
34.214 



285-8 
1.505 
5,833 
17,807 
13,677 
14,082 



120- 1 
1,162 



15.316 

75-5 

1,700 

16,080 



431 
288 
32,451 



285-4 
1,163 
5,095 
15,483 
14,552 
13,784 



967 
118-8 



15.398 

91 5 

2,371 

23,728 



453 
317 
32,426 



294-4 
1,585 
5,435 
16,302 
13,235 
14,419 



976 

117-7 
928 



23.119 

81-2 

1,714 

15,711 



475 

311 

32,597 



280-4 
1,312 
6,448 
16,971 
13,161 
13,519 



1,123 
123-9 
1,071 



20,344 

48-1 

1,042 

18,139 



477 

311 

34,471 



Oct. Nov. 



301-7 
1,300 
6,679 
17,717 
16,400 
13,743 



1,536 
122-5 
1,667 



27,105 

59-3 

1,517 

20,303 



513 
340 
38,263 



293-2 
1,614 
6,072 
17,270 
16,181 
14,409 



1,601 
116-8 
2,046 



25,528 
67-7 



26,379 



264 

246 

36,846 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of 


Economic 


Activity in 


Canada, 1935-1936 






Items 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


26 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 


7 


14 


21 


28 


4 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators — 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 


11,313 

1,306 

455 

107 

100 

266-1 

13.534 

10,103 

716 

4,355 

•887 
•331 
•319 
1-388 
•401 

22,081 
8,532 
16,881 
18,073 

4-88 
8-75 
9-00 
7-25 

9,067 

2,357 

8,282 

623 

1,712 

632 

2,027 

2,244 

1,642 

12,186 

11,998 

52,800 

21,809 

50-32 
78-80 
97-17 
149-40 
50-97 
47-70 
95-43 
75-18 
90-67 
75-29 
71-68 
70-92 
71-25 
70-69 

154-8 

125-3 

12-6 

60-7 

218-1 

64-6 

135 -e 

132-4 

220-7 

46-3 
24-1 

100-7 
60-6 

101-5 

107-0 
169-2 
119-1 

75-6 
72-8 


7,372 

727 

278 

58 

70 

271-5 

13,848 

10,289 

790 

4,446 

•858 
•329 
•319 
1-388 
•380 

30,805 
12,564 
18,869 
22,092 

4-82 
8-75 
811 
7-25 

7,151 

1,976 

9,293 

564 

1,693 

598 

1,940 

2,011 

1,502 

13,485 

11,881 

53,094 

22,710 

37-36 
60-10 
104-40 
118-99 
45-86 
45-37 
82-24 
63-80 
76-99 
76-59 
68-98 
65-97 
690-8 
61-81 

159-0 

128-6 

13-5 

61-9 

236-7 

66-2 

137-8 

140-4 

222-8 

46-4 
23-6 

101-0 
61-2 

103-5 

106-8 
170-2 
119-1 

75-7 
72-4 


4,785 

598 

267 

24 

61 

269-2 
13,531 
9,962 
739 
4,514 

•847 
•329 
•329 
1-428 
•396 

25,681 
10,144 
15,343 
14,369 

4-69 
8-75 
8-03 
7-51 

7,040 

2,117 

9,685 

632 

1,574 

716 

1,956 

2,334 

1,815 

13,349 

11,000 

52,218 

22,455 

36-28 
64-78 
108-24 
135-62 
45-72 
58-26 
81-26 
78-27 
91-81 
76-94 
67-38 
67-36 
69-60 
64-61 

163-7 

128-6 

13-7 

64-6 

231-8 

69-4 

143-2 

149-3 

230-6 

48-2 
23-8 

102-4 
65-0 

106-7 

107-6 
174-8 
120-7 

74-8 
72-4 


3,612 
362 
257 
22 
42 

267-7 
14,365 
9,763 
710 
4,527 

•847 
•322 
•337 
1-425 
•414 

23,635 
9,565 
15,465 
13,386 

4-74 

8-75 
8-10 
7-75 

6,009 

2,030 

8,872 

667 

1,391 

613 

2,179 

2,301 

1,740 

12,467 

10,415 

48,684 

21,519 

33-61 
62-89 
108-90 
132-08 
43-96 
52-08 
88-40 
85-22 
95-08 
81-30 
72-94 
68-08 
70-80 
65-41 

168-3 

126-9 

140 

66-4 

230-9 

68-7 

144-4 

152-9 

247-2 

49-6 
25-6 

103-7 
66-0 

108-7 

111-5 
179-8 
124-8 

74-1 
72-5 


5,461 

558 

262 

15 

62 

265-1 
12,777 
9,495 
673 
4,586 

•865 
•313 
•338 
1-404 
•426 

21,860 
7,975 
20,348 
10,973 

5-08 
9-13 
8-09 
7-79 

6,396 

2,113 

7,449 

641 

1,581 

700 

2,371 

2,643 

1,740 

13,332 

10,017 

48,983 

22,593 

34-58 
66-05 
86-99 
135-23 
49-53 
62-72 
94-73 
98-62 
99-60 
78-70 
70-30 
67-75 
68-88 
67-46 

172-3 

127-5 

15-2 

67-7 

228-9 

68-4 

146-5 

163-0 

259-8 

52-2 
29-3 

105-9 
67-6 

111-9 

112-5 
184-4 
126-6 

74-3 
72-9 


4,799 

516 

221 

12 

51 

265-2 
12,443 
9,059 
632 
4,579 

•868 
•308 
•331 
1-396 
•413 

22,471 
7,060 
17,660 
10,501 

4-98 
9-25 
7-75 
8-04 

6,826 

1,750 

5,362 

623 

1,524 

752 

2,051 

2,658 

1,740 

12,840 

10,689 

46,815 

21,479 

38-66 
58-94 
65-63 

124-85 
46-98 
57-23 
83-24 
84-97 

114-55 
77-32 
80-03 
66-99 
69-42 
63-74 

173-2 

126-7 

15-8 

69-1 

223-8 

69-7 

147-5 

159-9 

268-6 

52-4 
29-fc 

106-7 
67-3 

112-0 

115-6 
188-6 
129-9 

74-8 
72-9 


3,040 

358 

154 

6 

25 

266-5 
12,441 
9,133 
610 
4,605 

•844 
•289 
•319 
1-375 
•399 

17,689 
5,315 

15,729 
8,533 

4-80 
9-25 
813 
8-54 

4,959 

1,641 

6,434 

933 

1,392 

882 

2,218 

3,078 

1,537 

12,794 

9,053 

44,921 

22,152 

33 00 
55-84 
79-75 
158-94 
48-28 
61-17 
88-97 
101-65 
102-26 
77-20 
73-23 
67-36 
72-91 
61-57 

175-6 

124-6 

15-0 

75-4 

215-0 

69-4 

147-9 

161-7 

285-8 

50-9 
29-3 

108-4 
63-8 

111-4 

115-3 
197-4 
131-5 

74-8 
72-7 


5,353 

593 

201 

14 

49 

267-5 
12,533 
9,117 
539 
4,639 

•843 
•293 
•333 
1-425 
•413 

17,098 

6,483 

22,329 

8,427 

504 
9-50 
8-24 
901 

3,941 

1,524 

6,906 

789 

1,319 

1,114 

2,582 

2,390 

1,244 

12,650 

8,472 

42,931 

24,173 

31-27 
53-38 
88-89 

151-15 
49-29 
71-92 

100-27 
86-06 
82-44 
78-42 
74-95 
68-99 
74-67 
61-42 

180-5 

126-3 

15-5 

75-0 

215-8 

70-5 

148-5 

165-4 

300-5 

50-5 
29-6 

109-4 
62-5 

113-3 

118-2 
211-7 
136-7 

75-2 

72-7 


2,654 

358 

115 

9 

23 

264-8 
12,434 
9,162 
520 
4,659 

•854 
•299 
•348 
1-494 
•423 

11,361 
4,258 

22,121 
6,961 

5-18 
9-29 
8-29 
8-81 

4,958 

1,066 

5,295 

800 

1,241 

1,181 

2,584 

2,206 

1,418 

12,473 

8,428 

41,650 

23,452 

48-18 
50-52 
70-88 

150-09 
47-31 
60-19 

102-58 
90-45 
96-33 
80-22 
79-13 
72-94 
75-17 
69-13 

176-1 

124-5 

16-0 

76-2 

217-9 

70-1 

148-7 

156-2 

285-6 

49-4 
27-8 

107-6 
62-3 

110-8 

117-2 
199-3 
133-3 

74-4 
72-8 


1,799 

298 

121 

5 

26 

261-8 
12,341 
9,102 
503 
4,662 

•945 
•309 
•354 
1-529 
•426 

4,050 
2,236 
9,838 
2,922 

5-13 
9-50 
8-75 
8-54 

3,530 

671 

4,505 

954 

695 

925 

1,828 

1,167 

1,039 

9,105 

5,827 

30,246 

18,694 

46-00 
56-34 
71-79 
208-30 
33-22 
50-77 
88-91 
59-18 
80-79 
72-95 
70-42 
68-14 
71-33 
63-06 

176-1 

124-3 

16-3 

77-6 
212-0 

70-7 
148-8 
154-3 
291-5 

49-4 
27-6 

106-5 
62-7 

110-2 

117-0 
199-8 
133-3 

74-2 
72-6 




Barley 000 bushels 




Flax 000 bushels 




Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply— 
Wheat 000,000 bushels 


261-1 


Oats 000 bushels 


12,492 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver^Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 

ARTHUR — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor $ per bush . 

Oats No. 2C.W " 


9.162 

474 

4,681 

•852 
•322 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


•356 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C " 

Rye No. 1 C.W " 


1-572 
•433 


Sales and Prices of Live Stock— 
Sales on Stock Yards — 
Cattle No. 


11,119 


Hogs " 

Prices at Toronto — 

Steers, medium per cwt. $ 

Calves, good veal $ 

Hogs, bacon " $ 

Lambs, good handy weights " % 

Carloadings, Totals- 


3,219 
11,687 
2,622 

5-82 
10-46 
8-82 
8-97 

3,164 




1,218 


Coal 


5,619 


Coke 


931 




879 




1,098 




2,092 




1,287 


Ore 


1,405 


Mdse. L.C.L 


9,835 
6,930 




34,458 


Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100— 

Grain and grain products 


20,244 

43-14 
75-28 


Coal 


95-33 


Coke 


230-45 




45-40 




48-63 




108-73 




67-56 


Ore 


109-08 




80-95 




83-53 


Total for Canada 


74-63 


Eastern Division 


76-20 




73-87 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices- 
Total (89) 


178-3 




125-3 




17-3 


Milling (5) 


78-6 


Oils (5) 


212-6 


Textiles and clothing (11) 


72-1 


Food and allied products (18) 


149-5 




155-1 


Miscellaneous (20) 


297-9 


Utilities — 
Total (23) 


49-8 




28-6 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


107-5 


Power and traction (19)... 


62-4 


Grand total ( 1 12) 


111-4 


Mining Stocks — 
Gold (20) 


116-7 


Base Metals (3) 


200-4 


Total Index (23) 


133-1 


Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields 
(1926=100) 


73-3 


Wholesale Price, 567 commodities (1926= 
100) 


72-8 







2 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,159 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5.507 


1.725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


573 


8,475 


11,236 


6.000 


1,842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9.910 


11.998 


5,886 


1.960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,644 


14,642 


6.127 


2.053 


1928 


43.477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1,982 


745 


14,913 


17.313 


8.007 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4,789 


2,366 


798 


16,484 


18.543 


7,923 


2,923 


1930 


37,491 


302 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13,137 


15.044 


6,279 


2.323 


1931 


31,586 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10.550 


13.377 


5,201 


1.806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


188 


7,136 


8.066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11.259 


4,797 


1.503 


1933 


29,981 


254 


154 


7,944 


10,222 


4,798 


1,207 


481 


8,567 


13,027 


6,414 


1.492 


1934 


32.867 


276 


171 


8.835 


11.389 


4.682 


1,321 


534 


9,450 


14.920 


6,337 


1,626 



Clearing House 


1934 


1935 


Centres 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 


S 

22-4 
8-5 
16-3 


s 

23-1 
6-7 
13.7 


$ 

19-1 
6-7 
11-1 


$ 

20-8 
6-4 
12-7 


$ 

22-5 

6-8 

13-2 


S 

23-4 

7-6 
16-4 


S 

26-2 

8-8 

17-6 


S 

29 1 
7-9 
14 5 


S 

26-2 
7-5 
14-8 


$ 

25-6 
7-3 
13-8 


1 

28 
8-0 
14-7 


37-9 
8-3 
16-3 


$ 
28-3 




8-6 


Saint John 


14-4 


Totals 


47-2 


43-5 


36-9 


39-9 


42-4 


47-5 


52-6 


51 5 


48-5 


46-7 


50-7 


62-5 


51-3 


Quebec — 


839-2 

48-2 

5-4 


725-8 
60-3 
5-2 


536-9 
31-8 
3-9 


637-9 
63-3 

4-6 


609-6 

41-2 

4-7 


808-4 

44-8 

5-3 


733-6 
66 6 
60 


685-7 

48 6 

5-2 


625-7 

46-1 

5-3 


652-3 

44-4 

4-9 


732-0 

49-3 

6-5 


801-9 
70-2 
6-1 


757-2 




50-5 


Sherbrooke 


5-7 


Totals 


892-7 


781-3 


572-6 


705 -S 


655-5 


858-5 


806-2 


739-5 


677-1 


701-6 


787-8 


878-2 


813-4 


Ontario— 


8-5 
8-0 
5-0 

43-8 
5-5 
9-7 

33-2 

201-1 

5-6 

5-8 

4-1 

1,097-9 

16-5 


6-7 
6-6 
3-8 

41-9 
4-3 
8-8 

291 

145-8 

4-3 

5-7 

3-8 

1,009-1 

19 4 

1,289-5 


6-5 
5-5 
3-8 

37-5 
3-9 
8-2 

24-3 

128-4 

3-4 

4-6 

3-8 

8131 

20-6 


70 
5-9 
3 6 

39-4 
3-8 
8-5 

24-7 

106-2 

4-1 

51 

4-3 

825-7 

22-6 


7-5 

5-4 

3-9 

41-5 

41 

8-6 

27-4 

108-0 

4-7 

4-8 

4-3 

800-3 

22-3 


8-4 
6-4 
3-7 

49-5 
4-5 

10-6 

32-0 

140-5 

50 

60 

4-8 

1,062-3 

26-1 


8-7 
6-6 
4-8 

52-6 
4-8 
9-9 

39 4 

134-3 

4-9 

6-6 

4-8 

962-8 

23-5 


9-3 
7-0 
3 9 

46-8 
4-8 
9 6 

31 5 

129-8 

6 5 

6 4 

4-5 

838 3 

20-0 


6-7 
5-4 
4-7 

42-9 
4-3 
8-9 

28-1 

89-2 

4-5 

6-0 

4-5 

770-0 

17-2 


7-4 
5-7 
4-2 

46-8 
4-3 
8-7 

27-1 

92-8 
5-1 
5-7 
4-7 
751-6 

18-4 


8-4 
6-2 
4-4 

50-3 
5-5 

10-9 

29-2 

117-7 

5-5 

6-1 

4-8 

823-8 

29-0 


7-9 
10-1 

4-5 

58-4 

5-2 

10-2 

35-5 

121-7 

5-6 

60 

5-6 

999-2 

30-9 


9-7 




90 


Fort William 


4-9 
51-7 




6-1 




11-3 




34-3 


Ottawa 

Peterborough 


129-7 
6-3 
6-4 




5-5 




986-3 




39-4 






Totals 


1,444-7 


1,063-5 


1,060-8 


1,042-8 


1,3600 


1,263-7 


1.118-4 


992-4 


982-4 


1,101-8 


1,300-9 


1,300-6 


Prairie Provinces- 


2-3 

37-3 

37-7 

4-3 

3-5 

5-2 

2-0 

33-9 

100 

382-2 


2-3 
451 
37 4 
3-4 
17 
4-4 
1-5 

rs-i 

7-1 
297-3 


1-9 

35-8 

26-4 

2-9 

1-7 

3-4 

1-6 

191 

7-1 

198-2 


1-9 

38-3 

30-3 

31 

1-9 

3 3 

1-8 

30-3 

6-9 

178-1 


2-1 

49-8 

43-1 

3-5 

1-9 

3-6 

2-2 

31-5 

8-8 

339-5 


2-2 

46-6 

34-7 

3-7 

20 

41 

2-2 

72-5 

9-6 

552-2 


21 

48 6 

34-6 

4-2 

2-1 

4-3 

2-3 

33 7 

8-8 

310-5 


2 C 

49 1 

33 7 

4-6 

2 2 

4 6 

2-2 

39-5 

9 6 

344-6 


1-9 

48-2 

310 

4-4 

2-3 

4-5 

1-9 

38-0 

8-6 

497-0 


2-1 

49-2 

29-6 

5-3 

31 

5-0 

1-9 

45-6 

9-8 

412-2 


2-5 

82-8 

35-2 

50 

3-4 

5-8 

2-4 

65-2 

13-2 

604-3 


2-5 
63-9 
31-8 
4-5 
2-5 
5-5 
2-1 
48-1 
10-6 
458-4 


2-2 




59-5 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 


32-6 
4-4 
2-6 
5-4 
2-2 

46-6 




10-0 


Winnipeg 


440-4 


Totals 


518-4 


435-4 


297-9 


295 9 


485-9 


729-8 


451 3 

4 8 
106 9 

24 8 


492 


637-8 


563-8 


819-9 


629-9 


605-8 


British Columbia- 
New Westminster 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


4-3 
108-4 
24-4 


3-9 
109-3 
191 

132-4 


3-8 
94 4 
20 


4-6 
108-5 
20 3 


4-6 
114-2 
21 2 


4-7 
113 
190 


6-4 

113-7 
24-5 


5-3 
116-3 
20-3 


5-4 
104-1 
21-8 


6-1 
118-1 
23-1 


5-7 
121-5 
22-7 


5-5 

129-8 
25-9 






Totals 


137-1 
3,040-2 


118-1 


133-4 


140-1 


136-7 


136-5 


143-7 


141-9 


131-4 


147-3 


149-9 


161-2 


Totals Canada 


2,682-1 


2,089-0 


2,235-8 


2,366-7 


3.132-2 


2,710-3 


2,5451 


2,497-6 


2,425-9 


2,907-5 


3,021-5 


2,932-3 


Bank clearings 


1.475 


1,310 


1.038 


1,230 


1,252 


1.654 


1.561 


1,380 


1,376 


1,334 


1.583 


1,695 





Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 


1934 












1935 














1936 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. | Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Employ- 
ment- 


87-3 
96-5 
97-2 
98-6 
86-3 
76-1 
86-4 


86-7 
92-4 
97-1 
96-0 
86-1 
77-9 


84-8 
88-9 
95-8 
97-5 
83-0 
88-4 


81-6 
90-0 
930 
98-2 
84-6 
109-1 
82-6 
88-0 


86-3 
94-0 
94-0 
99-0 
85-8 
127-0 
83-3 
900 


83-8 

93-4 
94-8 
99-3 
87-7 
132-6 
83-5 
89-7 


86-3 
96-7 
96-7 

101-3 
90-3 

133-5 
85-5 
93-4 


87-2 
95-8 
97-9 

103-5 
93-5 

123-5 
870 
96-5 


86-8 
99-0 
97-7 

106-2 
93-9 

113-4 
89-1 
99-9 


87-2 
100-9 

97-2 
104-3 

95-4 
106-6 

90-6 
101-7 


88-7 
102-8 

98-7 
103-9 

95-2 
105-2 

90-1 
105-7 


91-5 
101-8 
101-1 
105-6 
100-1 
106-8 

91-1 
103-5 


91-7 
100-5 
101-7 
104-0 
101-4 
115-4 

91-4 
101-3 


91-9 
99-0 
100-8 
103-6 
100-4 
118-7 
94-1 
100-3 


86-4 




93-5 




100-6 




103-2 




95-7 


Windsor 


116-4 


Winnipeg 


87- 10 85-6 


91-9 




89-0 89-oli ftft-7 


97-2 

































MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 23 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-one Cities in Canada in Thousands of Dollars 



City 


1934 
Dec. 


1935 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Building Permits— 

Prince Edward Isd 
Charlottetown 


3 




10 




20 


25 


42 


24 


5 


23 


15 


4 




Nova Scotia 


42 


14 


35 


26 


58 


114 


77 


65 


969 


62 


85 


81 


32 




41 


12 


30 
4 
2 


25 

i 


56 
2 

1 


104 
3 

8 


68 
2 
7 


50 
15 


963 
1 
5 


52 
5 
5 


84 

1 


71 
2 
8 


32 






Sydney 


1 


2 




New Brunswick. . . 


21 


3 


10 


15 


37 


40 


35 


35 


25 


29 


16 


20 
















1 
21 
18 


17 

18 


8 
13 
14 


1 
6 
18 


5 

8 
16 


2 
2 
12 


10 

10 






3 


3 


8 
3 


4 
11 


18 
19 




Saint John 




Quebec 


254 


114 


521 


248 


1,806 


1.688 


1,497 


689 


331 


584 


1,257 


519 


928 


Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


170 
5 

55 
8 
1 

16 


86 
23 


488 
17 


192 
25 

2 
11 

6 
13 


1,681 

60 

1 

35 

5 

25 


567 
1,053 
14 
31 
12 
10 


1,408 
35 
3 
20 
14 
18 


547 
88 

3 
20 

5 
26 


257 

55 

1 

6 

1 

11 


360 

168 

1 

16 

2 

36 


675 

530 

27 

15 

2 

7 


428 
60 

ie 

1 

13 


740 

27 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


1 


4 
1 


7 
4 
6 


135 
3 
23 




1,825 


459 


2,399 


1,725 


3,518 


2,152 


2,339 


1,610 


2,325 


1.616 


2,119 


2,306 


1,140 














3 

28 

13 
8 
9 
4 

48 
1 

20 
100 

332 
5 
3 
3 

1 
5 
1 
3 
7 
1,022 

72 
11 
15 
2 


14 
13 

7 
16 

6 

24 

916 

23 

55 

1,065 

3 
250 

6 
12 
28 

9 
23 

2 

9 

17 
616 

274 

12 

99 

3 

1 


11 
31 
14 

8 
11 
11 
109 
48 
95 
57 

5 

6 
259 

5 
15 
42 

2 
17 

3 

10 

15 

1,179 

141 

6 

33 


8 
33 

7 
43 
262 
158 
86 
24 
24 
62 

1 
15 
203 
13 
63 
20 

5 
25 

7 
15 

9 
1,027 

188 
5 

18 
2 


10 
33 

6 
34 

7 

27 
100 
35 
91 
59 
10 

6 
100 

1 

15 
16 

8 
27 
60 
11 

9 
736 

173 
8 
15 
3 


86 

32 

9 

12 

42 

12 

142 

11 

106 

30 

1 

72 

753 

5 

38 

11 

5 

55 

9 

27 
702 

133 

4 
11 

1 
2 


1 
18 

4 

16 
44 
11 
143 
19 
16 
52 
43 
17 
63 

7 
13 
25 

5 
31 
14 

8 

10 
630 

126 

4 

286 


12 
35 

5 
11 

3 

14 
51 
37 
61 
89 

6 

2 
590 

24 
11 
10 

8 
4 
7 
9 
783 

155 

22 

156 


i6 

2 
4 
2 
16 
142 
15 
78 
253 

2 

358 
4 

10 
5 
1 

41 

1 

5 

6 

1,098 

220 
3 

18 


1 


Rrantford. 

Chatham 

Fort William 

Gait 


44 
8 
6 


10 


9 

21 

.... 

3 
56 


17 
22 

i 




4 

90 
3 
4 

84 
9 
2 

14 
1 
4 
7 
1 
6 

16 

7 

1 

1,393 

79 
2 
3 


5 
37 


1 




48 








2 
8 

1 

7 

1 


10 

48 

"i.'isi 
i 


32 




13 


Niagara Falls 


1 




25 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 


1 
3 






1 


Stratford 






5 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


1 
1 
1 
3 
345 

24 


l 

4 

2 
. 1.025 

33 


5 

36 
3 


Sault Ste. Marie... 


17 
740 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


139 




6 


10 


9 














1 


3 






Sandwich 

Walker ville 

Woodstock 


13 

6 
7 
















8 

7 


6 
13 


3 
11 


"'4 
6 


" 2 
13 










4 




9 


6 


8 


6 


20 


Manitoba 


43 


40 


306 


1.523 


116 


181 


189 


158 


103 


117 


115 


56 


42 


Brandon 

St. Boniface 


2 

27 
14 


1 

40 


4 

10 

292 


2 
1,520 


53 
4 

59 


8 

4 

169 


3 

5 

182 


11 
27 
119 


27 
1 

74 


2 
30 
85 


1 
18 
95 


2 
'"55 


9 

33 






Saskatchewan 


9 


19 


8 


45 


59 


143 


39 


25 


28 


491 


18 


30 


9 






7 

e 


8 


4 

21 
20 


21 
18 
20 


88 
J8 
36 


1 
31 

7 


1 

15 
10 


5 
7 
16 


5 
479 

7 


5 

7 
6 






Regina 


8 


23 

7 


1 


Saskatoon 


8 


Alberta 


206 


24 


63 


213 


409 


175 


312 


156 


122 


106 


84 


31 


26 








191 
8 
6 
2 


15 

7 
1 


56 
6 
1 


181 
19 
11 
2 


108 

280 

16 

4 


72 
72 
28 
3 


238 

66 

8 


78 
63 
12 
3 


58 
53 
10 


55 

42 
9 


18 
50 

16 

1 


16 
6 
5 
4 


14 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


11 
1 














British Columbia... 


119 


114 


245 


216 


270 


307 


586 


1,505 


387 


294 


313 


268 


213 


Kamloops 






3 
2 

26 

2 

168 

3 

41 


2 
3 
6 
3 
168 

33 


3 

3 

33 

2 

199 

4 

28 


7 

4 
16 

3 
203 

5 
69 


29 
3 
18 

""508 
1 

27 


6 

5 
27 

2 
1,377 

3 
84 


2 

1 

11 

22 

309 

1 

41 


5 
3 
9 
1 
246 
1 
27 


5 

3 
24 

3 
248 

1 
29 


3 

3 

16 

3 

217 


3 


Nanaimo 


4 

2 


2 

5 


6 


New Westminster. 
Prince Rupert 


20 


Vancouver 


85 


86 


164 


Victoria 


27 


20 


25 


19 


Total 81 cities.. . 


2,522 


787 


3,598 


4,010 


6,292 


4,825 


5,117 


4,266 


4,293 


3,322 


4,020 


3,315 


2,390 



1 Includes East Windsor, 
September, 1935. 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products. . . . 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products.. 
Non-ferrous metals — 
Non-metallic minerals. 
Chemicals 



Purpose — Consumers' goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment , 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma 

terials ■ 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field Origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODUCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products... 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured .... 



Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton . raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods — ., 

Silk, raw .. 

Artificial silk and its products. 



Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products. 



Lead and its products 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Clay and allied material prod'ts 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 



1934 
Dec. 



1935 



an. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



72-6 

64 

86 

63-7 

86-1 

80-4 

72-9 

67- 

68- 

89- 

65- 

81-5 
63-4 

64-3 

72 

55-2 

73-5 

65-1 

67-7 

68-2 

68-0 

56-0 

70 

61 

53-8 

75-5 

69-6 

74-5 

55-9 

64-6 

77-9 

85 

82 

75-5 

58-5 

71-8 

55 

83 

39-0 

69-8 

45-7 

58-0 

73-9 

85-4 
66-1 
63-4 
65-4 
65-6 
72-9 



Asbestos.., 
Fertilizers. 



44-9 
80-0 
54-0 
76-7 
69-3 
83-0 
91-1 
50-9 
80-4 
55-0 

40-6 
86-6 
41-6 
88-4 
91-6 
93-2 
74-8 

102 

105-2 



75 



•*u 



71-4 



67-3 
71-4 
64-8 
86-9 
64-0 
86-4 
80-6 

73-4 
68-5 
68-5 
89-7 
66-1 

81-8 
63-4 

64-9 

73-7 

55-6 

73-6 

65-3 

69-0 

67-8 

68 

55-7 

71-0 

61-4 

66-0 

75-5 

72-9 

75-1 

63-3 

68-8 

78-0 

85-8 

82-3 

76-3 

57-9 

70-6 

58 

83-9 

390 

73-6 

51-5 

60-2 

74-7 

85-8 
69-4 
65-0 
67-0 
58-9 
73-2 
82-3 
81-3 
241 
50-8 

44-1 
79-6 
54-0 
77-6 
69-3 
83-0 
91-2 
50-9 
81-0 
55-3 

41-0 

87-8 
41-4 
88-4 
91-6 
93-2 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 



81-3 81-3 



75-8 



71 9 

67-1 

69 

71-3 

64 

87 

63-9 



74-0 

69 

69-3 

89-7 

66-5 

81-6 
63-9 

65-2 

74-6 

55 

73-9 

65-5 

69-7 

70-4 

701 

55-7 

72-6 

620 

66-3 

75-4 

72-9 

750 

63-3 

68 

78 

85-9 

82-4 

75-4 
57-7 
70-9 
581 
83-5 
390 
73-8 
52-5 
57-7 
75-3 

85-8 
74-4 
66-5 
71-4 
570 
73-4 
82-3 
81-3 
23-8 
50-8 

441 
79 9 

540 
77-4 
69-4 
830 
91-9 
50-9 
81-2 
54-7 

41-0 
88-3 
41-3 
88-4 
91-7 
93-1 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 

75-8 



720 

67-5 
69 
70 
64 

87 
65 
85 
80 



73-7 
70-2 
69-3 
89-7 
670 



65-5 

74 -8 

561 

73-9 

65-7 

70-4 

70-0 

70-2 

56-4 

73 

62 

70 

75 

74 

74 

63 

68-6 

781 

860 

82-5 

77-7 
58-4 
71-2 
57-6 
83-7 
390 
74-7 
52-5 
56-4 
75-3 

85-8 
811 
68-6 
71-6 
48-6 
68-0 
82-3 
81-3 
221 
50-8 

42-5 
79-2 
640 
77-1 



41-9 

96-2 
41-3 
88-4 
90-2 
93-1 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 
75-8 



72-5 



73-5 

70-3 
70-7 
89-9 



81-3 
66-4 

66-6 

74-3 

58-7 

74 

67-3 

70-0 

69-1 

69-5 

59 

72-9 

64-7 

67-7 

73-6 

72 

73-2 

63-3 

67-9 

79-1 

85-7 

82-7 

77-5 
62-2 
741 
57-6 
83-8 
41-4 
72-9 
52-5 
61-5 
75-3 

85-8 
85-1 
700 
69-5 
44-3 
69-1 
82-3 
83-0 
23-6 
50-8 

42-5 
79-6 
540 
76-0 
66-8 
83 
91-9 
61-3 
78-2 
58-6 



9 
4 
9 
4 

1 
7 

99-7 
105-2 



81-3 
75-8 



72-3 



71-5 

66 
68 
70 
64 
87 
69 
85 
79 

72 



75-8 75-8 
75-8 75-8 



71-5 



75-8 
75-8 



71-6 



75-8 
75-8 



72-3 

G7 
72 
68 
65 
87 
71 
85 
76 



105 



73 1 

68-5 
73-5 
69-2 
64-fi 
87-1 
73-6 
85-0 
77-4 

74 

72-5 

70-6 

89-7 

68-5 

82-2 
66-2 

68-0 

73-4 

58-3 

72-7 

66-1 

74-4 

73-5 

73-4 

59-3 

76- 

65-8 

65-6 

68-4 

67-6 

74-4 

56-5 

64 

81.-4 

84-5 

83-1 

76-7 
61-3 
72-0 
56-3 
C 
4 



81 

41 

70-9 

52-7 

88-3 

84-6 

85-3 
74-2 
72-5 
71-3 
75-3 
66-6 
82-0 
82-3 
34-4 
49-6 

54-7 

84-4 
54-0 
78-0 
66-2 
83-0 
92-1 
55-4 
78-5 
65-5 

58-2 
1070 
50-7 
88-4 
92-0 
931 
73-3 
99-7 
105-2 

75-8 
75-8 



72 7 



72-6 



67-3 
72-9 


67- 

72- 


69-6 


69- 


65-2 


65- 


87-2 


87- 


73-3 


71- 


85-0 


85- 


77-4 


77- 


74-1 


74- 


72-2 


72- 


69-6 


69- 


89-6 


90- 


67-4 


67- 


82-4 


83- 


64-8 


64- 


67-5 


67- 


72-9 


72- 


57-0 


56- 


71-8 


71- 


65-0 


64- 


74-3 


74- 


72-7 


72- 


73-4 


73- 


57-8 


57- 


77-1 


77- 


65-0 


65- 


60-0 


59- 


70-7 


70- 


67-8 


67- 


75-3 


76- 


56-5 


56- 


65-3 


65- 


81-4 


80- 


84-5 


84- 


831 


83- 


83-3 


81- 


58-1 


57- 


69-0 


69- 


56-5 


56- 


80-9 


80- 


41 -4 


47- 


70-0 


70- 


52-7 


51- 


86-8 


84- 


85-7 


85- 


85-8 


87- 


72-3 


77-. 


69-7 


68- 


70-9 


72- 


81-5 


78' 


721 


70-' 


82-1 


82- 


82-3 


82-! 


34-9 


33-' 


49-6 


49-1 


59-6 


59- 


84-3 


84-, 


540 


54-i 


78-5 


80-i 


68-1 


66-[ 


83 


83-i 


921 


92- 


57-6 


57" 


77-1 


77- 


64-8 


64-f 


58-5 


57-i 


106-6 


94-S 


50-9 


49-! 


88-4 


88-4 


91-9 


92-i 


93 


93-1 


73-3 


73-1 


99-7 


99-' 


105-2 


105-5 


75-8 


75-J 


75-8 


75-i 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description 1 


1934 


1935 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Wholesale Prices of Important 


$ 


1 


S 


S 


S 


* 


$ 


$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


i 


S 


Commodities— 




























Oats, No. 2 C.W bush. 


•442 


• 442 


•427 


•411 


-422 


•408 


•398 


•429 


•363 


•360 


•340 


•319 


•298 


Wheat, No.l Man. Northern " 


•792 


•790 


•795 


•819 


•876 


•857 


•817 


•814 


•845 


•903 


•908 


•857 


•847 


Flour, First Patent 2-98's 




























jute 


5-400 


5-200 


5-300 


5-4O0 


5-700 


5-300 


4-900 


5-100 


5-300 


5-700 


5-800 


5-700 


5-700 


Sugar, Br. West Indies, 




Montreal 2 cwt. 


1-725 


1-900 


1-850 


1-900 


1-940 


1-980 


1-900 


1-770 


1-875 


1-850 


1-968 


1-901 


1-950 


Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4 -£95 


4-895 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


Rubber, Ceylon, ribbed, 




























smoked sheets, N.Y.* lb. 


•128 


•131 


•129 


•116 


•116 


•121 


-126 


•121 


•120 


•117 


•129 


•133 


•133 


Cattle, steers, good, over 




























1,050 lbs cwt. 


5-380 


5-540 


5-950 


6-800 


7-110 


7-200 


6-760 


6-400 


6-550 


6-800 


6-010 


5-800 


6-330 


Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 


8-120 


8-560 


8-600 


8-170 


8-740 


9-390 


9-920 


9-660 


9-920 


9-380 


8-940 


7-990 


8-400 


Beef hides, packer hides, 




























native steers lb. 


•105 


•110 


•100 


•093 


•105 


•115 


•115 


•120 


•120 


•128 


•153 


•153 


•148 


Leather, green hide crops... " 


•290 


•290 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•320 


•340 


•360 


•360 


Box sides, B, Oshawa ft. 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•220 


•240 


•240 


•240 


Butter, creamery, finest, 




























Montreal lb. 


•226 


•246 


•268 


•259 


•250 


•232 


•220 


•219 


•226 


•247 


•263 


•274 


•278 


Cheese, Canadian, old, large, 




























Montreal " 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•160 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•140 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


Eggs, Grade "A", Montreal doz. 


•389 


•310 


•308 


•239 


•213 


•221 


•244 


•268 


•304 


•364 


•403 


•435 


•424 


Cotton, raw 1-11/16°, Ham- 




























ilton lb. 


•143 


•143 


•145 


•134 


•137 


•143 


•138 


•143 


•139 


•126 


•133 


•145 


•139 






























single " 


•310 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•275 


•290 


•290 


Bleached flannelette, 4-50 




























yds. to lb " 


•489 


•489 


•489 


•484 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 




yds. to lb. " 


•959 
1-634 


•959 
1-710 


•959 
1-729 


•959 
1-608 


•959 
1-738 


•959 

1-720 


•959 
1-644 


•959 
1-724 


•959 
2-008 


•797 
2-090 


•797 
2-337 


•797 
2-337 


•797 


Silk, raw, New York 1 " 


2-208 


Wool, eastern bright \ blood " 


•140 


•140 


•140 


•130 


•130 


•140 


•150 


•165 


•165 


•160 


•160 


•180 


•180 


Wool, western range, semi- 




























bright, i blood " 


• 140 
19-853 


•130 

19-786 


•130 
19-802 


•130 
19-688 


•130 
19107 


•140 
19-063 


•150 
18-995 


•185 
18-434 


•180 
19-060 


•180 
18-922 


•180 
19-027 


•190 
20-653 


•190 


Pulp, ground wood No. 1 ton 


19-593 


Pig iron, malleable " 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 




2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


Copper, electrolytic, domes- 




























tic cwt. 


7-428 


7-475 


7-238 


7-474 


8-252 


8-718 


8-221 


8-316 


8-677 


9-129 


9-540 


9-413 


9-407 


Lead, domestic, Montreal " 


3-220 


3-250 


3-250 


3-321 


3-426 


3-686 


3-711 


3-882 


4-164 


4-298 


4-716 


4-740 


4-655 


Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto, lb. 


•553 


•550 


•543 


•525 


•565 


•573 


•568 


•570 


•535 


•540 


•560 


•570 


•555 


Zinc, domestic, Montreal., cwt. 


3-665 


3-650 


3-640 


3-636 


3-690 


3-943 


3-816 


3-905 


4-080 


4-224 


4-467 


4-490 


4-364 


Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 


12-454 


12-454 


12-454 


11021 


10-730 


10-898 


11-178 


11-469 


11-760 


12-050 


12-340 


12-340 


12-340 


Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 




























of-mine " 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 


Gasoline. Toronto gal. 


•150 


Sulphuric acid,66°Beaume,net ton 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 




























Other Countries 4 — 




























United States- 






























78-7 
76-9 


81-0 
78-8 


82-0 
79-5 


81-3 

79-4 


81-6 
80- 1 


82-3 
80-2 


820 

79-8 


82-1 
79-4 


83-8 
80-5 


851 

80-7 


85-4 


84-7 


84-2 


Bureau of Labour, 784: 1925.. 




Annalist, 72; 1913 


118-0 


122-6 


124-3 


123-5 


125-8 


1260 


123-2 


123-6 


126-8 


127-6 


i29-2 






United Kingdom — 






Board of Trade, 150: 1930. . . . 


87.8 


88.3 


88.0 


86.9 


87.5 


88-2 


88-4 


88-0 


88-4 


89-6 


91-1 


91-2 





Economist, 58: 1927 


65-7 


66-6 


66-4 


66-1 


66-7 


68-6 


68-1 


67-6 


69-9 










France, Statist! que General, 










126: 1913 


344 


350 


343 


335 


336 


340 


330 


322 


330 


332 


342 






Germany, Federal Statistical 






Office, 400: 1913 


101-0 


101-1 


100-9 


100-7 


100-8 


100-8 


101-2 


101-8 


102.4 


102-3 


102-8 


103 1 




Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 




130: 1914 


468 


472 


466 


464 


531 


552 


555 


553 


552 


560 


574 






Netherlands, Central Bureau 






Statistics, 48: 1913 


78 
125 


78 
125 


77 
125 


75 

126 


76 
125 


75 
125 


75 
126 


74 
127 


73 
128 


75 
128 


78 
130 






Norway, Official, 95: 1913.'.'.'. '. . . 
Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 
































1913 


115 

276 
90 


115 

277 
90 


115 

278 
90 


115 

288 
90 


115 

296 
90 


115 

302 

90 


116 

308 
90 


116 

310 

90 


115 

323 

90 


115 

330 
91 


117 






Italy, Bachi, 150: 1913 






Finland, Official, 139: 1926 


""92 






India, Dept. of Statistics, 72: 




























1914 


88 
136-8 


94 
137-1 


90 
139-1 


87 
138-6 


88 
137-7 


91 
137-8 


91 
136-2 


91 
136-2 


89 
138-2 


89 
142-7 


93 







Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 
































tistician, 92: 1913 


134-1 


134-1 


133.4 


132.6 


132-7 


134-0 


134-7 


135-9 












New Zealand, Official, 180: 












1909-1913 


133-8 


134-5 


1360 


136-5 


136-7 


1371 


138-3 


139-5 


140-3 


143-0 


144-6 


142-8 




Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 
Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 






98 


100 


100 


96 


92 


92 


94 


95 


96 


92 


96 













VFor full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 
eation for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 
*For month of nearest delivery when spot quotations not available. 
'Canadian Funds. 
4 The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



Appli- 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 









Imports of Merchandise for Consumption in Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1933 

April 


$000 

20,457 
32,927 
33,619 
35,698 
38,747 
38,698 
41,070 
43,712 
35,368 

32,391 
33.592 
47.519 
34,815 

52.887 
46.186 
44,145 
43.507 
42.208 
47,229 
49,884 
39,108 

37,229 
37,014 
48,191 
36.637 
54,540 
46,732 
48.414 
49,560 
44,689 
52,751 
55,958 
38,569 


$000 

3,944 
7,666 
7.855 
7.061 
7,676 
7,575 
8,329 
10,517 
8,215 

5.825 
7,429 
8,737 
7,528 

10,629 
9,141 

10,171 
8.970 
8.646 

10,632 

11,728 
9,766 

7,020 

6,791 

8,397 

6,427 

13,399 

10.405 

10,162 

8,949 

8,072 

9,292 

12,451 

8,334 


$000 

842 
1,580 
1,670 
1,608 
1,979 
1,778 
1.934 
1,588 
1.351 

1,639 
1,538 
2.335 
1,646 
1,747 
1,678 
1,635 
1.716 
1,731 
1,606 
1,615 
1,350 

1,581 
1.574 
2,078 
1,600 
2,216 
1,707 
1,809 
2,070 
1,930 
2,061 
2,235 
1,766 


$000 

3.311 
4,700 
5,441 
6,452 
7,272 
6,749 
7,302 
7,241 
7.254 

6,521 
7,202 
9,928 
6,085 
8,140 
6.896 
6,215 
6.620 
6,254 
6,254 
7.372 
6.387 

6,781 
6,250 
8.546 
6.293 
5,833 
6.197 
7,074 
9,163 
6,691 
7.350 
7,759 
7,261 


$000 

1,084 
1.416 
1,497 
1,615 
1,743 
1,690 
1,933 
1.903 
1.565 

1.536 
1.394 
1,981 
1.369 
1.878 
1,657 
1,668 
1,766 
1,852 
1,984 
2,027 
1.743 

1,584 
1.611 
2,061 
1,577 
1,974 
1.763 
1,819 
1,902 
1,963 
2,267 
2.301 
1,641 


$000 

3,647 
5,529 
5,540 
5,636 
6,046 
5,353 
5,328 
5,929 
5,228 

5.763 
5.804 
9.324 
7.800 
12,196 
9.368 
8,525 
7,138 
6,782 
6,770 
7,282 
6,864 

7,384 
8,322 

11,626 
9.192 

11.903 
9,421 
8.855 
9,389 
8,625 

10,556 

10.780 
6,084 


$000 

912 
1,490 
1,498 
1,307 
1,516 
2,117 
2,180 
2,091 
1.641 

1.571 
1.613 
2,235 
1,681 
2,478 
2,551 
1,936 
2,261 
1,851 
2,460 
2.745 
2,577 

2,454 
2,392 
3,110 
2,073 
3,226 
2,571 
3,684 
3,019 
2,340 
2,867 
3,307 
2,571 


$000 

4,022 
6,252 
5,977 
7,116 
7,753 
8,371 
9,013 
9.181 
6,351 

6,012 
5,423 
7,926 
4,760 
10,230 
9,881 
9,131 
10.357 
10,428 
10,546 
11.089 
6,207 

6.553 

6.299 

6,943 

5.411 

10.313 

9.946 

9,967 

9,472 

10,218 

11,479 

10,731 

6,504 


$000 

1,229 
2,330 
2,144 
2,358 
2,054 
2,544 
2,347 
2.727 
1,946 

1,880 
1.578 
2,448 
2,043 
3,052 
2,722 
2.204 
2.194 
2.201 
2,637 
3,118 
2.078 

2.134 
2,012 
2.482 
2,056 
2,990 
2,420 
2.227 
2,455 
2,364 
3,064 
3,483 
2,071 


$000 
1,464 




1,964 




1.995 


July 


2,545 




2,708 




2,523 




2,704 


November 

December 

1934 


2,536 
1,818 

1,644 




1,612 




2,606 




1,903 


Mav 


2,537 




2,292 


July 


2.660 




2.485 


September 

October 


2.463 
4.341 


November 


2,907 
2,135 


1935 


1,740 


February 


1,793 


March 


2,933 
2,008 




2,693 


June 


2,310 


July 


2.817 




3,140 




2,486 




3,814 


November 


2,911 


December 


2,338 



Month 



1933 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November... 
December. . . 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November... 
December.. . 

1935 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . 

October 

November . 
December... 









Exports of Merchandise from Canada 








Total 


Domestic Produce 


Total 










Iron 






Chemi- 


Miscel- 


Export? 


Exports 


Vege- 


Animal 




Wood 


and 


Non- 


Non- 


cal and 


laneous 


of 


of Can- 


table 


Pro- 


Tex- 


and 


its 


Ferrous 


Metallic 


Allied 


Com- 


Mdse. 


adian 


Pro- 


ducts 


tiles 


Paper 


Pro- 


Metals 


Miner- 


Pro- 


modi- 




Produce 


ducts 








ducts 




als 


ducts 


ties 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


$000 


20,312 


20,012 


4.666 


2.479 


146 


7,139 


1,033 


2,926 


409 


792 


422 


46,109 


45,576 


18,148 


4,378 


624 


10.976 


1,935 


6,124 


1,044 


1,442 


904 


46,472 


45,968 


15,942 


5,569 


634 


11,175 


2,198 


7,393 


971 


1,257 


829 


51,866 


51,345 


17,746 


6,816 


754 


13,000 


2.225 


7,343 


1,373 


1.059 


1,029 


45,135 


44.723 


12,380 


6,324 


783 


13,937 


1,750 


6,184 


1,232 


1.017 


1.111 


58.329 


57,785 


22,520 


7,326 


1,168 


13,567 


2,336 


7,291 


1,408 


1,142 


1,027 


61,035 


60,489 


25.348 


6,911 


859 


12,903 


2,901 


7.733 


1,647 


1,024 


1.162 


60,926 


60,385 


26,016 


6,679 


701 


11,935 


1.902 


9.056 


1,943 


1,224 


928 


51.624 


50.929 


20,628 


7,012 


48 c 


11.899 


2.032 


5,722 


1,466 


941 


741 


47,118 


46,652 


14,694 


8.272 


410 


11,567 


1,967 


6,861 


1,076 


1.147 


657 


38,365 


37,842 


11,903 


5,321 


428 


9.447 


2,505 


5,680 


836 


1.117 


607 


58.364 


57,637 


15.807 


8,064 


836 


15,596 


3,856 


9.455 


1,404 


1.692 


941 


32.047 


31,582 


6,866 


3,902 


303 


9,300 


2,581 


6,248 


766 


948 


667 


58,543 


57.900 


20,143 


5.815 


810 


13,773 


3,741 


9,298 


1,456 


1,473 


1.391 


58,643 


58.046 


19.743 


6, 786 


823 


13,684 


3,909 


9,031 


1,612 


1.316 


1,141 


56.787 


56,121 


16.519 


7,719 


616 


15.013 


4.240 


8,355 


1.253 


1.082 


1,283 


55,837 


55.249 


19.197 


7.061 


601 


14.680 


2.926 


7.626 


1,245 


921 


993 


58,815 


58.135 


22,799 


6,617 


614 


13,879 


2,585 


8,203 


1,464 


870 


1.103 


68.313 


67,748 


29.950 


7,650 


799 


14,402 


3,950 


7,373 


1,390 


1.048 


1.186 


65,677 


65,125 


26.016 


7,517 


627 


14,444 


2,458 


10.142 


1,633 


1.361 


926 


61,395 


60,850 


25,743 


7,846 


468 


14,924 


2.683 


5,368 


1,623 


1,386 


809 


44,374 


43,902 


11.053 


9,159 


531 


11,685 


1.846 


6,628 


957 


1,436 


605 


47,677 


46,719 


12,609 


8,337 


556 


10,618 


3.861 


7.434 


1,068 


1,456 


781 


59.026 


58,098 


15,595 


8.440 


774 


14.104 


5,955 


8,873 


1,187 


1,974 


1,197 


38,296 


37,575 


9.389 


5.157 


366 


9.795 


4.362 


5,786 


803 


1,034 


886 


62,947 


62,101 


17,606 


7,820 


939 


15,360 


5,020 


10,810 


1,636 


1,550 


1,359 


52,763 


51,869 


11,819 


6,954 


838 


15.409 


3,742 


8,980 


1,592 


1,409 


1,127 


57.786 


56,239 


14,231 


7,408 


1,168 


15,092 


5,010 


9,649 


1,565 


960 


1,155 


71,700 


70,738 


23,159 


7,527 


883 


17,141 


4,091 


14,196 


1,665 


1,036 


1,039 


66,152 


64,565 


20,965 


8,551 


968 


15,667 


3,956 


10,358 


1,692 


1,185 


1,223 


85,749 


84,953 


35,943 


9,960 


982 


17,255 


3,911 


12,832 


1,734 


1,235 


1,100 


85,317 


84,115 


34,489 


9,614 


1,010 


16,578 


4,035 


13,681 


1,987 


1.682 


1,010 


70,565 


68,419 


22,963 


8 293 


626 


17,167 


4,238 


10,763 


2,013 


1,417 


941 



Balance 

of 
Trade 



$000 

(-) 145 
(+)13,182 
(-H12.854 
(+)16,167 
(+) 6,388 
(4-H9.630 
(+)19.965 
(-W17,21fi 
(4-)16.257 

(+114,727 
(+) 4,773 
(+)10,845 
(-) 2,768 
(+) 5.657 
(+)12.457 
t+)12,642 
(+H2.330 
(+)16,607 
(+)21,084 
(+)15,793 
f+)22,713 

(+) 7,144 
(-H10.634 
(-BIO, 835 
(+) 1,660 
(+) 8,408 
(+) 6,031 
(+) 9,372 
(-H22.140 
(+)21,463 
(+)32,998 
f+)29.359 
(+)31,995 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. 



Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living and Cost per Week of a Family Budget. 



Classification 



Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 

Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 
whiskey) 

Fruits 

Grains (Total) 

Barley 

Wheat 

Rubber (chiefly tires and 
footwear) 

Sugar 

Vegetables 

Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 

Cattle 

Cheese 

Fish 

Furs, (chiefly raw) 

Hides, raw 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Meats 

Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts— 

Binder twine 

Cotton 

Rags 

Raw wool 

Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 

Paper (chiefly newsprint) 

Planks and boards 

Pulp-wood 

Shingles 

Timber, square 

Wood-pulp 

Iron and Its Products — 

Automobiles 

Automobile parts 

Farm implements 

Hardware and cutlery 

Machinery 

Pigs and ingots 

Tubes and pipes 

Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts — 

Aluminium 

Copper, (chiefly ore and 
blister) 

Gold , raw 

Lead 

Nickel 

Silver 

Non-Metallic Mineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 

Petroleum and products 

Stone and products 

Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 

Acids 

Fertilizers 

Soda and compounds 

Miscellaneous Commodities — 

Electrical energy 

Films 

Settlers' effects 

indexes of Retail Prices, Rents 
and Costs of Services- 
Total. 1926=100 

Food 

Fuel 

Rent 

Clothing 

Sundries 

Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods S 

Fuel and light $ 

Rent S 

Totals $ 



1934 
Dec. 



3.89C 
1,162 

16,113 
1,928 

13,406 

798 

79 

470 

1,297 



244 

412 

1,997 

2,301 

129 

173 

1.977 



1935 



.379 
,780 
350 
263 

97 
,184 

355 

412 
213 
168 
517 

462 

48 



128 

1,485 
227 
420 

1,727 
266 



78-9 
69-3 
88-4 
80-3 
71-0 
920 



7-54 
2-89 
5-54 
16-02 



563 
1,164 
5,074 

286 
4,266 

966 

53 

174 

1,316 



42 

1,811 

3,781 

163 

324 

2,241 



1,343 
253 
251 
128 

2,069 

621 
107 
223 
94 
440 
71 
33 



267 

1,416 
200 
423 

2,560 

188 



78- 



80-3 
710 
92-1 



7-51 
2-90 
5-54 
15-99 



537 
1,221 
6,158 

206 
5,536 

1,123 

53 

159 

1,167 



494 

52 

1,843 

2,111 

155 

347 

2,703 



5,585 
1,558 



1,739 
199 
312 
146 
487 
152 
45 



480 

1,444 
177 
524 

2,705 
528 



330 



78-9 
69-2 
88-8 
80-3 
71-0 
921 



7-59 

2-89 
5-54 
1606 



910 
1,182 
7,956 

144 
7,458 

1,289 

37 

158 

1,868 



1,045 
57 

1,741 

1,532 
227 
446 

2,601 



36 



1.822 
410 
314 
144 

2,798 

3,719 
323 
412 



212 



414 

3,136 
321 
459 

2,314 
707 



1,123 
131 

4,687 

234 

4,288 

962 

35 

108 

1,051 



1,067 
40 

1,010 
623 
117 
183 

1,561 



5,708 

1,199 

140 

410 

88 

1,669 

2,774 
290 
501 
88 
326 
78 
47 



174 

1,0% 
125 
355 

2,724 

424 



251 252 
400 244 
165 167 



78*8 
69-5 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
921 



7-63 
2-89 
5-54 
16-10 



78-6 
68-6 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
92-1 



7-50 
2-88 
5-55 
15-97 



1,102 
222 

11,588 
865 

10,081 

885 
105 
394 



1,337 
162 

1,289 

1,007 
237 
366 

2.365 



8,737 

2,337 

316 

327 

163 

2,620 

2,598 
306 
602 
217 
474 



49 



2,497 

2,546 
354 
636 

2,400 
565 



623 



575 



78 6 
68-7 
85-9 
81-4 
70-3 
92- 1 



7-52 
2-84 
5-57 
15-97 



618 

97 

6,383 

521 
5,149 

1,027 
157, 
333 



747 
196 

1,570 
749 
280 
393 

2,147 



364 
72 
62 
5 



8,182 

2,444 

703 

647 

110 

2,433 

1,628 
265 
710 
104 
412 
64 
71 



302 

2,981 

312 

369 

2,294 

1,027 



437 



159 

392 



221 

386 
249 



78-8 

84-8 
81-4 
69-9 
92-6 



7-54 
2-81 
5-57 
15-95 



July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. j 


964 


715 


908 


1,512 


2,262 


151 


183 


586 


2,733 


2,803 


8,257 


18,237 


15,091 


26,277 


23,239 


502 


327 


104 


322 


437 


7,214 


17,604 


14,670 


25,474 


21,743 


1,119 


1,056 


1,022 


1,005 


1,121 


170 


72 


43 


111 


112 


394 


163 


408 


771 


984 


1,460 


1,405 


1,489 


2,009 


2,218 


365 


310 


342 


488 


250 


582 


675 


1,745 


1,630 


989 


2,082 


2,308 


2,514 


2,647 


3,266 


835 


968 


720 


343 


344 


251 


175 


383 


227 


302 


336 


297 


324 


375 


436 


2,114 


1,768 


1,462 


1,690 


2,424 


321 


27 


22 


12 


5 


211 


155 


181 


106 


120 


56 


58 


49 


89 


93 


131 


195 


220 


232 


270 


7,911 


8,101 


7,737 


8,727 


8,882 


2,249 


3,206 


2,263 


2,842 


2,660 


948 


1,231 


942 


899 


445 


964 


986 


928 


957 


658 


115 


82 


118 


180 


138 


2,128 


2,356 


2,221 


2,269 


2,651 


1,732 


1,868 


1,670 


1,373 


1,632 


276 


235 


319 


186 


162 


1,124 


507 


419 


376 


340 


200 


170 


166 


178 


274 


563 


634 


503 


499 


464 


212 


127 


299 


267 


472 


72 


61 


61 


83 


88 


363 


1,518 


567 


744 


2,827 


2,541 


3,187 


2,636 


3,892 


2,246 


525 


528 


525 


586 


366 


529 


900 


566 


823 


797 


3,309 


4,080 


3,676 


3,641 


3,959 


855 


1,979 


752 


947 


1,363 


517 


594 


688 


747 


777 


185 


175 


161 


82 


184 


130 


36 


125 


89 


203 


543 


452 


482 


448 


562 


98 


267 


259 


255 


278 


171 


94 


102 


150 


403 


320 


253 


341 


365 


445 


266 


236 


205 


323 


327 


315 


266 


279 


163 


174 


327 


248 


387 


299 


285 


78 8 


79-4 


79-6 


80-4 


80-6 


69 3 


71-3 


70-9 


72-4 


73-2 


84 7 


85-4 


85-4 


86-5 


87-0 


81 4 


81-4 


81-4 


82-6 


82-6 


69 9 


69-9 


71-6 


71-6 


71-6 


92.4 


92-5 


92-6 


92-5 


92-5 


7-53 


7-73 


7-74 


7-93 


8-04 


2-80 


2-80 


2-81 


2-83 


2-83 


5-57 


5-57 


5-57 


5-63 


5-63 


15-94 


16-15 


16-16 


16-42 


16-54 



1,641 
1,968 

14,298 
207 

13,672 

943 

101 

627 

1,867 



150 

255 

1.898 

2,699 

433 

319 

1,616 



104 
76 
116 



9,942 
2,129 

448 



2,426 

1,612 
257 
370 
163 
492 
365 
175 



606 

2,572 

298 

781 

2,621 

2,497 



976 

246 

39 

432 



250 
383 
356 

297 
207 
214 



80-8 
73-7 
87-2 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 



814 
2-84 
5-63 
16-65 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1934 


1 








1935 














Dec. 


I Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties- 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 


2,088 
160 
288 

1,751 
146 
251 

1,068 
208 

1,113 
517 
242 

116 
245 

281 
221 
86 

181 

2,442 

187 

752 

493 

15 

86 

344 

82 

60 

145 

273 

157 

188 

415 

774 
427 

231 

211 

20 

74 

130 

1,457 

168 

548 

79 

212 

1,655 

46 

796 

380 

74 

97 

79 

79 

202 
151 
133 

41 
642 
778 

68 

405 
2,436 
318 
355 
1,476 
182 
205 

168 
362 
182 
27 
28 
163 


1,036 

91 

279 

1,064 
104 
136 
927 
274 
467 
716 
299 

108 

429 
321 
212 
107 

185 

1.551 

262 

1.149 

493 

36 

91 

394 

159 

55 

236 

341 

174 

354 

617 

697 
399 

218 
195 
24 
48 

187 
2,368 
164 
642 
196 
154 
1,275 

43 
591 
388 

70 
102 

89 

83 

198 
135 
82 
42 
622 
650 
229 

448 
2,432 
358 
337 
1,736 
430 
287 

212 
392 
227 
18 
32 
187 


872 
121 
409 
1,185 
166 
148 
610 
154 
466 
463 
376 

101 
409 
267 
250 
178 

210 
863 
197 
1,085 
662 

59 
117 
349 
129 

59 
215 
351 
175 
457 
638 

682 
458 

178 

212 

31 

50 

204 

2,590 

178 

792 

387 

197 

1.380 

62 

705 

470 

77 

122 

111 

116 

207 
181 
80 
48 
624 
471 
193 

423 
2,472 
418 
409 
1,635 
106 
223 

238 

433 

38 

28 

14 

169 


776 
186 
328 
1,425 
146 
247 
947 
257 
857 
626 
614 

113 
594 
271 
272 
270 

244 

1,587 

249 

1,571 

782 

67 

90 

411 

151 

92 

189 

437 

197 

476 

760 

873 
541 

254 
263 
41 
73 

363 

3,692 
280 

1,078 
698 
267 

2,003 
42 
859 
599 
96 
179 
124 
119 

391 
222 
130 
62 
743 
512 
255 

556 
2,461 
475 
558 
1,347 
387 
327 

304 
407 
50 
40 
43 
203 


430 

67 
242 
1,086 
112 
166 
506 
235 
975 
571 
633 

53 
406 
306 
210 

177 

120 

1,134 

191 

1,133 

613 

55 

56 

303 

96 

58 

261 

489 

139 

327 

415 

633 
385 

237 
212 
57 
52 

337 
2,569 
183 
871 
692 
184 
1,742 

22 
827 
398 

91 
100 

73 
110 

124 

178 
121 
45 
597 
336 
143 

447 
1,937 
257 
456 
1,250 
132 
258 

249 
287 
88 
29 
35 
139 


623 
309 
346 

1,970 
134 
401 

1,221 
337 

2,041 
680 
865 

140 

522 
286 
230 
116 

128 
871 
211 
1,116 
599 

43 
183 
352 
109 

44 
139 
295 
198 
284 
436 

801 
489 

313 

212 

40 

98 

391 

2.678 

233 

958 

662 

211 

1.879 

50 

2,133 

710 

124 

208 

117 

137 

575 
215 
128 
47 
625 
754 
207 

598 
3,269 
311 
608 
3,491 
470 
382 

255 
477 
248 
32 
41 
206 


984 
157 
360 

2,050 

149 

277 

556 

73 

2,259 
576 
703 

108 
377 
195 
232 
72 

135 

976 

191 

971 

575 

19 

64 

387 

83 

24 

357 

472 

196 

269 

431 

755 
477 

220 

236 

25 

20 

244 

1,803 

167 

744 

642 

190 

1,676 

30 

1,507 

482 

118 

135 

103 

117 

271 
183 
130 
69 
674 
540 
146 

541 
2,952 
139 
436 
3,956 
501 
291 

242 
344 
111 
32 
43 
158 


520 
155 

227 

2,532 

164 

144 

529 

16 

2,165 

681 

271 

168 
379 
257 
284 
100 

139 

1,368 
199 
972 
704 

24 
175 
383 
186 

26 
201 
483 
222 
290 
657 

744 
489 

239 
212 
51 

47 

236 

1,159 

179 

602 

594 

158 

1,758 

41 

2,028 

421 

83 

127 

83 

119 

405 
196 
128 
60 
640 
1,454 
209 

488 
2,925 
116 
397 
3,931 
560 
495 

227 

402 

65 

46 

26 

212 


615 

106 

253 

1,940 

101 

155 

889 

26 

2,012 

2,915 

86 

172 
360 
240 
296 
200 

189 

939 

206 

1,232 

837 

75 

87 

1,772 

323 

62 

276 

548 

236 

432 

927 

799 
508 

242 

227 

48 

34 

193 
934 
180 
479 
740 
178 

1,661 
110 

2,493 
469 
103 
150 
149 
121 

689 

188 
126 
48 
815 
360 
156 

618 

2,737 

95 

422 
3,734 

251 

311 

221 
455 
170 
31 
52 
194 


584 
103 
221 

1,935 

123 

219 

641 

24 

1,613 
640 
80 

163 
375 

396 
240 
227 

192 
794 
191 
1,196 
788 

71 
193 
132 
213 

74 
186 
485 
196 
322 
739 

898 
479 

246 

210 

43 

61 

126 

1,385 

216 

576 

430 

215 

1,754 

22 

1,483 

493 

82 

133 

105 

109 

288 
187 
173 
57 
730 
159 
190 

474 
3,073 
128 
462 
3,889 
456 
469 

206 

478 

174 

35 

34 

211 


737 
128 
282 

1,520 
202 
411 
477 
128 

1,847 
804 
96 

187 
321 
446 
305 
206 

240 

1.334 

201 

1,203 

720 

28 

208 

323 

169 

89 

301 

638 

261 

258 

655 

981 
573 

293 

304 

51 

55 

140 

2,309 

201 

675 

179 

209 

1,818 

46 

2,020 

738 

118 

147 

161 

143 

262 
204 
208 
69 
919 
226 
195 

614 
3,817 
132 
520 
4,067 
587 
419 

275 
542 
403 
42 
53 
259 


1,086 
126 
324 

1,894 
208 
609 

1,383 
96 

2,602 
785 
246 

175 
326 
623 
290 
133 

157 

1754 

229 

1,027 

887 

23 

93 

346 

116 

68 

357 

523 

232 

234 

629 

662 
949 

286 
277 
55 
63 

224 

1,868 

243 

578 

158 

270 

1,902 

163 

2.680 

641 

98 

150 

172 

115 

492 
223 
211 
79 
899 
396 
264 

746 
2,815 
197 
669 
4,139 
423 
484 

231 
652 
417 

47 
85 
276 


190 




114 




322 


Fruits 


1,609 




111 




373 




884 




79 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


1,378 
557 




286 


Animal Products— 
Fish 


137 




368 


Hides 


586 


Leather, unmanufactured 


262 
87 


Textile Products— 


138 




2,869 




187 




718 




560 




19 




206 


Silk— Raw 


193 




79 




45 




313 




479 




210 




212 


Other wool 


476 


Wood and Paper — 
Books and printed matter 


718 
368 


Wood — Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


247 
213 




47 


Other unmanufactured wood. 
Iron and Steel— 


33 
165 




1,164 


Castings and forgings 


189 
358 




114 




173 




1,086 




71 


Plates and sheets 


982 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products. . 
Tools 


456 

65 
87 




95 


Wire 


83 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


238 




133 




187 




46 


Electric apparatus 


595 




591 


Tin 


199 


Non-Metallic Products — 


485 


Coal 


2,442 


Coke 


173 


Glass and glassware 


363 


Petroleum, crude 


1,724 




145 


Stone and products 

Chemicals— 


205 
177 


Dyeing and tanning materials. . 


467 
145 




40 




37 


Soda and compounds 


146 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 29 

Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



Classification 


1934 


1 








1935 












Nov. 


Dec. 


1 Jan 1 Feb. 1 Mar. 1 April 1 May 


June | July | Aug. | Sept. | Oct. 


Nov. 


Banking— 

Readily Available Assets— 




End of Month 




49-32 
176-86 


50-07 

169-83 


fi 50-65 
177-36 


51-11 

178-45 


1C-44 
51-16 

149-03 
29-61 
60-95 
20-71 

797-73 
94-12 
1,220 

132-07 

40-31 

80-52 

819 

137-53 
28-19 

117-43 
1,355 

14-52 

7-90 

5-51 

77-50 

53-83 

13-29 

2-75 

6-72 

6-36 
77-76 

3-76 
2,845 

124-68 
14-35 
32-79 


15-83 
43-47 

163-71 
24-76 
71-59 
20-52 

825-70 
77-00 
1.243 

135-69 

39 03 

81-33 

823 

144-33 
29-65 

127-84 
1.381 

14-48 
7-99 
5-52 
77-40 
52-46 
13-27 
2-78 
6-73 

7-19 

112-97 

4-22 

2,929 

121-42 
15-14 
37-06 


1 15-32 
30-92 

1166-97 
22-48 
93-80 
20-64 

835-41 
71-21 
1,257 

129-52 

39-58 

81-98 

824 

147-81 
26-87 

120-43 
1,370 

14-46 
8-64 
5-52 
75-71 
52-96 
1312 
3-16 
6-73 

5.97 
96-95 

3-49 
2,915 

122-45 
23-73 
32-45 


14-02 
28-38 

172-90 
13-26 
88-52 
21-02 

838-74 
67-45 
1,244 

135-86 

43-32 

85-24 

831 

156-45 
16-37 

107-19 
1,375 

14-45 
8-72 
5-45 
76-61 
52-65 
13-10 
3-04 
6-84 

7-84 
96-82 

4-22 
2,909 

129-57 
32-16 
35-52 


14-41 
33 07 

169-92 
14-39 
96-48 
21-33 

847-48 
59-93 
1,257 

136-63 

46-67 

77-04 

813 

154-26 
17-82 

107-18 
1,352 

14-50 
8-67 
5-46 
76-62 
57-97 
13-02 
2-60 
6-91 

6-90 
84-92 

4-95 
2,892 

121-26 
16- 02 
34-77 


13-84 
30-58 

192-35 
19-29 
93-62 
22-63 

854-23 
68-55 
1,295 

139-43 

46-99 

77-44 

829 

155-91 
25-20 

101-05 
1,375 

14-50 

8-75 
5-46 
76-47 
55-78 
12-84 
2-24 
6-86 

7-47 
96-90 

5-89 
2,963 

129-97 
38-85 
38-19 


15-2C 
33-28 

183-83 
20-55 

115-38 
22-02 

910-87 
60-01 
1,361 

140-55 

51-79 

75-62 

839 

147-02 
28-52 
97-48 
1,380 

14-45 
8-83 
5-45 
76-27 
53-40 
12-96 
2-32 
6-87 

9-?l 
99-27 

5-65 
3,036 

131-75 
55-81 
41-24 


16-53 
38-66 

190-85 
1901 
99-31 
22-91 

917-64 
52-13 
1,357 

142-85 

55-38 

73-76 

856 

153-04 
29-63 
96-67 
1,407 

14-25 

8-86 

5-45 

76-39 

54-33 

12-91 

1-91 

6-87 

5-71 

102-80 

5-23 

3,059 

126-47 
12-91 
47-10 


14-79 




36-71 




186-72 


In United Kingdom banks... 


33-80 
71-61 
24-52 
752-76 
107-22 
1,232 

129-50 

37-84 

98-47 

872 

133-26 
24-82 

106-58 
1,402 

13-97 
7-70 
5-71 
77-75 
49-34 
13 15 
1-56 
6-71 

7-86 
98-14 

2-54 
2,918 

140-00 
31-10 
31-08 
36-94 

1,411 
561-73 

1,973 
326-53 

5-58 

22-16 

•94 

49-34 

2-25 
2,619 
11-71 

2,408 
132-75 
145-50 

2,911 

+539 

61-8 

163-32 

920 

97-1 
105-2 
92-9 
175-7 
69-8 
40-5 
86-4 


26-83 
58-83 
19-69 
780-76 
98-74 
1,223 

146-15 
39-64 

102-70 
839 

133-94 
30-17 

107-50 
1,399 

14-09 
7-73 
5-6? 
77-64 
50-81 
12-99 
1-68 
6-71 

12-95 

102-19 

4-61 

2,919 

136-43 
24*27 
28-35 
35-24 

1,407 
575-50 

1,983 
325-40 

6-50 
22-95 

1-01 
50-81 

2-50 
2,616 
15-09 

610 

132-75 

145-50 

2,910 

+568 

59-6 

157-28 

967 

100-7 
105-3 
90-4 
183-5 
71-5 
38-7 
86-2 


27-50 
58-39 
20-36 
795-18 
93-45 
1,236 

138-84 

3914 

91-36 

819 

131-99 
34 02 

104-84 
1,360 

1412 
7-60 
5-50 
77-77 
54-94 
12-83 
2-33 
6-72 

7-32 
91-55 

4-39 
2,881 

124-73 
21*00 
50*89 
35-20 

1,412 
529-92 

1,942 
314-69 

6-37 

26 00 

•87 

54-94 

2-52 
2.580 
12-29 

950 
132-75 
145-50 
2,871 

+593 

58-0 

148-92 

973 

95-7 
105-3 
89-3 
183-3 
65-0 
37-3 
85-1 


30-54 
61-82 
20-89 
807-09 
90-35 
1,252 

137-36 

39-47 

85-58 

815 

136-34 
31-22 

110-39 
1,356 

14-32 
7-86 
5-50 
77-73 
54-52 
12-75 
2-35 
6-72 

7-28 
78-07 

5-17 
2,880 

125-98 
25-08 
33-73 
34-84 

1,428 
516-24 

1,945 
321-87 

6-92 

26-37 

•67 

54-52 

2-54 
2,577 
11-32 

2,946 
132-75 
145-50 

2,870 

+613 

57-1 
153-93 

984 

95-3 
106-3 
88-9 
184-6 
610 
351 
86-5 


21-73 
109-89 




23-24 


Government securities 


945-30 
59-71 


Total quick assets 

Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments— 
Public securities 


1,398 
138-91 


Railway securities 


52-79 


Canadian call loans 


95-90 


Current loans 


857 


Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 


138-97 
22-59 
100-20 




1,406 


Other Assets — 
Non-current loans 


13-47 
8-61 




5-33 




76-11 




59-43 




10-98 




1-71 


Note circulation deposits 

Inter-bank balances, notes of 


6-87 
6-43 


Cheques of other banks 

Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public — 
Note circulation 


93-21 

5-33 

3,092 

130-53 


Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 


38-59 
47-54 


Deposits by public — 
Savings deposits 


1,447 
512-50 

1,959 
322-95 

6-64 

26 00 

•47 

53-83 

2-27 
2,543 
10-03 

807 
132-75 
145-50 
2,832 

+628 

56-6 

164-23 

970 

93-7 
107-8 
87-9 
182 6 
57-5 
38-2 
90-6 


1,452 
581-86 

2,034 
328-41 

6-62 

24-81 

•73 

52-46 

2-39 
2,623 
13-62 

1,847 
132-75 
145-50 

2,916 

+ 629 

56-7 
158-13 
1,000 

105-4 
107-9 
86-6 
187-2 
58-5 
31-6 
89-1 


1,446 
561-21 

2,008 
339-86 

8- 04 

24-28 

•89 

52-96 

2-40 
2,615 
11-61 

2,946 
132-75 
145-50 

2,908 

+622 

57-0 
160-39 
1,005 

102-7 
107-6 
87-2 
187-4 
59-7 
28-5 
90-8 


1,426 
545-41 

1,971 
340-95 

15-25 
26-65 
•75 
52-65 
2-40 
2,607 
13-78 

802 
132-75 
145-50 
2,900 

+595 

58-3 
169-07 
1,018 

98-3 
106-5 
88-4 
188-6 
61-3 
26-6 
94-4 


1,428 
553-01 

1,981 
338-25 

12-72 
24-03 

1-35 
57-97 

2-40 
2,590 
12-56 

2,541 
132-75 
145-50 

2,883 

+615 

56-9 

158-43 

1,031 

102-6 
106-5 
87-2 
192-1 
56-6 
24-4 
90-9 


1,434 

553-82 

1,988 

360-70 

13-17 
26-G3 

1-62 
55-78 

2-38 
2,655 
15-05 

2,950 
132-75 
145-50 

2,952 

+606 

57-8 
171-93 
1,041 

103-8 
106-8 
89-3 
194-9 
56-4 
27-4 
97-5 


1,444 
590-01 

2,034 
370-41 

11-44 
27-71 

1-70 
53-40 

2-47 
2,730 
13-67 

811 
132-75 
145-50 
3,023 

+605 

58-1 
174-31 
1,103 

107-2 
108-1 
89-7 
206-8 
54-5 
24-8 
95-7 


1,465 
625-21 

2,091 
376-66 

9-91 
28 09 

206 
54-33 

2-34 
2,750 
15-08 

2,545 
132-75 
145-50 

3,046 

+610 

58-4 
178-16 
1,116 

109-6 

109-9 
90-5 

207-9 
52-5 
21-7 
93-4 


1,474 


Demand deposits 


613-27 


Total deposits 


2,087 




382-66 


Due banks abroad, etc. — 


12-30 




27-73 


Bills payable 


1-47 


Letters of credit 


59-43 


Other liabilities 


2-71 


Total public liabilities . . . 
Due between banks 


2,790 
12-25 


Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 


2,950 
132-75 
145-50 


Grand total liabilities 

Surplus of notice deposits over 
current loans 


3,084 
+617 


Percentage of current loans to 
notice deposits, p.c 


58-1 


All notes in hands of public ... . 
Security holdings 


182-65 
1,137 


(With seasonal adjustment 

me =■ 100) 

Demand deposits 


106-0 


Notice deposits 


109-9 


Current loans 


91-3 


Security holdings 


217-3 


Call loans, Canada 


68-0 


Call loans, elsewhere 


22-6 


Notes in hands of public 


96-0 



beginning with March, 1935, there is given in this line the amount of Bank of Canada notes in the hands of the 
chartered banks at the end of the appropriate month. The sum of this amount and the "deposits with the Bank of 
Canada" in the next line is approximately comparable with the previous figures of Dominion notes. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Percentage Change in the Average of the Index of Industrial Production for eighteen 
Countries in the Months of 1935 for which Statistics are Available 
over the Same Period of 193^ • 

Changements de l'indice moyen de la production industrielle en 1935 comparativement 
aux mois correspondants de 193^- ~ 18 pays- 



-10 



Italy 
I tali e 

Germany * 
Alleinagne 

Chile 
Chili 

Japan 
Jap on 

Greece 

Grece 

Sweden 
Sudde 

United States 
Etats-Unis 

Austria 
Autriche 

Denmark 
Danemark 

Canada 

Belgium 
Belgique 

United Kingdom 
Eoyaume-Uni 

Poland 
Pologne 

Finland 
Finlande 

Norway 
Norvgge 

Czechoslovakia 
Tchecoslovaquie 

Netherlands 
Pays-Bas 

France 




v/>/////////, 



w//////////a 



-7.0 
-7-9 



* Since March 1935 includes Saar. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Tabic 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 



Security Prices— 

Common Stock Prices — 

Total (121) 

Industrials, total (87) 

Iron and Steel (15) 

Pulp and paper (6) 

Milling (4) 

Oils (4) 

Textiles and Clothing (10) . . 

Food and Allied products (19) 

Beverages (8) 

Miscellaneous (21) 

Utilities total (20) 

Transportation (2) 

Telephone and telegraph (2) . 

Power and traction (16) 

Companies abroad total (5).. 

Industrial (1) 

Utilities (4) 

Banks (9) 

Mining Stock Prices— 

Total(23) 

Gold (19) 

Base Metals (4) 

Financial Factors- 

Prpf erred Stocks 

Long-term bond yields.l926 = 100 

Dominion of Canada 

Ontario 

Yield on Ontario Government 
bonds p.c. 

Shares traded. Montreal .No. 

Brokers' loans» $000. 000 

New Issues of Bonds $000,000 
Sales on Toronto Stock Ex 
change — 

Industrials 000 

Values $000 

Mining 000 

Values $000 

Market values*... $000,000 

Foreign Exchange — 

New York Funds in Montreal 

High $ 

Low $ 

A verage $ 

Close $ 

London Sterling in Montreal- 
High $ 

Low $ 

A verage , $ 

Ho«a ... $ 



1934 












1935 












Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


86-2 


88-6 


87-8 


84-4 


86-4 


93 6 


93-8 


92 4 


94-7 


93-6 


961 


105 8 


107 4 


125-6 


129-7 


128-8 


125-6 


130-8 


144-4 


145-2 


143-8 


146-1 


147-1 


152-9 


170-3 


178-2 


119-8 


129-4 


126-4 


117-0 


119-4 


121-9 


118-6 


122-2 


122-1 


118-7 


123-0 


127 8 


125-0 


11-6 


14-0 


13 4 


11-6 


11-1 


10-8 


10-5 


10-6 


12-0 


12-4 


12-6 


146 


15-9 


71-0 


71-5 


67-4 


56-0 


56-9 


59-9 


58-4 


57-4 


59-3 


61-2 


60-9 


66-9 


76-7 


177-8 


181-5 


179-7 


176 


178-6 


211-7 


217-9 


210-6 


210-0 


206-6 


215-1 


228-7 


214-8 


74-3 


75-8 


75-6 


74-1 


731 


70-3 


67-2 


66-7 


65-5 


61-8 


63-5 


690 


70-4 


130-3 


134-2 


131-3 


126-5 


125-1 


127-8 


127-0 


128-5 


130-1 


128-7 


134-4 


145-7 


148-5 


93-6 


106-8 


1091 


101-6 


99-6 


102-4 


104-7 


116-7 


122-9 


126-5 


133-2 


157-3 


161-0 


166-2 


168-6 


168-6 


168-7 


185-1 


200-0 


198-1 


195-4 


202-0 


209-6 


217-5 


254-4 


294-5 


47-5 


50-4 


49-4 


45-1 


43-8 


44-4 


45-0 


44-7 


47-7 


46-3 


45-6 


50-9 


50-1 


29-1 


32-1 


30-8 


25-3 


25-8 


27-0 


26-5 


25-0 


26-7 


25-7 


23-4 


27-9 


28-6 


97-6 


100-3 


102-4 


100-1 


94-8 


95-5 


97-6 


98-6 


99-9 


100-3 


1000 


105-1 


108-0 


58-5 


61-3 


59-8 


56-4 


53-9 


53-8 


55-3 


56-0 


60-8 


58-6 


59-6 


661 


62-7 


109-0 


108-0 


107-5 


104-8 


110-2 


125-9 


124-5 


119-4 


122-7 


119-9 


123-0 


130 8 


124-3 


187-4 


187-4 


186 -J 


184-2 


194-7 


224-5 


222-6 


214-5 


222-5 


217-5 


224-3 


233-6 


219-3 


39-4 


36-9 


37-2 


32-9 


33-4 


35-6 


34-5 


31-9 


30-1 


29-3 


28-7 


36-7 


38-3 


79-0 


80-1 


79-9 


76-8 


75-0 


73-1 


72 


71-7 


70-6 


65-9 


68-4 


73-0 


751 


124-9 


124-3 


124-2 


128-2 


128-7 


128-3 


123-0 


117-9 


115-6 


1191 


118-6 


125-5 


133-6 


124-7 


123-2 


123-4 


127-5 


124-5 


121-4 


116-3 


1101 


106-2 


109-5 


106-3 


111-8 


116-9 


129-6 


132-4 


131-2 


135-3 


149-1 


159-2 


153-2 


151-9 


155-4 


159-6 


169-7 


181-9 


201-7 


71-4 


73-5 


73-8 


71-2 


69-2 


68-4 


68-4 


69-6 


70-9 


69-2 


69-5 


72-5 


73-8 


71-3 


70-9 


73-2 


71-4 


72-2 


71-4 


73-4 


72-1 


71-6 


79-8 


78-9 


74-5 


75-5 


76-2 


76-2 


78-3 


79-5 


80-8 


78-5 


80-4 


80-2 


79-7 


88-3 


85-4 


80-8 


82-7 


3-65 


3-65 


3-75 


3-81 


3-87 


3-76 


3-85 


3-84 


3-82 


4-23 


4-09 


3 87 


3-96 


317, 


396. 


220, 


288, 


282, 


350. 


228, 


248, 


318, 


273, 


352, 


809, 


590, 


322 


788 


365 


842 


672 


738 


433 


645 


960 


798 


172 


693 


284 


19-69 


19-50 


18-98 


18-81 


18-24 


18-32 


17-70 


16-93 


17-33 


16-86 


16-76 


18-09 


18-59 


46-78 


39-23 


25-73 


16-38 


76-57 


70-54 


63-37 


63-20 


121-92 


194-63 


65-92 


147-73 


115-93 


667 


815 


423 


457 


440 


761 


397 


537 


606 


578 


807 


1,590 


926 


11,397 


15,751 


7,613 


8.930 


10,440 


19,019 


8.893 


11,436 


12,414 


12,999 


17,351 


31,951 


29,555 


10,207 


12,782 


10,749 


20,303 


20,977 


18,105 


8,240 


7,141 


10,218 


11,964 


9,179 


15.695 


19,528 


9,542 


12,200 


10,011 


20.28'- 


15,222 


16,991 


8,457 


6,230 


8,870 


8,987 


10,728 


16.554 


24,487 


3,779 


3,740 


3,743 


3,663 


3,764 


3,908 


3,842 


3,880 


3,880 


3,858 


4,088 


4,366 


4,521 


•995 


1002 


1-003 


1-016 


1-008 


1005 


1003 


1-004 


1-006 


1-017 


1-020 


1-012 


1012 


•978 


•991 


1-001 


1-003 


1-003 


1-000 


1001 


1-001 


1-001 


1-002 


1-010 


1-009 


1-006 


•988 


•999 


1-001 


1-010 


1-005 


1-001 


1-001 


1-002 


1-003 


1-008 


1-014 


1-011 


1-009 


•994 


1-002 


1-002 


1-008 


1-005 


1-001 


1-002 


1-002 


1-006 


1-012 


1-012 


1011 


1-006 


4-918 


4-900 


4-895 


4-853 


4-875 


4-945 


4-955 


4-975 


4-998 


5-000 


4-993 


4-988 


4-990 


4-850 


4-870 


4-855 


4-808 


4-835 


4-855 


4-915 


4-955 


4-965 


4-943 


4-956 


4-967 


4-959 


4-887 


4-887 


4-883 


4-825 


4-862 


4-896 


4-943 


4-967 


4-985 


4-970 


4-978 


4-978 


4-976 


4-915 


4-883 


4-855 


4-825 


4-860 


4-935 


4-950 


4-968 


4-993 


4-970 


4-973 


4-988 


4-959 



Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 


Year and 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal 3 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Month 


Entered | Cleared 1 Entered | Cleared 


Enteredl ClearedlEntered| Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


000 Tons 



1920. 

1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1831. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 



1,918 


1,930 


3,659 


3,603 


4,047 


3,205 


4,222 


4,017 


1,753 


1,739 


9,866 


1,757 


1,799 


3,716 


3,800 


4,278 


3,375 


4,993 


4,865 


1,738 


1,744 


10,306 


1,639 


1,592 


4,333 


4,429 


4,572 


3,792 


5,493 


5,460 


1,765 


1,750 


11,743 


1,772 


1,742 


4,848 


4,896 


4,273 


3,531 


4.638 


4,583 


1.993 


1,938 


11,971 


1,827 


1,865 


4,971 


4,918 


4,235 


3,474 


4,436 


4,417 


2,100 


2,017 


12,606 


2,013 


2,003 


4,503 


4,480 


5,003 


4,321 


7,840 


7,760 


2,554 


2.560 


12,137 


2,083 


2,040 


4,221 


4,159 


2,861 


2,868 


8,013 


7,993 


2,678 


2,683 


11,083 


2,257 


2.253 


4,333 


4,306 


3,342 


3,330 


8,415 


8,427 


2,923 


2.924 


10,354 


2.502 


2.462 


4.407 


4.362 


2,715 


2,831 


7,856 


7,819 


3,362 


3,382 


11,487 



9,872 
10,390 
11,729 
11,930 
12,588 
12,304 
11,172 
10,388 
11.467 



Tons 



1934 

Dec. . . 

1935 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . 

Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 



270, 

26\978 
233,942 
267,370 
187,976 
145,957 
150,963 
183,292 
188.876 
179,380 
155.315 
142,810 



240,420 490,751 



250,529 
255,715 
248,779 
211,365 
152,934 
143,001 
184,719 
182,272 
174,571 
164,617 
123,008 



538,011 
470,792 
519,575 
322,870 
152,908 
180,318 
221,221 
255.954 
218,894 



472,351 25,460 



537,799 
469,787 
519,075 
328,614 
151,634 
181,592 
217,995 
254,634 
218,684 
228,998 



355,415 
350,111 
502,588 
416,697 
339,132 
630,958 
51,284 



35,329 



101,102 
636.888 
359,643 
339,530 
519,486 
412,089 
344,197 
632,390 
42,916 



33,735 54,767 77,877 40 



1,076,888 
1,149,237 
1,392,080 
1,330,599 
1,186,847 
1,076,378 
987,460 
48,938 



146.966 
1,102,976 
1,140,492 
1,331,383 
1,422,728 
1,099,401 
1,091,955 
1,130,575 
76,859 



110,087 
357,561 
507,570 
564,539 
604,873 
399,384 
310,299 



146.306 
351,118 
518,164 
568,687 
604,894 
405,364 
307,449 



892,150 

884,732 
777,803 
905,380 
875,224 
934,847 
865,864 
1,121,992 
1,175,896 
974,870 
952,357 
861,926 
881,401 



886,180 

882,650 
808,652 
890,642 
864,579 
945,453 
864,972 
1,115,755 
1,182,793 
987,101 
928,986 
878,269 
853,548 



'Last day of each month. 

* Month end values of all listed stocks. 



'Records of inland shipping unavailable from 1926 to 1930 inclusive. 



32 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance. Revenue and Expenditure in Dollars. 



Classification 



Receipts — Ordinary Revenue — Customs Import Duty. 

Excise Duty 

Excise Taxes, Sales, Stamps, etc 

Income Tax 

Gold Tax 

Post Office Department , 

Miscellaneous Departments , 



Total Ordinary Revenue 

Special Receipts 

Can. Nat. Rlys. — Advances Repaid. 
Loan Account Receipts , 



Grand Total. 



Ordinary Expenditure— Agriculture 

Auditor General's Office 

Civil Service Commission 

External Affairs 

Finance— Interest on Public Debt. . . : 

Subsidies and Grants to Provinces., 

Old Age Pensions 

Office of the Comptroller of the Treasury. . . 

Farmers' Creditors' Arrangement Act 

Superannuations and Miscellaneous Pensions . 

General Expenditure (Finance Dept.) 

Miscellaneous Grants 

Miscellaneous Offices and Commissions 

Fisheries 

Governor General's Secretary's Office 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Penitentiaries 

Labour 

Legislation — 

Houses of Parliament and Library 

Dominion Franchise and Election Acts 

Marine 

Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission. 
Mines 

Movements of Coal 

National Defence 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Pensions and National Health 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Archives 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Soldier Settlement 

Trade and Commerce 



Total Ordinary Expenditure. , 

Special Expenditure— 

Public Works Construction Act 

Unemployment Relief 

Sundry Charges to Consolidated Fund. 

Total Special Expenditure 



Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans— Marine 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Loans to Harbour Commissions, Merchant Marine, etc. . . 

Total Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans 

Total Expenditure 

Other Disbursements — Loans and Advances— Active Assets. 

Provincial Governments (under Relief Act) 

Railways (Under Supp. P.W.C.A., 1935) 

Harbour Commissions 

Canadian Farm Loan Board 

Dominion Housing Act, 1935 

Soldier and General Land Settlement 

Canadian National Railways (Temporary Loan) 

Can. Nat. Rlys.— Debentures Redeemed 

Total Loans and Advances 



Redemption of Debt— Redemption of Debt. 
GrandTotal 



Month of 
December, 



5,498,378 
4,014,720 
9,586,476 
1,945,506 
588,694 
4,500,033 
2,806,921 



28,940,726 

11,226 

20,570,583 

5,000,000 



54,522,535 



567,271 

30,799 

18,221 

76,068 

6,764,451 



125 
123,105 

33,718 

80,834 

117,585 

9,450 

79,203 
116,961 

19,883 

98,059 
216,727 

11,817 
192,233 
230,704 
214,029 

37,582 

57,044 

317,597 

453,148 

74,798 

78,030 

127,428 

1,147,575 

29,245 

819,574 

4,534,712 

2,611,632 

3,404 

13,351 

20,919 

888,680 

333,637 

293,088 

454,661 

32,038 

57,017 

587,659 



21,974,064 



1,387,713 

4,142,390 

189,081 



5,719,185 



290,091 

1,277 

38,051 

220,578 



549,998 



28,243,247 



2,473,947 
"i22i659 



109,024 
7,500,000 



10,205,631 



13,664,894 



52,113,772 



Month of 

December, 

1935 



5,326,038 
4,252,749 
10,259,132 
3,550,284 



4,600,248 
2,006,853 



29,995,305 
7,716 



42,051,471 



72,054,492 



883,052 
35,884 
20,629 
59,488 
7,461,257 



14 

142,002 

58,473 

73,257 

40,746 

9,481 

42,040 

121,106 

20,704 

99,911 

244,534 

11,737 

179,677 

232,576 

180,426 

39,255 

48,920 

217,110 

481,584 

122,114 

89,131 

198,715 

1,391,941 

35,605 

940,052 

4,586,744 

2,627,651 

4,784 

13,231 

16,540 

1,411,470 

243,778 

334,207 

475,825 

53,532 

63,353 

559,641 



23,872,175 



3,102,768 

4,752,094 

97,155 



7,952,017 



154,602 

847 

2,797 



828,155 



32,652,347 



3,761,923 
873,770 



1,150,000 

4,500 

37,637 

11,000,000 

20,000,000 



36,827,829 



35,340,171 



104,820,347 



April 1, 1934 

to 

December 

31, 1934 



57,311,313 
34,141,971 
83,858,432 
54,138,717 
5,145,455 
23,070,000 
16,337,378 



274,003/267 

244,349 

20,570,583 

493,500,654 



788,318,853 



5,247,639 

273,364 

163,828 

1,169,499 

116,021,491 

8,484,477 

7,256,179 

1,137,204 

93,026 

641,768 

1,019,878 

481,481 

347,863 

1,185,221 

99,052 

954,855 

3,140,135 

96,857 

2,105,451 

1,849,180 

1,858,232 

377,506 

1,622,146 

859,681 

4,189,912 

932,160 

714,383 

1,627,662 

9,808,232 

281,792 

7,514,047 

40,303,757 

21,255,074 

34,645 

163,364 

110,089 

7,149,260 

3,040.331 

1,785,362 

4,466,040 

285,377 

571,581 

4,533,861 



265,252,939 



5,751,689 

29,336,523 

1,881.949 



36,970,162 



5,584,847 
298,627 
733,347 
871,208 



7,488,028 



), 711, 129 



27,179,788 



219,659 
103,492 



314,948 
43,748,438 
20,570,583 



92,136,909 



432,221,968 



834,070,006 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant 


Statij 


jtics of the 


United Kingdom 










1934 


1934 


Classification 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Production— 




























Iron 000 metric tons 


522 

665 


530 
770 


491 

782 


562 
855 


535 

822 


568 
867 


538 

782 


556 
816 


552 

772 


538 

870 


553 

922 


534 

918 




Steel 000 metric tons 




Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 
Generated mill, k.w.h. 


18,922 


20,848 


18,608 


19,593 


17,863 


19,589 


16,397 


17,721 


17,165 


18,007 


20, 152 






1,557 


1.714 


1.478 


1,507 


1,330 


1,326 


1,147 


1,216 


1,189 


1,320 


1,650 


1,758 




New orders received. 1920=100 


96 


101 


107 


102 


105 


110 


109 


101 


85 


71 


70 


79 




Copper Available 000 tons 


19-4 


14-9 


18-4 


20- 1 


23-8 


20-4 


251 


15-9 


16-9 


17-3 


23-5 


12-3 




Raw Cotton Delivered to 




























Mill mill. lb. 


105 


126 


103 


113 


105 


115 


98 


116 


93 


90 


120 


132 




Production, Artificial Silk 




























Yarn and Waste. . .mill. lb. 


7-86 


10 12 


9-61 


10-73 


9-79 


11-10 


9-95 


10-91 


7-54 


9-74 


12-52 


11-80 




NaturalSilkDeliveriesOOO lb. 
Crude Rubber 


328 


432 


366 


481 


409 


449 


375 


447 


407 


407 


508 


481 




8-95 

142-7 
104-4 


6-73 

184-8 
164-3 


7-84 

201-6 
159-5 


8-26 

176-8 
132-7 


7-22 

185-8 
117-2 


9-86 

198-6 
171-3 


7-79 

142-9 
102-8 


6-72 

183-6 
134-1 


10-52 

126-8 
98-0 


10-97 

160-5 
165-9 


9-51 

185-6 
123-2 


7-18 

199-2 
129-3 




Building Plans 




Other* 1924 = 100 








Insured Workers in 






























10-25 


1005 


10-08 


10-20 


10-32 


10-33 


10-36 


10-38 


10-42 


10-44 


10-49 


10-54 


10-60 


Number Unemployed 2 000 


2,086 


2.325 


2.285 


2,154 


2.044 


2,045 


2,000 


1.973 


1,948 


1,959 


1,916 


1,919 


1,869 


Percentage Unemployed 


161 


17-7 


17-5 


16-5 


15-7 


15-6 


15-3 


15-3 


14 9 


15-0 


14-6 


14-6 






190 

23-6 

13-7 

6-9 


190 
24-1 
14-6 

7-8 


18-7 
24-4 
14-6 

7-7 


18-5 

23 

14-0 

7-6 


18-7 

22-5 

13-9 

7-2 


18-9 

23-5 

13-2 

6-9 


18-8 

22-4 

12-8 

6-8 


17-6 

21-8 

12-6 

6-3 


17-9 

20-3 

12-1 

6-3 


18-6 

201 

12-4 

5-9 


18-5 
20-0 
11-5 

5-6 


18-2 
18-9 
11-1 
5-6 
















Shipbuilding and marine en- 






421 
11-3 
20-5 
12-8 
20-8 
47-4 


421 
12 3 

220 
15-7 
24-9 
49-5 


41-8 
120 
22-5 
15-2 
21-6 
48-9 


41-3 
12-4 

21-8 
150 
17-0 
46-8 


40-2 
11-8 
21-4 
13-5 
15-2 
46-3 


40-3 
12-6 
20-9 
13-6 
14-2 
44-9 


38-9 
11-4 
21-0 
13-7 
140 
43-6 


38-6 
10-7 
21-4 
12-8 
14-7 
46-0 


37-1 
10-6 
21-2 
12-1 
14-4 
46-2 


38-0 
10-4 
22-0 
10-2 
14-5 
46-5 


36-7 
11-2 

19-2 

7-9 

14-9 

46-9 


33-9 
10-5 
17-5 

7-8 
16-7 
47-6 




















Public works contracting 




Trade— 




























Imports, Total £ mn. 


63-3 


61-9 


56-3 


60-5 


59-8 


64-5 


57-8 


61-8 


59-1 


60-8 


73-4 


71-5 




Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 


30-4 


27-6 


26-3 


28-6 


27-1 


30-1 


27-5 


290 


27-0 


29-6 


37-5 


34-4 




Raw materials £ mn. 


18-7 


19-7 


16-2 


16-5 


16-9 


18-4 


15-7 


170 


16-0 


15-3 


18-0 


19-7 




Manufactured £ mn. 


13-8 


14-3 


13-6 


15-2 


15-5 


15-8 


14-4 


15-5 


15-8 


15-5 


17-6 


16-9 




Total, net imports £ mn. 


59-7 


56-9 


51-9 


560 


55-6 


59-0 


52-6 


57-9 


55-0 


57-0 


68-7 


66-9 




Exports, Domestic,Total£ mn. 


34-3 


35-5 


34-1 


360 


330 


35-2 


32-9 


36-4 


34-9 


34-1 


39-9 


39-4 




Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 


2-7 


2-4 


2-1 


2-4 


2-2 


2-5 


2-4 


2-6 


2-5 


2-8 


3-4 


3-8 




Raw materials £ mn. 


3-9 


4-7 


4-2 


4-6 


4-0 


4-7 


4-0 


4-6 


4-1 


3-7 


4-7 


5-1 




Manufactured £ mn. 


25-8 


27-5 


26-8 


28-0 


25-9 


27-1 


25-5 


28-4 


27-2 


26-7 


30-6 


29-3 




Bank Clearings — 




























Provincial £ mn. 


112-2 


122 2 


109-2 


108-1 


97-7 


103-0 


97-6 


117-8 


100-3 


95-3 


110-9 


108-7 


110-6 




185 


135 


131 


140 


134 


131 


136 


129 


140 


144 


145 






Tran s porta tion— 


































Entrances mill, net tons 


507 


4-56 


4-22 


4-71 


506 


5-55 


5-44 


6-07 


5-93 


5-83 


5-61 


5-24 




Clearances mill, net tons 


4-38 


4-66 


3-98 


4-62 


4-42 


504 


4-71 


5-20 


5-31 


4-88 


5-15 


4-94 




Index of shipping 




























freights^ 1924=100 


63-8 


62-7 


581 


92.6 


950 


93-8 


92-9 


98-3 


95-8 


98-1 


115-1 


109-9 




Railwa ys— 




























Average weekly 




























rail wav receipts £000 


2,621 


2.595 


2.640 


2,705 


3,813 


2,769 


3.013 


3.155 


3.432 


3.074 


2,891 


2,831 




Freight traffic total.mill. tons 


22-7 


210 


21-8 


22-3 


220 


20-6 


191 


19-8 


19-8 


17-7 


20-3 


20-9 




Merchandise mill, tons 


40 


3-5 


3-6 


3-7 


3-7 


3-7 


3-5 


3-6 


3-7 


3-5 


3-7 


3-8 




Coal mill, tons 


14-5 


13-7 


14-3 


14-6 


14-3 


131 


11-7 


12-3 


12-2 


10-7 


12-9 


13-2 




Minerals and other 




























merchandise mill, tons 


4-2 


3-7 


3-9 


3-9 


40 


3-8 


3-8 


3-8 


3-9 


3-6 


3-7 


3-9 




Prices— 




























Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100 — 




























Board of Trade 1 


87-8 

90-4 

97-4 

127 

144 


88-3 

91-6 

98-4 

125 

143 


880 

91-3 

98-1 

124 

142 


86-9 

90-9 

97-5 

122 

141 


87-5 

91-8 

98-9 

119 

139 


88-2 

94-3 

100-2 

118 

140 


88-4 

93-7 

98-5 

120 

143 


88-0 

93-7 

99-2 

126 

143 


88-4 

930 

98-9 

126 

143 


89-6 
96-1 


91-1 

98-5 


91-2 
98-2 


91-4 










Retail Foods 


125 
145 








Cost of living 


147 


147 




Banking— 




Bank of England— 




























Private deposits £ mn. 


140 


145 


142 


149 


140 


141 


138 


142 


123 


130 


117 


130 


117 


Bank and currency notes £ mn. 


339 


378 


375 


379 


392 


390 


399 


400 


406 


398 


400 


401 


419 


Gold reserve £ mn. 


192-1 


192-4 


192-4 


192-5 


192-6 


192-6 


192-7 


192-7 


192-8 


193-5 


193-7 


196-5 


200-1 


Nine Clearing Banks — 






























1,933 


1,944 


1,916 


1,885 


1,902 


1,923 


1,966 


1.982 


1,976 


1,986 


1,998 


2,002 




Discounts £ mn. 


253 


282 


263 


205 


198 


216 


242 


272 


285 


298 


295 


292 






738 


738 


741 


752 


760 


755 


740 


760 


750 


748 


759 


759 




Investments £ mn. 


578 


577 


590 


598 


601 


604 


608 


599 


599 


602 


610 


604 






889 


892 


812 


788 


813 


843 


881 


887 


880 


893 


902 


898 




Money— 




Day to Day Rate p.c. 


•63 


•75 


•63 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


Three Months Ratb p.c. 


•53 


•38 


•41 


•50 


•59 


•59 


•69 


•63 


•61 


•56 


•61 


•56 


•75 


Security Values— 




























Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 


132-7 


134-6 


131-6 


130-3 


131-3 


131-3 


130-3 


131-5 


129-8 


124-3 


125-5 


128-9 




Variable Dividend. .1921 = 100 


113-5 


115-7 


113-7 


1100 


111-5 


114-4 


115-6 


115-6 


117-5 


112-7 


112-6 


118-3 




Total 1921 = 100 


126-5 


128-5 


125-8 


123-7 


124-9 


125-8 


125-5 


126-4 


125-8 


120-6 


121-3 


125-5 




Exchange, New York $ to £ 


4-977 


4-944 


4-870 


4-834 


4-785 


4-836 


4-923 


4-942 


4-956 


4-956 


4-906 


4-914 


4-931 


Exchange, Francs to £ 


75-47 


74-69 


74-22 


72-71 


72-53 


73-28 


74-72 


74-50 


74-91 


75-16 74-47 


74-53 74-84 



'Beginning with March 1935, this factor is expressed as a percentage of 
2 Number of persons on the Registers of Employment Exchanges in Great Britain only, 
index is revised, being placed on the base of 1930. 



8 The Board of Trade price 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States 



Classification 



United States Statistics— 

Industrial Produc- 
tion 1923-5 = 

Mineral Production. . 1923-5 = 

Manufacturing Pro- 
duction 1923-5 = 100 

Wheat, Visible Supply.MjI. bush. 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Shipments, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Exports, including 
wheat flour 000 bush. 

Wheat Flour Produc- 
tion OOObbls. 

Sugar Meltings, 8 
Ports 000 long tons 

Tobacco Consumption, 

Cigars Millions 

Cigarettes Millions 

Cattle Receipts, Primary 
Markets O0C 

Hog Receipts, Primary 
Markets '. 000 

Cotton Consumption . . . 000 bales 

Newsprint Produc- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Newsprint Consump- 
tion 1 000 s. tons 

Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 

Steel Ingot Produc- 
tion 000 1. tons 

Automobile Produc- 
tion 000 cars and trucks 

Zinc Production s. tons 

Stocks b- tons 

Lead Production s. tons 

Petroleum Produc- 
tion 000 bbls 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls 

Gasoline Production. .000 bbls 
Consumption 000 bbls 

Contracts Awarded $000,000 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Electric Power Pro- 
duction mill. k.h. 

Index Factory Employ- 
ment 1923-5 = 100 

Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 

Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains . $000 

Imports $000,000 

Exports $000,000 

F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 
counted Mil. Dolls 

Reserve Ratio p.c 

Member Banks Loans 

and Discounts Mil. Dolls 

Demand Deposits, 
adjusted 2 Mil. Dolls. 

Interest Rates, Time Loans.p.c 

Call loans renewal p.c 

Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months PC 

Bond Prices High Grade 

Rails (10) 

Forty bonds 

Prices Common Stocks 
(421) 1926=100 

(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 

Industrials (351) 

Railways (33) 

Utilities (37) 

Automobiles (13) 

Tires and rubber goods (7) 

Chain stores (16) 

Copper and brass (8) 

Oil (15) 

Railway equipment (9) 

Steel and iron (11) 

Textile (28) 

Amusement (7) 

Tobacco (11) 

Stock Sales, N.Y Mil. Shares 

Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 

Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Bank Debits, N.Y....Mil. Dolls. 

Outside, 140 centres. . .Mil. Dolls 



1934 



Dec. 



860 
890 

860 
89 

7,843 

8,051 

1,511 

7,547 



318 
9,210 

1,797 

3,140 
414 

79-8 

165-5 
1,028 

1, 

153-6 
35.981 
119,830 
32,500 

75,010 

76,593 

35,997 

30,486 

92-7 

2,592 

8,058 

78-9 

76,631 

78,717 

132-3 

170-7 

7 
70-8 

7.646 

11,414 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May 



•00 



107-4: 

83-9: 



80-3 
35 
58-2 
89-9 
39-9 
73-3 
55-6 
70-6 
48 3 
47-6 
51-4 
12-3 
134-8 
23-6 
272 

830 
15,214 
15.666 



91-0 
94 

900 
75 

5,127 

8,638 

1,257 

8.315 

357 

328 
11,337 



2,422 
547 



157-9 
1,477 

2,872 

292-8 
35,218 
117,685 
26,350 

78,715 

75,456 
25,330 
28,062 
99 8 
2,170 

8,349 

80-5 

41,194 

32,546 

1670 

176-2 

7 
720 

7,561 

11,683 

-88 

1-00 



110-25 
86-02 



81-4 
34-6 
57-4 
90-2 
39-7 
72 
56 
71 
50 
49 
50 
11-3 
133 
19-4 
330-5 
825 
14,997 
15,066 



890 
960 

88-0 
63 



3,771 



1,301 

7,599 

301 

321 

9,306 

1,381 

1,823 

478 

70-6 



2,748 

335-7 
33,494 
116,276 
25,103 

72,763 

0.817 

32.702 

26.432 

75-1 

2.326 

7,494 

81-9 

41,573 

34.479 

152-5 

163 

6 
72-2 



11,793 

•88 

100 



112-52 
83-16 

67-8 

800 
31 

54-5 
85-6 
36-9 
720 
54-3 
69 
47 

45-8 

47-6 

10 7 

130-7 

14-4 

220-3 

816 

12.549 

13,181 



88-0 
97-0 

860 
53 

4,668 

6,355 

1,502 

7,986 

328 

352 
10,200 

1,470 

1,622 
481 

73-3 

171 1 

1,777 



429-8 

36,667 
111,806 
30,118 

81. 

76,630 

35,314 

31,997 

123-0 

3,015 

8,012 

82-4 

55,647 

38,950 

177-3 

185 



72-3 



11,688 
1-00 



111-42 
79-00 

63-9 

75-4 
27-8 
53-2 
77-2 
30-7 
69 

49-4 
65-9 
40-4 
39-2 
43-4 
10-2 
1261 
15 
310 

773 
15.895 
15,849 



86 
87-0 

86-0 
43 

6,390 

7,971 

1.281 

7,787 

341 

374 
10,697 

1,630 

1,650 
463 

74-7 

166-1 
1,663 

2,641 

477-7 
35,334 

108,680 
29,857 

78,427 

75.066 

34,728 

36,076 

124 

2,303 



82-3 

59, 644 

43,368 

170-6 

164-4 



73-0 
7,696 



12,231 
•63 
•64 



112-58 
78-37 

67-5 

78 

29-4 

591 

80-7 

31-2 

71-8 

56-6 

71-1 

41-2 

41-4 

42-8 

10- 

127- 

22-4 

266-0 

805 

15,905 

15,746 



850 
89 



84-0 
32 



,298 



,426 



437 

408 
11,709 

1,636 

1,551 
469 

84-1 

202-0 
1.727 

2,636 

364-7 
34,597 
107,625 
33,202 

82,454 

80,412 
37,583 
39,089 

126 

2,327 

8,021 

81-2 
58,105 
40,468 

170 

165-5 



73-3 

7,612 

12,556 
•25 
•25 



113-57 
79-60 

73- 

85-5 
310 
64-5 
86-8 
31-9 
75- 
68- 
80- 
40- 
44-5 
45-0 
12-5 
136-5 
30-4 
284 

793 
14,551 
15,655 



June July Aug Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 



860 
98-0 

840 

24 

10,024 
11,217 
1,195 

7,381 

323 

402 
12,120 

1,402 

1,301 
386 

77-0 

161 

1,553 

2,231 

361-3 
34,677 
112,909 
29,332 

82, 

81,724 
38,180 
37,884 
1480 
3,035 

7,873 

79 
58,953 
40,678 

156 

170-2 



74-2 

7,548 

12,921 
•25 
•25 

•75 

11507 
81-08 

760 



32- 

70 

88-. 

31-3 

78- 

65- 

82- 

43- 

44- 

450 

13 

140-5 

22-3 

263 

8 

15,667 

15,914 



86-0 
84-0 

86-0 
37 

28,895 

11,233 

1,231 

7,387 

414 

432 
13,138 



1,336 
392 

72-8 

153 
1.520 

2.270 

337-0 
35,055 
115,723 
30,488 

85,485 

84,903 
40,667 
41,203 
159-2 
2.22* 

8.370 

80-4 

49,887 

38,550 

177-7 

173-4 

7 
74-5 

7.327 

12,962 
•25 
•25 

•75 

116-65 
81-95 

79-4 

91-7 

34-1 
730 

101 
32-4 
80 
69- 
80-5 
48 
53 

47 3 
14 

148 
29-4 

235-7 

769 

16.737 

16.657 



87 
810 



48,169 
14,997 



1,278 



331 



422 
11,975 



1,943 



1,278 
408 



75- 



148-1 
1,761 



240-1 

35,922 
112,445 
30,807 

84,816 

84,584 
40,488 
12,830 
168-6 
3,102 

8,573 

81-7 

52,402 

40,914 

1690 

172-2 



74- 

7,345 

13,263 
•25 
•25 

•75 

113-83 
81-90 

83-3 

95 

35-9 

81-6 

117-b 
341 
81-7 
79-9 
80-8 
481 
60 
49 9 
15- 

151 • 
42-9 

286-9 

772 

14,733 

15,643 



90-0 
87-0 

91-0 

79 

42,289 

15,595 

1,324 

9,055 

302 

431 
10,774 

2,257 

1,220 
449 

71-3 

160-6 
1,776 



,830 



36, 

106,316 

29,358 

84,109 

83,347 

39,817 

37,862 

167-4 

2,632 



81-9 

59,474 

39, 

161-7 

198-2 

10 
75-3 

7,556 

13,246 
•25 
• 25 

•75 

113-83 
81- 

85-0 

97-5 

37-0 

81 
127-3 

33 

81-5 

88 

77 

45 

64 

51 3 

17 
153 

34 

249-8 

781 

14,014 



95-0 
93-0 



950 

82 



27,883 
14,695 



>,897 
314 



524 
12,711 



2,545 



1,652 
552 



179-8 
1,978 

3,146 

275-0 
36,701 
95,954 
37,844 

1,160 

85,132 
41,956 
41,401 

200 

2,882 

8,841 

83 
79,945 
44,911 

189-2 

221 



76-4 



13,598 
•29 
•75 



112-55 
79-51 



34 
82 

137 
31 

78-6 
92-0 
78-8 
41 

63-1 
54-8 
18-3 

153-0 
46 

275 

792 
15.733 



970 
92-0 

980 
80 

14,501 

12,403 

1,602 

8,275 

240 

457 
10,801 

2,037 

1,671 
508 

87-3 

187-4 
2,066 

3,153 

3980 
37,694 

85,777 
36,229 

86,476 

83,180 
40,260 
35,956 

188 

3,179 

8,689 

84 

71,777 

45,628 

169 



77-1 



14,018 
•25 
•75 

•75 

114-32 

83-52 

94-2 

108-4 
38-3 
91-0 

159-9 
38-2 
79-1 



86-7 
49-8 
71-2 
59-3 
20 6 

156-5 
57-5 

302-0 

846 

15.542 



15,12716,96216,802 



1 Based on sample of 422 publishers. 

2 Method of computing net demand deposits was changed by the Banking Act of 1935, approved Aug. 23, 
Consequently figures since that date are not comparable with those for earlier periods. 



1935. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, JANVIER 1936 N° 1 

Statisticibn du Dominion: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 
Statistiques Economiques: Stone? B. Smith, M.A. 

STATISTIQUE COURANTE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE AU CANADA 

Bien que les facteurs majeurs servant a mesurer les conditions economiques soient plutot 
legerement deficitaires en decembre la reaction est de proportion moderee. Le niveau des 
actions ordinaires est un peu plus eleve en decembre, continuant l'avance des deux mois prece- 
dents. L'activite a la bourse a ete plus grande le dernier trimestre que depuis un certain temps. 
Les prix de gros montrent un faible flechissement tout en continuant la zone de stabilisation 
apparente depuis deux ans. Les depots bancaires se sont a peu pres maintenus, l'avance des 
derniers dix-huit mois etablissant un niveau un peu superieur a la moyenne d'apres-guerre. 
Les effets publics ont cote un peu plus bas en decembre qu'en novembre et ont ete en consequence 
beaucoup inferieurs aux niveaux extremement eleves de decembre 1934. Le volume physique 
des affaires n'est pas si haut qu'en novembre mais si on le mesure a la moyenne mobile 
trimestrielle l'avance en 1935 a ete a peu pres contnue. 

Les expeditions d'argent a la Monnaie et a l'exterieur ont atteint la cime de 4,048,000 onces, 
ce qui apres ajustement pour variation saisonniere d^passe un peu plus de deux fois les expeditions 
du mois precedent. Le gain ajuste des expeditions d'or est de 19f p.c. Les exportations de 
cuivre ont augmente de 16 p.c. apres ajustement saisonnier et les exportations de nickel montrent 
un declin de proportion considerable. La production de plomb le dernier mois sur lequel les 
statistiques sont etablies accuse un gain, l'indice montant de 139 a 146 tandis que les exportations 
de zinc ont baisse d'environ 11 p.c. 

Les principaux traits saillants de la division des manufactures portent sur les fortes impor- 
tations de coton brut par l'industrie textile, un gain ajuste des exportations de bois-d'ceuvre 
et de bardeaux et une acceleration des activites de l'industrie primaire du fer et de I'acier. II y a 
violent declin dans les importations de caoutchouc brut et de petrole brut. L'industrie du 
batiment a decline comparativement a decembre. Les transports commerciaux des chemins 
de fer, apres ajustement saisonnier, tels que mesures par les wagons charges se sont presque 
maintenus et les deux divisions du commerce exterieur accusent des declins. 

Les quatres graphiques 

Nous attirons l'attention sur les quatre graphiques paraissant dans ce numero. Les traits 
saillants du graphique illustrant les trois elements representatifs ont ete la hausse des actions 
ordinaires durant le dernier trimestre de 1935 et le relevement soutenu du volume physique des 
affaires durant l'annee entiere. Le cours des obligations a atteint un niveau plus eleve que pour 
toute autre annee de l'apres-guerre et meme avant. Dans le graphique illustrant les donnees 
economiques, le rapport entre le volume physique des affaires et les prix de gros est d'interet 
tout special. La reprise de l'activite en 1935 est en contraste avec la stabilite relative des prix de 
gros. Un ccart meme plus marque est constate entre les depots a terme et les prets courants durant 
l'annee. Des gains de la production industrielle sur la periode ccrrespondante de 1934 sont 
enregistres dans dix-huit pays sur les vingt pour lesquels on dispose de statistiques. La France et 
les Pays-Bas sont les deux seuls pays dans lesquels la depression a continue sous ce rapport. 

Production minerale 

La prospection et les travaux de developpement qui se sont faits sur une grande echelle, 
notamment avant l'annee 1929, produisent maintenant des resultats qui se traduisent par les 
niveaux eleves de la production minerale. Durant les premieres annces de la depression l'ex- 
ploitation des gisements auriferes etait favorisee, grace a la fixation du prix du metal jaune. La 
hausse de l'or au commencement de 1934, a environ $35 l'once contre $20.67, a donne un essor 
meme plus grand a l'exploitation des gisements, principalement ceux a basse teneur. Bon 
nombre de mines de metaux communs se pretent essentiellement a l'exploitation peu couteuse 
et ceci est attribuable en partie aux combinaisons favorables de metaux dans les minerals, tels 
que l'or et le nickel, avec le cuivre, et 1' argent avec le plomb et le zinc. La production metallique 
a ete par consequent moins influencee par la crise qu'il y avait lieu de s'y attendre. L'activite 
qui a regne dans l'exploitation des gisements metalliferes a ete de fait un des elements qui ont 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

rendu supportables les pires phases de la dislocation e*conomique. L'industrie miniere a exerce* 
une influence constructive a un degre" plus important que ne le r6vele la valeur mon£taire du 
rendement. 

La production minerale du Canada est evalu6e pour 1935 a $308,165,000, soit une plus- 
value de 11 p.c. sur l'annee pr6c6dente. Ce niveau n'a 6te depasse qu'en 1929, annee record que 
le total avait atteint $310,850,000. La production d'or, de cuivre, de nickel et de zinc a battu 
tous les records. La hausse recente de Tor a permis aux exploitants de traiter profitablement 
des minerals a basse teneur; ceci, toutefois, a eu pour effet de reduire temporairement le volume 
de production. La prospection pour de nouveaux gisements auriferes s'est egalement activee 
et a eu pour resultat bon nombre de trouvailles. Comme il faut de deux a trois ans pour mettre 
en production une nouvelle mine, l'effet ne s'est pas fait sentir dans son entier jusqu'a cette annee 
lorsque les nouvelles exploitations ont contre-balance la diminution du rendement de quelques 
unes des mines plus anciennes. 

Transports 

En raison de l'interdependance etroite entre les industries et les chemins de fer, la statistique 
d'exploitation et les donnees financieres de ces derniers revelent une reprise de l'activite indus- 
trielle. Le trafic ferroviaire en 1935 n'enregistre toutefois qu'une modeste amelioration sur l'an- 
nee precedente. Les chargements de wagons ont augmente de 1-4 p.c, le total etant passe de 
2,320,050 a 2,351,393 wagons. On constate des flechissements pour cinq des onze categories 
de la classification officielle. Les transports de grain ont diminue de 10,218 wagons ou 3-2 p.c. 
Les chargements de coke ont baisse de 5-2 p.c; les chargements de betail, de houille et de bois 
d'ceuvre enregistrent egalement de legers flechissements. II est . encourageant de noter le gain 
dans les transports des divers qui a presque atteint 24,000 wagons, soit 4-6 p.c de plus qu'en 
1934. Les chargements de produits forestiers, tels que le bois a pulpe, la pulpe et le papier et les 
divers ont augmente. Les transports de minerals ont augmente de 8-0 p.c, et ceux de mar- 
chandises en lots de moins d'un wagon se sont quelque peu releves. 

Le leger gain du trafic ferroviaire a fait monter les revenus bruts d'exploitation des deux 
grands reseaux. Les chiffres preliminaires pour les premiers onze mois de 1935 revelent un gain 
d'un peu plus de 2 p.c pour le Pacifique Canadien et pour les lignes canadiennes du Canadien 
National. Les recettes de ces dernieres ont atteint $132,290,000 au lieu de $129,334,000 les 
premiers onze mois de 1934. Le flechissement du revenu net d'exploitation du reseau national 
a 6te* de 18-4 p.c pour les premiers dix mois de l'annee passee comparativement a la periode 
correspondante de 1934, le total s'etablissant a $6,311,631 vis-a-vis de $7,732,042. Le revenu 
net d'exploitation du Pacifique Canadien s'etablissait a $18,667,823 pour la meme periode, soit 
une moins-value de 12-6 p.c. La baisse du revenu net de tous les chemins de fer a ete de 
$33,915,308 ou 9-6 p.c 

Le trafic des canaux a ete inegal en 1935, le gain du tonnage passant par les canaux du Saint- 
Laurent contre-balancant en partie le flechissement qui s'est produit dans les transports du canal 
Welland. Le trafic du Saint-Laurent pour la periode avril-novembre a atteint 6,380,056 tonnes 
contre 6,621,400 la periode correspondante de 1934. L'accroissement pour les ecluses cana- 
diennes et americaines de Sault-Ste-Marie a ete de 5,905,000 tonnes ou 14-1 p.c 

Le tonnage net des batiments partis des six principaux ports du Canada durant la periode 
janvier-octobre 1935 s'etablissait a 27,540,000 tonnes au lieu de 27,538,000 la periode correspon- 
dante de l'annee precedente, soit un gain de -01 p.c Le poids des cargaisons en provenance 
dc cinq de ces ports (on ne dispose pas de statistiques pour Montreal) a atteint 4,420,000 tonnes 
vis-a-vis de 4,685,000 les premiers dix mois de 1934, soit une baisse de 5-7 p.c 

Emploiement 

Le relevement de la situation industrielle en general dans bon nombre de grands pays, qui 
a commence en 1933 et a continue en 1934, n'a pas ete interrompu l'annee passee. Dans le but 
d'indiquer les oscillations relatives dans le niveau general du chomage industriel, l'Office Inter- 
national du Travail a echafaude un indice international du chomage, calcule sur des series 'selec- 
tionnees de statistiques fournies par seize des plus grands pays, avec 1929 pour annee de base. 
Cet indice ressortait a 201 pour les premiers sept mois de 1935 contre 221 la periode corres- 
pondante de 1934, 274 en 1933, 291 en 1932, 235 en 1931 et 164 en 1930. Quoique les expe- 
riences faites dans un grand nombre de pays demontrent que les oscillations de l'emploiement 
et du chomage ne s'harmonisent pas tou jours inversement, la statistique internationale revele 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

que le declin general du chomage en 1935 a ete accompagne d'un relevement marque de l'em- 
ploiement dans bon nombre de pays, notamment en Grande-Bretagne, aux Etats-Unis, en Alle- 
magne, en Italie et au Japon. Au Canada egalement il y a eu une amelioration notable durant 
l'annee qui vient de finir et pendant laquelle le relevement economique s'est reparti sur presque 
tous les domaines. 

Le Bureau Federal de la Statistique recueille tous les mois des renseignements provenant 
de 9,000 a 9,500 grands etablissements qui se classent sous huit rubriques industrielles, savoir: 
etablissements manufacturiers, exploitation forestiere, industrie extractive, transports, com- 
munications, construction et entretien, services et commerce. Les effectifs des etablissements 
qui ont fourni des declarations constituent environ 45 p.c. du total des personnes engagees dans 
toutes les industries, telles qu'enumerees dans le recensement decennal du ler juin 1931. Le 
grand total de ces etablissements etait de 933,085 unites en 1935. Entre le ler Janvier et le 
commencement de decembre il n'y a eu que deux interruptions dans le mouvement ascendant. 
L'indice s'etablissait le ler decembre a 104-6, soit une amelioration de 10-8 p.c. par rapport 
au commencement de l'annee. L' augmentation moyenne durant les periodes correspondantes 
des annees 1931 a 1934, a ete de sept a huit p.c, de sorte que l'amelioration de 1935 a ete plus 
marquee que d'ordinaire. L'indice de l'emploiement pour les douze mois a ete de 99-4 (base 
100 en 1926) contre 96-0 en 1934, 83-4 en 1933 et 87-5 en 1932. La moyenne de 1935 a toutefois 
ete plus basse que celle de 1931 et des annees immediatement precedentes. 

Le relevement enregistre durant l'annee qui vient de finir se repartit entre les cinq regions 
economiques. Dans les Provinces Maritimes l'indice moyen accuse en 1935 une hausse de 
2-7 p.c. sur 1934; Quebec, 4 p.c; Ontario, 2 p.c; Provinces des Prairies, 5-8 p.c; Colombie 
Britannique, 8-1 p.c. On constate des ameliorations pour la plapart des groupes industriels 
dans chacune de ces regions en 1935. L'industrie manufacturiere enregistre generalement des 
gains marques et il en a ete de meme pour bon nombre d'autres industries. 

Les compilations effectuees separement pour huit centres, — Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, 
Ottawa, Hamilton, Windsor, Winnipeg et Vancouver, — indiquent que la situation a ete plus 
favorable partout. Les gains dans ces huit cites dans leur ensemble ont ete plus marques qu'ail- 
leurs. Comme dans les provinces, les redressements ont ete generaux; l'industrie manufac- 
turiere en particulier accuse une activite plus marquee et plus uniforme. On constate egalement 
des ameliorations notables dans le commerce. 

Chomage 

Le ministere du Travail dispose de statistiques relatives au chomage parmi les membres des 
syndicats ouvriers. Ces chiffres indiquent une diminution continuelle du nombre de chomeurs 
enregistres entre fevrier et septembre 1935, le pourcentage de chomage parmi les syndiques ay ant 
diminue de 18-2 a 13-0 dans l'intervalle. A la fin d'octobre, toutefois, il etait monte a 13-3 p.c, 
meme pourcentage que le 30 novembre. 

La statistique preliminaire de la Commission Federale des Secours aux Chomeurs revele 
que le nombre de chefs de famille et de leurs a charge qui recevaient des secours directs etait de 
883,794 en Decembre alors que le nombre de ceux secourus autrement etait de 322,635, soit un 
total 1,206,429. Ceci se compare favorablement au total de 1,465,821 enregistre en mars, 
maximum pour 1935 et etait egalement plus bas qu'en Decembre 1934, lorsque 1,242,020 per- 
sonnes recevaient des secours a meme les fonds publics. 

Gages 

Le Ministere du Travail declare qu'apres la hausse en 1934, les tarifs des gages en 1935 ont 
6te legerement plus eleves en raison d'augmentations dans plusieurs industries et dans differents 
endroits. II y a egalement eu beaucoup moins de travail a temps partiel. Dans Sexploitation 
forestiere, les gages ont hausse generalement dans les Provinces Maritimes et le Quebec, alors 
que dans l'Ontario et la Colombie Britannique, ils avaient augmente d'une facon marquee en 
1934. Dans les charbonnages, les gages accusent une hausse accentuee en Nouvelle-Ecosse 
ainsi que dans 1' Alberta central et septentrional; on constate egalement des augmentations dans 
l'exploitation des gisements metalliferes. II y a egalement eu une amelioration dans l'industrie 
manufacturiere, notamment le vetement et 1'ameublement. Dans la construction, les gages 
ont hausse dans les provinces de Quebec et Ontario. Les gages des cheminots ont augmente* 
d'a peu pres 5 p.c et de presque autant dans un petit nombre de compagnies de tramways elec- 
triques. Les gages des debardeurs se sont releves dans la plupart des ports oceaniques et dans 
quelques ports lacustres. 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUR 

Prix 

Le niveau g6n6ral des prix de gros s'est bien maintenu durant les derniers deux ans apres. 
la hausse marquee sur le bas-fond de la crise au cours de 1933. Depuis Janvier 1934, l'indice ca- 
nadien des prix de gros a subi des oscillations peu marquees autour de la ligne de 72 p.c. (base 
100 en 1926), quoique un leger gain durant le dernier trimestre ait ete suffisant pour faire main- 
tenir le niveau au maximum de la periode de relevement. Les produits animaux et les metaux 
non ferreux ont enregistre des hausses durant les derniers quelques mois, tandis que plusieurs 
parmi les groupes principaux ont baisse a des niveaux inferieurs a ceux du dernier trimestre de 
1934. 

Durant la periode de declin inauguree en aout 1929 et terminee au commencement de 1933, 
les prix des matieres premieres ont baisse plus rapidement que ceux des produits ouvres, et la 
contraction resultante du revenu des producteurs primaires a eu une influence defavorable sur 
la situation generale. Les prix anormalement bas regus par ces producteurs qui representent 
a peu pres la moitie de la population active du pays ont provoque une baisse notable du pouvoir 
d'achat. Cette divergence s'est fortement r^duite en 1933 et 1934, et le relevement des matieres 
premieres de 5-0 p.c. comparativement a une augmentation de 0-7 p.c. pour les produits ouvres 
indique que l'ecart s'est encore r6treci durant la periode de douze mois terminee en novembre 1934. 

Cours des actions ordinaires 

Le niveau eleve de l'activite industrielle et la stabilite relative du prix des denrees a favorise 
les perspectives de revenu des compagnies canadiennes durant l'annee qui vient de finir. Malgre* 
la diversite des interets parmi les acheteurs et les vendeurs d'actions, les benefices actuels et a 
venir des compagnies constituent le principal element dans la determination du cours de leurs titres. 

Par consequent, les tendances a la hausse ont une grande signification pour les previsions 
ainsi que pour les tendances de l'heure actuelle. La cote des actions avait atteint le maximum 
de la periode de relevement au cours des premiers mois de 1935; la hausse sur le niveau de 1934 
a 6te accentuee. II y a eu une nouvelle hausse durant le dernier trimestre, l'indice officiel de la 
derniere semaine de l'annee enregistrant un gain de 25-4 p.c. sur la semaine correspondante de 
1934. Les boissons, les petroles et les divers ont participe pleinement a cette hausse, le gain 
pour 87 titres industriels atteignant presque 41 p.c; 16 titres d'energie electrique et de traction 
ont enregistre une hausse modeste de 6-3 p.c. 

Les auriferes ont flechi de 6-2 p.c. alors que les metaux communs ont hausse* de pres de 56 p.c. 

On annonce officieusement qu'en 1935 les societes canadiennes ont declare* des dividendes 
d'environ 213 millions de dollars contre 186 millions en 1934 et 193 millions en 1933. Les derniers 
mois ont 6te temoins d'un progres notable en ce qui concerne la distribution des arr6rages accu- 
mules, et les paiements de boni ont contribu6 au gain marque des paiements en dividendes 
durant 1935. 

Cours des obligations 

La cote moyenne des effets publics a 6te plus 61evee en 1935 qu'en toute autre annee de 
l'apres-guerre. Les obligations ont enregistre une hausse accentuee durant l'annee precedente 
et le niveau atteint en decembre s'est maintenu durant la plus grande partie de 1935. La baisse 
survenue en septembre a ete contre-balancee en partie par la hausse du dernier trimestre. Durant 
les derniers deux ans, les fonds liberes en partie par la baisse des prix de gros et le ralentissement 
de l'activite generale ont ete places dans des obligations de tout repos. 

Les cours des obligations a breve echeance ont hausse plus que les obligations a longue £ch£- 
ance. Les obligations taxables, a six mois eta deux ans, sesont vendues en 1935 surun rendement 
de moins de 2 p.c. Les obligations a long terme du Dominion ont 6te* cotees durant l'annee 
presque entiere sur des rendements de 3-0 a 3-5 p.c. La divergence dans les cours des deux 
categories d'obligations' a ete* infime durant la periode 1925-33. Les rendements extremement 
bas des effets publics refletent une amelioration dans la situation du credit et ont stimule* 
l'expansion des entreprises en general. 

Bureau federal de la statistique, 21 Janvier 1936. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

JANUARY 16, 1936 

Administration. — Canada, 1936, the official handbook of present conditions and recent progress, 196 p., 
illus., map. (25 cents; 10 cents to ministers of religion, teachers and students.) 

Peoduction. — Agricultural Products.— World trade in barley, calendar years 1927-1934, 36 p. The 
grain situation in the Argentine, Dec. 13, 1935, 5 p. Animal Products.— The leather industry in 
Canada, 1934, 25 p. Fisheries Products.— Fisheries statistics of Canada, 1934 (English and French), 
285 p., 35 cents. Mineral Products. — Final statistics on the mineral producing industries of Canada, 
1934, 1 p. Quarterly report on coal and coke statistics for Canada, July, August, September, 1935, 
16 p. Preliminary estimate of mineral production, 1935, 5 p. 

Manufactures.— Animal Products and their Manufactures. — The leather glove and mitt industry in 
Canada, 1934, 14 p. mimeo. Forest Products. — The cooperage industry, 1934, 1 p. (English and 
French.) Miscellaneous paper goods, 1934 (English and French), 1 p. Vegetable Products. — Stocks 
of canned fruits and vegetables on hand, September 30, 1935 (English and French), 3 p. Report on 
the fruit and vegetable preparations industry in Canada, 1934, 34 p. Report on the cotton and jute 
bag industry in Canada, 1934, 12 p. Report on the rubber industry in Canada, 1934, 23 p. Textiles. — 
Report on the silk industry in Canada, 1934, 26 p. Report on the hat and cap industry in Canada, 
1934, 19 p. Lron and Steel and their Products.— Farm implements and machinery in Canada, 1934, 
12 p. The automobile parts and accessories industry in Canada, 1934, 11 p. Chemicals and Allied 
Products. — The toilet preparations industry in Canada, 1934, 10 p. Miscellaneous.— Report on the 
bed, spring and mattress industry in Canada, 1934, 11 p. 

Internal Trade. — Motion picture statistics, 1934, 7 p. Retail merchandise trade in the Maritime prov- 
inces, 1934, 11 p. Retail merchandise trade in Canada, 1934, 11 p. Retail merchandise trade in 
Quebec, 1934, 10 p. Wholesale trade in Canada and the provinces, 1934, 11 p. 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities.— Index numbers of car loadings, 1931-1935, 
4 p. Preliminary report, central electric station industry, 1934, 4 p. Summary of canal traffic for 
December and season of navigation, 1935, 6 p. 

Education. — Cost of education, bulletin No. 5. Financial statistics of the provincial school systems in 
Canada, 1914-1934, 14 p. 

General. — Annual review of the employment situation in Canada during 1935, 17c, 9 p.; charts. 



2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER. 

Daily Bulletins.— The daily bulletin— $1.50 per year. 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian grain statistics. Carloadings of revenue freight. Investors' indexes of 
security prices. Index number of 20 mining stocks. The weekly bulletin — $1.00 per year. Weekly 
index numbers of wholesale prices. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural statistics. The wheat situation: review; statistical supplement. $1.00 
per year. Canadian milling statistics. Cold storage holdings. Preliminary summary of price move- 
ments. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and shoes, (d) Automobiles, (e) Iron 
and steel, (f) Coal and coke, (g) Leading mineral products, (h) Asbestos, (i) Asphalt roofing, 
(j) Cement. (k) Clay products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold. (o) Gypsum, 
(p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, (v) Silver, (w) 
Zinc, (x) Concentrated milk products, (y) Creamery butter. Rigid insulating board industry. 
Building permits. Summary of the trade of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of 
Canada's domestic exports. Summary of Canada's imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements 
and machinery. Footwear trade. Exports: Fertilizers, Grain and flour; Hides and skins; Lumber; 
Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; 
Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Pipes, tubes and fittings; Pulpwood, wood pulp 
and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vegetable oils; Vehicles (of iron). Imports: 
Canada's imports from Empire and foreign countries. Coffee and tea; Fertilizers; Hides and skins; 
Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and 
smelter products; Paint and varnishes; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Petroleum and its products; 
Pipes, tubes and fittings; Rubber; Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vegetable oils, 
Vehicles (of iron). Canada's monthly trade trends. Canada's monthly trade trends with Emmre 
countries Canada's monthly trade trends with foreign countries. Railway operating statistics. 
Traffic of Canadian railways. Canal statistics. Output of central electric stations in Canada. 
Prices and price indexes. Automobile financing. Bank debits. Changes in the value of retail sales. 
Commercial failures. The employment situation as reported by employers. New motor vehicle 
sales. Outstanding facts and figures gathered from reports, statements, bulletins and radio broad- 
casts. Review of business statistics — Price $1.00 per year. Sales and purchases of securities between 
Canada and other countries. Vital statistics, births, marriages and deaths, by provinces. 

Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price $2.00 per year. Coal and coke. Factory sales of electric 
storage batteries. Galvanized sheets. Price movements in other countries. Production and sales 
of radio receiving sets. Stocks and consumption of unmanufactured tobacco. Vital statistics. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Statistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 

The complete service of all publications issued by the Bureau (with the exception of news bulletins) 
may be obtained for a special rate of $15 per annum. 



Volume XI Mmlms Numero 1 




CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE GENERALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



JANVIER, 1936 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. W. D. Euler, MP., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA 
J.-O. PATENAUDE, O.S.I. 
IMPRIMEUR DE 8A TRES EXCELLENTE MAJESTE LE ROI 
1936 



Prix: Un dollar par an 



/(— OOO 273 BLOOn ST. v.. 

TORONTO .5.0 NT 
S.27-4- 




Volume XI ffiSSms Number 2 



CANADA 



DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 







'oUcjU^JL Rjuntz^ 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



FEBRUARY, 1936 



Published by Authority of the Honourable W. D. Euler, M.P. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J. O. PATENAUDE, I.8.O. 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1936 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

Tbe Business Situation In Canada 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Production, Trade, Transportation, Immigration, 
Labour Factors, Industrial Production in other 
countries 9 

Chart of Common Stock Prices 10 

Tabled Ber-eipts, Visible Supply, Exports and 11 
Cash Price of Canadian Grain 

Table 4. Report of the Bank of Canada 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug. Cigarettes. To- 
bacco snuff. Cigars. Foreign raw leaf tobacco.. . . 13 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, 
Retail Food Prices and Cold Storage Holdings. . 14 

Chart of Canadian Price Index Numbers 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations 
and Ball way Operating Statistics 1 fl 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries and Cargo Tonnage 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 18 

Table 14. Trend of Business In the Fire Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia — Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zinc. Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas. Non- 
Metals—Asbestos. Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt. Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime . . 20 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity In 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Carloadings, Common Stock Prices, Min- 
ing Stock Prices 21 



Paoi 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada and 
total Bank Clearings 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued in Sixty-one 
Cities 23 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices. ... 24 

Table 21. Prices or Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 26 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 
Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports ny 
Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 20 

Chart of Economic Conditions In the United 

States 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, 
Foreign Exchange and other Financial Factors. 

Common Stocks — Total. Industrials: Total, 
Iron and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, 
Textiles and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, 
Beverages, Miscellaneous. Utilities: Total, Trans- 
portation, Telephone and Telegraph, Power and 
Traction. Companies Abroad: Total, Industrial, 
Utilities, Banks. 

Mining Stocks— Total, Gold and Base Metals. 

Financial Factors — Preferred Stocks, Interest 
Rates, Bond Yields, Shares Traded, New Issues 
of Bonds, Brokers' Loans. Foreign Exchange— New 
York Funds, Sterling 81 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Six Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance, Revenue and 
Expenditure 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 81 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

The Business Situation In Canada (In French) . . 88-38 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, FEBRUARY, 1936 No. 2 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.S.S. (Hon.) 
Business Statistician: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE CURRENT ECONOMIC SITUATION IN CANADA 

Further betterment was shown in economic conditions during January in continuance of 
the recovery apparent for the last three years. Most of the six major factors considered in this 
connection showed important advances in the first month of the year. 

The advance in common stock prices was the most spectacular, sharp gains being shown 
from week to week after the beginning of the year. Trading broadened out and gains were 
practically general in the groups of the official classification. 

Continued improvement in bond prices was reflected in the steady decline of yields during 
January. An index of Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields dropped from 73-3 to 71-1 
during the month. The gains persisted into the early weeks of February, the bid quotations for 
representative Dominion bonds reaching nearly as high as the extreme peaks of 1935. 

The commodity price level was well maintained in January in continuance of the stabilized 
position of the last two years. A slight increaes in prices was shown over the same month of 
last year, but recession was shown in the early weeks of February narrowing the gap. 

Another gain was shown in the deposit liabilities of the banks at the first of the year, adding 
to the pronounced increase of the last twenty months. Deposits were at about the same level as 
in the early months of 1930, contributing greatly to the strong liquid position of the banks. 

Three Representative Factors 

A fundamental change is shown in the chart of the three representative factors used in this 
connection for January. The indexes of business and common stocks, after having been since 
1931 below the line of long-term trend based on post-war data, recently crossed that line in an 
upward direction. Each of the three factors are at present above the long-term trend. 

The index of the physical volume of business, smoothed by taking the three months' moving 
average for the elimination of irregular fluctuations, crossed the trend line in December, while 
the index of common stock prices showed a slight ascendency over that line in January. The 
index of inverted bond yields has been above the trend line since the early months of 1934. 

Business Operations 

A moderate decline was shown in business operations in the first month of the year from 
the high level of the last quarter of 1935. The flow of Canadian products to external markets 
was exceptionally heavy, being greater than in any January since 1930. The gain over the 
same month of last year was 22-6 p.c. Eight of the nine commodity groups showed gains over 
the same month of 1934, the exception having been chemical and allied products which recorded 
only a minor recession. The index of the physical volume of business declined from 106-2 in 
December to 104 • 7 in the month under review. 

Mineral Production 

Nickel, zinc and bauxite were moved in greater volume during January contributing to the 
showing of the mining industry. Exports of nickel at 14,111,000 pounds were greater than in 
any other January of the post-war period. The adjusted gain over December was no less than 
67 p.c. Copper exports, on the other hand, at 19,182,000 pounds showed decline from the high 
level of the preceding month. Exports of zinc were 18,452,000 pounds, showing an adjusted 
gain of 29 p.c. over December. 

The increase in gold shipments was less than normal for the season, but the total at 311,056 
ounces was greater than in any other January in history. Silver shipments were at a lower level 
than in December, but showed a marked gain over January of last year. 

Textile Imports 

The imports of raw cotton were greater than in any January since 1927, although an adjusted 
decline was shown from the preceding month. The inward shipment was 19,940,000 pounds 
reflecting important preparation for operations in the cotton textile industry. The adjusted 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

decline from December in cotton yarn imports was limited to 4*4 p. c, and the increase in wool 
imports was only slightly less than normal for the season. 

Iron and Steel 

While the primary iron and steel industry, after seasonal adjustment, was less active than 
in December, the production of pig iron and steel ingots was at a higher level than in any other 
January since 1930. The output of pig iron was 61,336 tons against 70,647 in December and 
44,416 in January of last year. The gain in the output of steel ingots from 98,888 tons in December 
to 100,225 in January was less than normal for the season, the adjusted index dropping from 
165-4 to 161-4. The comparative output in the first month of 1935 was 59,500 tons. 

Meat Packing 

Operations in the meat packing industry were accelerated in the first month of the year. 
The index of inspected slaughterings with seasonal adjustment advanced from 108 • in December 
to 133-0 in January. Cattle slaughterings were heavy, exerting the preponderant influence on 
the slaughterings index. 

Newsprint 

While showing a marked increase over the same month of last year, the production of news- 
print in January was considerably below the seasonally adjusted level of the last quarter of 1935. 
Shipments of 181,403 tons against production of 227,955, reflected a contraction from preceding 
high levels, although a slight gain was shown over January 1935. Mill stocks were 76,658 tons 
against 30,140 at the end of December. 

Construction 

An interesting development was the increase in the new business obtained by the construction 
industry during January. The total at $13,610,000 compared with $4,365,000 in December 
and $10,220,000 in the same month of last year. Governmental contracts played a very small 
part in the placements in January, the three large contracts being for a power mill in part at 
Comeau Bay, Quebec, for $2,000,000, a partial contract for an addition to a smelter at Copper 
Cliff at $2,000,000, and for a power house near Sault Ste. Marie at $1,000,000. 

Railways 

The railway freight movement was less in the first five weeks of the present year than in 
the corresponding period of 1935. A deficit of 10,658 cars was mainly due to a reduced movement 
of coal, pulpwood and miscellaneous commodities. The substantial gain in grain was offset by a 
decline in several other commodity groups, resulting in a drop from 203,926 cars in the first 
five weeks of 1935 to 193,268 in the same period of the present year. In making this comparison, 
it should be remembered that the railway freight movement was unusually heavy in the first 
part of 1935. 

The gross operating revenues on the internal lines of the Canadian National were $10,153,000 
in January against $10,015,000 in the same month of last year. The gross operating revenues 
of the Canadian Pacific increased from $8,217,000 to $9,323,000. 

Wholesale Trade 

Preliminary totals for 1935 show an increase of 5-3 per cent in the combined sales of all 
firms reporting compared with the sales of the same wholesale firms in the preceding year. The 
gains by kinds of business ranged from 2-0 per cent for dry goods to 8-0 per cent for footwear. 

Combined sales of all firms by provinces show that sales in the Maritime Provinces were 
maintained at the level of the preceding year. The remaining divisions showed gains ranging 
from 3 • 8 per cent for firms in Ontario to 8 • 6 per cent for those in British Columbia. 

Sales of the wholesale houses which are furnishing the monthly reports constitute generally 
between 40 and 50 per cent of the business of all wholesale firms in the same trades. 

Securities 

Strength was fairly general in security markets during January, although the impetus 
which carried the index of industrial and utility common stocks upward into new territory for the 
recovery movement, came largely from oils and a selective list of miscellaneous issues including 
International Nickel and Consolidated Smelters. Other groups such as iron and steel, pulp 
and paper, textiles, beverages, and utilities showed little change. The index mounted steadily 
from 111-4 in the final week of December to 120-7 for the last week of January. Industrials 

11599—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

were the main source of this strength, advancing from 178-3 to 194-4 between the two periods 
mentioned, while utilities mounted from 49 • 8 to 52 • 7. 

Mining stocks were also active, an index for this group rising from 133-1 to 149-9 during 
January. Both gold and base metal issues contributed to this movement, indexes for the former 
mounting from 116-7 to 131-3, and for the latter from 200-4 to 226-2. 

A marked advance was shown in common stock prices over the early months of last year. 
The greater part of the gain was shown in May, October and November of 1935, and in the 
first six weeks of the present year. The net result was that the index of 1 12 stocks increased from 
89-0 in the week of February 7 of last year to 124 • 2 in the corresponding week of 1936. The 
monthly index for 120 stocks at 112-9 in January was higher than in any other month since 
September, 1930. The lowest point of the depression at 43-2 was reached in June, 1932, a 
secondary low point of 48-9 being shown in March, 1933. Consequently, the gain in January 
over the lowest point of the depression was no less than 161 • 3 per cent. 

During the last twelve months, the group showing the greatest advance was that of 20 
miscellaneous stocks. The increase measured by the weekly index was no less than 95 per cent. 
The beverage and oil groups recorded advances of 42-2 per cent and 41-4 per cent respectively, 
while the marked percentage increase of 44-9 per cent was shown in 6 pulp and paper stocks. 
The textile and clothing stocks constituted the only group of the official classification showing a 
decline in this comparison, the recession being limited to less than 2 per cent. 

The food and milling groups recorded increases of 21 • 2 per cent and 22 • 4 per cent respectively, 
while the steel group of 15 stocks advanced 9 per cent. In the week of February 6, the indexes 
of the paper, milling and textile groups were below the average for the base year of 1926, while 
the other industrial groups showed a gain over that year. 

The index of 23 public utility stocks recorded an increase of 11 -6 per cent over the week of 
February 7, 1935. Nineteen power stocks were up 14 per cent, while the transportation and 
communication groups advanced 1-9 and 10-8 per cent, respectively. 

The index of 23 mining stocks showed a gain of 24-7 per cent, the base metals advancing 
78-2 per cent, while 20 golds were 9-8 per cent higher. 

Prices 

Commodity prices were relatively stable throughout January, the slight fluctuations being 
reflected in the weekly index which fell fractionally from 73 • to 72 • 8 between the first and final 
weeks of the month. Grain prices moved fractionally lower, dominating a moderate recession 
in farm products. Non-ferrous metals, on balance, were firmer, although silver prices dropped 
about five cents per ounce during January. 

Stability in the general wholesale index during 1935 was paralleled fairly closely by the eight 
constituent groups included. Only animal products and non-ferrous metals showed net changes 
amounting to more than one or two per cent. These groups registered advances of approximately 
6 per cent in each case. 

By comparing the index for last December with the same months of 1934 and 1933, a very 
gradual rise is disclosed. This advance was due largely to the irregular rise in prices for primary 
products which influenced the general index more than minor declines among manufactured 
goods. The continued improvement in primary product price levels relative to those for manu- 
factured goods restored to a considerable extent price group relationships existing prior to the 
prolonged decline beginning in 1929. That recession created much economic distress by destroy- 
ing equilibrium which had not been disturbed seriously for nearly a decade. Although prices 
are still materially below levels of the base year 1926, their group relationships one to another 
have been restored to a considerable extent. Farm products are still at a relative disadvantage, 
but the amount is smaller than it has been since the first half of 1930. 

Cost of Living 

The Canadian cost of living index number continued to move gradually upward during 1935, 
advancing irregularly from 78-9 in December, 1934, to 80-8 in December, 1935. When it is 
recalled that the extreme low point of the recent decline was 76 • 6 for June of 1933, the moderate 
proportions of subsequent increases may be better appreciated. The rise in living costs in the 
past three years relative to improvement in primary product prices has been smaller than in 
many other countries. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

The general cost of living index for Canada was unchanged at 80-8 for January, slightly 
higher prices for foods being offset by a decline in the sundries group. An index for foods rose 
from 73-7 to 73-9, due principally to increases for butter, eggs, cheese, potatoes and a number 
of meats. Sugar prices tended downward. The sundries index fell from 92-5 to 92-3, as the 
result of a reduction in motor operating costs caused by declines in gasoline prices in several 
cities. 

Economic Conditions in the United States 

Economic conditions in the United States from 1919 to the present are illustrated in the 
chart appearing on page 30. 

After the first quarter of 1935, the economic index of the United States showed a marked 
advance. The four factors participating in the gain were industrial production, bank deposits, 
common stock prices, and speculative trading. Industrial production after the primary post- 
war depression showed rapid recovery during 1922. The recession in 1924 was relatively moder- 
ate, considerable expansion being shown in 1928 and the early months of 1929. The lowest 
point of industrial activity occurred in July, 1932, and a spectacular advance occurred from 
March to July, 1933, the index on the transferred base of 1926 moving up from 55-6 to 92-6, 
a gain of 66-5 per cent. A considerable advance was shown in the latter half of 1935. 

The severe decline in wholesale prices was the essential factor in the primary post-war 
depression culminating in 1921. The recovery in 1922 was moderate and no important trend 
developed during the eight-year period to 1929. The decline in the next four years was persistent, 
resulting in February, 1933, in a new low point for the period under consideration. The trend 
of the sum of the time and demand deposits of the member Federal Reserve banks in leading 
cities was upward during the post-war period, the highest point being reached in the later months 
of 1930. The total was well maintained in the last four years. 

Interest rates on prime commercial paper have fluctuated widely in the last 16 years. The 
highest point was reached in the latter part of 1920, when reactionary credit conditions pre- 
vailed. From 1922 to 1927 money rates were at a relatively low level, while sharp advances 
were shown in the last two years of the prosperous period. The remarkable decline in rates 
since October, 1929, was interrupted by the advances in the last quarter of 1931 and in March, 
1933. Rates in the current period are as low as at any time in the 17 years of the post-war 
period. 

The most spectacular feature of the post-war period was the extreme fluctuation in specu- 
lative stocks. The index used in this connection was 50 in August, 1921, advanced to 225 in 
September, 1929, and reacted to 34 in June, 1932. A rally in July and August of that year 
was extended further during the period from March to July, 1933, and the advance after March, 
1935, was practically continuous. 

Referring to recent developments, it is noteworthy that the index of economic conditions, 
a weighted composite of six major factors, moved up in December, and while statistics for 
January are still incomplete, a further advance is indicated for the first six weeks of 1936. 

Liquid Position of the Banks 

The pronounced decline in current loans in the last six years is in contrast to the relative 
stability of deposit liabilities. Notice and demand deposits in Canada were more than main- 
tained in 1935, the gain in the twelve months ended December being $144,000,000. The surplus 
of notice deposits over current loans was $666,000,000 at the end of December compared with 
$568,400,000 on the corresponding date of 1934. 

It was in the gain of security holdings that the most striking development of the banking 
field occurred. The holdings increased sharply during the year, amounting at the end of Decem- 
ber to $1,154,677,000, the highest point in the history of Canadian banking. The sum of the 
accounts regarded as making up the readily available assets of the banks showed a gain over 
December, 1934, the highest total for quick assets having been shown at the end of November. 
The amount at the end of the year was no less than $1,395,000,000, compared with $1,223,000,000 
on the same date of 1934. 



Dominion Bureau of Statistics, February 21, 1936. 

11599—2* 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly Average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 1 



Classification 



Physical Volume of Business. . . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs . 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars.. 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production . 
Imports of Textiles 

Raw cotton imports 

Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports 

Automobile production . . . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports. . 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 

Agricultural Factors— 
GRAIN AND LIVE STOCK 

MARKETINGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings — 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef , 

Porx\ 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



1935 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. 



30-6 

19-3 

20 

36-1 

10 

2 5 

6-7 

81-5 

81-7 

146 1 

70-7 

89-0 

127-0 

149-1 

154-9 

109 

143-7 

177-7 

234-4 

75-6 
128-9 
106 
152-8 
181-4 

96-7 
148-5 



100 6 



62-2 

55-2 
59-5 
67-4 
220 
1-9 
90 
93-4 
95-3 

146-5 
75-2 

147-2 

134-8 
150-0 
228-6 
116-7 
141-2 
200-7 
217-4 

87-3 
135-7 

91-3 
136-7 
187-2 

68-0 
150-7 



94 2 



65-4 

57-7 

64-8 

28-3 

12-1 

1-3 

3-4 

100 

103-3 

109-1 

74-4 

241 2 

124-3 

129-2 
248-0 
110-7 
143-2 
199 
229-1 

890 
1270 

90-5 
150 1 

173 e 

80-9 
136-3 



91 8 

91-7 

104-7 

15-4 

12-6 

1-4 

6-9 
920 
88-8 
79-6 
72-2 
299-3 

135-5 
131 3 
344-1 
120-8 
135-8 
125-5 
226-6 
105-3 
122-5 

93-8 
170-9 
169-9 

89-7 
134-4 



103-2 



104-4 
147 

361 
208 
115 
209 
200 

50 

63 
222 

81 
105 



90-3 
88-6 
75-2 
2150 

129-3 
127-9 
285-6 
116-9 
123-2 

81-7 
229-0 
100-0 
120-5 

77-4 
169-6 
1610 

59-4 
166-7 



99 2 



106- 1 

112-3 

126-7 

150 

270 

18-3 

26-3 

78-2 

76-1 

118-6 

64-1 

169-2 

117-5 
125-2 
249-4 
101-2 
1250 

78-9 
226-9 

96-1 
120-8 

91-4 
155-1 
157-2 

73-1 
147-2 



103 

104.0 
135.3 
339.9 
176.0 
129-7 
139.3 
175. C 

62 

53 
259 8 

80.7 
101.7 

89.6 

79' 

56 

81 8 

23.1 
127.7 
134.0 

74.4 
160.6 



97 

100 

147 

58 9 

47.4 

150.5 

86.9 

142.8 

81.3 

53.3 

82.2 

115.3 

2475 

58 1 

67.7 

34.1 

81.8 

199.4 

100.2 

122.3 

75.0 

79.8 

78.6 



164.7 

183.4 

206.1 

105 2 

18.7 

9.0 

35.8 

80.4 

77.1 

132.8 

71.1 

137.0 

130 2 
132.2 
204.9 
122.5 
114.8 

75.3 
192.7 

86.5 
116.4 

89.2 
173.9 
163.0 

64.1 
157.7 



107-9 



163 9 

181-2 

202-5 

27-3 

741 

19-5 

57-7 

86-6 

83-3 

131-4 

82-8 

110-8 

118-9 

125-7 
162-4 
110-7 
117-0 

82-4 
182-8 

95-2 
114-2 

86-8 
238-1 
174-3 

66-8 
185-1 



101-9 



110-6 

115-1 
1200 
106-9 

117-2 
85-7 

188-0 
92-8 

112-5 
84-1 

234-3 



107 2 



472-6 
199-1 
1391 
280-6 
199-7 
77-6 
68-3 
289-3 
94-4 

105-4 
100-5 
82-6 
67-5 
91-1 
49-4 
123-9 
144-0 
63-2 
178-9 
49-8 
92-6 
107-1 
104-6 
104-0 
121-9 
114-5 
164-8 
58-1 
64-3 
127-7 
76-8 
150-8 
74-0 
73-0 
60-2 
126-9 
224-3 
53-6 
59-9 
37-7 
811 

198-9 

100-7 
122-8 
710 
85-4 
88-6 



131- 
82-6 
93-6 

123-5 
121-4 
125-9 
124-8 
119-7 

88-2 
195-7 

79-0 
125-5 

91-8 
216-5 
168-8 

95-7 
191-7 



110 ( 



93 

771 



103-2 
104-1 
104-8 

102-5 
127-1 

92-1 
193-7 

86-7 
148-7 
1130 
149-7 
165-2 
104-3 
200-3 



106 2 101 



108-0 

109-1 

128-9 - 

105-5 107-5 

133-4 

104-1 

207-2 

100-0 

140-6 

111-9 

123-5 

174-3 

109-6 

194-5 



Consult the supplements of the Monthly Review dated Nov 
wax data. 



1932, May 1934 and June 1935 for description and post* 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Classi fication 



Production- 
Condensed milk output.000 lbs 
Evaporated milk output.000 lbs 

Creamery butter 000 lbs. 

Newsprint production .. 000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

B.C. timber scaled Mil. bd. ft 
Pig iron production.. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys production tons 

Steel ingots and cast- 
ings 0001. tons 

Shipments:— 

Gold 000 oz 

Gold bullion, n.o.p., 000 oz 
exports. $000 

Silver 000 oz. 

Passenger automobile pro- 
duction No. 

Truck production No. 

Total cars and trucks No. 

Coke production 000 tons 

Coal available 000 tons 

Gasoline sales 000 gal. 

Trade- 
Imports: — 

Cotton, raw 000 lbs. 

Rubber, crude 000 lbs. 

Wool, raw 000 lbs. 

Petroleum, crude.. 000,000 eal. 

Bauxite 000 lbs. 

Exports:— 

Fish 000 lbs. 

Fish $000 

Cheese exports 000 lbs. 

Canned salmon cwt. 

Planks and boards .. .mil. ft. 

Wood pulp 000 cwt. 

Shirgles squares 

Auto complete or chassis No. 

Copper 000 lbs. 

Nickel 000 lbs. 

Zinc. 000 lbs. 

Transportation- 
Canal Cargo Traffic:— 
Sault Ste. Marie. : .... 000 tons 

Welland 000 tons 

St. Lawrence 000 tons 

Immigration- 
Total 

Returned Canadians from U.S. 

Labour Factors- 
Percentage unemployment in 

trade unions p.c. 

Employment. Applications. No. 

Vacancies No. 

Placements.. No. 
Strikes and Lockouts: — 

Disputes in existence No. 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days — 

Industrial Production 1 [1929= 
100]— 

Canada 

United Kingdom: Board of 
Trade, Quarterly 
Economist 

United States 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Japan 

Austria 

Belgium 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Sweden 

Norway 

Chile 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



581 
2,654 
7,755 
201-96 
180 03 
51-93 
63-7 
44-42 
2,807 

59-53 

281-1 

311 

10,835 

387 

8,269 
2,338 

10,607 

200 

1,964 

26,415 



11,068 
5,981 
1,382 
59-95 

11,401 

29,279 

1,830 

2,872 

43,195 

75 19 

932 

102,949 

1,585 

21,121 

10,736 

28, 105 



18-1 
54,190 
29,467 
28,131 

9 
4,792 
21,429 



487 
2,715 
7,168 
180-31 
160-86 
71-36 
92-9 
37-26 
2,700 

56-01 

245-8 

194 

6,761 

1,007 

13,885 
4,229 

18,114 

181 

1,464 

24,058 



6,193 
3,491 
1,378 
53-58 
11,201 



18-2 

41,487 
25,453 
24,138 

7 
1.545 
6,116 



76-8 79-4 73-2 



823 
4,812 
8,735 
205-68 
198-57 
78-40 
181-3 
44-73 
2,715 

57-84 

246-5 

267 

9,322 

1,278 

18,179 
3,796 

21,975 

198 

1.536 

28,185 



11,242 
6,071 
1,135 
43-65 

21,321 

23,392 
1,754 
3.664 

29,253 

10012 
1.296 

129,143 
9,355 

45,838 
9,645 

22,228 



623 



16-7 
46,014 

24,788 
23,231 

13 

3,276 
12,043 





105-4 


98 7 


99-1 


76-5 


74-8 


66-7 


66-7 


83-8 


84-8 


84-7 


89-C 


131-6 


130-e 


75-5 


73-0 


66-9 


65-6 


59-8 


62-6 


64-6 


64-9 


105-5 


106-4 


98-3 


108-6 


109-4 


117-9 



97-8 
74-0 
66-7 
90 -7 2 
95-3 
142-7 
73-0 
66-9 
64-9 
64-9 
109-1 
101-3 
115-9 



837 
7,379 
13,329 
222-24 
237-00 
63-55 
231-4 
43-39 
5,147 

68-53 

214-2 

279 

9,739 



20, 688 
3,435 

24,123 

180 

1,521 

39,052 



8,836 
2,380 
1,865 
40-45 
9,211 

13,505 
1,020 
2,485 
15,802 
63-87 
769 
171,299 
6,356 
16,259 
11,895 
18,438 



830 



170 
52,397 
27,183 
24,641 

11 

2,952 
14,900 



745 

7,913 

23,140 

242-69 

251-01 

55-21 

252-4 

45-43 

4,978 

72-81 

278-7 

97 

3,398 

831 

17,093 
3,672 

20,765 

185 

2,386 

50,770 



6,316 

8,801 

902 

11313 

25,909 

19 061 

1,326 

1,204 

19,305 

129-52 

1,227 

135, 974 

6,499 

34,597 

10,238 

26,337 



5,985 

1,122 

919 



1,030 
676 



15-9 

52,251 
30, 847 
28,672 

22 
5,189 
32,357 



76-7 81-9 78-3 



8,985 
36,602 
232-02 
228-20 
57-77 
259-7 
44-56 
3,845 

73-45 

2570 

190 

6,636 

1,428 

12,276 
3,469 

15,745 

186 

2,398 

59,184 



7,397 
3,215 
2,498 
131-87 
15,866 

15,184 
1,578 
1,735 
9,103 

129-80 
1,209 

251,267 
4,829 

37,746 
9,951 

15,201 



7,058 
1,072 

882 



1,061 
601 



15-4 

51,129 
27,721 
25,889 

14 
4,997 
57,081 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
93-4 
97-8 
1430 
73-8 
71-8 
66-7 
66-1 
107-3 
103-4 
118-5 



103-9 

101-3 

71-4 

66-0 

95-2 

104 1 

143-1 

77-1 

72-8 

65-2 

68-2 

109-1 

105-5 

119-6 



101-8 
72-3 
66-7 
92-4 
93-5 

137-2 
73-0 
700 
67-9 
68-0 



110-9 
123 



834 

7,230 

37,116 

234-27 

226-45 

65-71 

211-2 

50-51 

7,269 



270-5 

202 
7,047 
1,263 

9,471 
3,598 

13,069 

176 

2,358 

67,158 



9,913 
2,955 
1,161 
133-65 
26,792 

22,697 

2,096 

5,361 

27,297 

101-93 

968 

355,601 

5,070 

33,543 

12,222 

25,358 



7,503 
1,128 
1,007 



1,050 
521 



15-1 

55,778 
35,168 
33,043 

25 

7,355 

67,888 



81- 



655 

6,820 

33,157 

235-57 

225-74 

75-31 

241-5 

54-41 



82-49 

301-3 

142 

4,939 

2,999 

5,524 
2,168 
7,692 
175 
2,467 
64,427 



7,027 
6,304 
1.569 
126-73 
41,897 

27,171 
2,370 
6,480 
38,476 
164-45 
1,073 
339,300 
5,995 
42,408 
14,102 
28,481 



7,731 
1,334 
1,024 



14-2 

60,363 
40, 164 
37,566 

20 

7,573 

49,429 



755 

6,287 

27,598 

223-89 

225-40 

73-82 

241-4 

54-36 

4,513 

90-95 

282-3 

364 

12,694 

1,186 

3,819 
1,504 
5,323 
180 
2,517 
70,818 



5,857 

3,594 

1,053 

12702 

26,409 

27,770 
2,591 
15,950 
63,571 
112-41 
1,113 
319,633 
4,777 
33,924 
14,265 
19,477 



7,148 

1,180 

983 



1,160 
485 



130 



38,410 
35,775 



18 
5,691 
48,351 



103-2 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
94-3 
85-0 

141-7 
79-6 
69-3 
65-7 
67-4 



86-0 
117-3 



100-9 


73-1 


66-7 


95-2 


87-2 


139-9 


85-3 


70-7 


67-1 


68-1 


100-3 


117-4 



103-1 
74-0 

67-4 
101-4 



81-2 

72-8 
69-2 
72-6 



110-6 
121-5 



847 
5,267 
20,745 
266-52 
266-68 
73-58 
264-7 
45-52 
9,653 

95-02 

294-9 

160 

5,574 

1,483 

7,128 
1,185 
8,313 
205 
2,933 



10,770 

1,819 

1,636 

133-73 

30,288 

42,060 
2,733 
13,050 
98,585 
138-12 
1,093 
340,354 
3,931 
48,089 
13,568 
30,417 



7,454 
1,151 

992 



1,160 
449 



13-3 

65,300 
35,464 
33,737 

19 

3,566 

35,279 



773 
3,469 
13,479 
262-85 
285-18 
50-99 
239-3 
64-56 
4,693 

94-07 

274-9 

296 

10,369 



12,020 
1,454 

13,496 

206 

2,916 



13,814 
9,832 
1,857 
137-40 
20,896 

53,702 

3,372 

8,654 

87,939 

121-44 

1,338 

252,451 

5,576 

26,788 

14,857 

24,236 



4,087 

1,313 

865 



916 
347 



13-3 
51,983 
29,713 
28,144 

13 

2,133 

24,733 



1 89-1 



502 
2,930 
10,327 
244-73 
265-23 
30-14 
182-9 
70-65 
4,688 

98-89 

285-4 

246 

8,681 

4,048 

11,370 
2,405 

13,775 

216 

2,087 



22,187 
5,746 
1,618 
55-64 

13,421 

35,183 

1,958 

2,070 

39,525 

111-52 

1,317 

261,189 

5,515 

30,202 

10,498 

22,64(i 



440 



14-6 

61,665 
29,270 
27,716 



1,745 
5,718 



103-1 
'79-0 
68-1 



76-9 
68-7 



110 « 

129-9 



103-1 



588 
2,709 

227 : 96 
181-40 
76-66 



1936 



Jan. 



61-34 
4,324 

100-23 

311-1 

295 

10,327 

1,239 

11,261 
2,041 

13,302 

212 

1,794 



19,940 
3,938 
1,948 
61-13 

14,242 

36,147 
1,977 
10,155 
28,455 
72-24 
1,090 
206,039 
6,607 
19,182 
14,111 
18,452 



•Source: Monthly Bulletin League of Nations, unless othei wise stated 
2 Since March 1935 includes Saar. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 2 


1. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain. Thousand Bushels. 






1935 


1936 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Receipts Country 
Elevators and 
Platform 
Loadings- 
Wheat 


3,873 

1,203 

279 

7 

14 

245,853 

15,490 

12,378 

414 

3,928 

5,380 

1,131 

396 

3 


8,815 

2,734 

498 

13 

11 

240,802 

15,368 

11,502 

407 

3,878 

7,207 

1,012 

305 

2 

1 

•791 
•427 
•468 

1-422 
•506 


8,427 

2,881 

440 

14 

9 

229,752 

13,576 

10,322 

413 

3,794 

8,906 

741 

223 

4 

17 

•818 
•411 

•480 

1-425 
•490 


6,280 

2,096 

333 

19 

8 

214,255 

9,447 

8,570 

409 

3,777 

5,027 

348 

312 

39 

20 

•876 

•422 
•458 

1-408 
•516 


5,626 

1,532 

329 

17 

11 

202, 120 

7,126 

6,608 

373 

3,659 

11,990 
1,593 
1,380 


9,334 

1,510 

243 

28 

14 

197,183 

5,772 

5,268 

288 

3,432 

6,494 

1,475 

970 


13,347 

1,296 

156 

31 

9 

196,984 

5,986 

3,856 

282 

2,946 

9,158 
1,070 
1,098 


12,494 

808 

1,123 

17 

368 

194,890 

5,750 

3,834 

197 

3,301 

21,698 
651 
721 


73,178 

6,211 

4,496 

169 

698 

246,109 

11,407 

8,719 

396 

3,913 

17,272 
820 
241 


60,000 

6,406 

2,913 

466 

538 

270,749 

13,925 

10,308 

795 

4,459 

28,919 

1,386 

159 

1 

9 

•907 
•340 
•338 

1-411 

•422 


21,043 

2,215 

1,080 

84 

230 

265,823 

12,485 

9,054 

626 

4,585 

26,575 

2,961 

1,028 

4 

17 

•857 
•318 
•332 

1-411 
•411 


14,217 

1,679 

629 

34 

127 

260,746 

12,433 

9,179 

474 

4,688 

17,044 

1,184 

486 

7 

28 

•846 
•297 
•338 

1-457 

•416 


3,203 


Oats 


1,169 




430 


Flax 


10 


Rye 


61 


Visible Supply 1 — 
Wheat 


244,540 


Oats 


11,672 




8,838 


Flax 

Rye 


452 
4,662 


Exports- 
Wheat 


7,557 


Oats 


261 




81 


Flax . 




Rye 


17 

•857 
•408 
•422 

1-340 
•460 


252 

•817 
•397 
•391 

1-213 
•411 


215 

•813 

•428 
•355 

1-226 
•361 


75 

•845 
•363 
•338 

1-237 
•365 


52 

•902 
•360 
•357 

1-363 
•905 




Average Cash Price, 
dollars per bush. 

Wheat, No. 1 Nor. 

Oats, No. 2C.W.. 

Barley, No.3,C.W. 

Flax, 
No. 1 N.W.C.... 

Rye, No. 1 C.W... 


•790 
•442 
•503 

1-426 
•543 


•847 
•336 
•342 

1,596 
•425 



First of following month. 

Table 4. Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Bank of Canada, 1936. 



Classification of Accounts 


Jan. 15 


Jan. 22 


Jan. 29 


Jan. 31 


Feb. 5 


Feb. 12 


Liabilities— 


5,000,000 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

90,409,260 

30,764,028 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

88,439,541 

32,095,800 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

87,978,955 

33,293,228 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

88,013,050 

22.393,831 


5,000,000 




173,092 
87,175,383 

20,163,390 




93,154,651 
36,293,854 


4. Deposits— 








171,412,733 

847,557 


177,383,594 
1,634,691 


179,837,048 
1,824,179 


i78,739,i37 
1,832,012 


180,784,634 
1,532,378 


180,063,548 


(d) Other 


1,344,367 






Total 


208,554,143 


209,782,312 


213,757,026 


213,864,377 


204,710,843 


201,571,305 








1,066,584 
307,775,487 


379,152 


176,122 


625,238 


1,258,274 


553,333 






Total 


305,743,817 


307,545,782 


307,641,662 


299,155,259 


294,473,113 


Assets— 

1. Reserve-^ 


179,814,598 

1,638,366 

142,134 

9,756,198 

4,766 


179,538,475 

1,496,263 

162,540 

11,944,863 

9,346 


179.533,790 

1,496,267 

1,298,311 

12,889,064 

8,376 


180,252,586 

1,496,267 

25,897 

9,768,279 

8,415 


180,923,092 

1,496,267 

452,276 

7,740,819 

8,816 


180,149,431 




1,496,267 




1,515,519 




6,336,656 


Reserve in funds of other countries 
on a gold standard 


4,909 


Total 


191,356,062 


193,151,488 


195,225,807 


191,551,444 


190,621,270 


189,502,783 




2. Subsidiary coin 


168,654 


231,281 


229,681 


231,654 


241,969 


250,207 


4. Advances tc^— 


2,200,688 


2,200,000 


2,197,250 


2,195,875 












(c) Chartered Banks 














Total 


2,200,688 


2,200,000 


2,197,250 


2,195,875 




















6. Investments- 
Co^ Dom. Govt, short securities 


26,728,551 


24,756,055 


24,757,999 


24,784,732 


21,623,947 


21,623,947 


(c) Other Dom. Govt, securities 


82,900,206 


82,909,121 


81,672,720 


80,899,855 


79,976,186 


79,976,186 


(e) U.K., other British Dominions 
or U.S.A. securities more than 
three months 














Total 


109,628,757 


107,665,177 


106,430,719 


105,684,587 


101,600,114 


101,600,114 




111,932 
4,309,395 


111,947 
2,383,925 


111,947 
3,350,377 


111,947 
7,866,155 


111,947 
3,008,062 


111,947 


8. All Other Assets 


3,008,062 


Total 


307,775,487 


305,743,817 


307,545,782 


307,641,662 


294,473,113 


294,473,113 






Ratio of Net Reserve (Item 1 of Assets less 
Item 5 of Liabilities) to Notes and 
Liabilities 


p.c. 

63-42 


p.c. 
64-34 


p.c. 
64-60 


p.c. 

63-46 


p.c. 
65-63 


p.c. 
65-63 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Oats 



Corn 



Barley 



Mixed 
grain 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Quan- 
tity 



Oatmeal 



Rolled 
oats 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Wheat 

flour 

exported 



1933 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. 

1934 
January 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1935 
January . . . 
February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . 
November 
December , 



Bushels 

6.401.501 
6.179.626 
7,345,792 
8,158,446 
4,327,524 

4,676,474 
4,887.102 
4,740,844 
4,866,537 
5,258,707 
5,066.622 
4.815,792 
5,749,909 
6,202,164 
7,426,566 
7,659,805 
4,360,882 



4,622, 
4,220, 
4,675, 
4,313, 
5,188, 
4,431. 
4.460. 
5,230, 
6,932, 
8,261, 
7,262, 
4,358. 



Bushels 

854,309 

900,766 

1,153,701 

1,262,294 

631.497 

844,482 

786, 180 

694,721 

681.909 

578,306 

713,298 

782,307 

783,208 

1,024.845 

1,260,471 

1,162,272 

715,529 



754,909 

744,621 

618,422 

621,952 

699,498 

823,174 

656.006 

733,282 

1,151,068 

1,543,665 

1,513,259 

1,026,706 



Bushels 

200,995 
151,413 
153,862 
168,662 
124,216 

143,794 
157,303 
156,800 
152,057 
144,344 
189,875 
225,727 
235,382 
156.337 
152,965 
149,553 
111,141 

120,984 
172,875 
166,872 
148,932 
241,095 
204,197 
235.119 
229,976 
218,914 
218,229 
166,813 
174,963 



Bushels 

40,304 
62,141 
74,011 
81,383 
59.925 

78,195 
99,837 
80,562 
62,432 
47,978 
43,865 
47,291 
51.325 
71.113 
75.673 
60.079 
62,243 

73,467 
74,196 
55,325 
57, 588 
44, 710 
42,455 
47.758 
59,523 
68,880 
99,278 
128,150 
98,350 



Bushels 

753,304 
1,127,286 
1,353,384 
1,588,189 
1,501,845 



259,377 
379,894 
154,072 
092,036 
726,298 
552,371 
490,552 
713,438 
035,672 
330,138 
473,878 
,636,179 

512,919 

937, 
355,148 
,401,247 
,066,167 
793. 
736.232 
913.719 
,134,815 
,627,948 
,778,71 
,969,230 



50-6 
50-6 
62-2 
68-8 
37-7 

39-5 

470 

42-4 

47-4 

47-9 

47-7 

45-1 

63-3 

61-7 

66 

68-7 

41-2 

42-4 
41-7 
43-5 
41-2 
48-4 
44-7 
41-9 
48-9 
68-3 
75-0 
68-3 
41-6 



Barrels 

1,443,692 

1,392,683 

1,650,557 

,827,340 

967,284 



,042,505 
,102,043 
,064,428 
,088,785 
,175,433 
,127.477 
,072.747 
,282,214 
,383,205 
,654,189 
,703.831 
969,482 

,024,958 
941,417 

,046,087 
965,765 

,164,322 
991,559 
992,340 

,161,389 

,535,189 

,824,7 

,603,8 
957,219 



Pounds 

648.373 
598.044 
751,566 
927,171 
441,557 

803.504 
558,853 
569,533 
629.032 
614,693 
319,089 
553,201 
416.383 
717,964 
1,065,990 
1,119.776 
458,890 

649,: 
636,312 
533,046 
531,438 
816,112 
871,222 
491,472 
493,528 
902,388 
1.700,720 
1,549,038 
692, 



Pounds 

11,258,685 
12,093.243 
15.676,287 
16,416,025 
7,468,493 



261,459 
338,950 
866,835 
397,869 
132, 154 
556,820 
292,971 
644,925 
521,725 
697,250 
345,997 
587,664 



Pounds 

1.514,590 
1,320.404 
2,153,041 
2,109,060 
1,347.928 

1.428,968 
1.447,127 
881,990 
1.141,966 
1,398.166 
1.726,506 
1,748.106 
2,215,458 
1,894,880 
1.725,600 
1,570,810 
1,036,210 



8,379,451 
8,739,753 
6,424,542 
6,513,572 
7,538,950 
9,223,425 
7,650,617 
7,977,920 
13,911,445 
19,488,481 
17,448,402 1 
11,375,644 1 



894,306 
,491,528 
,560,504 
,448,836 
,013,518 
,914,815 
,182,370 
,321,082 
,312,180 
,842,570 
,944,746 
,543.590 



Barrels 

480,288 
552.556 
514.368 
547,602 
418.183 

448,498 
328,376 
493,327 
340,621 
481,725 
441,064 
408.028 
412,089 
369,320 
485.549 
504.384 
340,751 

346,099 
309,729 
497,468 
276 907 
383,221 
429,561 
395,232 
376,562 
395,640 
501,442 
525.368 
443,828 



Table 6. 


Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sug 


ar in T 


housan 


d Pounds 






Raw Sugar 


Refined Sugar 


4-week period 


Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Re- 
ceipts 


Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 


Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 


Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 
manu- 
factured 


Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 


Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 


Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 
ship- 
ments 


1933 
August 12 


132,670 
106,943 
102,398 
132.530 
130,616 
91,959 

84,383 

82,635 
103,160 

91.390 
101,951 
124.747 
131.708 
121,490 
105.652 
103,510 

84,266 
102,119 
126,718 

132,212 

119,318 

141,712 

150,238 

117,702 

145,413 

115,797 

146.970 

113,989 

102,057 

97,747 

85,022 

86,410 

79,673 


70,202 
58,725 
106,990 
63,618 
55,801 
26,830 

14,873 
40,595 
10.714 
57,294 
65,605 
97.455 
72.327 
84,535 
88.921 
68.649 
106.111 
83.713 
53.971 

4,240 
43,027 
35,548 
19.998 

107, 883 
63.993 

122,344 
66,816 
62,292 
69,367 
73,374 
98,491 
56,903 

30,480 


95,928 
63,270 
76,858 
65.532 
94.458 
34,406 

16,621 
20,070 
22.484 
46.733 
42,809 
90.495 
82,544 
100,373 
91.064 
87.893 
88,258 
59,114 
48,476 

17,134 
20,633 
27,020 
52,534 
80,171 
93,608 
91,171 
99,798 
74,223 
73,677 
86,100 
97,102 
63,640 

21,055 


113,120 
118,079 
95,104 
94,814 
140,587 
207,044 

214,486 
189,945 
161.406 
135,848 
135,013 
114,921 
113,663 
102,391 
109,420 
99,569 
87,142 
134,432 
173,898 

173,253 
156,031 
129.023 
105,374 

94,349 
103,253 
122,289 
116,100 
117.050 
103,912 

66,987 
108,403 
157,222 

189,289 


81,103 
53,386 
75,909 
105,177 
126,137 
50,117 

20,545 
17,269 
18,407 
35,730 
34,371 
70,923 
72,892 
85,557 
78,190 
76,926 
109,378 
94.646 
47,231 

25,546 

22,631 
21,094 
42,156 
68,455 
77,490 
78,954 
85,009 
65,085 
63,827 
116,294 
122,616 
77,429 

21,410 


6,987 

6,991 
11,708 

7,356 
12,864 

6,852 

2,112 

2,575 
2,953 
7,575 
7,260 
13,142 
10,652 
9,484 
10,489 
10,008 
17,044 
10,660 
8,646 

4,255 
3,048 
3,321 
7,457 
9,065 
9,874 
11,012 
10,065 
6,098 
10,230 
13,531 
14,823 
11,251 

2,635 


88,089 
60,378 
87,617 
112,533 
139,001 
56,968 

22,657 
19,845 
21,360 
43,305 
41,631 
84,064 
83,544 
95,042 
88,679 
86.934 
126,422 
105,306 
55.877 

29,801 
25,679 
24,415 
49,613 
77,520 
87,364 
89,976 
95,074 
71,183 
74,056 
129,825 
137,440 
88,680 

24,045 


79,961 
79,103 
83,186 
63,462 
70,342 
48,728 

46,593 
47,686 
46,246 
43,000 
60,349 
84,018 
93,754 
86,828 
95,281 
97,025 
78,247 
64,997 
56. 114 

46,756 
52,531 
47,758 
60,443 
68,377 
67,676 
95,670 
93,131 
81,727 
109,879 
87,194 
87.756 
56,397 

38,559 


76,913 
74,992 
78,669 
59,040 
62,004 
43,021 

41,336 
42,370 
40,730 
37,980 
54,434 
76,550 
86.799 
81.038 
88.784 
86,729 
68,057 
55,572 
48.674 

41.561 
45,916 
41,097 
52,772 
60,511 
60,817 
88,151 
87,671 
76,010 
99,353 
77.298 
73.417 
48,459 

33,585 


6,217 
8,360 
9,237 
7,720 
10,541 
6,505 

5,862 
6.014 
6,188 
6.164 
7.407 
8.822 
8.018 
6.977 
9,749 
12.634 
11.099 
10,273 
7,847 

5,462 
6,816 
7,036 
7.867 
8.106 
7.515 
8,014 
6.454 
8,313 
11,641 
11,112 
15,204 
8,154 

5,090 


83,131 




83,353 


October 7 


87,906 




66,761 


December 2 


72,544 




49.526 


1934 


47,198 


February 24 


48,384 


March 24 

April 21 


46,918 
44.144 


May 19 


61,842 


June 16 


85.373 


July 14 


94,817 




88,015 


September 8 


98,532 


October 6 


99.363 




79,156 




65,846 


December 31 

1935 
January 26 


56,521 
47,024 


February 23 


52,731 


March 23 


48,133 


April 20 


60,639 


May 18 

June 15 


68,617 
68.332 


July 13 


96,166 


August 10 


94,125 


September 7 


84,323 


October 5 


110,994 




88.409 




88.621 


December 31 


56,613 


1936 


38,674 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. — Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption 



13 



Year and Month 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Cigarettes 



Tobacco, 

Snuff 



Cigar9 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



1933 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December , 

1935 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July,,. 

Augist 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1936 
January 



Pound 

1,517,064 

1,599.257 

1,823,454 

1,329.411 

1,473,910 

1,561,675 

1.223.930 



1.156.731 
1.380.982 
1,529,343 
1,456,045 
1,731,922 
1,585,094 
1,495,730 
1,590.786 
1.514,766 
1,702.791 
1,533,982 
1,321,349 



1,324,374 
1,333,114 
1,396.416 
1,438.868 
1,647,792 
1,675,696 
1,644,869 
1,671,995 
1,557,787 
1,586,753 
1,694,618 
1,301,415 

1,326,050 



Pound 
412,655 
345.055 
397.770 
357,519 
350,617 
364,839 
290,671 



321,339 
306,407 
326,628 
353,109 
415,972 
381,019 
367,317 
380,339 
329.761 
370.555 
338,851 
284,916 



306,664 
285,667 
303,003 
336, 628 
351,975 
338,704 
366,413 
323,818 
317.774 
356,978 
299,100 
300,057 

304,983 



Number 
437,535,200 
449,784,830 
410,553.620 
401,231.720 
379,614,915 
374,490.820 
355,920,395 



267,435,575 
312,784,585 
325,042,310 
348,658,920 
431,667,650 
468,990,240 
472,025,100 
509,045,040 
429,906.595 
448,758,930 
435,078,600 
373.011,520 



360,016,140 
337,960,370 
342,829,010 
367,428,910 
478,376,670 
479.028,135 
515,995,050 
517,502,390 
486,470,185 
463,276,145 
495,019,898 
461,468,601 

316,533,632 



Pound 
64,216 
65,224 
72,727 
74,667 
67,643 
68,499 
55.299 



64,245 
55,248 
56,870 
57,078 
74,322 
69,113 
65,246 
74,667 
67,601 
71,610 
67,503 
58,790 



66,773 
56,605 
58,274 
59,742 
67,429 
63,892 
63,881 
71,645 
68,061 
73,172 
67,131 
56, 608 

66,328 



Number 
10,998,932 
11,661,814 
11.879,869 
11,506,697 
14,202,255 
13,935,402 
8,721,959 



5,069.775 
4,448,840 
6,711,960 
8.744,376 
10.325.277 
11.510,509 
10,773,621 
12,349,405 
9,890,762 
14,358,520 
15,480,850 
10,014.125 



6,789,935 
6.901,967 
8,378,494 
9.385.800 
11,030.725 
11.098.617 
11.751,025 
11,424,735 
11,504,975 
13,276,725 
13,492,260 
10,389,598 

4,953,520 



Pound 
1,014,568 
1,012,478 
990,819 
880,042 
838,879 
893,716 
635,474 



630,982 
621,222 
716,938 
731.018 
869.923 
868,269 
776.670 
817,495 
774.128 
783,839 
744,894 
538,257 



632,502 
545.650 
544,890 
649,987 
684,557 
669,217 
685,684 
660,925 
610,444 
535,016 
544,321 
521,489 

304,722 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes in Pairs. 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



Nailed, 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



Stitch- 
downs 



Total 



Total footwear 



Men's 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



Women's 



Misses' 

and 
childrens 



Babies' 
and 

infants' 



Total 



1933 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . . 

October 

November.. 
December... 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
December... 

1935 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 



273,575 
323.774 
368.581 
363.232 
311.182 
257,370 
200,583 
147,622 

172,192 
216,094 
283.532 
263,511 
281.021 
239,527 
243.867 
323,442 
278.570 
242,808 
212,427 
238,238 

272,610 
288,265 
343,710 
346,346 
333,834 
301,746 
335,872 
401,446 
350,264 
331.647 
293,146 
287,180 



846,285 
921,428 
861,664 
,007.916 
942.552 
712.195 
470.711 
329.554 

451,121 
685,693 
907,542 
890,772 
,022,979 
903,804 
595.268 
980,677 
796.344 
707,633 
416,798 
416,502 

632,884 
821,770 
,013,566 
,049,365 
,041,300 
826,313 
709,529 
,007,599 
882,828 
677,857 
509,734 
534,393 



139,933 
167,448 
199,168 
260,289 
227.428 
159,127 
117,437 
88.699 

100,757 
122,254 
116,220 

97. 129 
137.581 
135.140 
101.228 
146.229 
164,952 
163.530 
107,421 

90,887 

126,909 
153,222 
171,798 
159, 769 
148,123 
141,613 
159,274 
193,793 
165,558 
170,650 
122,546 
102,887 



315.543 
318,003 
264,433 
210.696 
182.023 
202.590 
195,675 
141.100 

178,045 
201,233 
257,724 
266,910 
292,018 
280,461 
165,815 
161,403 
169,725 
205.207 
166,578 
127,350 

186,101 
207.598 
253,267 
304,889 
316.095 
295,873 
224,426 
157,390 
149,349 
185,925 
184,940 
176,866 



1.631.358 
1.785,434 
1,746.992 
1.919.069 
1.729.685 
1,388,574 
1,020.654 
731,474 



934,606 
,257,824 
,607,076 
,569.912 
,778.700 
,608,131 
,152,142 
,672,013 
,460,998 
,420,320 
964.078 
911,919 

,254,078 
,520,012 
,844,805 
,912,398 
,899,077 
,619.932 
488,628 
,826,595 
,604,476 
,447,039 
,168,136 
,154,631 



468,592 
566,993 
634,980 
659.556 
583,038 
484,141 
391,663 
299.534 

294,330 
367,456 
433,720 
414,050 
497,158 
509,337 
423,022 
541.093 
487,584 
503.290 
405,870 
425,074 

413,686 
465,240 
567, 637 
588,324 
577,122 
527,336 
568,016 
619.319 
579.213 
552,372 
501,224 
504,713 



108.270 
120,308 
101,253 
133,747 
138,087 
146.894 
112.024 
59.553 

42,529 
79,586 
75,023 
80,184 
102,058 
85.297 
53.584 
98,513 
111,681 
131,669 
88.522 
67,190 

55.159 

75.213 

98.521 

119.623 

120.009 

104,186 

95,099 

123,479 

115,297 

131,243 

105,951 

80,337 



836.667 
949.938 
909,760 
1,085,425 
1,003.719 
870,948 
572,204 
403.164 

467,609 
637.047 
846.800 
814,106 
929,823 
845,128 
648,401 
980,634 
832.734 
801,952 
536,304 
488, 128 

619,293 
759.011 
946,195 
985,026 
984,808 
797,640 
754,084 
1,093,443 
992,901 
863,081 
758,389 
741,227 



250.595 
229,827 
232,910 
263,552 
218.096 
232.164 
203,292 
132,344 

160,666 
160,198 
232,597 
271,414 
266,661 
204,527 
154,707 
177,839 
189,107 
259,002 
220,878 
143.954 

186,011 
206.465 
243.249 
256,370 
269.737 
250,740 
228,332 
236,522 
218,887 
273,186 
268,495 
165,889 



90.440 
98,581 
95,964 
95.299 
92.585 
99.624 
92,070 
50.221 

65.533 
79.761 
98.095 
72,736 
89,296 
82,240 
54,093 
79,582 
83.571 
86,259 
64,544 
45,664 

55,731 
74.112 
83,198 
77,121 
81,075 
76,402 
82,661 
81.192 
76,153 
91,831 
72,090 
73,820 



1.754,564 
1.965.647 
1,974,867 
2.237,179 
2.035,525 
1.833.771 
1.371.253 
944,816 

1.030.906 
1.326,216 
1,686.235 
1.652,490 
1.884,996 
1.726,525 
1.333,807 
1,877,661 
1.704,677 
1,782,172 
1,316,118 
1,170,010 



,329,880 
,580,041 
,938,800 
,026,464 
,032.751 
,756,304 
.728,192 
,153,955 
,982,451 
,911,713 
.706.149 
,565,986 



11599—3 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Tabic 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



Sales on Stock Yds 

(Current montfi 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle , 

Calves 

Sheep , 

Lambs , 

Swine 

Av. Retail Prices, In 
cents, of Food in 
Canada: 
Beef, chuck... lb. 

Veal, roast " 

Mutton, roast. " 
Pork, fresh.... " 
Bacon, break- 
fast " 

Lard, pure " 

Eggs, fresh — doz. 

Milk qt. 

Butter, cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour " 

Rolled oats.. . " 

Rice " 

Beans " 

Apples, evap. . " 

Prunes " 

Sugar, gran... " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



1935 



Jan. 



59.542 
20,531 
97,399 
17,463 



67,716 

28,142 

4,806 

35,642 

281,689 



10-8 
12-1 
19-8 
19-4 

32-3 
14-6 
37-1 
10-4 



25-5 
19-4 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-9 
5-0 
15-0 
12-5 
6-4 
52-9 
38-0 
16-4 



Feb. 



50,093 
21,339 
88,679 
13,895 



53,401 
29,947 
4,228 
33,013 
254.944 



11-2 
12-9 
20-7 
19-9 

31-9 
14-9 
32-9 
10-4 

28-0 
19-7 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-9 
51 
151 
12-5 
6-5 
52-4 
38-2 
16-5 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. 



53,440 
28,536 
65,177 
15,312 



56,234 
49,246 
3,474 
36,458 
242,820 



11-6 
12 
20 
200 

31-5 
151 
31-4 
10-5 

29-6 

19-9 

6-7 

3-3 

5-2 

8-0 

51 

14-9 

12-5 

6-4 

52-3 

38-1 

16-8 



64,114 
41,444 
81,331 
23,060 



57,189 

72,252 

42,006 

1,302 

255,666 



12-6 
12-7 
21-5 
200 

31-2 
15-2 
24-3 
10-5 

28-1 
20-0 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-8 
5-2 
15-3 
12-3 
6-4 
51-8 
37-7 
16-9 



56,948 
40,880 
68,159 
13,572 



63,713 

76,381 

30,630 

7,080 

244,893 



13-4 

12-6 
21-6 
20-4 

30-3 
15-2 
22-0 
10-5 

28-6 

20-2 

5-6 

3-4 

5-2 

7-8 

5-2 

15-6 

12-3 

6-4 

52-2 

37-3 

16-6 



44,195 
39,968 
57,513 
27,163 



52,063 
65,056 
13,911 
40,097 
194,613 



14-0 
12-7 
21-5 
21-3 

30-1 
15-3 
22-6 
10-5 

26-3 

200 

5-7 

3-4 

5-3 

7-9 

5-3 

15-9 

12-4 

6-5 

52-0 

37-6 

16-7 



58,158 
41,840 
60,430 
43,217 



56,047 
57,360 
8,292 
65,176 
191,088 



14-0 
12-8 
21-4 

22-4 

30-1 
15-5 
24-7 
10-3 

24-8 
19-9 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-8 
5-4 
16-0 
12-3 
6-4 
51-8 
37-1 
16-3 



74,229 
33,859 
49,536 
49,524 



66,679 
47,505 
6,799 
90,391 
175,542 



13-2 
12-7 
21-1 

22-6 

30-5 
15-9 
27-7 
10-3 

25-0 

19-7 

5-7 

3-3 

5-2 

7-8 

5-3 

161 

12-3 

6-4 

51-5 

37-5 

27-5 



101,949 
41,602 
50,115 

62,488 



72,313 
46,007 
8,276 
96,807 
176,786 



12-8 
12-9 
20-9 
231 

31-6 
17-2 
31-2 
10-4 

25-4 
19-6 
5-6 



5-2 
7-9 
5-2 
15-7 

12-1 
6-4 
52-4 
37-1 
20-4 



122,298 
43,075 
74,847 
95,248 



92,844 

49,115 

13,213 

157,324 

262,599 



12-7 
13-4 
20-3 
22-7 

31-6 
18-1 
35-8 
10-6 

27-1 

19-9 

5-7 

3-3 

5-3 

7-9 

5-3 

15-4 

12-0 

6-3 

51-8 

37-1 

22-1 



Nov. 



94,010 
35,009 
68,228 
49,626 



88,942 
39,515 
12,943 
95,532 
256,361 



12-3 
13-4 
19-9 

21-9 

31-2 
18-3 
41-5 
10-6 

28-6 
20-5 
5-7 
3-5 
5-2 
7-8 
5-3 
15-4 
11-6 
6-2 
52-3 
36-6 
22-0 



Dec. 



59,926 
20,991 
80,835 
28,771 



62,570 

26,325 

8,084 

45,744 

268,824 



1936 



Jan. 



67,131 
20,564 
84,012 
18,186 



69,810 

27,060 

9,365 

39,069 

275,775 



12-1 
13-4 
20-2 
20-8 

29-9 
18-3 
43-4 
10-6 

30-3 

20-5 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-9 

5-4 

15-7 

11-3 

6-2 

51-9 

36-7 

23-6 



12-6 
14-1 
21-6 
21-1 

29-3 
17-9 
41-5 
10; 7 

30-6 

20-6 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-8 

5-4 

15-4 

11-4 

6-2 

52-2 

36-6 

24-2 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter— 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


19 
Jan. 


36 
Feb. 


22,345 

316 

22,661 

15,253 

1,764 

310 

1,532 

9.967 
3.878 
15.826 
29,671 
2,378 

14,507 

6,264 

356 

218 

21,344 

1,442 

407 

1,850 

5,841 

249 

6,090 

11,100 

15,984 
4,562 

1,102 


14,749 

290 

15,039 

12,899 

562 

266 

1,459 

13,008 
4,088 
16,085 
33,181 
3,195 

11,226 

5,174 

332 

176 

16,909 

945 

337 

1,282 

5,168 

288 

5,456 

8,396 

12,809 
3,721 

1,971 


6,833 

263 

7.096 

12,422 

287 

554 

1,149 

14,931 
3,511 
18,191 
36,633 
3,566 

9,170 

5,172 

396 

148 

14,885 

712 

403 

1,115 

4,708 

202 

4,909 

7,589 

6,734 
3,184 

900 


3,466 

2oe 

3,668 
10,909 

2,238 

655 

1,625 

13,661 

2,915 

14,919 

31,495 

2,671 

6,722 

5,240 

518 

259 

12,739 

780 

864 

1,644 

3,103 

203 

3,306 

5,542 

6,807 
3,684 

1,750 


5,785 

153 

5,938 

11,685 

6,237 

588 

2,785 

16,188 
3,27e 
16,449 
35,912 
3,688 

5,631 

5,120 

349 

214 

11,314 

1,039 

594 

1,633 

1,539 

208 

1,746 

4,275 

7,666 
2,649 

2,150 


22,344 

285 

22,629 

18,836 

7,858 

614 

3,733 

13,501 
2,691 
15,949 
32,141 
3,400 

4,200 

4,466 

299 

209 

9,174 

1,294 

550 

1,844 

705 

332 
1,037 
3,538 

9,826 
3,347 

3,833 


40, 129 

540 

40,669 

29,410 

9,797 

355 

4,216 

9,657 
2,586 
14,571 
26,813 
3,699 

3,331 

4,975 

298 

207 

8,811 

1,467 

716 

2,183 

569 

332 

901 

2,901 

16,301 
4,908 

8,499 


51.271 

868 

52,139 

34,626 

10,076 

427 
4,221 

6.812 
2,105 
12,964 
21,881 
3,198 

3,968 

5,097 

253 

237 

9,555 

1,604 

483 

2,087 

546 
279 

825 
2,213 

20,162 
5,356 

5,448 


54,820 

362 

55,182 

29,431 

9,430 

542 

3,946 

5,181 
1,820 
13,027 
20,028 
3,068 

5,700 

6,137 

190 

255 

12,282 

1,992 

562 

2,553 

1,081 

449 

1,530 

1,983 

21,312 
4,717 

3,950 


47,474 

367 

47,841 

28,237 

6,458 

243 

3,383 

5,334 
3,159 
14,575 
23,069 
2,435 

11,611 

7,544 

180 

214 

19,549 

2,358 
1,033 
3,391 

3,890 

620 

4,510 

2,630 

25,913 
5,585 

5,870 


39,236 

437 

39,673 

25,052 

3,404 

285 

2,994 

7,708 
3,149 
15,168 
26,026 
2,598 

17,377 

6,986 

264 

203 

24,829 

3,123 

489 

3,612 

5,633 

249 

5,881 

5,941 

23,580 
5,516 

2,672 


31,751 

219 

31,970 

23,472 

1,252 
316 

2,543 

12,576 
2,740 
15,120 
30,436 
3,387 

16,719 

4,658 

283 

272 

21,933 

2,615 

244 

2,858 

5,314 

263 

5,577 

12,036 

16,369 
4,826 

1,627 


24,251' 




121 


Totals 


24,372 
21,957 


Eggs— 


526 


Fresh 


424 




2,093 


Pork — 


13,430 




3,409 


Cured or in cure 

Totals 


15,973 
32,813 




3,609 


Beef — 


13.32S 




6,272 


Cured 


371 




265 


Totals 


20,237 


Veal — 
Fresh, frozen 


1,851 




329 


Totals 


2,180 


Mutton and Lamb — 
Frozen 


4,507 
268 


Totals 


4,775 


Poultry 

Fish— 

Fresh frozen 

Smoked, etc 

Fresh frozen during preced- 


11,095 

16,679 
3,869 

1,876 











'This figure includes approximately 350,000 pounds of butter reported by creameries added to the list in the provinces 
of Quebec and Ontario since June 1, 1935. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 




11599-3* 



16 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations and Railway Operating Statistics 



OUTPUT OF CENTRAL 
ELECTRIC STATIONS 
€00 KILOWATT HOURS 

Monthly Data 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

Provincial Consumption- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Total 

Deliveries to Boilers- 
New Brunswick. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 

Total 

Daily Average 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Eiports 

RAILWAYS 

Car loadings 000 care 

Operating Revenues — 
Canadian National .... S 000 
Canadian Pacific $000 



Canadian National- 
Operating Expenses. . $000 
Operating Income $000 
No of tons carried 000 tons 
No. of tons carried 

one mile... 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll .$000 

Number of employees. .000 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll $000 

Number of employees .000 
All Railways- 
Operating Revenues... $000 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total payroll $000 

Number of employees. .000 



1935 



1936 



Jan. 



1978039 
35,243 
2013282 

54,494 
1082667 
579,166 
135,701 
126,011 

20,233 

15,010 

113,878 

67,237 
837, 124 
712,395 
157,268 
125,282 
1899306 

1,650 

379,677 
108,593 
35,707 
218 
525,845 



63,808 

1,137 

64,945 

1,758 
34,925 
18,683 
4,377 
4,065 

652 

485 

3,673 



181-80 



10,015 
8,217 



Feb. Mar. April 



1772812 
30,635 
1803447 

39,961 
962,720 
544,279 
113,686 
112,166 

16,791 
13,839 
109,524 

52,037 
754,543 
644,611 
131,734 
110,998 
1693923 



353,556 
118,017 
28,162 
368 
500,103 



63,315 

1,094 

64,409 

1,427 
34,383 
19,439 
4,060 
4,006 

600 

494 

3,912 



179-89 



10,280 
8,667 



1912931 
30,624 
1943555 

43,416 
1032363 
578,285 
125,713 
133,154 

16,633 

13,991 

103,956 

55,561 
808,771 
699,713 
143,840 
131.713 
1839598 

181 

315,157 

122,117 

30,121 

477 

518,053 



61,707 

988 

62,695 

1,401 
33,302 
18.654 
4,055 
4,295 

536 

452 

3,353 



186-68 



11.477 
9,463 



1854252 
26,777 
1881029 

53,065 
1028940 
533,740 
118,689 
119,818 

12, 755 
14,022 
97,475 

65,564 
805,219 
661,467 
133,026 
118,278 
1783554 

3,775 

372,817 
114,637 
24,184 
365 
515,778 



61,808 

893 

62,701 

1,769 
34,298 
17,791 
3,956 
3,994 

425 

468 
3.249 



184-61 



11,566 
9.957 



May 



26,950 
1923071 

57,830 
1061757 
535,894 
113,655 
126,985 

13,143 
13,807 
94,256 

70,173 
835,323 
669,512 
128,295 
125.513 
1828816 

5,867 

383,242 

117,386 

16,934 

493 

523,922 



61,165 

869 

62,034 

1,866 
34,250 
17,287 
3,666 
4,096 

424 

445 

3,041 

188-35 

11,696 
9,886 



June July 



1788045 
28,205 
1816250 

57,871 
982,233 
530,315 

97,157 
120,469 

12,863 
15,342 
107,994 

71,962 
772,604 
633,155 
111,311 
119,224 
1708256 

6,180 
339,864 
110,351 

5,879 

324 

462,598 



59,601 

94 V 

60,542 

1,929 
32,741 
17,677 
3,239 
4,015 

429 

512 



185-88 



11,273 
10,162 



1762747 
28,796 
1791543 

56,564 
979,105 
499,736 
102,789 
124,553 

12,936 
15,860 
93,348 

70,773 
765,661 
621,431 
117,108 
123,222 
1698195 

5,642 

310,078 

96,637 

14,645 

326 

427,328 



56,863 

928 

57, 792 

1,825 

31,584 

16,121 

3,316 

4,018 

417 

511 

3,011 



194-98 



12,527 
11,119 



Aug. 



1820892 
30,261 
1851153 

49,761 
1003785 
529,590 
107,891 

129,865 

14,154 

16,107 

130,305 

64,160 
766,772 
637,955 
123,618 
128,343 
1720848 

1,892 

304,742 

96,263 

10,903 

338 

414,138 



58,738 

976 

59,714 

1,605 
32,380 
17,084 
3,480 
4,189 

457 

519 

4,203 



196-92 



12,006 
10,924 



Sept. Oct. Dec. 1 Jan. 



1888013 
31,201 
1919214 

44,442 
1045369 
546,865 
124,220 
127,117 

14,849 
16,352 
142,177 

59,125 
801,002 
650,675 
140,719 
125,516 
1777037 

1,419 

337,569 

99,256 

21,149 

331 

459,724 



62,934 

1,040 

63,974 

1,481 
34,846 
18,229 
4,141 
4,237 

495 
545 

4,739 



220-58 



13,616 
13,296 



2122992 
39,577 
2162569 

46,811 
1176353 
626,559 
137,698 
135,571 

21,149 

18,428 

146,530 

63,761 
940,676 
717,072 
160,457 
134,073 
2016039 

445 

445,043 

123,501 

30,716 

438 
600,143 



68,484 

1,277 

69,761 

1,510 

37,947 

20,212 

4,442 

4,373 

682 

595 

4,727 



251 08 



15,124 
14,115 



2217404 
39,121 
2156525 



681,644 
156,681 
134.066] 

21,452 
17,659 
112,838 

60,536 
925,472 
745,410 
179,643 
132,627 
2043688 

1,036 

449,528 

132,113 

49,549 

364 

632,590 



68,303 

1,262 

69,565 

1.424 

35,512 

21,988 

5,054 

4,325 



570 
3,640 



173-53 



12,305 
11,581 



2051660 
39,381 
2091041 

38,572 
1045702 
675,429 
159,899 
132,058 

21,051 
18,330 
118,051 

55,234 
865,741 
738,665 
182,485 
130,865 
1972990 



377, 143 

129,567 

51,586 

345 

558,641 



66,182 

1,270 

67,452 

1,244 

33,732 

21,788 

5,158 

4,260 



679 
591 



172-90 



10,153 
9,323 



1934 
Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


10,398 
919 

2.160 


10.944 
l,200i 
2,223 


10.440 

434 1 

2,333 


10,828 

385 

2,424 


10,452 

823 

2,252 


11,433 

16 

2,290 


12,163 
1.168 1 
2,227 


11,676 

503 

2.400 


11,596 

91 

2,279 


11,718 
1,615 
2.869 


12,018 
2.823 
3.382 


10,958 
1,406 
2,767 


819 
888 


751 
913 


823 
849 


894 
960 


860 
863 


794 
642 


873 
657 


1,002 
792 


823 
834 


1,250 

620 


1,386 
558 


1,068 
669 


62 

6,706 
61 


53 

7,241 
64 


49 

6,754 

62 


60 

7,022 
65 


60 

6.716 

59 


61 

7,493 

64 


59 

7,459 
67 


74 

7,944 

69 


81 

7,970 

70 


60 

7,838 

70 


50 

8,091 

70 


44 

7,514 

65 


7,231 
3,171 
1,943 


7,705 

204 

1,867 


7,436 

850 

1,908 


8,119 
1,047 
1,986 


8,223 
1,413 
1,958 


8,419 
1,144 
1,966 


8,434 
1.404 
1,897 


9,254 
1.526 
2,036 


10,097 

508 

2,025 


9,829 
3,290 
2,663 


9,621 
4,249 
3,258 


8,074 
3,455 
2,554 


734 
712 


641 
755 


680 
682 


759 

817 


743 

624 


746 
522 


822 
554 


888 
654 


799 

683 


1,287 
521 


1,351 
454 


993 

487 


59 

4,724 

43 


49 

5,279 

46 


45 

4,900 

45 


62 

5,058 

44 


53 

5.047 

45 


54 
5.527 

49 


62 

5,423 

49 


70 

5,808 

50 


87 

5,884 

51 


59 

5,679 

49 


47 

5,737 

48 


47 

5,278 

44 


24,778 
19,902 
3,629 
5,543 


20,953 

20.475 

419' 

5.659 


21,579 

19,676 

937 

5,765 


23,847 

20.865 

2.114 

5,836 


24,482 

20.563 

2.990 

5,725 


24,529 

21,839 

1,781 

5.822 


24,049 

22,455 

691 

5,796 


26,187 
22,754 
2,442 
5.975 


25,520 

23,435 

1.134 

5.703 


29,585 

23.436 

5,380 

7,031 


32,279 

23,598 

7,730 

8,349 


27,154 
20,854 
5.290 
6.876 


1,73? 

1,776 


1.576 
1,846 


1,685 
1 . 696 


1.858 
1,959 


1,797 
1,674 


1.720 
1,332 


1.860 
1,396 


2,341 
1,644 


2,101 
1,741 


2,712 
1,333 


2,937 
1,150 


2,240 
1,295 


13f 

12,18/ 

11C 


115 

13.340 
11* 


105 

12,441 

113 


133 

12,928 

116 


125 

12,590 

111 


124 

13,900 

120 


134 

13.749 

123 


157 

14,682 

127 


185 

14,781 

129 


137 

14,388 
127 


119 

4,751 

124 


101 

13,655 

116 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons, 



17 



Commodities 


1934 


1935 


Nov. 

893,572 

2.322 

103.887 

59,994 

2.800 

1.677 

2.394 

126 982 

92.567 

77.615 

676 

40.779 

869 

35.059 

10.409 

134.180 

4,249 
56. 189 

4.708 
19.029 
10.702 

6.597 

4.252 
1,101 

778 
2.372 

780 
4.492 

3,698 

2,127 

657.787 
340,049 

70.526 

190 

142,294 

70.629 
152.413 

4,795 
2,046 
4,306 
19,337 
160,695 

209,569 

1.962 

84,671 

199,713 
16,584 

139,784 
18,831 
16.838 
6,491 

22,822 
4.997 

24.931 
9.630 

14.975 
1,522 

3.643 

5,970 

9,746 

2,089 

16.855 

32.528 

154.604 

58.024 

6,961 

18.055 

194,746 

121,173 

4,731 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products — 
Wheat 


361,598 

6,819 

76,468 

21,209 

597 

346 

2,420 

82,567 

81,148 

81,573 

1,068 

18,751 

493 

30,318 

8,687 

16,946 

5.782 
36,525 

1,402 
16,726 

9,066 

6,757 

5,236 

656 

710 

1,885 

- 248 

* 3,842 

4,270 

1,700 
453,046 
189,042 
66,398 
92 
182,047 
56,051 
23,957 

3,343 

919 

1,834 

14,505 

143,742 

255,674 

1,866 

351,737 

204,305 
18,502 

88,444 
16,101 
8,994 
1.270 

26,566 
4,212 

14,792 
4,612 

14,347 
675 

8,617 
44,223 

5,109 

1.844 

12,980 

61,373 

176,697 

62,143 

6,392 

11,782 

174,179 

141,325 

3,740 


503,979 

4,956 

87,761 

21,469 

584 

975 

2,401 

79,027 

73,951 

54,309 

738 

5,759 

790 

32,328 

6,155 

20,273 

9,601 
37,479 

1,594 
16,644 

8,924 

6,621 

5,032 
353 

1,334 

1,869 
362 

4,005 

3,157 

801 

404,213 
111,740 
50,767 
480 
188,904 
53,722 
41,313 

4,870 

1,091 

3,732 

17,077 

153,165 

190,289 

3,056 

160,567 

210,628 
15,842 

122,759 
19,266 
12,220 
2,589 

34,869 
5,512 

28,936 
7,231 

18,832 
808 

10,660 

45,056 

9,362 

1,762 

15,457 

77,276 

187,609 

66,785 

3,365 

13,324 

194,378 

149,260 

3,634 


525,595 

98 

65,844 

22,272 

1,499 

863 

1,628 

78,759 

80,714 

23,409 

1,083 

1,685 

840 

30,597 

3,251 

17,272 

3,497 
32,534 

1,055 
15,141 

8,318 

8,250 

5,987 
199 

2,151 

1,684 
498 

5,595 

3,717 

1,129 

576,742 

55,691 

40,073 

451 

175,263 
57,842 

133,873 

12,198 

1,841 

9,602 

19,622 

186,364 

174,086 

5,525 

128,260 

224,488 
18,881 

165,947 
18,476 
15,115 
20,340 

37,507 
4,796 
46,095 
10,003 
18,510 
2,626 

8,841 

34,706 

3,786 

1,686 

15,913 

105,313 

160,299 

65,956 

2,355 

13,752 

210,233 

134,897 

3,863 


586,688 

21 

38,178 

17,843 

2,259 

1,624 

1,691 

74,528 

67,053 

9,621 

736 

478 

762 

15,009 

3,499 

13,152 

2,337 

23,884 

862 

12,931 

7,401 

6,001 

4,877 
142 

1,678 

3,738 
485 

4,810 

3,370 

1,800 
698,768 
45,593 
43,868 
1,472 
155,342 
62,234 
191,999 

9,696 

1,404 

25,833 

14,509 

167,963 

164,866 

5,011 

127,887 

259,509 
27,063 

154,199 
16,734 
8,455 
11,715 

28,086 
4,387 
55,675 
13,154 
18,044 
3,241 

10,300 

26,110 

1,707 

1,501 

15,919 

23,729 

150,734 

54,378 

2,713 

12,338 

225,027 

123,426 

3,874 


883,457 

466 

59,497 

15,082 

2,724 

2,571 

786 

76,394 

72,263 

4,396 

678 

50 

2,243 

8,005 

5,289 

17,410 

5,075 
29,070 

1,716 
11,157 

8,208 

6,515 

5,287 
85 
1,333 
5,445 
2,696 
4,685 

3,802 

1,318 
656,113 
42,051 
48,845 
2,244 
133,447 
59,767 
204,900 

12,557 

1,768 

28,298 

17,622 

189,628 

124,111 

7,521 

136,552 

270,889 
25,524 

175,398 

26.954 

12.326 

9,003 

29,748 
5,186 
53,683 
13,605 
18.826 
2,585 

16,341 

21,093 

1,946 

2,509 

18,908 

14,858 

149,026 

59,388 

2,455 

13,373 

255,524 

123,793 

4,226 


660,405 

1,859 

20,558 

25,372 

3,717 

354 

1,323 

81,963 

77,589 

8,630 

495 

1,554 

7,445 

2,352 

9,375 

16,867 

3,707 

42,317 
2,768 

10,745 
7,393 

5,021 

5,669 
150 

864 
4,343 

723 
3,725 

5,484 

2,691 

573,495 

89,157 

40,544 

1,111 

146,004 

59,523 

230,587 

10,172 

1,857 

32,678 

14,219 

218,253 

147, 184 

8,100 

110,042 

251,046 
21,274 

201,074 
21,950 
11,263 
5,529 

32,289 
5,940 
53,383 
16,929 
17,829 
2,720 

11,462 

13,832 

1,395 

2,024 

16,983 

13,580 

148,847 

61,817 

2,779 

12,897 

257,623 

130,939 

4,015 


1,314,096 

2,316 

71,110 

91,860 

11,982 

705 

634 

109,849 

100,34? 

15,665 

1,973 

28,589 

23,122 

9,911 

13,406 

15.118 

3,253 

53,984 
3,423 
9,734 
8,357 

3,864 

5,228 
119 
830 

5,062 
738 

4,407 

4,974 

5,040 

514,687 
203,834 

68,836 

969 

142,815 

66,326 
264,586 

12,288 
3,271 
29,583 
14,088 
205,795 

173,411 

5,114 

109,021 

231,313 
21,111 

187,978 

24,732 

14,177 

2,613 

35,234 
5,558 
58,627 
15,667 
16,665 
3,068 

4,899 
10,009 

2,127 

2,197 

14,230 

20,974 

145,389 

60,314 

3,912 

16,005 

232,527 

130,057 

4,995 


1,573,000 

1,398 

136,969 

88,619 

11,166 

5,042 

2,195 

127,446 

116,863 

15,163 

912 

70,446 

8,933 

37,500 

16,847 

134,878 

2,973 
72,514 

9,518 
13,914 

9,316 

5,173 

6,769 
294 

1,116 

5,576 
965 

4,616 

5,201 

4,740 

655,034 

372,809 

99,990 

1,235 

148,545 

73,874 

325,573 

10,862 

2,606 

22,494 

14,259 

2.59,492 

232,301 

2,398 

91,760 

246,329 
20,372 

168,440 

27,368 

20,036 

6,802 

43,277 
6,401 
58,953 
13,258 
17,090 
4,520 

3,795 
13.717 

5,323 

2,785 

16,826 

30,453 

179,197 

71,798 

6,396 

20,058 

232,519 

137,994 

6,158 


765,425- 


Corn 


7,458 


Oats 


77,629 




30.810 


Rye 


3,355 




5,569 


Other grain 

Flour 


3,523 
119,589 




106,078 




15,912 




1,125 




51,396 




863 




32,579 


Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products . . 
Animal Products— 


11,877 
103,703 

4,185 




58,814 




5,929 




15,850 


Dressed meats (fresh) 


9,325 
6,135 


(edible) 


6,382 




519 




750 




2,933 


Wool 


1,013 




4,801 


Other animal products (non- 


4,463 


Mine Products — 


1,896 




595,021 




515,685 


Coke 


86.872 




327 


Other ores and concentrates . . 

Base bullion and matte 

Gravel, sand, stone (crushed). 
Slate — Dimensions or block 


158,920 
67.850 
131,897 

8,176 




1.411 




5,638 


Salt 


18,181 




212,501 


Forest Products— 
Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 
Ties •. 


246,803 
15,482 




59,141 


and cooperage material 


210,156 
16,565 


Manufactures and Miscellan- 
Gasoline, petroleum and itst 


133,366 




19.652 




19,494 
1,960 

46,574 


Rails and fastenings 

Iron and steel (bar, sheet, 
structural, pipe) 


Castings, machinery & boilers 


5,580 
25,336 


Brick and artificial stone . . . 


11,060 
14,784 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 


1,620 

3,517 

24,448 
5,172 




2,369 




19,356 




42,746 


Paper, printed matter, books. 


165,379 
72.929 


Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 
Canned goods (all canned food 

products, except meats) 

Other manufactures and mis- 


6,903 

24,055 

227,344 




132,111 


Grand Total, 000 tons. . 


4,817 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes of Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries— First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products— edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber. 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products— edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products. . .,. . . 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur- 
nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilledand malt liquors. 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 
Electric light and power.. . 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements. 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts. 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances . . . 
Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products. . 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous # 

Logging .' 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex- 
cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage. . 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries) . 

Tbade 

Retail 

Wholesale 











19 


35 












1936 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


94-6 


96-4 


93-4 


95-2 


97-6 


99-5 


101-1 


102-7 


106-1 


107-7 


104-6 


99-1 


98-4 


901 


92 7 


93-9 


95-6 


98-4 


•)8-5 


99-8 


100-8 


103-3 


103-5 


101-4 


96-8 


98-S 


102 9 


101-7 


102-5 


111-1 


120-6 


125-7 


142-3 


134-6 


124-6 


120-5 


115-4 


1100 


108-5 


78-4 


75-4 


79-5 


84-S 


99-0 


96-8 


100-3 


99-7 


103-2 


100-4 


101-5 


94-5 


81-3 


98-7 


104-0 


107-3 


108-8 


108-1 


102-8 


107-4 


111 


110-1 


106-3 


103-8 


96-1 


10i-l 


58-4 


63-3 


63-0 


67-2 


75-6 


80-8 


82-6 


8'-7 


79-9 


76-2 


69-8 


63-3 


65 -i 


45-9 


51-2 


49-8 


56-3 


68-1 


75-8 


78-6 


77 5 


72-5 


66-5 


57-2 


51-2 


55 S 


71-3 


72-1 


72-6 


70-9 


72-4 


73-3 


76-6 


75-9 


82-0 


86-6 


85-4 


79-8 


78-7 


86-9 


93-4 


96-7 


98-2 


101-6 


102-4 


99-7 


99-1 


101-1 


97-8 


96-2 


88-0 


88-1 


311 


330 


29-9 


29-0 


27-4 


35-1 


41-1 


47-4 


50-1 


51-8 


51-8 


51-6 


41-1 


94-0 


90-9 


90-4 


92-6 


98-9 


103-3 


114-3 


126-4 


136-2 


126-5 


114-7 


97-6 


96-4 


92-4 


91-1 


92-7 


93-4 


96-7 


96-6 


98-3 


98-2 


98-5 


98-6 


98-7 


96-7 


96-i 


79-5 


78-4 


80-8 


81-6 


86-7 


87-8 


90-3 


89-9 


89-1 


88-6 


87-4 


85-3 


83-1 


105 6 


106-4 


107-1 


108-0 


109-7 


108-8 


110-4 


113-0 


115-9 


117-8 


118-1 


110-5 


112-fc 


104 8 


102-6 


103-5 


104-1 


105-5 


104-2 


104-8 


104-2 


105-0 


105-1 


106-9 


106-9 


106 -i 


907 


94-1 


92-7 


91-2 


91-3 


91-8 


88-2 


91-2 


92-3 


96-3 


98-3 


92-0 


94-1 


105 


110-1 


111-9 


111-9 


112-4 


110-4 


109-9 


112-3 


116-9 


118-9 


117-0 


113-3 


115-5 


121-0 


125-7 


123-6 


1242 


127-3 


125-3 


128 


129-0 


131-7 


134-8 


136-9 


135-5 


134 -t 


111-1 


114-9 


118-4 


117-1 


117-9 


118-8 


117-1 


117-9 


123-5 


127-2 


127-6 


123-3 


120-' 


92 8 


97-7 


102-4 


102-9 


101-0 


98-5 


94-3 


99-9 


105-6 


105-8 


99-4 


93-9 


100-! 


85 5 


93-8 


96-7 


95-2 


94-3 


89-7 


92-7 


92-6 


97-2 


97-7 


94-5 


89-6 


92-1 


122 4 


120-2 


118-9 


109-7 


115-5 


117-5 


117-9 


121-0 


120-8 


122-3 


143-8 


139-2 


135 -f 


123-1 


118-5 


114-5 


941 


104-1 


106-3 


103-3 


109-0 


107-2 


106-2 


144-1 


137-0 


135 •' 


120-5 


120-9 


122-9 


130-4 


130-1 


129-5 


135-4 


133-5 


138-4 


144-6 


141-0 


140-6 


133-1 


130 8 


129-6 


120-2 


111-8 


118-8 


103-1 


101-2 


107-5 


139-0 


145-5 


140-0 


127-0 


148-1 


121 7 


123-2 


128-0 


130-6 


1310 


132-0 


128-7 


129-5 


132-0 


134-8 


135-5 


131-1 


133-; 


59 7 


55-5 


59-9 


69-4 


77-9 


81-2 


83-6 


80-6 


84-5 


80-1 


75-8 


67-6 


64-' 


106 2 


105-8 


106-9 


109-0 


1110 


113-5 


115-4 


118-8 


119-6 


117-6 


116 2 


111-5 


110-' 


104-5 


105-2 


106-0 


106-0 


108-1 


110-6 


118-6 


122-3 


128-4 


131-2 


124-5 


120-4 


115-' 


77-9 


82-9 


84-3 


86-0 


86-2 


83-4 


81-0 


79-7 


84-7 


88-7 


86-8 


84-9 


89-1 


911 


91-8 


88-4 


98-7 


104-0 


100-7 


100-6 


100-0 


112-0 


116-7 


115-7 


108-0 


113-< 


82-6 


85-5 


87-4 


88-7 


90-1 


91-2 


92-6 


91-8 


94-9 


95-8 


93-6 


93-4 


95-, 


52-5 


560 


59-6 


61-2 


61-8 


59-6 


591 


52-8 


53-0 


55-9 


52-5 


62-2 


6b-< 


82-1 


88-4 


89-4 


89-1 


86-9 


82-7 


77-6 


75-1 


79-0 


85-4 


83-7 


83-9 


90-; 


126-6 


152-0 


156-6 


154-6 


145-8 


131-0 


109-2 


100-1 


110-8 


131-5 


1200 


119-9 


138-i 


55-7 


651 


66-6 


69-1 


64-2 


58-5 


62-5 


58-4 


68-0 


62-9 


50-5 


47-7 


59-( 


81 


88-5 


90-0 


94-3 


97-4 


98-3 


99-6 


100-9 


112-1 


113-1 


105-3 


86-2 


95- 


58-8 


63 


67-9 


72-1 


760 


76-1 


76-3 


79-1 


83-9 


86-8 


89-5 


82-9 


83- 


79-6 


88-4 


89-6 


92-7 


92-9 


91-3 


87-2 


87-9 


97-1 


97-4 


94-8 


92-1 


92- 


74-1 


77-3 


80-9 


80-2 


83-7 


81-8 


80-9 


83-0 


86-4 


88-5 


87-2 


83-2 


85- 


111-5 


114-2 


116-2 


119-0 


121-3 


122-6 


122-3 


123-2 


125-8 


126-8 


125-8 


122-1 


123- 


125-6 


126-7 


126-8 


129-3 


134-6 


138-1 


140-3 


141-6 


142-7 


139-8 


137-5 


134-6 


130-, 


115-2 


114-2 


117-4 


118-7 


123-5 


123-8 


119-3 


128-3 


130-2 


124-6 


125-0 


116-8 


116- 


183-4 


166-9 


104-3 


93-9 


96-0 


82-2 


790 


77-7 


115-8 


158-4 


183-5 


183-4 


173- 


120-3 


118-8 


117-7 


116-2 


119-2 


121-5 


125-2 


128-6 


129-5 


132-5 


131-1 


129-9 


129-' 


94 7 


91-5 


88-3 


82-2 


83-2 


81-9 


83-6 


86-5 


89-0 


92-9 


93-7 


94-7 


94- 


204-4 


204-6 


207-2 


211-0 


216-7 


223-2 


230-0 


233-0 


230-3 


234-4 


230-31 226-6 


228- 


75-7 


77-0 


78-4 


85-4 


92-8 


101-7 


106-5 


112-8 


113-1 


110-6 


104 -81 99-4 


93- 


77-8 


77-5 


77-7 


77-5 


79-2 


80-8 


81-6 


82-1 


82-1 


81-4 


81-01 79-3 


77- 


86-7 


85-6 


85-4 


85-5 


89-4 


92-4 


930 


94-2 


93-6 


94-8 


91-7 


87-9 


84- 


75-5 


75-4 


75-6 


75-4 


76-5 


77-7 


78-6 


78-9 


79-0 


77-8 


78-1 


77-0 


75- 


76-2 


76-5 


76-3 


80-1 


79-9 


82-7 


85-4 


85-8 


86-4 


84-5 


84-0 


77-9 


78- 


108-1 


108-2 


108-3 


109-8 


111-3 


114-2 


1171 


118-3 


118-7 


117-4 


115-2 


111-9 


113-. 


701 


69-8 


69-4 


69-8 


70-4 


72-5 


74-7 


75-4 


75-8 


74-2 


73-1 


71 -V 


71- 


63-2 


66-1 


66-7 


90-3 


83-6 


89-9 


94-7 


921 


94-0 


89-8 


93-7 


63-0 


63 -J 


87-2 


94-2 


80-2 


84-7 


89-5 


101-1 


104-7 


110-9 


117-4 


119-9 


95-9 


74-8 


74-' 


43-3 


43-3 


45-2 


47-2 


54-0 


57-3 


60-6 


63-2 


67-2 


70-4 


67-3 


560 


53- 


161-4 


183-4 


143-4 


154-5 


146-1 


170-2 


179-0 


191-8 


213-3 


226-3 


1710 


119-4 


109- 


62-6 


63 


56-9 


58-0 


72-9 


81-5 


80-6 


84-5 


79-3 


71-5 


55-3 


52-4 


63- 


111-9 


111-7 


111-4 


116-4 


118-5 


123-6 


127-9 


127-8 


120-5 


117-1 


116-3 


118-0 


116- 


109 7 


108-9 


106-3 


110-9 


113-5 


122-2 


129-4 


129-9 


117-3 


113-3 


112-0 


114-6 


112- 


1271 


123-3 


126-7 


127-3 


125-5 


122-8 


126-9 


124-0 


123-5 


123-0 


122-4 


122-7 


126- 


111 7 


113-6 


116-4 


122-7 


125-1 


1260 


125-7 


125-3 


125-1 


122-2 


122 


122-5 


120- 


116 6 


116-7 


117-4 


119-3 


119-9 


122-1 


120-7 


121-8 


123-8 


124-6 


131 


135-9 


121- 


122-7 


122-5 


123-5 


126-0 


126-2 


128-9 


126-4 


126-8 


128-9 


130-2 


1400 147-9 


128- 


102-2 


103-1 


103-4 


104-0 


105-5 


106-4 


107-5 


110-2 


112-2 


I 111-6 


1101 


107-8 


106- 



Cargo Tonnage 


of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Five Canadian Ports 




1935 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


May 


38,916 
36,970 
39,434 
51,571 
54,183 
44,082 
48,267 


26,700 
21,528 
19,860 
29,183 
25,353 
37,491 
12,355 


97,226 

77,013 

100,307 

81,796 

62,555 

130.561 

100,591 

117,985 

137,815 


72,837 
31,740 
55, 658 
64,160 
54,925 
58,502 
63,768 
93, 087 

105,039 


131,080 
72,646 
83,660 

144,579 
91,144 
92,492 

124,831 
1,602 


92,232 
27,798 
14,867 
21,087 
15,879 
18,172 
69.181 
24,358 


387,118 
353,669 
363,215 
337,330 
365,002 
334,955 
423,247 
73,903 


28,538 
22,152 
30,748 
30,623 
25,792 
21,143 
26,171 
6,434 


255,452 
274,666 
281,992 
318,651 
298,404 
340,129 
278,738 
256,331 

265,480 


352,984 




180,589 


Julv 


236,554 




215,554 


September 


236,849 




244.024 




288,326 




268,020 


1936 
January 






302,496 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. 



Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 
and Automobile Financing. 



Classification 









1935 








1936 


Feb. 


Mar. | April 


May j June 1 July Aug. | Sept. 


Oct. 


1 Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 1 Feb. 


First of Month 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries . 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass nnd stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals (except 
coal) 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales— 

1930=100 

Boots and shoes (16) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing, men's (15) 

Clothing, women's (12) 

Departmental (37) 

Drugs (23) 

Dyers and cleaners (8) 

Furniture (7) 

Groceries and meats (34) . . 

Music and radio (9) 

Restaurants (14) 

Variety (9) 

General index (206) 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars — 

"f Number 

' Percentage change 1 

' Financing in dollars $000... 

„- Percentage change 1 



99-9 


101-0 


990 


97-9 


96-2 


95-9 


96 8 


98-5 


101 1 


103-5 


102 4 


106 1 


93-7 


94-4 


95-0 


951 


95-7 


95-9 


97-0 


98-1 


100-6 


102-5 


102-4 


104-9 


97-0 


101-1 


105 


109-9 


111-0 


104-9 


109-9 


112-3 


109-6 


104-6 


101-2 


98-5 


63-1 


68-3 


62-8 


58-9 


57-7 


59-4 


60-5 


61-3 


60-5 


64-6 


68-9 


73-8 


71-2 


710 


71-2 


69-4 


71-8 


73-3 


77-5 


78-1 


81-2 


84-5 


82-8 


87-7 


31-6 


33-4 


30-6 


29-8 


28-8 


36-9 


43-4 


48-4 


47-9 


47-1 


47-1 


51-4 


83-1 


81-4 


83-7 


82-0 


83-5 


84-9 


86-3 


85-9 


87-0 


87-9 


89-1 


90-5 


106-9 


106-9 


106-7 


107-7 


109-5 


109-8 


112-2 


112-9 


112-6 


114-6 


113-4 


118-3 


103-1 


102-4 


104-3 


104-6 


105-8 


104-5 


105-2 


105-6 


106-0 


105-0 


106-4 


104-7 


88-5 


91-1 


900 


90-2 


89-1 


90-5 


88-2 


93-5 


94-8 


98-2 


97-7 


99-4 


104-2 


107-8 


109-1 


109-4 


112-3 


112-1 


112-6 


114-8 


116-6 


116-7 


116-2 


118-9 


120-6 


123-4 


123-4 


123-1 


127-3 


127-5 


129-8 


132-2 


131-8 


133-5 


134-9 


135-6 


110-9 


113-5 


117-2 


115-8 


117-9 


120-5 


120-1 


120-4 


123-1 


122-9 


122-2 


130-8 


67-8 


62-6 


64-0 


70-0 


73-8 


75-5 


76-b 


74-8 


80-2 


76-7 


74-8 


76-0 


112-4 


112-3 


112-9 


112-5 


109-6 


109-3 


109-1 


112-1 


114-9 


114-5 


116-3 


116-0 


104-7 


104-7 


107-0 


106-5 


109-0 


111-9 


123-5 


123-2 


126-5 


126-9 


120-6 


120-8 


79-5 


80-3 


82-6 


83-8 


82-9 


82-2 


80-4 


80-3 


85-6 


89-6 


87-5 


92-6 


96-5 


89-6 


851 


93-1 


98-2 


100-0 


100-0 


102-0 


112-6 


118-4 


117-9 


117-8 


82-8 


85-4 


86-4 


86-6 


90-8 


90-7 


91-2 


91-0 


94-2 


96-4 


94-3 


98-1 


51-4 


53 


55-5 


58-4 


591 


57-2 


59-2 


58-3 


59-2 


58-0 


52-3 


65-5 


132 


134-0 


134-1 


125-1 


122-3 


124-4 


124-5 


103-2 


115-2 


145-5 


142-2 


171-3 


122-8 


121-4 


134-1 


124-0 


117-2 


123-8 


134-1 


115-1 


137-2 


137-0 


126-9 


130-7 


118-8 


120-2 


121-2 


119-3 


121-6 


122-9 


126-3 


128-6 


127-3 


128-6 


127-8 


127-2 


209-9 


212-2 


214-7 


215-3 


215-2 


219-9 


223-1 


226-9 


224-5 


228-0 


228-0 


232-9 


87-4 


88-9 


88-8 


87-3 


88-4 


93-5 


96-6 


102-9 


102-5 


103-9 


103-7 


111-3 


77-7 


76-9 


77-0 


75-7 


76-3 


76-8 


77-1 


77-1 


77-7 


77-6 


77-9 


77-8 


80-7 


81-8 


80-9 


83-2 


79-1 


80-7 


82-8 


82-7 


82-1 


80-2 


80-9 


80-6 


112-4 


114-3 


114-6 


111-9 


110-2 


112-1 


113-5 


114-5 


113-2 


112-8 


113-7 


115-6 


72-1 


73-0 


72-7 


72-9 


71-2 


71-4 


72-9 


73-1 


73-0 


71-3 


71-4 


72-1 


84-2 


88-4 


82-7 


98-6 


71-8 


79-2 


84-3 


81-7 


81-4 


77-8 


82-8 


80-2 


129-2 


142-5 


119-7 


101-7 


83-9 


79-8 


76-6 


83-2 


92-2 


101-8 


99-2 


105-6 


56-5 


58-8 


57-5 


53-2 


53-4 


51-5 


49-8 


50-8 


54-9 


60-0 


64-8 


69-8 


390-8 


550-8 


419-3 


318-6 


161-4 


110-9 


99-7 


111-4 


135-4 


169-0 


179-2 


198-0 


86-9 


850 


77-7 


62-0 


59-9 


61-2 


60-8 


68-7 


69-6 


68-1 


65-6 


71-4 


111-0 


120-5 


117-3 


121-5 


111-4 


107-0 


109-9 


110-6 


109-2 


118-1 


126-1 


125-7 


118-9 


120-7 


120-5 


121-0 


121-2 


122-6 


122-3 


122-8 


123-6 


122-8 


124-1 


128-8 


123-9 


126-8 


126-4 


127-8 


128-3 


130-9 


129-6 


130-5 


131-0 


129-2 


129-3 


135-7 


104-3 


106-2 


106-3 


105-9 


106-7 


106-5 


106-6 


107-8 


108-6 


108-5 


108-2 


108-6 


105-0 


102-1 


99-9 


99-4 


100-4 


100-9 


101-0 


102-0 


108-8 


111-2 


110-5 


112-3 


95-4 


104-1 


91-6 


92-8 


91-0 


91-9 


92-2 


94-8 


97-6 


100-0 


101-8 


104-3 


104-0 


106-7 


105-1 


103-6 


99-9 


99-9 


99-8 


100-8 


103-8 


104-9 


105 1 


109-8 


94-4 


94-1 


96-1 


93-2 


91-8 


91-7 


92-8 


95-4 


98-2 


101-5 


97-3 


99-3 


97-8 


98-2 


96-0 


92-8 


94-2 


95-3 


99-9 


100-9 


100-4 


98-4 


99-8 


102-7 


88-9 


92-9 


87-7 


87-4 


84-5 


83-7 


83-8 


85-3 


87-3 


87-7 


891 


92-4 


95-3 


101-3 


97-0 


99-9 


99-6 


96-8 


97-1 


98-6 


95-7 


94-6 


96-4 


95-7 


97-1 


98-2 


97-1 


971 


97-8 


97-4 


96-7 


970 


98-2 


98-6 


97-0 


102-0 


107-6 


108-7 


107-4 


101-9 


98-4 


99-3 


97-8 


98-2 


98-7 


101-6 


105-6 


110-3 


88-9 


89-0 


89-3 


90-0 


92-4 


92-2 


93-4 


93-6 


97-9 


99-2 


98-7 


98-8 


107-1 


118-0 


139-0 


121-4 


1111 


111-1 


104-0 


101-5 


107-9 


121-9 


122-0 


155-8 


86-1 


87-3 


87-8 


88-6 


88-5 


89-1 


89-6 


87-3 


87-5 


87-9 


89-9 


90-5 


94-4 


94-4 


91-6 


93-1 


96-8 


98-9 


97-4 


100-8 


99-5 


99-3 


98-8 


101-5 



103 

102 
102 
7(3 
78 
42 
87 
114 
105 
91 
114 
134 
120 
73 
117 
115 
91 

120 
95 
64 
144 
115 
127 
234 



77 

82 

118 

73 

85 

110 

69 

263 

88 

117 

124 

129 

109 



107-2 
101-5 
106-3 

99-2 
102-7 

95-5 

97-5 
100-6 
109-0 
101-7 
117-8 

90-5 
104-9 



1934 



Dec. 



121-5 
115-4 
94-7 
122-2 
1120 
85-4 
59- 1 
79-4 
75-3 
67-4 
53-7 
159-6 
95-2 



2,818 
+40-3 

1,060 
+43-6 



1935 



Jan. 



43-9 
39-8 
44-8 
38-3 
56-3 
72-1 
51-7 
44-8 
71-7 
37-2 
49-0 
53-2 
58-6 



2,729 
+26-5 

1,164 
+43-0 



Feb. Mar. April 



36-4 
55-6 
39-6 
39-4 
54-3 
68-9 
44-7 
55-6 
67-6 
36-1 
44-9 
57-7 
56-4 



4,249 
H-55-4 

1,984 
+75-8 



61-2 
52-2 
53-2 
61-6 
61-1 
76-8 
64-1 
63-7 
75-2 
39-7 
51-4 
67-5 



7,185 
+38-9 

2,981 
+39-3 



83-1 
78-9 
84-9 
70-6 
72-3 
71-7 
96-3 
74-8 
73-9 
35-5 
50-7 
77-9 
72-9 



12,749 
+50-1 
5,373 
+53-7 



May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



80-9 
60-8 
71-4 
60-9 
70-8 
72-0 
93-7 
77-4 
74-8 
430 
51-9 
79-5 
72-4 



14,736 
+24-8 
6,147 
+27-9 



109-8 
47-1 
75-3 
69-5 
70-8 
70-7 
900 
70-8 
71-4 
301 
49-8 
88-6 
71-6 



12,821 
+22-2 
4,956 
+16 



70-0 
44-0 
57-7 
56-3 
56-9 
71-4 
77-6 
59-2 
69-9 
26-6 
51-2 
82-8 
63-1 



11,965 
+27-6 
4,641 
+28-0 



59-2 
50-3 
50-5 
59-5 
74-2 
76-5 
78-6 
71-5 
35-2 
55-4 
83-7 
64-9 



9,081 
+21-0 

3.405 
+18-8 



68-7 
52-6 
59-5 
52-1 
71-8 
69-8 
83-2 
85-0 
69-6 
52-3 
530 
77-9 



7,285 
-4-21-9 

2,806 
+17-2 



70-7 
57-4 
87-9 
62-1 
88-4 
74-4 
88-1 
93-6 
77-3 
66-6 
54-3 
90-4 
81-0 



6,323 
+15-7 

2,364 
+17-8 



79-6 
52-3 
93-5 
62-9 
88-1 
76-8 
71-1 
84-7 
75-3 
64-0 
52-4 
91-3 
79-9 



5,849 
40-0 

2,293 
54-1 



116-7 
116-4 
100-6 
123-0 
116-2 
87-8 
56-7 
85-8 
80-9 
68-3 
55-2 
164-5 
990 



5,206 

84-7 

2,228 

110-2 



'To same month in preceding year. 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada — 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .. Number 
Liabilities $000 

Maritime Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures.. Number 

Quebec— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 

Ontario — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Prairie Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 



1935 



Jan. 



10,220 

883 

94-6 

2,682 

32,716 

107 

1,502 

434 

17 

100-1 

43-5 

1,899 

3 

1,772 

114 

89-5 

781 

8,921 

59 

6,578 
559 
100-2 
1,289 
15,672 
24 

555 

73 

89-2 

435 

4,206 

20 



120 

89-6 

132-4 

2,018 

1 



Feb. 



10,672 

3,598 

96-4 

2,089 

28.476 

130 

1,189 

504 

56 

98-6 

36-9 



1,485 

521 

91-3 

573 

8,236 

65 

6,792 
2,399 
103-5 
1,064 
12,645 
30 



378 

87-2 

298 

3,575 



911 

245 

91-9 

1181 

2,022 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



8,499 

4,010 

93-4 

2,236 

31,167 

124 



353 
41 

95-8 

39-e 

2,173 

7 

1,319 

248 

85-9 

706 

9.190 



5,273 
1,725 
100-7 
1,061 
13,785 
44 

962 
1,781 
86-9 



13 

593 

216 

91-8 

133-4 

2,183 



11,379 

6,292 

95-2 

2,367 

28, 649 

107 

1,685 

795 

116 

97-4 

42-4 

1,849 

7 

2,402 

1,806 

89-7 

656 

8,520 

35 

5,079 
3,518 
101-7 
1,043 
12,646 
40 

2,473 

583 

87-9 

486 

3,312 

18 

630 

270 

92-6 

140-1 

2,322 

7 



16,302 

4,825 

97-6 

3,132 

27,141 

101 

1,295 

1,987 
178 
101-6 
47-5 
1,639 



2,418 
1,688 
93-8 
858 
8,195 
52 

6,166 
2,152 
101-6 
1,360 
11,974 
30 

2,644 

499 

92-2 

730 

3,497 

12 

3,087 

307 

96-6 

136-7 



18,521 

5,117 

99-5 

2,710 

31,810 

109 

1,879 

3,447 

154 

106-7 

52-6 

1,762 



3,935 

1,497 

94-8 

806 

9,020 

50 

8,137 
2,339 
102-7 
1,264 
14,559 
32 

1,347 

541 

96-3 

451 

4.230 

19 

1,656 

586 

99-5 

136-5 

2,239 

2 



18,549 
4,266 
101-1 

2,545 

31,832 

110 

1,638 

1,464 

124 

106-7 

51-5 



5,123 

689 

97-2 

740 

9,738 

54 

8,819 
1,610 
102-4 
1,118 
13,385 
38 

2,454 

338 

98-7 

492 

4,454 

11 

690 
1.505 
106-8 
143-7 
2,266 
2 



23,837 
4,293 
102-7 
2,498 

26,639 

94 

1,255 

2,973 
998 
107-0 
48-5 
1,895 



11,314 
331 
99-3 

677 

8,552 

41 

6,763 
2,325 
103-9 
992 
10,841 
30 

1,337 
253 

100-5 
638 

3,341 
13 

1,451 
387 
108-0 
141-9 
2,010 
2 



14,743 
3,322 
1061 
2,426 

26,442 

98 

1,565 

1,111 
114 
112-9 
46-7 
1,827 
4 



584 
103-1 

702 

7,721 

50 



1,616 

108-1 

982 

11.454 



1,828 
714 

102-7 
564 

3,269 



740 

294 

106-0 

131-4 

2,171 

3 



14,925 
4,020 
107-7 

2,908 

30,184 

115 

1,859 

624 

115 

1111 

50-7 

1,844 

10 

6,712 
1,257 

105-0 

788 

8,594 

48 

4,967 
2,119 
1100 
1,102 
13,269 
37 

2,000 
217 

108-1 
820 

4,268 
18 

622 

313 

101-8 

147-3 



8,291 
3,315 
104-6 
3,022 
34,767 



4,365 

2,402 

99-1 

2,932 

36,134 



376 

105 

107-5 

62-5 

2,300 



2,231 

519 

103-8 

878 
9,540 



4,063 
2,306 
107 
1,301 
15,599 



1,132 

117 

101-3 

630 
4,708 



490 

268 

99-3 

149-9 

2,620 



305 

39 

108 1 

51-3 

2,761 



1, 

928 

95-5 

813 

9,836 



1936 



Jan. 



13,610 
1,284 
98-4 
2,492 

34,051 



150 

67 

102-2 

50-4 

1,970 



4,660 

284 

95-2 

829 



1.854 
1,140 
102-7 
1,301 
15,487 



768 

77 

95 1 

606 

4,995 



5,741 
457 
102-4 
1,312 
16,746 



358 

219 

92-4 

161-2 

3,055 



975 

48 

93-7 

635 

4,012 



2,086 
428 
94-1 
165-3 
2,454 



1 Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 


1934 


1935 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Mineral Productlon- 

Metals — 






























Gold 

Silver 

Nickel 


000 oz. 

000 oz. 

tons 

tons 
tons 
tons 


261-4 
1,363 
5,357 
15,685 
16,073 
13,842 


238-7 
1,244 
4.695 
16,740 
11,336 
13,086 


229-3 
1,019 
4,395 
16,734 
13,689 
10,306 


249-5 
1,279 
5,309 
18,914 
15,786 
13,468 


245-7 
1,014 
5,918 
19,424 
12,406 
11,806 


269-2 
1,613 
5,665 
17,886 
13,389 
13,694 


285-8 
1,505 
5,833 
17,807 
13,677 
14.082 


285-4 
1,163 
5,095 
15,483 
14,552 
13,784 


294-4 
1,585 
5,435 
16,302 
13,235 
14,419 


280-4 
1,312 
6,448 
16,971 
13,161 
13,519 


301-7 
1,300 
6,679 
17,717 
16,400 
13,743 


293-2 
1,614 
6,072 
17,270 
16,181 
14,409 


307-3 
1,700 

7,499 
18,278 


Lead 

Zinc 


14,784 
14,155 


Fuels — 

Coal 000 tons 

Petroleum 000 bbls. 

Natural Gas 000 M cu. ft. 


1,289 
1171 
2,415 


1,519 
124-7 

3,243 


1,017 
111-5 
2,354 


1,038 
120-5 
2,427 


892 
113-7 
2,077 


925 
123-8 
1,517 


929 
120- 1 
1,162 


980 

118-8 

908 


987 

117-7 

928 


1,117 
123-9 
1,071 


1,556 
122-5 
1,667 


1,618 
116-8 
2,046 


1,288 
125-7 
2,715 


NON-METALS— 

Asbestos 

Gypsum 

Feldspar 

BaJt (commercial] 


tons 

000 tons 

tons 

tons 


10,616 

27-7 

1,436 

11,531 


10,506 
3-6 
730 

11,136 


11,844 
3-3 
566 

10,853 


11,816 
4-5 
778 

13,794 


14,702 

26-5 

492 

21,407 


18,562 
58-3 
1,013 

22,748 


15,316 

75-5 

1,700 

16,080 


15,398 

91-5 

2,371 

23,728 


23.119 

81-2 

1,714 

15,711 


20,344 

48-1 

1,042 

18,139 


27,105 

59-3 

1,517 

20,303 


25,528 

67-7 

2,822 

26,379 


15,924 

1,072 

13,260 


Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products .... $ 000 
Lime tons 


82 

120 

34,020 


53 

80 

28,873 


71 

89 

29,018 


131 

137 

32,616 


244 

191 

35.149 


388 

260 

34,214 


431 

288 
32,451 


453 
317 

32,426 


475 

311 

32,597 


477 

311 

34,471 


513 

340 

38,263 


264 

246 

36,846 


117 

165 

32,338 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in 


Canada, 1935-1936 






Items 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


30 


7 


14 


21 


28 


4 


11 


18 


25 


1 


8 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators — 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply— 
Wheat 000,000 bushels 


4,799 

516 

221 

12 

51 

265-2 
12,443 
9,059 
632 
4,579 

•868 
•308 
•331 
1-396 
•413 

22,471 
7,060 
17,660 
10,501 

4-98 
9-25 
7-75 
804 

6,826 

1,750 

5,362 

623 

1,524 

752 

2,051 

2,658 

1,740 

12,840 

10,689 

46,815 

21,479 

38-66 
58-94 
65-63 

124-85 
46-98 
57-23 
83-24 
84-97 

114-55 
77-32 
80-03 
66-99 
69-42 
63-74 

173-2 

126-7 

15-8 

69-1 

223-8 

69-7 

147-5 

159-9 

268-6 

52-4 
294 

106-7 
67-3 

1120 

115-6 
188-6 
129-9 

74-8 
72-9 


3,040 

358 

154 

6 

25 

266-5 
12,441 
9,133 
610 
4,605 

•844 
•289 
•319 
1-375 
•399 

17,689 
5,315 

15,729 
8,533 

4-80 
9-25 
8-13 
8-54 

4,959 

1,641 

6,434 

933 

1,392 

882 

2,218 

3,078 

1,537 

12,794 

9,053 

44,921 

22,152 

33 00 
55-84 
79-75 
158-94 
48-28 
61-17 
88-97 
101-65 
102-26 
77-20 
73-23 
67-36 
72-91 
61-57 

175-6 

124-6 

150 

75-4 

2150 

69-4 

147-9 

161-7 

285-8 

50-9 
29-3 

108-4 
63-8 

111-4 

115-3 
197-4 
131-5 

74-8 
72-7 


5,353 

593 

201 

14 

49 

267-5 
12,533 
9,117 
539 
4,639 

•843 
•293 
•333 
1-425 
•413 

17,098 
6,483 

22,329 
8,427 

504 
9-50 
8-24 
901 

3,941 

1,524 

6,906 

789 

1,319 

1,114 

2,582 

2,390 

1,244 

12,650 

8,472 

42,931 

24,173 

31-27 
53-38 
88-89 

151-15 
49-29 
71-92 

100-27 
86-06 
82-44 
78-42 
74-95 
68-99 
74-67 
61-42 

180-5 

126-3 

15-5 

750 

215-8 

70-5 

148-5 

165-4 

300-5 

50-5 

29-6 
109-4 

62-5 
113-3 

118-2 
211-7 
136-7 

75-2 

72-7 


2,654 

358 

115 

9 

23 

264-8 
12,434 
9,162 
520 
4,659 

•854 
•299 
•348 
1-494 
•423 

11,361 
4,258 

22,121 
6,961 

5-18 
9-29 
8-29 
8-81 

4,958 

1,066 

5,295 

800 

1,241 

1,181 

2,584 

2,206 

1,418 

12,473 

8,428 

41,650 

23,452 

48-18 
50-52 
70-88 

150-09 
47-31 
60-19 

102-58 
90-45 
96-33 
80-22 
79-13 
72-94 
75-17 
69-13 

176-1 

124-5 

160 

76-2 

217-9 

701 

148-7 

156-2 

285-6 

49-4 
27-8 

107-6 
62-3 

110-8 

117-2 
199-3 
133-3 

74-4 
72-8 


1,799 

298 

121 

5 

26 

261-8 

12,341 

9,102 

503 

4,662 

•945 
•309 
•354 
1-529 
•426 

4,050 
2,236 
9,838 
2,922 

513 
9-50 
8-75 
8-54 

3,530 

671 

4,505 

954 

695 

925 

1,828 

1,167 

1,039 

9,105 

5,827 

30,246 

18,694 

46 00 
56-34 
71-79 
208-30 
33-22 
50-77 
88-91 
59-18 
80-79 
72-95 
70-42 
68-14 
71-33 
63 06 

176-1 

124-3 

16-3 

77-6 

212-0 

70-7 

148-8 

154-3 

291-5 

49-4 
27-6 

106-5 
62-7 

110-2 

117-0 
199-8 
133-3 

74-2 
72-6 


1,064 

262 

129 

2 

17 

261-1 

12,492 

9.162 

474 

4,681 

•852 
•322 
•356 
1-572 
•433 

11,119 
3,219 

11,687 
2,622 

5-82 
10-46 
8-82 
8-97 

3,164 

1,218 

5,619 

931 

879 

1,098 

2,092 

1,287 

1,405 

9,835 

6,930 

34,458 

20,244 

43-14 
75-28 
95-33 

230-45 
45-40 
48-63 

108-73 
67-56 

109-08 
80-95 
83-53 
74-63 
76-20 
73-87 

178-3 

125-3 

17-3 

78-6 

212-6 

721 

149-5 

155- 1 

297-9 

49-8 
28-6 

107-5 
62-4 

111-4 

116-7 
200-4 
133-1 

73-3 
72-8 


424 
169 

69 
3 

15 

256-9 
12,268 
9,077 
482 
4,689 

•851 
•333 
•356 
1-603 
•422 

15,175 
4,548 

16,809 
3,394 

5-49 
10-47 
8-77 
8-97 

3,680 

1,513 

6,896 

769 

1,031 

1,508 

2,071 

1,653 

1,503 

11,588 

8,009 

40,221 

22,305 

39-08 
63-65 
95-64 

162-24 
43-16 
48-80 
84-39 
63-38 

109-47 
81-28 
82-51 
73-53 
75-68 
71-21 

180-2 

128-8 

18-6 

79-5 

217-5 

74-9 

152-1 

152-6 

295-9 

50-8 
29-6 

110-3 
63-2 

112-8 

118-3 
205-5 
135-4 

73-1 
73-0 


795 

274 

108 

3 

17 

252-3 
12,111 

8,883 

477 

4,687 

•846 
•336 
•349 
1-605 
•421 

19,347 
5,870 

25,044 
5,340 

5-44 
9-85 

8-75 
8-67 

3,780 

1,664 

6,218 

874 

1,050 

1,422 

2,228 

1,917 

1,339 

11,947 

7,643 

40,082 

21,785 

43-65 
77-61 
92-21 
181-70 
38-98 
36-73 
88-62 
60-06 
95-03 
82-34 
74-20 
71-25 
71-99 
71-16 

187-2 

129-8 

18-9 

80-7 

232-2 

75-7 

152-9 

150-7 

301-8 

50-8 

28-8 
111-4 

63-7 
116-2 

124-0 
211-8 
141-2 

73-3 
72-9 


668 
272 

91 
2 

10 

247-8 
12,043 
8,907 
461 
4,655 

•847 
•344 
•351 
1-581 
•426 

16,246 
4,481 

17,877 
4,231 

5-09 
10-13 
8-60 
8-99 

3,747 
1,320 
6,410 
1,070 
1,115 
1,333 
2,195 
1,715 
1,099 
11,547 
7,455 
39,006 
21,036 

48-91 
64-93 
99-88 
220-16 
40-78 
32-33 
88-58 
52-33 
80-40 
78-16 
73-85 
70-17 
69-02 
73-16 

190-6 

128-2 

19-1 

80-4 

236-9 

76-5 

155-5 

152-1 

308-5 

50-6 
28-1 

112-5 
63-7 

117-8 

125-7 
215-6 
143-3 

71-9 
72-9 


645 
323 

98 
2 

11 

244-5 
11,701 

8,845 

455 

4,658 

•839 
•343 
•348 
1-601 
•425 

12,583 
3,836 

17.319 
3,575 

5-24 
10-64 
8-57 
9-02 

3,424 
1,429 
6,345 
1,145 
1,168 
1,690 
2,043 
1,963 
1,583 
11,081 
7,630 
39,501 
22,249 

44-43 
72-87 
99-87 

232-25 
39-59 
36-66 
82-08 
52-14 

114-79 
74-74 
71-24 
70-06 
70-08 
70-68 

194-4 

131-6 

19-4 

81-5 

241-9 

74-9 

156-1 

151-0 

315-9 

52-7 
30-6 

112-8 
65-9 

120-7 

131-3 

226-2 
149-9 

71-1 

72-6 


239-6 


Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver . Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor. . r. S per bush . 

Oats No. 2C.W " 


11,623 

8,793 

445 

4,672 

•830 
•347 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


•348 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W " 


1-599 
•425 


Sales and Prices of Live Stock- 
Cattle No. 


14,579 
4 534 


Hogs " 

Sheep " 

Prices at Toronto — 


18,401 
4,631 

5-06 
10-61 


Hogs, bacon " S 

Lambs, good handy weights.... " $ 


8-68 
8-78 

3,574 




1,281 


Coal 


7.181 




1,085 




1,204 




1,643 




2,174 




1,794 


Ore 


1,565 


Mdse. L.C.L 


11,931 
8,135 




41,567 


Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100— 


22,307 






Coal 




Coke 




















Ore 






79-25 






Total for Canada 


73-18 


Eastern Division 


71-99 




75-79 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices- 
Total (89) 


199-3 




136-4 


Pulp and paper (6) 


20-0 


Milling (5) 


81-9 


Oils (5) 


250-9 




73-4 


Food and allied products (18) 


157-5 


Beverages (9) 


150-7 


Miscellaneous (20) 


320-7 


Utilities— 
Total (23) 


55-0 




32-9 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


113-7 


Power and traction (19) 


68-6 


Grand total (112) 


124-2 


Mining Stocks— 
Gold (20) 


131-1 


Base Metals (3) 


229-2 


Total Index (23) 


150-3 


Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields 
(1926- 100) 


70-7 


Wholesale Price, 567 commodities (1926= 
100) 


72-4 







22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,159 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5.507 


1,725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


573 


8,475 


11,236 


6.000 


1.842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9.910 


11,998 


5,886 


1.960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,644 


I4,b42 


6.127 


2.053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1,982 


745 


14,913 


17.313 


8.007 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4,789 


2,366 


798 


16,484 


18.543 


7,923 


2,923 


1930 


37,491 


302 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13,137 


15.044 


6,279 


2.323 


1931 


31,586 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13.377 


5,201 


1.806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


188 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11.259 


4,797 


1.503 


1933 


29,981 


254 


154 


7,944 


10,222 


4,798 


1,207 


481 


8,567 


13,027 


6,414 


1.492 


1934 


32,867 


276 


171 


8,835 


11,389 


4,682 


1,321 


534 


9,450 


14,920 


6,337 


1,626 


1935 


31,546 


310 


173 


8,307 


10,643 


4,633 


1,350 


574 


8,978 


13,877 


6,445 


1,672 



Clearing House 


| 










1935 














1936 


Centres 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct* 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 


:, 

6-7 
13.7 


S 

19-1 
6-7 
11-1 


t 

20-8 
6-4 
12-7 


$ 

22-5 

6-8 

13-2 


S 

23-4 

7-6 

16-4 


$ 

26-2 

8-8 

17-6 


$ 

29 1 

7-9 

14-5 


s 

26-2 

7-5 

14-8 


8 

25-6 
7-3 
13-8 


S 

280 
8-0 
14-7 


37-9 
8-3 
16-3 


$ 

28-3 
8-6 
14-4 


$ 
29-5 




7-3 


Saint John.. 


13-6 


Totals 


43-5 


36-9 


39-9 


42-4 


47-5 


52-6 


51-5 


48-5 


46-7 


50-7 


62-5 


51-3 


50-4 






Quebec; — 


725-8 

50-3 

6-2 


536-9 
31-8 
3-9 


637-9 
63-3 
4-6 


609-6 

41-2 

4-7 


808-4 

44-8 

5-3 


733-6 

66-6 

60 


685-7 

48-6 

5-2 


625-7 

46-1 

5-3 


652-3 

44-4 

4-9 


732-0 

49-3 

6-5 


801-9 
70-2 
6-1 


757-2 

50-5 

5-7 


780-9 




42-8 


Sherbrooke 


5-3 


Totals 


781-3 


572-6 


705-8 


655-5 


858-5 


806-2 


739-5 


677-1 


701-6 


787-8 


878-2 


813-4 


829-0 


Ontario — 
Brantford 


6-7 
6-6 
3-8 

41-9 
4-3 
8-8 

291 

145-8 

4-3 

5-7 

38 

1,009-1 

19-4 


6-5 

5-5 

3-8 

37-5 

3-9 

8-2 

24-3 

128-4 

3-4 

4-6 

3-8 

813-1 

20-6 


7-0 
5-9 
3-6 

39-4 
3-8 
8-5 

24-7 
106-2 
4-1 
5-1 
4-3 
825-7 

22-6 


7-5 
5-4 
3-9 

41-5 
4-1 
8-6 

27-4 

108-0 

4-7 

4-8 

4-3 

800-3 

22-3 


8-4 
6-4 
3-7 

49-5 
4-5 

10-6 

32-0 

140-5 

50 

6-0 

4-8 

1,062-3 

26-1 


8-7 
6-6 
4-8 

52-6 
4-8 
9-9 

39-4 

134-3 

4-9 

6-6 

4-8 

962-8 

23-5 


9-3 
7-0 
3-9 

46-8 
4-8 
9-6 

31-5 

129-8 

6 5 

6-4 

4-5 

838-3 

20-0 


6-7 
5-4 
4-7 

42-9 
4-3 
8-9 

28-1 

89-2 

4-5 

6-0 

4-5 

770-0 

17-2 


7-4 
5-7 

4-2 

46-8 

4-3 

8-7 

27-1 

92-8 

51 

5-7 

4-7 

751-6 

18-4 


8-4 

6-2 

4-4 

50-3 

5-5 

10-9 

29-2 

117-7 

5-5 

61 

4-8 

823-8 

29-0 


7-9 

10-1 

4-5 

58-4 

5-2 

10-2 

35-5 

121-7 

5-6 

6-0 

5-6 

999-2 

30-9 


9-7 
9-0 
4-9 

51-7 
6-1 

11-3 

34-3 

129-7 

6-3 

6-4 

5-5 

986-3 

39-4 


7-9 
11-3 


Fort William 


3-9 

49-9 




50 




9-9 




36-0 




108-6 


Peterborough 


5-1 
6-6 




4-8 




1,017-7 




45-6 






Totals 


1,289-5 


1,063-5 


1,060-8 


1,042-8 


1,3600 


1,263-7 


1,118-4 


992-4 


982-4 


1,101-8 


1,300-9 


1,300-6 


1,312-4 


Prairie Provinces- 


2-3 

45-1 

37-4 

3-4 

1-7 

4-4 

1-5 

35-1 

7-1 

297-3 


1-9 

35-8 

26-4 

2-9 

1-7 

3-4 

1-6 

191 

7-1 

198-2 


1-9 

38-3 

30-3 

31 

1-9 

3-3 

1-8 

30-3 

6-9 

178-1 


2-1 

49-8 

431 

3-5 

1-9 

3-6 

2-2 

31 5 

8-8 

339-5 


22 

46-6 
34-7 
3-7 
20 
41 
2-2 
72-5 
9-6 
552-2 


21 

48-6 

34-6 

4-2 

21 

4-3 

2-3 

33-7 

8-8 

310-5 


20 

491 

33-7 

4-6 

2-2 

4-6 

2-2 

39-5 

9-6 

344-6 


1-9 

48-2 

310 

4-4 

2-3 

4-5 

1-9 

38-0 

8-6 

497-0 


2-1 

49-2 

29-6 

5-3 

3-1 

50 

1-9 

45-6 

9-8 

412-2 


2-5 
82-8 
35-2 
50 
3-4 
5-8 
2-4 
65-2 
13-2 
604-3 


2-5 

63-9 

31-8 

4-5 

2-5 

5-5 

2-1 

48-1 

10-6 

458-4 


2-2 

59-5 

32-6 

4-4 

2-6 

5-4 

2-2 

46-6 

10-0 

440-4 


2-1 




49-3 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 


37-6 
3-6 
2-1 
4-5 
1-9 

33-5 




8-5 




491-9 






Totals 


435-4 


297-9 


295-9 


485-9 


729-8 


451-3 


492-0 


637-8 


563-8 


819-9 


629-9 


605-8 


635-0 


British Coltjmbia- 
New Westminster 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


3-9 

109-3 

19-1 


3-8 
94-4 
20 


4-6 
108-5 
20-3 


4-6 
114-2 
21-2 


4-7 
1130 
190 


4-8 
106-9 
24-8 


5-4 
113-7 
24-5 


5-3 
116-3 
20-3 


5-4 
104-1 
21-8 


6-1 
118-1 
23-1 


5-7 
121-5 
22-7 


5-5 

129-8 

25-9 


50 

137-7 
22-6 


Totals 


132-4 


118-1 


133-4 


140-1 


136-7 


136-5 


143-7 


141-9 


131-4 


147-3 


149-9 


161-2 


165-3 


Totals Canada 


2,682-1 


2,089-0 


2,235-8 


2,366-7 


3,132-2 


2,710-3 


2,5451 


2,497-6 


2,425-9 


2,907-5 


3,021-5 


2,932-3 


2,992-1 


Bank clearings 


1,310 


1,038 


1,230 


1,252 


1,654 


1,561 


1,380 


1,376 


1,334 


1.583 


1,695 


1,516 


1,551 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 


1934 












1935 














1936 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb 


Employ- 
ment- 


86-7 
92-4 
97-1 
96-0 
86-1 
77-9 
87-1 


84-8 
88-9 
95-8 
97-5 
83-0 
88-4 
85 -fi 


81-6 
900 
93-0 
98-2 
84-6 
109-1 
82-6 
88-0 


86-3 
94-0 
94-0 
99-0 
85-8 
127-0 
83-3 
900 


83-8 
93-4 
94-8 
99-3 
87-7 
132-6 
83-5 
89-7 


86-3 
96-7 
96-7 

101-3 
90-3 

133-5 
85-5 
93-4 


87-2 
95-8 
97-9 

103-5 
93-5 

123-5 
87-0 
96-5 


86-8 
99-0 
97-7 

106-2 
93-9 

113-4 
89-1 
99-9 


87-2 
100-9 

97-2 
104-3 

95-4 
106-6 

90-6 
101-7 


88-7 
102-8 

98-7 
103-9 

95-2 
105-2 

901 
105-7 


91-5 
101-8 
101-1 
105-6 
100-1 
106-8 

911 
103-5 


91-7 
100-5 
101-7 
104-0 
101-4 
115-4 

91-4 
101-3 


91-9 
99*0 
100-8 
103-6 
100-4 
118-7 
94-1 
100-3 


86-4 
93-5 
100-6 
103-2 
95-7 
116-4 
91-9 
97-2 


87-6 




92-0 




96-4 




99-5 




96-8 


Windsor 


120-0 




91-2 




89-01 M-7 


97-8 





















MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-* 


3ne Cities in 


Canada in Thousands of Dollars 




1935 


1936 


City 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. x 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Building Permits— 

Prince Edward Isd 
Charlottetown 




10 




20 


25 


42 


24 


5 


23 


15 


4 


2 


3 


Nova Scotia 


14 


35 


26 


58 


114 


77 


65 


96S 


62 


85 


81 


32 


53 




12 
2 


30 
4 
2 


25 

i 


56 
2 

1 


104 
3 

8 


68 
2 
7 


50 

1 

15 


963 
1 
5 


52 
5 
5 


84 
1 


71 

2 
8 


32 


51 


New Glasgow 

Sydney 






2 


New Brunswick. . . 


3 


10 


15 


37 


40 


35 


35 


25 


29 


16 


20 


4 


11 


Fredericton 










1 
21 
18 


17 

18 


8 
13 
14 


1 
6 
18 


5 
8 

16 


2 
2 
12 








3 


8 
3 


4 
11 


18 
19 


10 
10 


4 


11 


Saint John 




Quebec 


114 


521 


248 


1,806 


1,688 


1,497 


689 


331 


584 


1,257 


519 


928 


284 


Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


86 
23 


488 
17 


192 
25 

2 
11 

6 
13 


1,681 

60 

1 

35 

5 

25 


567 
1,053 
14 
31 
12 
10 


1,408 

35 

3 

20 
14 
18 


547 
88 

3 
20 

5 
26 


257 

55 

1 

6 

1 

11 


'360 

168 

1 

16 
2 
36 


675 

530 

27 

15 

2 

7 


428 
60 

i<5 

1 
13 


740 

27 

1 

135 

3 

23 


266 
2 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 




4 

1 


7 
4 
6 


10 
2 
5 


Ontario 


559 


2,399 


1,725 


3,518 


2,152 


2,339 


1,610 


2,325 


1,616 


2,119 


2,306 


1,140 


457 








3 

28 
13 
8 
9 
4 
48 

20 

100 

1 

332 
5 
3 
3 

5 
1 
3 

7 
1,022 

72 
11 
15 
2 

1 


14 
13 

7 
16 

6 

24 

916 

23 

55 

1,065 

1 

3 
250 

6 
12 
28 

9 
23 

2 

9 

17 
616 

274 
12 
99 
3 

1 


11 
31 
14 

8 
11 
11 
109 
48 
95 
57 

5 

6 
259 

5 
15 
42 

2 
17 

3 

10 

15 

1,179 

141 

6 

33 


8 

33 

7 

43 

262 

158 

86 

24 

24 

62 

15 
203 
13 
63 
20 

5 
25 

7 
15 

9 
1,027 

188 
5 
18 
2 

1 


10 
33 

6 
34 

7 

27 
100 
35 
91 
59 
10 

6 
100 

15 
16 

8 

27 
60 
11 

9 
736 

173 

8 

15 

3 

1 


86 

32 

9 

12 

42 

12 

142 

11 

106 

30 

1 

72 

753 

5 

38 

11 

5 

55 

9 

27 
702 

133 

4 

11 

1 

2 


1 
18 

4 

16 
44 
11 
143 
19 
16 
52 
43 
17 
63 

7 

13 
25 

5 

31 
14 

8 

10 
630 

126 
4 

286 


12 

35 

5 

11 

3 

14 

51 

37 

61 

89 

6 

2 

590 

1 

24 

11 

10 

8 

4 

7 

9 

783 

155 

22 

156 


ie 

2 
4 
2 
16 
142 
15 
78 
253 

2 

358 
4 

10 
5 

41 

1 

5 

6 

1,098 

220 
3 

18 


1 
17 
22 

1 

1 

48 

32 

. 13 

1 

25 

1 
3 
1 
5 
5 

36 
3 

17 
740 

139 


1 


Brantford 

Chatham 

Fort William 

Gait 


10 

i 

5 

37 


9 
21 

3 

56 


17 
3 

2 








51 


Kingston 


3 


2 

8 
2 
1 

7 

1 


10 
48 
21 

* "i.isi 

l 


8 


London 

Niagara Falls 

Oshawa 


17 

1 

1 

22 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 


3 






2 






1 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


1 

3 

445 

24 


4 

2 
1,025 

33 


4 


Sault Ste. Marie... 


1 
201 


York and East 
Townships 


53 


Windsor 1 


6 


10 


9 


63 


East Windsor.... 

Riverside 

Sandwich 

Walkerville 

Woodstock 








1 


3 
























8 

7 


6 
13 


3 
11 


4 

6 


2 
13 












4 




9 


6 


8 


6 


20 


2 


Manitoba 


40 


306 


1,523 


116 


181 


189 


158 


103 


117 


115 


56 


42 


34 




i 

40 


4 

10 
292 


1 

2 
1,520 


53 
4 
59 


8 

4 

169 


3 

5 

182 


11 
27 
119 


27 

1 

74 


2 
30 

85 


1 

18 
95 


2 
55 


9 

33 


4 


St. Boniface 

Winnipeg 


30 


Saskatchewan 


19 


8 


45 


59 


143 


39 


25 


28 


491 


18 


30 


9 


5 


Moose Jaw 


7 
7 


8 


4 

21 
20 


21 
18 
20 


88 
18 

36 


31 

7 


1 

15 
10 


5 

7 
16 


5 

479 

7 


5 

7 
6 






4 


23 

7 


1 
8 




Saskatoon 


1 


Alberta 


14 


63 


213 


409 


175 


312 


156 


122 


106 


84 


31 


26 


9 




5 

7 


56 
6 
1 


181 
19 
11 

2 


108 

280 

16 

4 


72 

72 

28 

3 


238 

66 

8 


78 

63 

12 

3 


58 
53 
10 


55 

42 

9 


18 
50 

16 

1 


16 
6 
5 
4 


14 
11 

1 


7 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 


2 
















British Columbia... 


120 


245 


216 


270 


307 


586 


1,505 


387 


294 


313 


268 


219 


428 






3 
2 

26 

2 

168 

3 

41 


2 
3 

6 

3 

168 

33 


3 

3 
33 

2 
199 

4 
28 


7 

4 
16 

3 
203 

5 
69 


29 
3 
18 

■'■*608 

1 
27 


6 

5 
27 

2 
1,377 

3 
84 


2 

1 

11 

22 

309 

1 

41 


5 

3 
9 
1 
246 
1 
27 


5 
3 

24 
3 

248 

1 

29 


3 

3 

16 

3 

217 


3 

6 
20 

'"i64 


I 




2 

5 


7 


New Westminster. 


17 
2 


Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 
Victoria 


86 
26 


359 


25 


25 


40 






Total <51 cities... 


883 


3,598 


4,010 


6,292 


4,825 


5,117 


4,266 


4,293 


3,322 


4,020 


3,315 


2,402 


1,284 



1 Includes East Windsor, Sandwich and Walkerville, formerly shown separately, amalgamated with Windsor as from 
September, 1935. 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products.. 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals. 
Chemicals 



Purpose — Consumers' goods.. 
Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field Origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PHODUCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin — Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals.. 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products. . . 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured .... 



Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products. 



Cotton , raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. 



Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets..., 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products. 



Lead and its products 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Clay and allied material prod'ts 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 



Asbestos... 
Fertilizers. 



1935 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



71-4 



67-3 
71-4 
64-8 
86-9 
64-0 
86-4 
80-6 

73-4 
68-5 
68-5 
89-7 
66-1 

81-8 
63-4 

64-9 

73-7 

55-6 

73 

65-3 

69-0 

67-8 

68 

55-7 

71-0 

61 

66 

75 

72 

75 

56-0 

64-9 

78-0 



76-3 

57-9 

70-6 

58-1 

83-9 

41-4 

73-9 

61-5 

60 

74-7 

85-8 
69-4 
65-0 
67-0 
58-9 
73-2 
82-3 
81-3 
24- 1 
50-8 

44-1 
79-6 
54-0 
77-6 
69-3 
83-0 
91-2 
50-9 
81-0 
65-3 

41-0 
87-8 
41-4 
88-4 
91-6 
93-2 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 
75-8 



71 9 

671 

69- 

71- 
64- 

87- 
63- 



74 

69 

69-3 

89-7 

66-5 

81-6 
63 

65-2 

74 

55 

73 

65 

69 

70 

70 1 

55-7 

72 

620 

66-3 

75 

72 

750 

63- 

68- 

78- 

85- 

82- 

75- 

57- 

70- 

581 

83-5 

390 

73-8 

52-5 

57 

75-3 

85-8 

74-4 

66-5 

71-4 

57-0 

73-4 

82 

81 

23-8 

50-8 

44-1 
79-9 
54 
77-4 
69-4 
830 
91-9 
60-9 
81-2 
54-7 

410 
88-3 
41-3 
88-4 
91-7 
931 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 

75-8 



720 

67-5 
69-8 
70-7 
64-6 
87-6 
65 2 
85-9 
80-5 

73-7 
70-2 
69-3 
89-7 
67- 

81- 
64- 

65- 

74- 

561 

73 

65 

70 

70-0 

70 

56-4 

73-3 

62 

70 

75-5 

741 

74 

63 

68-6 

78-1 

860 

82-5 

77-7 
58-4 
71-2 
57-6 
83-7 
390 
74-7 
52-5 
56-4 
75-3 

85-8 

811 

68-6 

71-6 

48-6 

680 

82-3 

81-3 

22 

50 

42-5 

79 

540 

77-1 

69 

830 

92-2 

53-9 

810 

55-6 

41-9 
96-2 
41-3 
88-4 
90-2 
93-1 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 
75-8 



72 5 



70-3 

63-9 

87-4 

67-9 

85 

80-2 

73 

70-3 
70-7 
89-9 

68- 

80- 
66-4 

66 

74-3 

58 

74 

67-3 

70-0 



72-9 

64 

67 

73-6 

720 

73 

63 

67 

79 

85 

82 

77-5 

62 

74-1 

57-6 

83 

41-4 

72-9 

52-5 

61-5 

75-3 

85 

851 

700 

69-5 

44-3 

691 

82-3 

83 

23 

50 

42 5 

79-6 

54-0 

76-0 

66 

83 

91-9 

61 

78-2 

58-6 

42-9 
110-4 
41-9 
88-4 
90-0 
93 

75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

81-3 

75-8 



72 3 



105 



75-8 
75-8 



71 5 

66 
68 
70 
64 
87 
69 
85 
79 



72 



67 



75-8 
75-8 



71-5 

66-4 

68 

70 

64-2 

87-1 

68-9 

84-6 

79 



73-1 
69 

68 
89 
66 



81 
63-7 

65-2 

72 

55-9 

72-0 

64-6 

69-7 

68-1 

68 

55-7 

71 

61-5 

57-4 

72-5 

68-4 

73-7 

56-0 

64 

79-2 

84-9 

82-4 

80-3 

56-4 

66-2 

56-4 

83-4 

41-4 

69 

510 

60 

78-0 

85 

81 

73-3 

63-2 

55-8 

72-1 

82-3 

83-0 

23-6 

50-8 

55-5 
83-2 
54-0 
77-5 
65-1 
83-0 
921 
55-4 
77-9 
57-7 

48-3 
110-4 
44-3 
88-4 
90-2 
93-1 
74-0 
99-7 
105-2 

75-8 
75-8 



71-6 

65 
69 
70 
64 
87 
69 
84 
79 

73 



66 



105 



75-8 
75-8 



72-3 

67-2 

72-0 

68-8 

65-0 

87 

711 

85-2 

76 

73-3 
70-7 
70-2 
89-8 
68-0 

81-1 
65-5 

67-2 

72-4 

57-2 

71-7 

65-0 

73-3 

71-0 

72-0 

58 

75 

64 

66 

69 

68 

75 

56-2 

65-1 

80-4 

84-7 

82-8 

77-3 
60- 

68- 

55- 

80- 

41-4 

71-7 

52-7 

73-7 



80-6 
74-2 
66-5 
69-5 
63-7 
82-1 
83-0 
300 
50 



53-3 
106-3 
47-9 
88-4 
91-4 
931 
74-6 
99-7 
105-2 

75-8 

75 8 



73 



66 



85 
74 

72 
71 
75 
66 
82 
82 
34 
49 

54 

84 
54 
78 
66 
83 
92 
55 
78 
65 

58 
107 

50 

88 

92 

93 

73 

99 
105 

75-8 
76 



72-7 

67-3 
72-9 
69 

65 
87 
73 

85 

77 

74 

72 
69 
89 
67 

80 



75-8 
75 



72-6 



67-0 
72- 

69 
65 
87 
71 

85 

77 



66 



75-8 
75-8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description 1 


1935 1 1936 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Wholesale Prices of Important 


$ 


S 


1 


$ 


I 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


5 


3 


S 


$ 


Commodities- 




























Oats, No. 2C.W bush. 


• 442 


-427 


•411 


•422 


•408 


•398 


•429 


•363 


•360 


•340 


•319 


•298 


•337 


Wheat, No.l Man. Northern " 


•790 


-795 


•819 


•876 


•857 


•817 


•814 


•845 


•903 


•908 


•857 


•847 


•848 


Flour, First Patent 2-98's 




























jute 


5-200 


5-300 


5-400 


5-700 


5-300 


4-900 


5-100 


5-300 


5-700 


5-800 


5-700 


5-700 


5-800 


Sugar, Br. West Indies, 




Montreal 2 cwt. 


1-900 


1-850 


1-900 


1-940 


1-980 


1-900 


1-770 


1-875 


1-850 


1-968 


1-901 


1-950 


1-950 


Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


Rubber, Ceylon, ribbed, 




























smoked sheets, N.Y. 8 lb. 


-131 


•129 


•116 


•116 


•121 


•126 


•121 


•120 


•117 


•129 


•133 


•133 


•144 


Cattle, steers, good, over 




























1,050 lbs cwt. 


5-540 


5-950 


6-800 


7-110 


7-200 


6-760 


6-400 


6-550 


6-800 


6-010 


5-800 


6-330 


6-290 


Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 


8-560 


8-600 


8-170 


8-740 


9-390 


9-920 


9-660 


9-920 


9-380 


8-940 


7-990 


8-400 


8-450 


Beef hides, packer hides, 




























native steers lb. 


•110 


•100 


•093 


•105 


•115 


•115 


•120 


•120 


•128 


•153 


•153 


•148 


•153 


Leather, green hide crops... " 


•290 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•320 


•340 


•360 


•360 


•370 


Box sides, B, Oshawa ft. 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•2C0 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•220 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


Butter, creamery, finest, 




























Montreal lb. 


•246 


•268 


•259 


•250 


•232 


•220 


•219 


•226 


•247 


•263 


•274 


•278 


•277 


Cheese, Canadian, old, large, 




























Montreal " 


•150 


•150 


•160 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•140 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


Eggs, Grade "A", Montreal doz. 


•310 


•308 


•239 


•213 


•221 


•244 


•268 


•304 


•364 


•403 


•435 


•424 


•319 


Cotton, raw 1-11/16", Ham- 




























ilton lb. 


•143 


•145 


•134 


•137 


•143 


•138 


•143 


•139 


•126 


•133 


•145 


•139 


•136 






























single " 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•275 


•290 


•290 


•290 


Bleached flannelette, 4-50 




























yds. to lb " 


•489 


•489 


•484 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


Gingham, dress, fl 1-50-7 -75 




yds. to lb " 


•959 
1-710 


•959 
1-729 


•959 
1-608 


•959 
1-738 


•959 
1-720 


•959 
1-644 


•959 
1-724 


•959 
2-008 


•797 
2-090 


•797 
2-337 


•797 
2-337 


•797 
2-208 


•797 


Silk, raw, New York» " 


2-130 


Wool, eastern bright J blood " 


•140 


•140 


•130 


•130 


•140 


•150 


•165 


•165 


•160 


•160 


•180 


•180 


•190 


Wool, western range, semi- 




























bright, * blood " 


•130 
19-786 


•130 
19-802 


•130 

19-688 


•130 
19-107 


•140 
19 063 


•150 
18-995 


•185 
18-434 


•180 
19-060 


•180 
18-922 


•180 
19-027 


•190 
20-653 


•190 
19-593 


•200 


Pulp, ground wood No.. 1 ton 


20-485 


Pig iron, malleable " 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


Steel, merchant bars, mill 100 lb. 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


Copper, electrolytic, domes- 




























tic cwt. 


7-475 


7-238 


7-474 


8-252 


8-718 


8-221 


8-316 


8-677 


9-129 


9-540 


9-413 


9-407 


9-279 


Lead, domestic, Montreal " 


3-250 


3-250 


3-321 


3-46 


3-686 


3-711 


3-882 


4-164 


4-298 


4-716 


4-740 


4-655 


4-362 


Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto, lb. 


•550 


•543 


•525 


■565 


•573 


•568 


•570 


•535 


•540 


•560 


•570 


•555 


•528 


Zinc, domestic, Montreal., cwt. 


3-650 


3-640 


3-636 


3-690 


3-943 


3-816 


3-905 


4-080 


4-224 


4-467 


4-490 


4-364 


4-221 


Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 


12-454 


12-454 


11021 


10-730 


10-898 


11-178 


11-469 


11-760 


12-050 


12-340 


12-340 


12-340 


12-342 


Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 




























of-mine " 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 


Gasoline. Toronto gal. 


•140 


Sulphuric acid,66°Beaume,net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices in 


16-000 


16 000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 




























Other Countries* — 




























United States- 




























Fisher, 200: 1926 


81-0 
78-8 


820 
79-5 


81-3 
79-4 


81-6 
801 


82-3 
80-2 


820 

79-8 


82-1 

79-4 


83-8 
80-5 


85-1 
80-7 


85-4 


84-7 


84-2 


84-0 


Bureau of Labour, 784: 1925. . 
Annalist, 72: 1913 




122-6 


124-3 


123-5 


125-8 


126-0 


123-2 


123-6 


126-8 


127-6 


i29-2 


i28-3 


129-4 




United Kingdom — 




Board of Trade, 150: 1930. . . . 


88.3 


88.0 


86.9 


87.5 


88-2 


88-4 


88-0 


88-4 


89-6 


91-1 


91 2 


91-4 




Economist, ,58: 1927 


66-6 


66-4 


661 


66-7 


68-6 


68-1 


67-6 


69-9 












Frnnce, Statistique General, 




























126: 1913 


350 


343 


335 


336 


340 


330 


322 


330 


332 


342 


348 


354 




Germany, Federal Statistical 




Office, 400: 1913 


101-1 


100-9 


100-7 


100-8 


100-8 


101-2 


101-8 


102.4 


102-3 


102-8 


103-1 


103-4 




Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 




130: 1914 


472 


466 


464 


531 


552 


555 


553 


552 


560 


574 


582 


579 




Netherlands, Central Bureau 




Statistics, 48: 1913 


78 
125 


77 
125 


75 
126 


76 
125 


75 
125 


75 
126 


74 
127 


73 
128 


75 
128 


78 
130 


78 






Norway, Official. 95: 1913 






Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 




























1913 


115 

277 


115 

278 


115 

288 


115 

296 


115 

302 


116 
308 


116 
310 


115 

323 


115 

330 


117 


118 






Italy, Bachi, 150: 1913 






Finland, Official, 139: 1926 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


91 


""92 


""91 


""91 


"96 


India, Dept. of Statistics, 72: 




























1914 


94 
137-1 


90 
1391 


87 
138-6 


88 
137-7 


91 
137-8 


91 

136-2 


91 
136-2 


89 
138-2 


89 
142-7 


93 

146-6 


91 
146-3 


145-0 




Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 




Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 




























tistician, 92: 1913 


1341 


133.4 


132.6 


132-7 


134-0 


134-7 


135-9 


137-7 


137-4 


137-8 








New Zealand, Official, 180: 








1909-1913 


134-5 


1360 


136-5 


136-7 


1371 


138-3 


139-5 


140-3 


143-0 


144-6 


142-8 






Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 




Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 


100 


100 


96 


92 


92 


94 


85 


96 


92 


96 


94 


94 









'For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 
oation for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 
'For month of nearest delivery when spot quotations not available. 
•Canadian Funds. 
'The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



Appli- 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 









Imports of Merchandise for Consumption in Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1933 


$000 

32,927 
33.619 
35.698 
38.747 
38.698 
41,070 
43,712 
35,368 

32,391 
33,592 
47,519 
34,815 

52,887 
46,186 
44,145 
43,507 
42.208 
47,229 
49,884 
39,108 

37,229 
37,014 
48,191 
36,637 
54,540 
46,732 
48.414 
49,560 
44,689 
52,751 
55,958 
38,569 

40,590 


$000 

7,666 
7.855 
7.061 
7,676 
7,575 
8,329 
10.517 
8,215 

5,825 
7,429 
8.737 
7.528 

10.629 
9.141 

10,171 
8.970 
8.646 

10,632 

11,728 
9,766 

7.020 
6,791 
8,397 
6,427 
13,399 
10.405 
10,162 
8,949 
8,072 
9,292 
12,451 
8,334 

6,203 


$000 

1,580 
1,670 
1,608 
1,979 
1,778 
1.934 
1,588 
1,351 

1,639 

1,538 
2,335 
1,646 
1.747 
1,678 
1,635 
1.716 
1,731 
1,606 
1,615 
1,350 

1,581 
1.574 
2,078 
1,600 
2,216 
1,707 
1,809 
2,070 
1,930 
2,061 
2,235 
1,766 

1.854 


$000 

4.700 
5,441 
6,452 
7,272 
6,749 
7,302 
7.241 
7.254 

6,521 
7,202 
9,928 
6,085 
8,140 
6,896 
6,215 
6,620 
6,254 
6,254 
7,372 
6,387 

6,781 
6,250 
8.546 
6,293 
5,833 
6.197 
7,074 
9,163 
6,691 
7,350 
7,759 
7,261 

8,402 


$000 

1,416 
1.497 
1.615 
1,743 
1,690 
1,933 
1,903 
1,565 

1,536 
1,394 
1,981 
1,369 
1,878 
1,657 
1,668 
1,766 
1,852 
1,984 
2,027 
1,743 

1,584 
1,611 
2,061 
1,577 
1,974 
1,763 
1,819 
1,902 
1,963 
2,267 
2,301 
1,641 

1,783 


$000 

5,529 
5,540 
5,636 
6,046 
5,353 
5,328 
5,929 
5,228 

5,763 
5,804 
9,324 
7,800 
12,196 
9,368 
8,525 
7,138 
6.782 
6,770 
7,282 
6,864 

7,384 
8,322 

11,626 
9,192 

11,903 
9,421 
8.855 
9,389 
8,625 

10,556 

10,780 
6,084 

9,088 


$000 

1,490 
1,498 
1,307 
1,516 
2,117 
2.180 
2,091 
1,641 

1,571 
1,613 
2,235 
1,681 
2,478 
2,551 
1,936 
2,261 
1,851 
2,460 
2.745 
2,577 

2.454 
2.392 
3.110 
2,073 
3.226 
2.571 
3,684 
3,019 
2,340 
2,867 
3,307 
2,571 

2,487 


$000 

6,252 

5,977 

7,116 

7,753 

8,371 

9,013 

9,181. 

6,351 

6,012 
5,423 
7,926 
4,760 
10,230 
9.881 
9,131 
10.357 
10.428 
10,546 
11.089 
6,207 

6.553 

6.299 

6,943 

5,411 

10,313 

9,946 

9,967 

9,472 

10,218 

11,479 

10,731 

6,504 

6,720 


$000 

2,330 
2,144 
2.358 
2.054 
2,544 
2,347 
2,727 
1,948 

1,880 
1,578 
2,448 
2,043 
3,052 
2,722 
2,204 
2,194 
2.20! 
2,637 
3,118 
2,078 

2,134 
2.012 
2,482 
2.056 
2,990 
2,420 
2,227 
2,455 
2,364 
3,064 
3,483 
2,071 

2,144 


$000 
1,964 




1.995 


July 


2,545 




2,708 
2,523 
2 704 








2,536 




1,818 


1934 


1,644 




1,612 




2,606 




1,903 




2,537 




2,292 


July 


2,660 




2.485 


September 


2,463 
4,341 


November 

December 


2,907 
2,135 


1935 


1 740 




1,793 


March 


2.933 
2,008 


May 


2,693 
2,310 


July 


2,817 
3,140 




2,486 


October 


3,814 


November 


2,911 


December 

1936 

January 


2,338 
1,910 











Exports of Merchandise from Canada 












Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 










Domest 


c Produce 








Balance 

of 
Trade 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1933 


$000 

46,109 
46,472 
51,866 
45,135 
58.329 
61,035 
60,926 
51,624 

47,118 
38,365 
58.364 
32.047 
58.543 
58.643 
56,787 
55.837 
58.815 
68.313 
65,677 
61,395 

44,374 
47.677 
59,026 
38,296 
62,947 
52,763 
57.786 
71,700 
66,152 
85,749 
85.317 
70, 565 

54.417 


$000 

45,576 
45,968 
51,345 
44,723 
57,785 
60.489 
60.385 
50,929 

46,652 
37,842 
57.637 
31.582 
57.900 
58.046 
56,121 
55,249 
58.135 
67,748 
65,125 
60.850 

43,902 
46,719 
58,098 
37,575 
62,101 
51,869 
56,239 
70,738 
64,565 
84,953 
84,115 
68,419 

53,538 


$000 

18,148 
15,942 
17,746 
12,386 
22,520 
25,348 
26,016 
20.628 

14,694 
11,903 
15,807 
6,866 
20, 143 
19,743 
16,519 
19,197 
22,799 
29.950 
26.016 
25.743 

11.053 
12,609 
15,595 
9.389 
17,606 
11,819 
14,231 
23,159 
20,965 
35,943 
34,489 
22,963 

12,795 


$000 

4,378 
5,569 
6.816 
6,324 
7,326 
6,911 
6.679 
7,012 

8,272 
5,321 
8,064 
3,902 
5,815 
6,786 
7,719 
7,061 
6,617 
7,650 
7,517 
7,846 

9,159 
8,337 
8,440 
5,157 
7,820 
6,954 
7,408 
7,527 
8,551 
9,960 
9,614 
8,293 

10,249 


$000 

624 
634 
754 
783 
1,168 
859 
701 
488 

410 

428 
836 
303 
810 
823 
616 
601 
614 
799 
627 
468 

531 

556 
774 
366 
939 
838 

1,168 
883 
968 
982 

1,010 
626 

703 


$000 

10,976 
11,175 
13,000 
13,937 
13,567 
12,903 
11,935 
11,899 

11,567 
9,447 
15,596 
9,300 
13,773 
13,684 
15,013 
14.680 
13.879 
14,402 
14,444 
14,924 

11,685 
10.618 
14.104 
9,795 
15,360 
15.409 
15,092 
17,141 
15,667 
17.255 
16,578 
17,167 

12,362 


$000 

1,935 
2,198 
2,225 
1,750 
2,336 
2,901 
1,902 
2.032 

1.967 
2,505 
3,856 
2,581 
3,741 
3,909 
4,240 
2.926 
2,585 
3.950 
2,458 
2,683 

1.846 
3,861 
5.955 
4.362 
5,020 
3.742 
5,010 
4,091 
3,956 
3,911 
4,035 
4,238 

4,576 


$000 

6,124 
7,393 
7,343 
6,184 
7,291 
7.733 
9.056 
5.722 

6.861 
5,680 
9.452 
6,248 
9.298 
9,031 
8,395 
7,626 
8,203 
7,373 
10,142 
5,368 

6,628 
7.434 
8,873 
5,786 
10,810 
8.980 
9,649 
14.196 
10.358 
12,832 
13,681 
10,763 

8,993 


$000 

1,044 
971 
1.373 
1,232 
1,408 
1,647 
1.943 
1,466 

1,076 
836 
1,404 
766 
1,456 
1.612 
1,253 
1.245 
1,464 
1.390 
1.633 
1.623 

957 
1,068 
1,187 

803 
1,636 
1,592 
1,565 
1,665 
1,692 
1,734 
1,987 
2,013 

1,445 


$000 

1,442 
1.257 
1.059 
1.017 
1.142 
1.024 
1,224 
941 

1,147 

1,117 

1,682 

948 

1,473 

1.316 

1,082 

921 

870 

1,048 

1,361 

1,386 

1,436 
1.456 
1.974 
1,034 
1,550 
1,409 
960 
1,036 
1.185 
1.235 
1,682 
1,417 

1.436 


$000 

904 

829 
1.029 
1.111 
1.027 
1,162 
928 
741 

657 

607 

941 

667 

1.391 

1.141 

1.283 

993 

1.103 

1,186 

926 

809 

605 

781 
1.197 

886 
1.359 
1,127 
1,155 
1,039 
1,223 
1,100 
1,040 

941 

979 


$000 
(+)13,182 




(+)12,854 


July 


(-f)l6,167 


August 

September 

October 

November.... 

December. . . . 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

Mav 


(+) 6,388 
mi9,630 
(-H19.965 
(+J17.21B 
(-r-)16,257 

(-|-)14,727 

(+) 4,773 
(+)10,845 
(-) 2.768 
(+) 5.657 




(+)12,457 


July 


(+)12,642 


August 

September... . 

October 

November... . 

December 

1935 

January 

February 

March 


(+)12.330 
(+)16,607 
(-+O21.084 
( +11 5. 793 
f+)22.713 

(+) 7,144 
(+)10,634 
(+)10.«35 
(+) 1,660 




(+) 8,408 




(+) 6,031 


July 


(+) 9,372 


August 

September 

October 

November. . . 
Decem her .... 

1936 
January 


(+)22,140 
(+)21,463 
(-H32.998 
f+)29.359 
(+)31,995 

(+)13,827 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. 



Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living and Cost per Week of a Family Budget. 



Classification 












1935 












1936 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July | Aug. 

i 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


563 

1,164 
5,074 

286 
4,266 

966 

53 

173 

1,316 

266 

42 

1,811 

3,781 

163 

325 

2,241 


537 

1,221 

6,158 

206 

5,536 

1,123 

53 

159 

1,167 

494 

52 

1,843 

2,111 

155 

347 

2,703 

4 
108 
46 
39 

5,585 

1,558 

306 

229 

103 

1,986 

1,739 
199 
312 
146 
487 
152 
45 

480 

1,444 
177 
524 

2,705 
528 

330 

186 

11 

285 

239 
451 
356 

262 
231 
136 

78-9 
69-2 
88-8 
80-3 
71-0 
92-1 

7-59 

2-89 
5-54 
16-06 


910 

1,182 

7,956 

144 

7,458 

1,289 

37 

158 

1,868 

1,045 
57 

1.741 

1,532 
227 
446 

2,601 

33 

186 
61 
36 

7,686 

1,822 

410 

314 

144 

2,798 

3,719 
323 
412 
169 
508 
212 
124 

414 

3,136 
321 
459 

2,314 
707 

445 

116 

17 

332 

312 
842 
366 

251 

400 
165 

78«8 
69-5 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
921 

7-63 
2-89 
5-54 
16-10 


1,123 
131 

4,687 
234 

4,288 

962 

35 

108 

1,051 

1,067 
40 

1,010 
623 
117 
183 

1,561 

9 

69 
36 
12 

5,708 

1,199 

140 

410 

88 

1,669 

2,774 
290 
501 
88 
326 
78 
47 

174 

1,066 
125 
355 

2,724 
424 

306 

59 

11 

299 

204 

308 

288 

252 

244 
167 

78-6 
68-6 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
92-1 

7-50 
2-88 
5-55 
15-97 


1,102 
222 

11,588 
865 

10,081 

885 

105 

394 

1,486 

1,337 
162 

1,289 

1,007 
237 
366 

2,365 

311 
185 
39 
57 

8,737 

2,337 

316 

327 

163 

2,620 

2,598 
306 
602 
217 
474 
199 
49 

2,497 

2,546 
354 
636 

2,400 
565 

623 

96 

213 

439 

221 
469 
397 

196 
575 
289 

78-6 
68-7 
85-9 
81-4 
70-3 
92-1 

7-52 
2-84 
5-57 
15-97 


618 

97 

6,383 

521 
5,149 

1,027 
157 
333 

1,664 

747 
196 

1,570 
749 
280 
393 

2,147 

364 
72 
62 
5 

8,182 

2,444 

703 

647 

110 

2,433 

1,628 
265 
710 
104 
412 
64 
71 

302 

2,981 

312 

369 

2,294 

1,027 

649 

160 

38 

437 

159 
392 
326 

221 

386 
249 

78-8 
69-3 
84-8 
81-4 
69-9 
92-6 

7-54 
2-81 
5-57 
15-95 


964 
151 

8,257 
502 

7,214 

1,119 
170 
394 

1,460 

365 
582 

2,082 
835 
251 
336 

2,114 

321 
211 

56 
131 

7,911 

2,249 
948 
964 
115 

2,128 

1,732 
276 

1,124 

200 

563 

212 

72 

363 

2,541 
525 
529 

3,309 
855 

517 
185 
130 
543 

98 
171 
320 

266 
315 
327 

78.8 
69.3 
84.7 
81.4 
69.9 
92.4 

7-53 
2-80 
5-57 
15-94 


715 
183 

18,237 
327 

17,604 

1,055 

72 

163 

1,405 

310 
675 

2,308 
968 
175 
297 

1,768 

27 
155 

58 
195 

8,101 
3,206 
1,231 
986 
82 
2,356 

1,868 
235 
507 
170 
634 
127 
61 

1,518 

3,187 
528 
900 

4.080 
1,979 

594 
175 

36 
452 

267 

94 

253 

236 
266 

248 

79-4 
71-3 
85-4 
81-4 
69-9 
92-5 

7-73 
2-80 
5-57 
16-15 


908 
586 

15,091 
104 

14,670 

1,022 

43 

408 

1,489 

342 

1,745 

2,514 

720 

383 

324 

1,462 

22 
181 

49 
220 

7,737 

2,263 

942 

928 

118 

2,221 

1,670 
319 
419 
166 
503 
299 
61 

567 

2,636 
525 
566 

3,676 
752 

688 
161 
125 
482 

259 
102 
341 

205 
279 
387 

79-6 
70-9 
85-4 
81-4 
71-6 
92-6 

7-74 
2-81 

5-57 

16-16 


1,512 
2,733 

26,277 
322 

25,474 

1,005 
111 
771 

2,009 

488 

1,630 

2,647 

343 

227 

375 

1,690 

12 
106 

89 
232 

8,727 

2,842 

899 

957 

180 

2,269 

1,373 
186 
376 
178 
499 
267 
83 

744 

3,892 
586 
823 

3,641 
947 

747 
82 
89 

448 

255 

15C 
365 

323 
163 

299 

80-4 

72-4 
86-5 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

7-93 
2-83 
5-63 
16-42 


2,262 
2,803 

23,239 
437 

21,743 

1,121 
112 
984 

2,218 

250 
989 

3,266 
344 
302 
436 

2,424 

5 

120 

93 

270 

8,882 

2,660 

445 

658 

138 

2,651 

1,632 
162 
340 
274 
464 
472 
88 

2,827 

2,246 

366 

797 

3,959 

1,363 

777 
184 
203 
662 

278 
403 
445 

327 
174 
285 

80-6 
73«2 
87-0 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

8-04 
2-83 
5-63 
16-54 


1,641 

1,968 

14,298 

207 

13,672 

943 

101 

627 

1,867 

150 

255 

1,898 

2,699 

433 

319 

1,616 

"'i04 

76 
116 

9,942 
2,129 

448 

669 

96 

2,426 

1,612 
257 
370 
163 
492 
365 
175 

606 

2,572 

298 

781 

2,621 

2,497 

976 

246 

39 

432 

250 
383 
356 

297 
207 
214 

80-8 
73-7 
87-2 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

8-14 
2-84 
5-63 
16-65 


1 195 


Fruits 


1,166 


Grains (Total) 


6,636 
40 

6,497 

953 


Barley 

Wheat 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 




45 


Vegetables 

Wheat flour 


239 
1,311 

506 


Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts— 
Cattle 




139 


Fish 


1,881 
3,947 






401 


Leather, unmanufactured 


304 
2,185 


Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts- 


3 




122 
79 
104 

6,843 

1,343 

253 

251 

128 

2,069 

620 

108 

223 

94 

440 
71 
33 

267 

1,416 
200 
423 

2,560 
189 

409 

113 

12 

251 

342 
477 
261 

261 
121 
111 

78-8 
68-8 
88-8 
80-3 
710 
92-1 

7-51 
2-90 
5-54 
15-99 


125 




63 




172 


Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 
Paper (chiefly newsprint) 


6,949 
1,446 


Pulp-wood 

Shingles 


303 
522 
137 




2,094 

2,304 
336 


Iron and Its Products — 
Automobiles 


Farm implements 

Hardware and cutlery 


416 
209 
431 




247 




59 


Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts— 


120 


Copper, (chiefly ore and 


1,664 


Gold, raw 


406 


Lead 


892 


Nickel 


3,541 


Silver 


608 


Non-Metallic Mineral Pro- 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


615 
176 


Petroleum and products 

Stone and products 


65 
335 


Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts— 


203 




630 


Soda and compounds 


288 


Miscellaneous Commodities — 
Electrical energy 


293 


Films 


337 




140 


Indexes of Retail Prices, Bents 
and Costs of SerTices— 

Total. 1926=100 


80-8 


Food. 

Fuel 


73-9 
87-2 


Rent 


82-6 




71-6 




92-3 


Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light $ 

Rent $ 

Totala J 





28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1935 


1936 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 


1,036 

91 

279 

1,064 
104 
136 
927 
274 
467 
716 
299 

108 
429 
321 
212 

107 

185 

1.552 

262 

1.148 

491 

36 

90 

394 

160 

55 

236 

340 

174 

354 

618 

697 
399 

218 
196 
24 
47 

188 
2,368 
164 
647 
196 
154 
1,275 

43 
591 
388 

70 
102 

89 

83 

198 
135 
82 
42 
622 
650 
229 

448 
2,432 
358 
337 
1,736 
431 
287 

212 
392 
227 
18 
32 
187 


872 
121 
409 
1,185 
166 
148 
610 
154 
466 
463 
376 

101 
409 
267 
250 
178 

210 
863 
197 
1,085 
662 

59 
117 
349 
129 

59 
215 
351 
175 
457 
638 

682 
458 

178 

212 

31 

50 

204 

2,590 

178 

792 

387 

197 

1.380 

62 

705 

470 

77 

122 

111 

116 

207 
181 
80 
48 
624 
471 
193 

423 
2,472 
418 
409 
1,635 
106 
223 

238 

433 

38 

28 

14 

169 


776 

186 
328 
1,425 
146 
247 
947 
257 
857 
626 
614 

113 
594 
271 
272 
270 

244 

1,587 

249 

1,571 

782 

67 

90 

411 

151 

92 

189 

437 

197 

476 

760 

873 
541 

254 

263 

41 

73 

363 

3,692 

280 

1,078 

698 

267 

2,003 

42 

859 

599 

96 

179 

124 

119 

391 
222 
130 
62 
743 
512 
255 

556 
2,461 
475 
558 
1,347 
387 
327 

304 
407 
50 
40 
43 
203 


430 
67 
242 
1,086 
112 
166 
506 
235 
975 
571 
633 

53 
406 
306 
210 

177 

120 

1,134 

191 

1,133 

613 

55 

56 

303 

96 

58 

261 

489 

139 

327 

415 

633 
385 

237 
212 
57 
52 

337 

2,569 

183 

871 

692 

184 

1,742 

22 

827 

398 

91 

100 

73 

110 

124 

178 
121 
45 
597 
336 
143 

447 
1,937 
257 
456 
1,250 
132 
258 

249 
287 
88 
29 
35 
139 


623 
309 
346 

1,970 
134 
401 

1,221 
337 

2,041 
680 
865 

140 

522 
286 
230 
116 

128 
871 
211 
1,116 
599 

43 
183 
352 
109 

44 
139 
295 
198 
284 
436 

801 
489 

313 

212 

40 

98 

391 

2,678 

233 

958 

662 

211 

1.879 

50 

2,133 

710 

124 

208 

117 

137 

575 
215 
128 
47 
625 
754 
207 

598 
3,269 
311 
608 
3 491 
470 
382 

255 
477 
248 
32 
41 
206 


984 
157 
360 

2,050 

149 

277 

556 

73 

2,259 
576 
703 

108 
377 
195 
232 

72 

135 

976 

191 

971 

575 

19 

64 

387 

83 

24 

357 

472 

196 

269 

431 

755 

477 

220 

236 

25 

20 

244 

1,803 

167 

744 

642 

190 

1,676 

30 

1,507 

482 

118 

135 

103 

117 

271 
183 
130 
69 
674 
540 
146 

541 
2,952 
139 
436 
3,956 
501 
291 

242 
344 
111 
32 
43 
158 


520 
155 

227 

2,532 

164 

144 

529 

16 

2,165 

681 

271 

168 
379 
257 
284 
100 

139 

1,368 
199 
972 
704 
24 
175 
383 
186 
26 
201 
483 
222 
290 
657 

744 
489 

239 

212 

51 

47 

236 

1,159 

179 

602 

594 

158 

1,758 

41 

2,028 

421 

83 

127 

83 

119 

405 
196 
128 

60 

640 

1,454 

209 

488 
2,925 
116 
397 
3,931 
560 
495 

227 

402 

65 

46 

26 

212 


615 

106 

253 

1,940 

101 

155 

889 

26 

2,012 

2,915 

86 

172 
360 
240 
296 
200 

189 
939 
206 

1,232 

837 

75 

87 

1,772 
323 
62 
276 
548 
236 
432 
927 

799 
508 

242 

227 
48 
34 

193 
934 
180 
479 
740 
178 

1,661 
110 

2,493 
469 
103 
150 
149 
121 

689 
188 
126 
48 
815 
360 
156 

618 

2,737 

95 

422 
3,734 

251 

311 

221 
455 
170 
31 
52 
194 


584 
103 
221 

1,935 

123 

219 

641 

24 

1,613 
640 
80 

163 

375 
396 
240 
227 

192 

794 

191 

1,196 

788 

71 
193 
132 
213 

74 
186 
485 
196 
322 
739 

898 
479 

246 

210 

43 

61 

126 

1,385 

216 

576 

430 

215 

1,754 

22 

1,483 

493 

82 

133 

105 

109 

288 
187 
173 
57 
730 
159 
190 

474 
3,073 
128 
462 
3,889 
456 
469 

206 
478 
174 
35 
34 
211 


737 
128 
282 

1,520 
202 
411 
477 
128 

1,847 
804 
96 

187 

321 
446 
305 
206 

240 

1,334 

201 

1,203 

720 

28 

208 

323 

169 

89 

301 

638 

261 

258 

655 

981 
573 

293 

304 

51 

55 

140 

2,309 
201 
675 
179 
209 

1,818 
46 

2,020 
738 
118 
147 
161 
143 

262 

204 
208 
69 
919 
226 
195 

614 
3,817 
132 
520 
4,067 
587 
419 

275 
542 
403 
42 
53 
259 


1,086 
126 
324 

1,894 
208 
609 

1,383 
96 

2,602 
785 
246 

175 

326 
623 
290 
133 

157 

1.754 

229 

1,027 

887 

23 

93 

346 

116 

68 

357 

523 

232 

234 

629 

662 
949 

286 
277 
55 
63 

224 

1,868 

243 

578 

158 

270 

1 002 

'l63 

2,680 

641 

98 

150 

172 

115 

492 

223 
211 
79 
899 
396 
264 

746 
2,815 
197 
669 
4,139 
423 
484 

231 
652 
417 
47 
85 
276 


190 
114 
322 

1,609 

111 

373 

884 

79 

1,378 
557 
286 

137 
368 
586 
262 
87 

138 

2,869 

187 

718 

560 

19 

206 

193 

79 

45 

313 

479 

210 

212 

476 

718 
368 

247 
213 
47 
33 

165 

1,164 

189 

358 

114 

173 

1,086 

71 

982 

456 

65 

87 

95 

83 

238 
. 133 
187 
46 
595 
591 
199 

485 
2,442 
173 
363 
1,724 
145 
205 

177 

467 
145 
40 
37 
146 


616 




170 




284 




1 189 




136 


Nuts (edible) 


160 




714 




238 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


565 
581 




339 


Animal Products— 
Fish 


151 




651 


Hides 


430 


Leather, unmanufactured 

Leather, manufactured 

Textile Products — 


259 
79 

165 




2,482 




230 




1,191 




589 




24 




226 


Silk— Raw 


279 


Fabrics 


153 




35 




346 




566 




245 




450 


Other wool 


705 


Wood and Paper — 
Books and printed matter 


788 
457 


Wood — Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


237 
212 




41 


Other unmanufactured wood 
Iron and Steel — 


44 
335 




2,398 




171 




777 




343 




172 




2,127 




42 


Plates and sheets 

Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products. . 
Tools 


672 

448 

84 

101 


Tubes and pipes 

Wire 


105 
106 


Non-Ferrous Metals— 


282 




205 




93 




55 




677 




423 


Tin 


208 


Non-Metallic Products — 


498 


Coal 


2,301 


Coke . 


334 




433 




1,835 




309 




422 


Chemicals— 


255 


Dyeing and tanning materials. . 


497 
188 




22 




25 




173 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



29 



Classification 



Banking— 

Riadilt Available Assets- 

Specie 

Dominion notes 1 

Deposits with Bank of Canada 
In United Kingdom banks.. 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets 

Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments— 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current loans 

Current loans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets — 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits 

Inter-bank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks 

Balances due by other banks 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public; — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public- 
Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities... 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities.... 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Percentage of current loans to 

notice deposits, p.c 

All notes in hands of public ... . 
Security holdings 



Index Numbers— 

(With aeasonal adjustment 
1996 = 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Security holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans, elsewhere 

Notes in hands of public. . . 



1934 








1935 












Dec. 


Jan 


| Feb 


Mar. 


1 April 1 May 


June 1 July 


Aug. 


1 Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


End of Month 







50-07 


50-65 


51-11 


16-44 


15-83 


15-32 


14 02 


14-41 


13-84 


15-26 


16-53 


14-79 


169-83 


177-36 


178-45 


51-16 


43-47 


30-92 


28-38 


33-07 


30-58 


33-28 


38-66 


36-71 








149-03 


163-71 


166-97 


172-90 


169-92 


192-35 


183-83 


190-85 


186-72 


26-83 


27-50 


30 54 


29-61 


24-76 


22-48 


13-26 


14-39 


19-29 


20-55 


1901 


21-73 


58-83 


58-39 


61-82 


60-95 


71-59 


93-80 


88-52 


96-48 


93-62 


115-38 


99-31 


109-89 


19-69 


20-36 


20-89 


20-71 


20-52 


20-64 


21-02 


21-33 


22-63 


22-02 


22-91 


23-24 


780-76 


795-18 


807-09 


797-73 


825-70 


835-41 


838-74 


847-48 


854-23 


910-87 


917-64 


945-30 


98-74 


93-45 


90-35 


94-12 


77-00 


71-21 


67-45 


59-93 


68-55 


60-01 


52-13 


59-71 


1,223 


1,236 


1,252 


1,220 


1,243 


1,257 


1,244 


1,257 


1,295 


1,361 


1,357 


1,398 


146-15 


138-84 


137-36 


132 07 


135-69 


129-52 


135-86 


136-63 


139-43 


140-55 


142-85 


138-91 


39-64 


3914 


39-47 


40-31 


39 03 


39-58 


43-32 


46-67 


46-99 


51-79 


55-38 


52-79 


102-70 


91-36 


85-58 


80-52 


81-33 


81-98 


85-24 


77-04 


77-44 


75-62 


73-76 


95-90 


839 


819 


815 


819 


823 


824 


831 


813 


829 


839 


856 


857 


133-94 


131-99 


136-34 


137-53 


144-33 


147-81 


156-45 


154-26 


155-91 


147-02 


153-04 


138-97 


30-17 


34 02 


31-22 


28-19 


29-65 


26-87 


16-37 


17-82 


25-20 


28-52 


29-63 


22-59 


107-50 


104-84 


110-39 


117-43 


127-84 


120-43 


107-19 


107- 18 


101-05 


97-48 


96-67 


100-20 


1,399 


1,360 


1,356 


1,355 


1,381 


1,370 


1,375 


1,352 


1,375 


1,380 


1,407 


1,406 


14 09 


14-12 


14-32 


14-52 


14-48 


14-46 


14-45 


14-50 


14-50 


14-45 


14-25 


13-47 


7-73 


7-60 


7-86 


7-90 


7-99 


8-64 


8-72 


8-67 


8-75 


8-83 


8-86 


8-61 


5-6? 


5-50 


5-50 


5 51 


5-52 


5-52 


5-45 


5-46 


5-46 


5-45 


5-45 


5-33 


77-64 


77-77 


77-73 


77-50 


77-40 


75-71 


76-61 


76-62 


76-47 


76-27 


76-39 


76-11 


50-81 


54-94 


54-52 


53-83 


52-46 


52-96 


52-65 


57-97 


55-78 


53-40 


54-33 


59-43 


12-99 


12-83 


12-75 


13-29 


13-27 


1312 


13-10 


13-02 


12-84 


12-96 


12-91 


10-98 


1-68 


2-33 


2-35 


2-75 


2-78 


3-16 


3-04 


2-60 


2-24 


2-32 


1-91 


1-71 


6-71 


6-72 


6-72 


6-72 


6-73 


6-73 


6-84 


6-91 


6-86 


6-87 


6-87 


6-87 


12-95 


7-32 


7-2S 


6 36 


7-19 


5 97 


7-84 


6-90 


7-47 


9-?l 


5-71 


6-43 


102-19 


91-55 


78-07 


77-76 


112-97 


96-95 


96-82 


84-92 


96-90 


99-27 


102-80 


93-21 


4-61 


4-39 


517 


3-76 


4-22 


3-49 


4-22 


4-95 


5-89 


5-65 


5-23 


5-33 


2,919 


2,881 


2,880 


2,845 


2,929 


2,915 


2,909 


2,892 


2,963 


3,036 


3,059 


3,092 


131-43 


124-73 


125-98 


124-68 


121-42 


122-45 


129-57 


121-26 


129-97 


131-75 


126-47 


130-53 


•27 


i 00 


25 08 


14-35 


15-14 


23-73 


32-16 


16 02 


38-85 


55-81 


12-91 


38-59 


28-35 


89 


33-73 


32-79 


37-06 


32-45 


35-52 


34-77 


38-19 


41-24 


47-10 


47-54 


35-24 
1,407 


35-20 
1,412 


34-84 
1,428 




















1,447 


1,452 


1,446 


1,426 


1,428 


1,434 


1,444 


1,465 


1,474 


575-50 


529-92 


516-24 


512-50 


581-86 


561-21 


545-41 


553-01 


553-82 


590-01 


625-21 


613-27 


1,983 


1,942 


1,945 


1,959 


2,034 


2,008 


1,971 


1,981 


1,988 


2,034 


2,091 


2,087 


325-40 


314-69 


321-87 


322-95 


328-41 


339-86 


340-95 


338-25 


360-70 


370-41 


376-66 


382-66 


6-50 


6-37 


6-92 


6-64 


6-62 


8- 04 


15-25 


12-72 


13-17 


11-44 


9 91 


12-30 


22-95 


26 00 


26-37 


26- 00 


24-81 


24-28 


26-65 


24 03 


26-63 


27-71 


28-09 


27-73 


1-01 


•87 


•67 


•47 


•73 


•89 


•75 


1-35 


1-62 


1-70 


2-06 


1-47 


50-81 


54-94 


54-52 


53-83 


52-46 


52-96 


52-65 


57-97 


55-78 


53-40 


54-33 


59-43 


2-50 


2-52 


2-54 


2-27 


2-39 


2-40 


2-40 


2-40 


2-38 


2-47 


2-34 


2-71 


2,616 


2,580 


2,577 


2,543 


2,623 


2,615 


2,607 


2,590 


2,655 


2,730 


2,750 


2,790 


15-09 


12-29 


11-32 


10-03 


13-62 


11-61 


13-78 


12-56 


15 05 


13-67 


15-08 


12-25 


610 


950 


2,946 


807 


1,847 


2,946 


802 


2,541 


2,950 


811 


2,545 


2,950 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


2,910 


2,871 


2,870 


2,832 


2,916 


2,908 


2,900 


2,883 


2,952 


3,023 


3,040 


3,084 


+568 


+593 


+613 


+628 


+ 629 


+622 


+595 


+615 


+606 


+605 


+610 


+617 


59-6 


580 


57-1 


56-6 


56-7 


570 


58-3 


56-9 


57-8 


58-1 


58-4 


58-1 


157-28 


148-92 


153 93 


164-23 


158-13 


160-39 


169-07 


158-43 


171-93 


174-31 


178-16 


182-65 


967 


973 


984 


970 


1,000 


1,005 


1,018 


1,031 


1,041 


1,103 


1,116 


1,137 


100-7 


95-7 


95 3 


93-7 


105-4 


102-7 


98-3 


102-6 


103-8 


107-2 


109-6 


106-0 


105-3 


105-3 


106-3 


107-8 


107-9 


107-6 


106-5 


106-5 


106-8 


108-1 


109-9 


109-9 


90-4 


89-3 


88-9 


87-9 


86-6 


87-2 


88-4 


87-2 


89-3 


89-7 


90-5 


91-3 


183-5 


183-3 


184-6 


182 6 


187-2 


187-4 


188-6 


192-1 


194-9 


206-8 


207-9 


217-3 


71-5 


650 


61 


57-5 


58-5 


59-7 


61-3 


56-6 


56-4 


54-5 


52-5 


680 


38-7 


37-3 


351 


38-2 


3). 6 


28-5 


26-6 


24-4 


27-4 


24-8 


21-7 


22-6 


86-2 


851 


86-5 


90-6 


89-1 


90-8 


94-4 


90-9 


97-5 


95-7 


93-4 


96-6 



15-80 
40-58 

181-64 
17-20 
94-52 
24-29 

955-93 
64-74 
1,395 



145-47 

53-27 

82-98 

820 

144-98 
19-40 

105-67 
1,371 

13 13 
8-59 
5-31 

75-96 

58-19 

10-81 

1-62 

6-88 

7-89 

119-49 

5-27 

3,079 

118-93 
11-87 

40-72 



1,486 
640-92 

2,127 
379-48 

8-54 
27-40 

1-46 
58-19 

3-13 
2,777 
14-33 

7-94 
132-75 
145-50 
3.070 

+666 

55-2 
170- 14 
1,155 



112-2 
111-2 
88-4 
219-3 
57-8 
25-4 
93-3 



beginning with March, 1935, there is given in this line the amount of Bank of Canada notes in the hands of the 
chartered banks at the end of the appropriate month. The sum of this amount and the "deposits with the Bank of 
Canada" in the next line is approximately comparable with the previous figures of Dominion notes. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 














1935 
















Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Security Prices— 




























Common Stock Prices— 




























Total (121) 


88-6 
129-7 
129-4 

14-0 

71-5 
181-5 

75-8 


87-8 
128-8 
126-4 

13-4 

67-4 
179-7 

75-6 


84 4 

125-6 
117-0 
11-6 
560 
1760 
74-1 


86 4 

130-8 
119-4 
111 
56-9 
178-6 
73-1 


93 6 

144-4 
121-9 
10-8 
59-9 
211-7 
70-3 


93-fc 
145-2 
118-6 

10-5 

58-4 
217-9 

67-2 


93 4 

143-8 

122-2 

10-6 

57-4 

210-6 

66-7 


94-; 

146-1 
122-1 
12-C 
59-3 
210-0 
65-5 


93-6 

147-1 
118-7 
12-4 
61-2 
206-6 
61-8 


961 

152-9 
123-0 
12-6 
60-9 
215-1 
63-5 


105 8 

170-3 

127-8 

14-6 

66-9 

228-7 

690 


107-4 

178-2 
125-0 
15-9 
76-7 
214-8 
70-4 


112-9 


Industrials, total (89") 


187-7 




130-3 
18-6 


Pulp and paper (6) 


Milling (5) 


80-4 


Oils (5) 


231-0 


Textiles and Clothing (11) ... . 
Food and Allied products (18) 


75-5 


134-2 


131-3 


126-5 


125-1 


127-8 


127-0 


128-5 


130-1 


128-7 


134-4 


145 7 


148-5 


153-6 




106-8 
168-6 
50-4 
32-1 
100-3 


109-1 
168-6 
49-4 
30-8 
102-4 


101-6 
168-7 
45-1 
25-3 
100-1 


99-6 
185-1 
43-8 
25-8 
94-8 


102-4 
200-0 
44-4 
27-0 
95-5 


104-7 
198-1 
45-0 
26-5 
97-6 


116-7 
195-4 
44-7 
25-0 
98-6 


122-9 
202-0 
47-7 
26-7 
99-9 


126-5 

209-6 

46-3 

25-7 

100-3 


133-2 
217-5 
45-6 
23-4 
100-0 


157-3 
254-4 
50-9 
27-9 
105-1 


161-0 
294-5 
50-1 

28-6 
108-0 


151-7 


Miscellaneous (20) 


307-1 


Utilities total (23) 


52-4 


Transportation (2) 


29-8 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 


111-4 


Power and traction (19) 


61-3 


59-8 


56-4 


53-9 


53-8 


55-3 


560 


60-c 


58-6 


59-6 


66-1 


62-7 


66-0 


Banks (9) 


80-1 


79-9 


76-8 


750 


73-1 


72-0 


71-7 


70-6 


65-9 


68-4 


73-0 


75-1 


78-6 


Mining Stock Prices — 




Total(23) 


124-3 
123-2 
132-4 


124-2 
123-4 
131-2 


128-2 
127-5 
135-3 


128-7 
124-5 
149-1 


128-3 
121-4 
159-2 


123-0 
116-3 
153-2 


117-9 
1101 
151-9 


115-6 
106-2 
155-4 


1191 
109-5 
159-6 


118-6 
106-3 
169-7 


125-5 
111-8 
181-9 


133-6 
116-9 
201-7 


142-4 


Gold (19) 


124-8 


Base Metals (4) 


214-8 


Financial Factors- 






73-5 


73-8 


71-2 


69-2 


68-4 


68-4 


69-6 


70-9 


69-2 


69-5 


72-5 


73-8 


74-9 


Long-term bond vields,1926=100 






70-9 
76-2 


73-2 
78-3 


71-4 
79-5 


72-2 
80-8 


71-4 
78-5 


73-4 
80-4 


72-1 
80-2 


71-6 
79-7 


79-8 
88-3 


78-9 
85-4 


74-5 
80-8 


75-5 

82-7 


72-4 




85-5 


Yield on Ontario Government 




bonds p.c. 

Shares traded. Montreal.. No. 


3-65 


3-75 


3-81 


3-87 


3-76 


3-85 


3-84 


3-82 


4-23 


4-09 


3-87 


3-96 


4-10 


396, 


220, 


288, 


282, 


350. 


228, 


248, 


318, 


273, 


352, 


809, 


590, 


857, 




788 


365 


842 


672 


738 


433 


645 


960 


798 


172 


693 


284 


056 


Brokers' loans* $000. 000 


19-50 


18-98 


18-81 


18-24 


18-32 


17-70 


16-93 


17-33 


16-86 


16-76 


18-09 


18-59 


17-37 


New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 


19-23 


25-73 


16-38 


76-57 


70-54 


63-37 


63-20 


121-92 


194-63 


65-92 


147-73 


119-93 


133-66 


Sales on Toronto Stock Ex- 




























change — 




























Industrials 000 


815 


423 


457 


440 


761 


397 


537 


606 


578 


807 


1,590 


926 


1,431 


Values $000 


15,751 


7,613 


8.930 


10.440 


19,019 


8,893 


11,436 


12,414 


12,999 


17,351 


31,951 


29,555 


29,151 


Mining 000 


12,782 


10,749 


20,303 


20,977 


18,105 


8,240 


7,141 


10,218 


11,964 


9,179 


15.695 


19,530 


36,823 


Values $000 


12,200 


10,011 


20,286 


15,222 


15,931 


8,457 


6,230 


8,870 


8.987 


10,728 


16,554 


24,503 


35,184 


Market values* ...$000,000 


3,740 


3,743 


3,663 


3,764 


3,908 


3,842 


3,880 


3,880 


3,858 


4,088 


4,366 


4,507 


4,933 


Foreign Exchange — 




























New York Funds in Montreal 




























High $ 


1-002 


1003 


1-016 


1-008 


1-005 


1-003 


1-004 


1-006 


1-017 


1-020 


1-012 


1-012 


1-004 


Low $ 


•991 


1-001 


1-003 


1-003 


1-000 


1001 


1-001 


1-001 


1-002 


1-010 


1-009 


1-006 


0-996 


Average $ 


•999 


1-001 


1-010 


1-005 


1-001 


1-001 


1-002 


1-003 


1-008 


1-014 


1-011 


1-009 


1-000 


Close $ 


1-002 


1-002 


1-008 


1-005 


1-001 


1-002 


1-002 


1-006 


1-012 


1-012 


1-011 


1-006 


0-998 


London Sterling in Montreal- 




























High $ 


4-900 


4-895 


4-853 


4-875 


4-945 


4-955 


4-975 


4-998 


5 000 


4-993 


4-988 


4-990 


4-994 


Low $ 


4-870 


4-855 


4-808 


4-835 


4-855 


4-915 


4-955 


4-965 


4-943 


4-956 


4-967 


4-959 


4-941 


Average $ 


4-887 


4-883 


4-825 


4-862 


4-896 


4-943 


4-967 


4-985 


4-970 


4-978 


4-978 


4-976 


4-966 


Close $ 


4-883 


4-855 


4-8251 4-860 


4-935 4-950 


4-9681 4-993 4-970 4-973 


4-988 


4-959 


4-993 



Table 27- Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 



Year and 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Montreal 8 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Month 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered' Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


000 Tons 



1926. 
1927. 
1928. 
1929. 
1930. 
1931. 
1932. 
1933. 
1934. 
1935. 



1,918 


1,930 


3,659 


3,603 


4,047 


3,205 


4,222 


4,017 


1.753 


1,739 


9,866 


1,757 


1,799 


3,716 


3,800 


4,278 


3,375 


4,993 


4,865 


1,738 


1,744 


10,306 


1,639 


1,592 


4,333 


4,429 


4,572 


3,792 


5,493 


5,460 


1,765 


1,750 


11,743 


1,772 


1,742 


4,848 


4,896 


4,273 


3,531 


4,638 


4,583 


1,993 


1,938 


11,971 


1,827 


1,865 


4,971 


4,918 


4,235 


3,474 


4,436 


4,417 


2,100 


2,017 


12,606 


2,013 


2,003 


4,503 


4,480 


5,003 


4,321 


7,840 


7,760 


2,554 


2,560 


12.137 


2,083 


2,040 


4,221 


4,159 


2,861 


2,868 


8,013 


7,993 


2,678 


2,883 


11,083 


2.257 


2,253 


4,333 


4,306 


3,342 


3,330 


8.415 


8,427 


2,923 


2,924 


10,354 


2,502 


2,462 


4,407 


4,362 


2,715 


2,831 


7,856 


7.819 


3,362 


3,382 


11.487 






3.809 


3,797 


3,379 


3,388 


8.515 


8,543 


3,289 


3,296 


11,212 



9,872 
10,390 
11,729 
11,930 
12,588 
12,304 
11,172 
10,388 
11,467 
11,203 



Tons 



1935 

Jan 


26 >,978 
233.942 
267.370 
187,976 
145.957 
150,963 
183,292 
188,876 
179.380 
155.315 
142,810 


250,529 
255,715 
248.779 
211,365 
152,934 
143,001 
184,719 
182,272 
174,571 
164.617 
123,008 


538,011 
470,792 
519.575 
322,870 
152.908 
180,318 
221,221 
25). 954 
218.894 
229.988 
234,741 
463,768 

445,838 


537,799 
469,787 
519,075 
328,614 
151,634 
181,592 
217,995 
254,634 
218.684 
228 998 
233,179 
454,584 

442,139 














884,732 
777,803 
905,380 
875,224 
934,847 
865,854 
1,121,992 
1,175,89) 
974,870 
952,357 
861,926 
881,401 

795,728 


882,650 


Feb 














808.652 


Mar 














890.642 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

Sept 

Oct 


98.896 
633.926 
355.415 
350.111 
502, 58< 
416,697 
339,132 
630,958 

51,284 


101,102 
636,888 
359,643 
339,530 
519,486 
412,089 
344,197 
632,390 
42,916 


266,480 
1,076,888 
1,149,237 
1,392,080 
1,330,599 
1,186,847 
1,076,378 

987,460 
48,938 


146.966 
1,102,976 
1,140,492 
1,331,383 
1,422,728 
1,099,401 
1,091,955 
1,130,575 
76,859 


110,087 
357,561 
507,570 
564,539 
004,873 
399,384 
310. 29Q 
352,270 
81,994 


146,306 
351,118 
518,104 
568,687 
604,894 
405,364 
307,449 
343,246 
50,669 


864,579 
945,453 
864,972 
1,115.755 
1,182,793 
987,101 
928,986 


Nov 

Dec 


878,269 
853,548 


1936 
Jan 






810,106 



'Last day of each month. 

'Month end values of all listed stocks. 



3 Reiord3 of inland shipping unavailable from 1926 to 1930 inclusive. 



32 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance. Revenue and Expenditure in Dollars. 



Classification 


Month of 

Januarv, 

1935' 


Month of 

January, 

1936 

(unrevised) 


April 1, 1934, 

to 

January, 

31, 1935 


April 1, 1935, 

to 

Januarv, 

31, 1936 

(unrevised) 


Receipts— Ordinary Revenue— Customs Import Duty 


5,701,092 
2,793,273 
8,503,620 
3,220,441 
717,453 
2,400,078 
2,055,970 


5,268,628 
2,797,292 
8,931,653 
3,822,364 


63,012,405 
36,935,244 
92,362,053 
57,359.158 
5,862,908 
25,470,078 
18,393,349 


61,909,993 
38,057,661 
91.847,953 

77.072,257 
1 412 825 






Gold Tax 




2,500,014 
3,004,767 


26.389,266 
17,052,939 








25,391,929 
2,608,194 


26,324,717 
8,091 


299,395,195 

2,852,543 

20,570,583 

493,500,654 


314,342,894 

282,583 

11,832,000 

865.368,124 




Can. Nat. Rlys.— Advances Repaid 


Loan Account Receipts 




138,000,000 


Grand Total 


28,000,123 


164,332,808 


816,318,976 


1,191,825,601 


Ordinary Expenditure — Agriculture 


636,908 

31,769 

17,717 

63,794 

4,121,293 

6,479,102 

3,975,946 

131,604 

36,267 

72,955 

152,397 

73,550 

65,261 

81,456 

7,345 

108,789 

498,080 

10,573 

196,472 

217,955 

202,276 

27,079 

188,819 

341,125 

86,466 

66.969 

113,066 

1,168,332 

29,952 

852,492 

4,404,620 

2,488,351 

3,448 

13,705 

97,335 

904,463 

230,276 

1,238 

510,872 

30,937 

53,917 

562,898 


666,963 

34,208 

20,828 

93,722 

5,034,081 

6.479,102 

4.765,852 

137.744 

41.207 

68,221 

99,327 

192.037 

51,369 

98,498 

8,151 

105.342 

551,584 

9,805 

213,407 

223,379 

194,026 

86,146 

67,555 

242,312 

429,781 

110,145 

73,631 

126,122 

1,378,739 

39.150 

914,657 

4,559,615 

2,526,765 

3,516 

13,539 

10,936 

1,134,121 

236,016 

154,314 

548,311 

61,043 

57.461 

687, 135 


5,884,548 
305,133 
181,544 

1,233,293 

120,142,783 

14,963,578 

11,232,125 

1,268,808 
129,294 
714,723 

1,172,275 
555,031 
413,125 

1,266,677 
106,397 

1,063,644 

3,638,215 
107,429 

2,301,923 

2,067,136 

2,060,508 
404,585 

1,810,965 

1,153,965 

4,531,038 

1,018,626 

781,351 

1,740,727 

10,976,564 

311,744 

8,366,540 

44,708,377 

23,743,425 

38,093 

177,069 

207.424 

8,053,723 

3,270,607 

1,786,600 

4,976,912 

316,314 

625.498 

5,096,759 


7,850,919 




344,115 




213,610 




1,084.082 




114,719,419 




16,588,578 




12.807,317 




1,379,550 




612,628 




652.074 




607,894 




831,324 




369,166 




1.315.279 




120.058 




1,094.777 




4.059,054 




111.108 




2,469,746 




2,077.420 




1,950,857 


Labour 

Legislation — 


508,899 
1,481.604 




1,324.980 




4.725,865 




1,230,076 




879,113 




1.496,042 




12,556,173 




360,785 




9,053,222 




45,195,127 


Post Office 


24,591.620 




37,823 




129,324 




123.110 


Public Works 


10.427,184 


Railwavs and Canals 


3,348.777 




1,689,665 


Roval Canadian Mounted Police 


4,892.990 


Secretary of State 


539.959 


Soldier Settlement 


648,954 


Trade and Commerce 


5.596,023 




29,652,156 


32,549.865 


294,905,095 


302.096.292 






Special Expenditure— 

Public Works Construction Act 


871.968 

10,294,694 

57,612 


1,761.786 

4.599,141 

372.197 


6,623,657 

39,631,217 

1,939.562 


25,041.148 


Unemplovment Relief 


33,361.935 


Sundry Charges to Consolidated Fund 


774,247 


Total Special Expenditure 


11.224,274 


6,733,123 


48.194,436 


59,177,330 


Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans— Marine 

Public Works 


57,385 

16,149 

-42.836 

131,690 


83,318 

104 

51.370 

42.366 


5.642,231 
314.776 
690,511 

1,002,898 


4,520,361 
205.921 


Railways and Canals 


543.936 


Loans to Harbour Commissions, Merchant Marine, etc. . . 


1,558.988 


Total Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans 


162.388 


177.158 


7.650,416 


6,829.205 


Total Expenditure 


41,038,818 


39,460.147 


350,749.947 


988,102,827 






Other Disbursements — Loans and Advances — Active Assets. 
Provincial Governments (under Relief Act) 


-3.747,130 

100,000 
50.000 


6,019,252 

1.445.917 

23,000 

1,124,728 

23,649 

11.387 

5,500,000 

5,418,000 


23,432,658 


34.545,104 


Railways (Under Supp. P.W.C.A., 1935) 


3.385,129 


Harbour Commissions 


319.659 
153,492 


341.971 


Dominion Housing Act, 1935 


5.175,012 
29.609 




82.620 
5,499,971 


397,568 
49.248.410 
20 570,583 


145.554 


Canadian National Railways (Temnorarv Loan) 


4 8. 000.000 
85.145.975 




1,985,461 


19,565,933 


94,122.370 


176 768 354 






Redemption of Debt— Redemption of Debt 


1,372.725 


79,172,140 


433,594,693 


621. 91-1,766 






Grand Total 


44,397,004 


138,198.220 


878,467,010 


1,166.785.948 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



Classification 



Production— 

Iron 000 metric tons 

Steel 000 metric tons 

Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 

Generated mill, k.w.h 

New orders received. 1920=100 

Copper Available 000 tons 

Raw Cotton Delivered to 

Mill mill, lb 

Production, Artificial SaK 
Yarn and Waste. . .mill, lb 
NaturalSilkDeliveriesOOO lb 
Crude Rubber 

Available 000 tons 

Building Plans 

Approved l 1924 = 100 

Other' 1924 = 100 

Employment— 
Insured Workers in 

Emplo yment 2 mi 

Number Unemployed 2 000 

Percentage Unemployed 

Coal mining 

Iron and steel 

General engineering 

Electrical engineering 

Shipbuilding and marine en- 
gineering 

Base metal working 

Cotton 

Woollen 

Building. . 

Public works contracting 

Trade— 

Imports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 

Raw materials -. £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Total, net imports £ mn. 

Exports, Domestic,Total£ mn. 
Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Bank Clearings — 

Provincial £ mn. 

Postal Receipts, Daily. . £ 000 
Transportation— 
Shipping— 

Entrances mill, net tons 

Clearances mill, net tons 

Index of shipping 

freights 1 1924 = 100 

Railways— 
Average weekly 

railway receipts £000 

Freight traffic total. mill, tons 

Merchandise mill, tons 

Coal mill, tons 

Minerals and other 

merchandise mill, tons 

Prices— 
Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100— 

Board of Trade 1 

Economist 

Statist 

Retail Foods 

Cost of living 

Banking— 
Bane of England— 

Private deposits £ mn. 

Bank and currency notes £ mn. 

Gold reserve £ mn. 

Nine Clearing Banks— 

Deposits £ mn. 

Discounts £ mn. 

Advances £ mn. 

Investments £ mn. 

Treasury Bills £ mill 

Money— 

Day to Day Rate p.c. 

Three Months Rate d.c. 

Security Values- 

FlXED INTERE8T 1921 = 100 

Variable Dividend . .1921 = 100 

Total 1921 = 100 

Exchange, New York $ to £.... 
Exchange, Francs to £ 



1934 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



530 

770 

20,848 

1.714 
101 
14-9 

126 

10 12 

432 

6-73 

184-8 
164-3 



10-05 

2,325 
17-7 
190 
24-1 
14-6 
7-8 

421 
12 3 
22 
15-7 
24-9 
49-5 

61- 

27- 

19- 

14-3 

56 

35 

2 

4 
27-5 

122 2 
135 



4-56 
4 

62-7 



2.595 
210 
3 5 
13-7 

3-7 



145 

378 

192-4 

1,944 
282 
738 
577 



•75 

•38 

134-6 
115-7 
128-5 
4-944 
74-69 



491 

782 

18,608 

1,478 

107 

18-4 

103 

9-61 
366 

7-84 

201-6 
159-5 



10 

2.285 
17-5 
18-7 
24-4 
14-6 
7-7 

41-8 
120 
22-5 
15 2 
21-6 
48-9 

56-3 

26-3 

16-2 

13 

51-9 

34-1 

2 

4-2 
26 

109-2 
131 



4 

3-98 



581 



2,640 
21-8 
3 
14-3 



3-9 



880 
91-3 



142 

375 

192-4 

1,916 
263 
741 
590 
812 

•63 
•41 

131-6 
113-7 
125-8 
4-870 
74-22 



562 

855 

19,593 

1,507 

102 

20- 1 

113 

10-73 

481 

8-26 

176-8 
132-7 



10-20 
2,154 
16-5 
18-5 
23-0 
140 
7-6 

41-3 
12 4 

21-8 
150 
170 
46 

60-5 
28-6 
16-5 
15-2 
560 
360 
2-4 
4-6 
28-0 

108-1 
140 



4-71 
4-62 



92.6 



2,705 

22-3 

3-7 

14-6 

3-9 



86-9 

90-9 

97-5 

122 

141 



149 

379 

192-5 

1,885 
205 
752 
598 
788 

•75 
•50 

130 3 

1100 
123-7 
4-834 
72-71 



535 

822 

17,863 

1,330 

105 

23-8 

105 

9-79 
409 

7-22 

185 
117-2 



10-32 
2.044 
15-7 
18-7 
22-5 
13 
7-2 

40-2 
11-8 
21-4 

13-5 
15-2 

46-3 



27-1 
16 9 
15-5 



97-7 

134 



506 
4-42 



950 



3,813 

220 

3-7 

14-3 

40 



87-5 

91 

98-9 
119 
139 



140 

392 

192-6 



1,902 
198 
760 
601 
813 

•75 

•59 

131-3 
111-5 
124-9 

4-785 
72-53 



568 

867 

19,589 



110 
20-4 



11-10 

449 



198-6 
171-3 



10-33 
2,045 

15 6 

18 

23-5 

13-2 



40-3 
12-6 



13-6 
14-2 



64-5 
301 
18-4 
15-8 
59-0 
35-2 
2-5 
4-7 
27-1 

103-0 
131 



5-55 
5-04 



2,769 
20-6 



131 



3-8 



88-2 

94-3 

100-2 

118 

140 



141 

390 

192-6 

1,923 
216 
755 
604 
843 

•75 
•59 

131-3 
114-4 
125-8 
4-836 
73-28 



782 
16,397 

1,147 

109 
25-1 



7-79 



142-9 
102 



10-36 
2,000 

15-3 

18 

22 
12 



38-9 
11-4 
21-0 
13-7 

140 
43-6 

57-8 
27-5 
15-7 
14-4 
52-6 
32-9 
2-4 
40 
25-5 

97-6 
136 



5-44 
4-71 



92-9 



1.013 
191 



3-8 



88-4 

93-7 

98-5 

120 

143 



138 

399 

192-7 

1,966 

242 
740 



•75 



130-3 

115-6 
125-5 
4-923 
74-72 



556 

816 

17,721 

1, 

101 

15-9 

116 

10-91 
447 

6-72 

183-6 
134-1 



10-38 

1,973 

15-3 

17-6 

21-8 
12 
6-3 

38-5 
10-7 
21-4 
12-8 
14-7 
460 

61-8 
29-0 
170 
15-5 
57-9 
36-4 
2-6 
4-6 
28-4 

117-8 
129 



607 
5-20 



3,155 
19 
3 
12-3 

3-8 



880 

93-7 

99-2 

126 

143 



142 

400 

192-7 

1,982 
272 
760 

599 
887 

•75 
•63 

131-5 
115-6 
126-4 
4-942 
74-50 



552 

772 

17,165 



7-54 
407 



10-52 



126-8 
980 



10-42 
1,948 

14-9 

17 

20-3 

12 
6-3 

37-1 
10-6 
21-2 
12-1 
14-4 
46-2 

59-1 
27-0 
16-0 
15- 
550 
34-9 
2-5 
41 
27-2 

100-3 
140 



5-93 
5-31 



95-8 



3.432 
19-8 
3 
12-2 

3-9 



88-4 

93-0 

98-9 

126 

143 



123 
406 
192 

1,976 
285 
750 
599 
880 

•75 



129-8 
117-5 
125-8 
4-956 
74-91 



538 

870 

18,007 

1,320 

71 

17-3 

90 

9-74 

407 

10-97 

160-5 
165-9 



10-44 
1,959 
150 
18-6 
20- 1 
12-4 
5-9 

38-0 
10-4 
22-0 
10-2 
14-5 
46-5 

60-8 
29-6 
15-3 
15-5 
57-0 
341 



3-7 

26-7 



95-3 
144 



5-83 
4 



3,074 
17-7 
3 

10 



89-6 
96-1 



553 

922 

20, 152 

1,650 

70 

23-5 

120 

12-52 



185-6 
123-2 



10-49 
1,916 
14-6 
18-5 
20-0 
11-5 
5-6 

36-7 
11-2 
19-2 
7-9 
14-9 
46-9 

73-4 
37-5 
18-0 
17 



130 

398 

193-5 



748 
602 
893 

•75 
•56 

124-3 
112-7 
120-6 
4-956 
75-16 



110 
145 



5-61 
5-15 



1151 



3-7 
12-9 



3-7 



911 

98-5 



147 



117 

400 

193-7 



295 
759 
610 
902 

•75 
•61 

125-5 

112-6 
121-3 
4-906 
74-47 



562 

918 

20,605 

1,758 

79 

12-3 

132 

11-80 
481 

7-18 

199-2 
129-3 



10-54 

1,919 

14 

18-2 
18-9 
11-1 
5-6 

33-9 
10-5 
17-5 

7-8 
16-7 
47-6 

71-5 
34-4 
19-7 
16-9 
66-9 
39-4 
3-8 
5-1 
29-3 

108-7 
145 



5-24 
4-94 



109-9 



2,831 



3-8 
13-2 



91-2 

98-2 



147 



130 

401 

196-5 



292 
759 
604 
898 

•75 
•56 

128-9 
118-3 
125-5 
4-914 
74-53 



1,929 

89 

19-4 

111 

9-96 
423 

6-63 

141-9 
133- 



1935 
Jan. 



10-60 
l.» 

14 

17 

17-6 

10 
5 

33-3 

9 

16 
7-5 
17-9 
47-4 



34- 

23- 

16- 

69-0 

34-9 
2-7 
4-2 

26-2 

110-6 
190 



5-39 
4-38 



117-7 



2.753 
23 
4-3 
15-1 



147 



117 

419 

200-1 

2,054 
320 

764 
589 



•75 
•75 

129-5 
120.1 
126-4 
4-931 

74-84 



148 

398 

200-2 



895 



4-929 
74-44 



1 Beginning with March 1935, this factor is expressed as a percentage of 1930. 

*Numberof persona on the Registers of Employment Exchanges in Great Britain only. »The Board of Trade price 
'ndex is revised, being placed on the base of 1930. 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States 





1935 


1936 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


United States Statistics— 




























Industrial Produc- 




























tion 1923-5 = 100 


910 
940 


89-0 
96-0 


88-0 
97-0 


86-0 
87-0 


850 
89 


86-0 
98-0 


86-0 
84-0 


87-0 
81-0 


90-0 
87-0 


950 
93-0 


98-0 
92-0 


103-0 
102-0 




Mineral Production. . 1923-5=00 




Manufacturing Pro- 




























duction 1923-5=100 


900 


88-0 


860 


86-0 


84-0 


84-0 


86-0 


88-0 


91-0 


95-0 


99-0 


104-0 




Wheat, Visible Supply.MU. bush. 
Receipts, principal 
markets 000 bush. 


75 


63 


53 


43 


32 


24 


37 


64 


79 


82 


80 


75 




5,127 


3,771 


4,668 


6,390 


8,298 


10,024 


28,895 


48,169 


42,289 


27,883 


14,501 


9,943 


9,277 


Shipments, principal 




























markets 000 bush. 


8,638 


6,846 


6,355 


7,971 


8,683 


11,217 


11,233 


14,997 


15,595 


14,695 


12,403 


7,181 


7,964 


Exports, including 




























wheat flour 000 bush. 


1,257 


1.301 


1,502 


1.281 


1,426 


1,195 


1,231 


1,278 


1,324 


1,489 


1,602 


1,132 




Wheat Flour Produc- 




























tion OOObbls. 


8,315 


7,599 


7,986 


7,787 


7.806 


7,381 


7,387 


8,082 


9,055 


9,897 


8,274 


7,172 




Sugar Meltings, 8 




























Ports 000 long tons 


357 


301 


328 


341 


437 


323 


414 


331 


302 


314 


240 


242 




Tobacco Consumption, 




























Cigars Millions 


328 


321 


352 


374 


408 


402 


432 


422 


431 


524 


457 


313 






11,337 


9,306 


10,200 


10,697 


11,709 


12,120 


13,138 


11,975 


10,774 


12,711 


10,801 


9,841 




Cattle Receipts, Primary 




























Markets 000 


1,889 


1,381 


1,470 


1,630 


1,636 


1,402 


1,603 


1,943 


2,257 


2,545 


2,037 


1 , 809 1 


Hog Receipts, Primary 
























1 


Markets 000 


2,422 


1,823 


1,622 


1,650 


1,551 


1,301 


1,336 


1,278 


1,220 


1,652 


1,671 


2,036 




Cotton Consumption. . .000 bales 


547 


478 


481 


463 


469 


386 


392 


408 


449 


552 


508 


498 




Newsprint Produc- 




























tion 000 s. tons 


80-3 


70-6 


73-3 


74-7 


84-1 


77-0 


72-8 


75-2 


71-3 


80 


87-3 


75-9 




Newsprint Consump- 




























tion 1 000 s. tons 


157-9 
1,477 


169-8 
1.609 


171-1 

1,777 


1661 
1,663 


202 
1.727 


161-9 
1,553 


153-8 
1,520 


148-1 
1,761 


160-6 
1,776 


179-8 
1,978 


187-4 
2,066 






Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 


2,106 


2,026 


Steel Ingot Produc- 




























tion 000 I. tons 


2,872 


2,748 


2,868 


2,641 


2,636 


2,231 


2,270 


2,919 


2,830 


3,146 


3,153 


3,082 


3,049 


Automobile Produc- 




























tion 000 cars and trucks 


292-8 


335-7 


429-8 


477-7 


364-7 


361-3 


337-0 


240-1 


89-8 


275-0 


398-0 


407-8 






35,135 

117,685 


33,468 
116,276 


36,735 
111,806 


35.329 
108,680 


34,572 
107,625 


34,637 
112,909 


35,120 

115.723 


35,547 
112,445 


36,221 
106,316 


36,716 
95,969 


37,469 
85,266 


40,136 
83,936 




Stocks s. tons 




Lead Production s. tons 


26,350 


25,103 


30,118 


29,857 


33,202 


29,332 


30,488 


30,807 


29,358 


37,844 


36,229 






Petroleum Produc- 






tion 000 bbls. 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls. 


78,715 


72,763 


81,488 


78,427 


82,454 


82,338 


85,485 


84,816 


84,109 


88,160 


86,476 


88,711 




75,456 


70,817 


76,630 


75.066 


80,412 


81,724 


84,903 


84,584 


83,347 


85,132 


83,180 


84,992 




Gasoline Production. .000 bbls. 


35,330 


32,702 


35,314 


34,728 


37,583 


38,180 


40,667 


40,488 


39,817 


41,956 


40,260 


40,667 






28,062 
99 8 


26,432 
751 


31,997 
123 


36,076 
124-0 


39,089 
126-7 


37,884 
1480 


41,203 
159-2 


42,836 
168-6 


37,862 
167-4 


41,401 
200-6 


35,956 
188-2 


33,734 
264-1 






204-8 


Carloadings 000 cars 


2,170 


2,326 


3,015 


2.3U3 


2,327 


3.035 


2,226 


3,102 


2,632 


2,882 


3,179 


2,319 


2,353 


Electric Power Pro- 




























duction mill. k.h. 


8,349 


7,494 


8,012 


7,819 


8,021 


7,873 


8.370 


8,573 


8,208 


8,844 


8,688 


9,118 
































ment 1923-5=100 


80-5 


81-9 


82-4 


82-3 


81-2 


79-9 


80-4 


81-7 


81-9 


83-6 


84-8 


85-6 




Mail Order Sales, 2 cos 5000 


41,194 


41,573 


54,763 


59.644 


58,105 


58,953 


49,887 


52,402 


59,474 


79,945 


71,777 


90,813 




Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains . . . $000 


32,546 


34.479 


38,950 


43,368 


40,468 


40,678 


38,550 


40,914 


39,008 


44.911 


45,628 


80,995 






167-0 


152-5 


177-3 


170-6 


170-6 


156-8 


177-7 


1690 


161-7 


189-2 


169-4 


186-9 




Exports $000, 000 


176-2 


163-0 


185-0 


164-4 


165-5 


170-2 


173-4 


172-2 


198-2 


221-2 


269-3 


223-5 




F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 




counted Mil. Dolls . 


7 


6 


8 


6 


8 


6 


7 


11 


10 


6 


6 


5 


9 


Reserve Ratio p.c. 


720 


72-2 


72-3 


73-0 


73-3 


74-2 


74-5 


74-9 


75-3 


76-4 


77-1 


77-6 


78-1 


Total Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Demand Deposits, 
adjusted 2 Mil. Dolls. 


8,023 


8,061 


8,084 


8,155 


8,111 


8,037 


7,811 


7,817 


8,030 


7,902 


8,152 


8,249 




11,683 


11,793 


11,688 


12,231 


12,556 


12,921 


12,962 


13,263 


13,246 


13,598 


14,018 


13,887 




Interest Rates, Time Loans.p.c. 
Call loans renewal p.c. 


•88 


•88 


•88 


•63 


•25 


•25 


•25 


•25 


-25 


•29 


•25 


•25 




100 


100 


1-00 


•64 


•25 


•25 


•25 


•25 


•25 


•75 


•75 


•75 




Prime commercial paper, 




























4-6 months p.c. 


•88 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


-75 


•75 


•75 


•75 




Bond Prices High Grade 




























Rails (10) 


110-25 
86-02 


112-52 
83-16 


111-42 
79-00 


112-58 
78-37 


113-57 
79-60 


11507 
81-08 


116-65 
81-95 


113-83 
81-90 


113-83 
81-82 


112-55 
79-51 


114-32 
83-52 


116-92 
86-50 








Prices Common Stocks 
(421) 1926=100 




69-7 


67-8 


63-9 


67-5 


73-1 


76-0 


79-4 


83-3 


85-0 


86-1 


94-2 


95-7 




(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 




























Industrials (351) 


81-4 

34-6 
57-4 


800 
31-8 
54-5 


75-4 

27-8 
53-2 


78-9 
29-4 
59-1 


85-5 
310 
64-5 


88-0 

32-7 
70 4 


91-7 
34-1 
73-9 


95-2 
35-9 

81-6 


97-5 
37-0 
81-9 


99-5 
34-5 
82-1 


108-4 
38-3 
91 


109-8 
41-4 
92-0 




Railways (33) 




Utilities (37) 






90-2 
39-7 


85-6 
36-9 


77-2 
30-7 


80-7 
31-2 


86-8 
31-9 


88-5 
31-3 


101-9 
32-4 


117-6 
341 


127-3 
33-8 


137-4 
31-7 


159-9 
38-2 


157-6 
43-4 




Tires and rubber goods (7) 






72-7 
56-4 
71-4 
50-6 
49-5 
50-4 
11-3 
133-1 
19-4 


720 
54-3 
69-9 
47-9 
45-8 
47-6 
10-7 
130-7 
14-4 


69-9 
49-4 
65-9 
40-4 
39-2 
43-4 
10-2 
1261 
15-9 


71-8 
56-6 
711 
41-2 
41-4 
42-8 
10-9 
127-2 
22-4 


75-6 
68-9 
80-9 
40-8 
44-5 
450 
12-5 
136-5 
30-4 


78-8 
65-7 
82-7 
43-9 
44-9 
45-0 
13-9 
140-5 
22-3 


80 
69-7 
80-5 
48-5 
53-3 
47-3 
14-7 
148-3 
29-4 


81-7 
79-9 
80-8 
48-1 
60-4 
49-9 
150 
151-8 
42-9 


81-5 
88-9 
77-2 
45-6 
64-2 
51-3 
17-8 
153-2 
34-7 


78-6 
92-0 
78-8 
41-7 
63-1 
54-8 
18-3 
153 
46-7 


791 
100-2 
86-7 
49-8 
71-2 
59-3 
20 6 
156-5 
57-5 


76-1 
109-2 
91-0 
52-3 
70-8 
67-2 
21-9 
150-2 
45-6 








Oil (15) 












Textile (28) 








Tobacco (11) 




Stock Sales, N.Y Mil. Shares 


67-2 


Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 


330-5 


220-3 


310-7 


266-0 


284-2 


2634 


235-7 


286-9 


249-8 


275-7 


302 


314-4 




Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 


825 


816 


773 


805 


793 


809 


769 


772 


781 


792 


846 


938 






14,997 


12,549 


15,895 


15,905 


14,551 


15,667 


16.737 


14,733 


14,014 


15,733 


15,542 


17,684 


17,925 


Outside, 140 centres. . .Mil. Dolls 


15,066 


13,181 


15,849 


15,746 


15,655 


15,914 


16,657 


15,643 


15,127 


16,962 


16,802 


18,816 


17,499 



1 Based on sample of 422 publishers. 

8 Method of computing net demand deposits was changed by the Banking Act of 1935, approved Aug. 23, 1935. 
Consequently figures since that date are not comparable with those for earlier periods. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, FEVRIER 1936 INK2 

Statisticixn du Dominion: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 
Statistiques FjConomiques: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE AU CANADA 

La situation economique en Janvier accuse une nouvelle amelioration en continuation du 
relevement qui dure depuis trois ans. La plupart des six principaux facteurs enregistrent des 
redressements marques pour le premier mois de l'annee. 

La hausse des actions ordinaires a ete le point saillant, des gains marques etant indiqu£s 
chaque semaine depuis le ler Janvier. Les operations se sont accelerees et le gain se repartit 
sur pratiquement toutes les categories de la classification officielle. 

La hausse soutenue des obligations se reflete par le flechissement ininterrompu des rende- 
ments durant Janvier. L'indice du rendement des obligations federates a long terme est passe 
de 73-3 a 71-1 durant le mois. II y a eu de nouveaux gains durant les premieres semaines de 
fevrier, la cote (demande) des emissions federates atteignant presque le maximum de 1935. 

Les prix des denrees se sont bien maintenus en Janvier en continuation de la position stabi- 
lised des deux dernieres annees. lis enregistrent une legere hausse sur le mois correspondant 
de 1935, mais le flechissement survenu au commencement de fevrier est a refermer l'ecart. 

Les depots des banques etaient en plus-value le ler Janvier, accroissement qui est venu 
s'ajouter a l'augmentation des derniers vingt mois. Les depots se sont maintenus environ au 
meme niveau qu'au commencement de 1930, ce qui a fait monter beaucoup les disponibilites des 
banques. 

Operations commerciales 

Les exportations de produits nationaux ont augmente beaucoup et depassent celles de tout 
autre mois correspondant ecoule depuis 1930; la plus-value sur le mois correspondant de 1935 
est de 22-6 p.c. Huit des neuf groupes de denrees ont augmente par rapport a Janvier 1934, 
la seule exception etant les produits chimiques et connexes qui n'enregistrent toutefois qu'un 
leger flechissement. L'indice du volume physique des affaires a decline de 106-2 qu'il etait en 
decembre a 104-6 en Janvier 1936. 

Production minerale 

Les chargements de nickel, de zinc et de bauxite se sont accrus en Janvier, ce qui a influence" 
favorablement la situation. Les exportations de nickel ont atteint 14,111,000 livres, maximum 
pour Janvier durant l'apres-guerre; le gain ajuste par rapport a, decembre correspond a 67 p.c. 
Les exportations de cuivre accusent par contre un flechissement sur le niveau eleve du dernier 
mois de 1935 et ont baisse a 19,182,000 livres. Les exportations de zinc ont augmente de 29 
p.c. pour atteindre 18,254,000 livres. 

L'accroissement des chargements d'or a ete inferieur a la normale saisonniere, mais le total 
de 311,056 onces constitue un record pour le mois de Janvier. Les chargements d'argent ont 
diminue par rapport a decembre mais enregistrent une augmentation notable sur Janvier 1935. 

Importations de textiles 

Les importations de coton brut ont ete plus elevees que celles de tout autre mois correspon- 
dant depuis 1927; elles enregistrent toutefois un flechissement ajuste sur decembre. Elles 
s'etablissent a 19,940,000 livres, indication de preparatifs importants de la part des filatures. 
La diminution ajustee des importations de files de coton par rapport a decembre correspond a 
4-4 p.c. et l'augmentation des importations de laine n'est que tres peu inferieure a la normale 
saisonniere. 

Fer et acier 

Quoique l'industrie primaire du fer et de l'acier ait 6t6 plus active qu'en decembre si Ton 
tient compte de l'accroissement saisonnier, la production de fonte et d'acier en lingots a d^passe" 
en Janvier celle de tout autre mois correspondant ecoule depuis 1930. La production de fonte 
s'Stablit a 61,336 tonnes contre 70,647 en decembre et 44,416 en Janvier 1935. Le gain dans la 
production d'acier en lingots, qui est passee de 98,888 tonnes en decembre 1935 a 100,225 en 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

Janvier 1936 a ete infe>ieur a la normale saisonniere, de sorte que l'indice ajuste" a fl£chi de 165-4 
a 161-4. La production en Janvier 1935 avait 6te de 59,500 tonnes. 

Trois facteurs representatifs 

Le graphique illustrant les trois facteurs representatifs indique qu'il y a eu un changement 
marque en Janvier. Apres s'etre maintenus depuis 1931 au-dessous de la ligne des tendances a 
long terrne fondees sur les donnees d'apres-guerre, les indices de l'activite commerciale et des 
actions ordinaires ont depasse" cette ligne recemment dans un mouvement ascendant. Chacun 
des trois facteurs se trouve a 1'heure actuelle au-dessus de la ligne a long terme. 

L'indice du volume physique des affaires, ajuste au niveau de la moyenne trimestrielle pour 
climiner les oscillations irregulieres, a depasse" la ligne en decembre, alors que l'indice du cours 
des actions ordinaires a depasse cette ligne en Janvier. L'indice des rendements invertis des 
obligations s'est maintenu au-dessus de la ligne depuis le commencement de 1934. 

Conserveries 

L'activite dans les conserveries de viande s'est acceleree en Janvier. L'indice ajuste des 
abatages controles est passe de 108-0 en decembre a 133-0 le mois suivant. Les abatages de 
betes a cornes ont ete considerables, et c'est ce qui a exerce la plus forte influence sur l'indice. 

Papier- journal 

Bien qu'elle accuse un relevement marque" sur le mois correspondant de 1935, la production de 
papier- journal s'est maintenue bien au-dessous du niveau ajuste du dernier trimestre de 1935. 
Les chargements s'etablissent a 181,403 tonnes contre une production de 227,955, renetant ainsi 
un ralentissement par rapport au niveau eleve precedent. II enregistre toutefois un leger gain 
sur Janvier 1935. Les stocks dans les papeteries etaient de 76,658 tonnes vis-a-vis de 30,140 
a la fin de decembre. 

Construction 

Un fait de grand interet a ete l'accroissement des nouveaux contrats accordes en Janvier. 
Le total a atteint $13,610,000 contre $4,365,000 en decembre et $10,220,000 en Janvier 1935. 
Les entreprises de l'Etat n'ont joue qu'un petit role en Janvier, les trois principaux contrats 
etant les suivants: usine electrique, annexe, Baie Comeau (Quebec) $2,000,000; affinerie, annexe, 
Copper Cliff, $2,000,000; centrale electrique, pres Sault Ste-Marie, $1,000,000. 

Chemins de fer 

Les chargements de wagons au cours des premieres cinq semainee de 1936 enregistrent une 
diminution sur la pe>iode correspondante de Pannee passee. La diminution de 10,658 wagons 
se repartit notamment entre la houille, le bois a p&te et les divers. Le gain notable enregistre 
par les chargements de grain a ete contre-balance" par le flechissement dans d'autres categories. 
Le total de la periode considered a baisse de 203,926 wagons en 1935 a 193,268 wagons en 1936; 
a noter que les chargements avaient 6te anormalement eleves au commencement de 1935. 

Les recettes d'exploitation brutes des reseaux canadiens du Canadien National ont atteint 
$10,153,000 en Janvier en regard de $10,015,000 le mois correspondant de 1935. Les recettes 
d'exploitation brutes du Canadien Pacifique sont passees de $8,217,000 a $9,323,000. 

Commerce de gros 

Les chiffres preliminaires de 1935 indiquent que les ventes globales de tous les etablisse- 
ments ayant fourni des declarations accusent une augmentation de 5-3 p.c. sur l'annSe prec6- 
dente. Les gains varient de 2-0 p.c. pour les marchandises seches a 8-0 p.c. pour les chaus- 
sures. 

Les ventes globales de toutes les firmes classifiees selon les provinces indiquent que les 
ventes dans les Provinces Maritimes se sont maintenues aux niveaux de l'annee passee. Dans 
les autres provinces, les accroissements varient de 3-8 p.c. dans l'Ontario a 8-6 p.c. en Colombie 
Britannique. 

Les ventes des maisons de gros qui fournissent des declarations mensuelles constituent de 
40 a 50 p.c. du chiffre d'affaires total de toutes les maisons de gros. 

Valeurs mobilieres 

Les bourses ont 6te" generalement fermes durant le mois de Janvier quoique le mouvement 
qui a fait monter l'indice des valeurs industrielles et des utility publiques a de nouveaux maxima 
pour la periode de relevement en cours provienne notamment des petroles et de certaines valeurs 
classees sous la rubrique "divers", telles que 1' International Nickel et la Consolidated Smelters. 









REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

Les autres categories telles que le fer et acier, la pate et le papier, les textiles, les boissons et les 
utilites publiques n'enregistrent presque aucun changement. L'indice s'est redresse" sans inter- 
ruption de 111-4 qu'il 6tait la derniere semaine de decembre 1935 a 120-7 la derniere semaine 
de Janvier 1936. Les valeurs industrielles ont etc" les plus fermes de toutes, 6tant passees de 
178-3 a 194-4 dans l'intervalle considere, alors que les utility publiques ont hausse" de 49-8 a 
52-7. 

Les valeurs minieres ont egalement ete" actives, l'indice de ce groupe 6tant monte" de 113-1 
a 149-9 en Janvier. Les auriferes ainsi que les bas metaux ont contribue" au mouvement ascen- 
dant; les premiers sont passes de 116-7 a 131-3 et les seconds de 200-4 a 226-2. 

Les cours des actions ordinaires accusent un redressement marque" sur les premiers mois 
de 1935. Les gains les plus notables ont ete" enregistres en mai, octobre et novembre 1935 et 
au cours des premieres six semaines de 1936. L'indice de 112 valeurs ordinaires est passe de 
89 qu'il etait la semaine terminee le 7 fevrier 1935 a 124-2 la semaine correspondante de l'annee 
en cours. L'indice mensuel de 120 actions ordinaires ressort a 112-9 en Janvier, niveau maxi- 
mum de la periode ^coulee depuis septembre 1930. Le bas fond de la crise, 43-2, avait ete 
atteint en juin 1932 et un autre minimum, 48-9, en mars 1933. Par consequent, le relevement 
en Janvier sur le bas fond de la depression correspond a, 161-3 p.c. 

Durant les derniers douze mois le groupe qui enregistre la plus forte amelioration a ete 
celui des 20 divers. Le gain, mesure par l'indice hebdomadaire, a atteint 95 p.c. Les boissons 
et les petroles ont hausse de 42-2 p.c. et 41 -4 p.c. respectivement; les 6 actions de pate et papier 
ont augmente de 44-9 p.c. Les textiles et le vetement constituent le seul groupe de la classi- 
fication officielle qui a ete a la baisse dans cette comparaison. Toutefois, cette baisse n'atteint 
meme pas 2 p.c. 

Les actions ordinaires sous les rubriques "vivres" et "minoterie" ont hausse de 21-2 p.c. 
et 22-3 p.c. respectivement, alors que les 15 actions de la classification acier ont rencheri de 
9 p.c. Durant la semaine du 6 fevrier, les indices du papier, de la minoterie et des textiles etaient 
au-dessous de la moyenne de l'annee de base (1926), tandis que les autres groupes industriels 
accusent des gains sur cette ann^e-la. 

L'indice de 23 utilites publiques a hausse de 11-6 p.c. par rapport a la semaine du 7 fevrier 
1935. Les 19 actions d'energie electrique ont hausse de 14 p.c, les transports de 1-9 p.c. et 
les communications de 10-8 p.c. 

L'indice des 23 valeurs minieres s'est releve de 24-7 p.c; les bas metaux ont hausse de 
78-2 p.c et les auriferes de 9-8 p.c 

Prix 

Les prix des denrees ont ete relativement fermes au cours de Janvier; de legeres oscillations 
ont fait baisser l'indice hebdomadaire de 73-0 a 72-8 entre la premiere et la derniere semaine 
du mois considere. Les cereales ont baisse" quelque peu, et e'est ce qui domine la baisse des 
produits de la ferme. Les metaux non ferreux se sont raffermis malgre" que le prix de l'argent 
ait baisse" d'environ cinq cents l'once durant Janvier. 

La stabilite de l'indice general des prix de gros en 1935 se repartit sur la plupart des 8 groupes 
qui le composent. II n'y a que les produits animaux et les metaux non ferreux qui enregistrent 
des changements depassant 1 ou 2 p.c. Ces deux groupes se sont ameliores d'environ 6 p.c 

Les comparaisons etablies pour decembre 1935 avec les mois correspondants de 1934 et 1935, 
revelent un mouvement ascendant soutenu. Ce mouvement est imputable notamment au 
rencherissement irregulier des produits primaires qui a influence l'indice general plus que les 
flechissements mineurs des produits ouvres. La hausse soutenue des produits primaires par 
rapport aux produits ouvres a restaure dans une large mesure la relation qui existait avant le 
declin prolonge inaugure en 1929. Cette baisse a cree un fort malaise economique en detruisant 
l'equilibre qui existait presque continuellement depuis pres d'un decennat. Quoique les prix 
soient toujours a des niveaux bien inferieurs a ceux de l'annee de base (1929), la relation entre 
eux a ete pas mal restaurec Les produits de la ferme se trouvent toujours a un desavantage 
relatif, mais il est plus petit qu'il ne l'a ete depuis le premier semestre de 1930. 
Co&l de la vie 

L'indice du cout de la vie au Canada s'est mis a remonter graduellement en 1935; de 78-9 
qu'il etait en decembre 1934, il a atteint 80-8 le mois correspondant de 1935. Lorsqu'on se rap- 
pelle que le bas fond du flechissement recent avait ete de 76 • 6 en juin 1933, les proportions mode- 
rees des augmentations subsequentes peuvent etre appreciees a leur juste valeur. Le renche- 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

rissement de la vie durant les derniers trois ans en relation au redressement du prix des produits 
primaires a EtE moins marquE que dans bon nombre d'autres pays. 

L'indice gEnEral du prix de la vie au Canada ressort a 80-8 en Janvier, n'accusant ainsi aucun 
changement sur dEcembre 1935; les prix lEgerement plus ElevEs des vivres ont EtE contre-balancEs 
par la baisse des divers. L'indice des vivres a haussE de 73-7 a 73-9 en raison notamment du 
renchErissement du beurre, des ceufs, du fromage, des pommes de terre et de certaines viandes. 
Le sucre a une tendance a la baisse. L'indice des divers a baisse* de 92*5 a 92-3, ce qui est 
imputable a la baisse du cout d'operation des automobiles produite par le flEchissement des 
prix de l'essence dans plusieurs villes. 
La situation economique aux Etats-Unis 

La situation economique aux Etats-Unis a partir de 1919 jusqu'a l'heure actuelle est illus- 
tree par le graphique insert a la page 30. 

Apres le premier trimestre de 1935, l'indice Economique des Etats-Unis accusait une hausse 
marquee. Les quatre Elements qui ont participE aux gains ont EtE la production industrielle, 
les depots bancaires, le cours des actions ordinaires et les operations spEculatives. Apres la 
premiere depression de l'apres-guerre, la production industrielle s'est relevee rapidement durant 
1922. Le ralentissement en 1924 a EtE relativement moderE. II y a eu ensuite un grand essor 
en 1928 et durant le commencement de 1929. Le bas fond de 1'activite industrielle avait EtE 
attemt en juillet 1932. II y a eu un nouvel essor entre mars et juillet 1933, et l'indice base sur 
1926 est passe de 55-6 a 92-6, soit un redressement de 66-5 p.c. Le relevement durant le 
deuxieme semestre de 1935 a EtE des plus notables. 

Le flechissement accentue des prix de gros a EtE Tenement principal de la depression de 
l'apres-guerre qui avait atteint son bas fond en 1921. Le relevement en 1922 avait EtE plut6t 
modeste, et on n'a pu constater de nouvelles tendances importantes durant la pEriode de huit 
ans terminEe en 1929. Le dEclin au cours des quatre annees suivantes a EtE persistant, et en 
fevrier 1933 un nouveau bas fond de la periode considErEe avait EtE atteint. La tendance des 
depots a preavis et sur demande des banques fEdErales dans les principales cites s'est maintenue 
a la hausse durant l'apres-guerre, le maximum ayant EtE atteint vers la fin de 1930. Le total 
de ces deux postes s'est bien maintenu durant les derniers quatre ans. 

Les taux de l'interSt sur le papier de haut commerce accuse des oscillations marquees durant 
les derniers 16 ans; le maximum avait ete atteint vers la fin de 1920, periode de grande reaction 
en ce qui concerne le credit. Entre 1922 et 1927, les taux avaient baisse a un niveau relative- 
ment bas, alors que des hausses marquees ont EtE enregistrEes durant les derniers deux ans de 
la periode de prosperity. Le flEchissement marque des taux depuis octobre 1929 a EtE inter- 
rompu par des relevements au cours du dernier trimestre de 1931 et en mars 1933. Les taux 
sont a l'heure actuelle aussi bas que jamais durant les 17 ans de l'apres-guerre. 

Le fait le plus important de l'apres-guerre a EtE l'oscillation tres accentuEe des valeurs spEcu- 
latives. Cet indice qui Etait de 50 en aout 1921 est monte a 225 en septembre 1929 pour retomber 
a 34 en juin 1932. f La reprise inaugurEe en juillet et aout 1932 a continue* jusqu'en juillet 1933, 
et apres le mois de mars 1935 l'avance a ete pratiquement continuelle. 

Pour ce qui est des^dEveloppements rEcents, il est intEressant de noter que l'indice de la 
situation Economique, compose de 6 principaux facteurs ajustEs, s'est relevE en dEcembre, et 
quoique la statistique de Janvier 1926 soit encore incomplete, il y a lieu de s'attendre a un nou- 
veau relevement pour les premi&res 6 semaines de 1'annEe en cours. 
Disponibilites des banques 

Le flechissement prononcE des prets courants durant les derniers six ans est en contraste 
avec la stabilitE relative des dEpots. Les dEpots a prEavis ainsi'que les dEp6ts sur demande au 
Canada se sont plus que maintenus en 1935, la plus-value pou/la pEriode de 12 mois terminec 
en decembre Etait de $144,000,000. L'excEdent des dEp6ts a'prEavis sur les prets courants 
s'etablissait a $666,000,000 a la fin de'dEcembre 1935 contre $568,400,000 a pareille date en 1934. 

Le fait le plus notable a EtE l'accroissement du portefeuille. II s'est accrU d'une facon mar- 
quEe durant 1'annEe pour atteindre $1,154,677,000, a la fin de dEcembre, maximum-record dans 
les annales bancaires du pays. La somme des postes qui constituent les biens facilement rEali- 
sables des banques enregistre un gain sur dEcembre 1934, le maximum ayant EtE atteint a la fin 
de novembre 1935. Le total a la fin de 1'annEe Etait de $1,395,000,000, vis-a-vis de $1,223,- 
000,000 a la fin de 1934. 

Bureau f£d£ral de la statistique, 21 fevrier, 1936. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

FEBRUARY 16, 1936 ./, ^ 

Administration.— Conference of British Commonwealth Statisticians, 1935; verbatim report of proceed- 
ings, Ottawa, Canada, September 13th to October 9th, 1935. 2 V. V. 1, 369 p.; V. 2, 404 + 1 p. 
Mimeo. Canada 1936 (edition francaise) 25 cents. 

Production. — Production and value of commercial fruits (1935 preliminary estimates) 4 p. 

Manufactures. — Vegetable Products. — Summary of sugar reports, 1935, receipts, meltings, and stocks 
of raw sugar; manufactures, shipments and stocks of refined sugar, exports and imports, 6 p. Pre- 
liminary report on the pack of canned fruits and vegetables, 1935, 2 p. The macaroni and kindred 
products industry in Canada, 1934, 8 p. Report on the prepared breakfast foods and other cereal 
products industry in Canada, 1934, 10 p. Report on the wine industry in Canada, 1934, 11 p. Report 
on the mixed feed trade in Canada, 1934, 10 p. Report on the tobacco industry in Canada, 1934, 25 p. 
Forest Products. — The woodenware industry, 1934 (English and French), 1 p. The box, basket 
and crate industry in Canada, 1934 (English and French), 1 p. The boatbuilding industry, 1934 
(English and French), 1 p. The beekeepers' and poultrymen's supply industry, 1934 (English and 
French), 1 p. Preliminary report on the hardwood flooring industry in Canada, 1934 (English 
and French), 10 p. Preliminary report on the furniture industry in Canada, 1934 (English and French), 
10 p. The sash, door and planing mill industry, 1934 (English and French), 1 p. The charcoal indus- 
try, 1934 (English and French), 2 p. The printing and bookbinding industry in Canada, 1934 (English 
and French), 1 p. The miscellaneous wood-using industry, 1934 (English and French), 1 p. Animal 
Products and Their Manufacture. — Report on the leather footwear industry in Canada, 1934, 20 p. 
Textile Products. — Report on the men's furnishings goods industry in Canada, 1934, 18 p. Report 
on the awning, tent and sail industry in Canada, 1934, 13 p. Iron and Steel and their Products.— 
The bridge building and structural steel work industry, 1934, 5 p. Galvanized sheets, fourth quarter, 
1935, 3 p. The sheet metal products industry, 1934, 10 p. Pig iron, 1935, 1 p. Manufactures of the 
Non-Metallic Minerals. — The asbestos products industry, 1934, 4 p. The abrasives industry in 
Canada, 1934, including: 1. Natural abrasives; 2. Artificial abrasives and abrasive products, 12 p. 
The clay and clay products industry in Canada, 1934, including: 1. Products from domestic clays; 
2. Products from imported clays, 17 p. Chemicals and Allied Products. — The explosives, ammuni- 
tion and fireworks industry, 1934, 3 p. The fertilizer manufacturing industry, 1934, 8 p. Ammonium 
sulphate, 1935, 3 p. The aerated waters industry in Canada, 1934, 15 p. The adhesives industry, 
1934, 6 p. The medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations industry in Canada, 1934, 12 p. The 
polishes and dressings industry, 1934, 7 p. Chemicals and allied products; final summary statistics, 
1934, 3 p. Electrical Industries. — Production and sales of radio receiving sets in Canada, third 
quarter, 1935, 13 p. Dry cell batteries, 1935, 1 p. Radio receiving tubes, 1935, 1 p. Miscellaneous o kC 
Manufactures. — Report on the broom, brush and mop industry in Canada, 1934, 16 p. ^ ^ ' 

External Trade. — Canada's total imports and domestic exports (calendar years 1931 to 1935) 4 p. Can- 
ada's monthly trade trends with Empire countries, January-December, 1933 to 1935, 1 p. Canada's 
monthly trade trends with foreign countries, January-December, 1933 to 1935, 1 p. 

Internal Trade.— Food chains in Canada, 1934, 15 p. Recent price movements; Jan. 18, 1936, 6 p. 
Retail chains in Canada, 1934, 23 p. S.£Yjenth Census oiCanada, 1931, Census of merchandising and 
service establishments, retail trade, Canad~aV 240 p. (English and French). Statistics for payrolls, 
stocks and gross margins of retail merchandising establishments, 1934, 7 p. Sales of manufactures 
outlets, 1934, 4 p. Current trends in wholesale trade, 2 p. 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities.— Statistics of steam railways of Canada 
for the year ended December 31, 1934, 206 p. (English and French) 50 cents. The railway rolling stock 
industry in Canada, 1934, 8 p. 

General.— Comparison of the geographical and the industrial distribution of the workers included in the 
monthly employment surveys, with the geographical and industrial distribution of the workers 
enumerated in the census of June 1, 1931, 12 p. Annual review of building permits issued by 58 cities 
in Canada, 1935 (with comparative datatfor 1920-1934), 16 p. Bank debits to individual accounts 
or amount of cheques passing through the banks at clearing house centres in Canada, 1935, 5 p. Business \ 
conditions in Canada during the calendar year 1935 compared with 1934 and with 1926, 1929 and 1933, 
13 p. charts. 

2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER. 

Dally Bulletins.— The daily bulletin— $1.50 per year. 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian grain statistics. Carloadings of revenue freight. Investors' indexes of 
security prices. Index number of 20 mining stocks. The weekly bulletin — $1.00 per year. Weekly 
index numbers of wholesale prices. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural statistics. The wheat situation: review; statistical supplement. $1.00 
per year. Canadian milling statistics. Cold storage holdings. Preliminary summary of price move- 
ments. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and shoes, (d) Automobiles, (e) Iron 
and steel, (f) Coal and coke, (g) Leading mineral products, (h) Asbestos, (i) Asphalt roofing, 
(j) Cement. (k) Clay products. (1) Copper, (m) Feldspar, (n) Gold. (o) Gypsum, 
(p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, (v) Silver, (w) 
Zinc, (x) Concentrated milk products, (y) Creamery butter. Rigid insulating board industry. 
Building permits. Summary of the trade of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of 
Canada's domestic exports. Summary of Canada's imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements 
and machinery. Footwear trade. Exports: Fertilizers, Grain and flour; Hides and skins; Lumber; 
Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; 
Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Pipes, tubes and fittings; P-ilpwood, wood pulp 
and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vegetable oils; Vehicles (of iron). Imports: 
Canada's imports from Empire and foreign countries. Coffee and tea; Fertilizers; Hides and skins; 
Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and 
smelter products; Paint and varnishes; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Petroleum and its products; 
Pipes, tubes and fittings; Rubber; Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vegetable oils, 
Vehicles (of iron). Canada's monthly trade trends. Canada's monthly trade trends with Empire 
countries. Canada's monthly trade trends with foreign countries. Railway operating statistics. 




Volume XI aWEIs? Num£ro 2 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE G&N&RALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE I 



FEVRIER, 1936 



Publie par ordre de l'Hon. W. D. Euler, M.P., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA 
J.-O. PATENAUDE, O.S.I. 
IMPRIMEUR DE 8A TRES EXCELLENTE MAJESTE LE ROI 
1936 



Prix: Un dollar par an 




^V* 1 . UNIVERSITY OF TORONToPAfciJJ 

D -l- TORONTO 5.QVT 

( 




Volume XI «4hK? Number 3 



CANADA 

DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



MARCH, 1936 



Published by Authority of the Honourable W. D. Euler, M.P. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J O. PATENAUDE, I.S.O. 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1936 



Price: One Dollar per year 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart or Three Representative Factors 4 

The Business Situation In Canada 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Vol- 
ume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements. 

Production, Trade, Transportation, Immigration, 
Labour Factors, Industrial Production in other 
countries 9 

Chart of Weekly Economic Index 10 

Table 3. Receipts, Visible Supply, Exports and 11 
Cash Price of Canadian Grain 

Table 4. Report of the Bank of Canada 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 
by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 
Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 
for Consumption. 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug. Cigarettes To- 
bacco snuff . Cigars. Foreign raw leaf tobacco... . 13 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, 
Retail Food Prices and Cold Storage Holdings. . 14 

Chart of Wage Rates 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations 

and Railway Operating Statistics 10 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 
Industries and Cargo Tonnage 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 10 

Table 14. Trend of Business In the Five Economic 
Areas. 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia— Construction 
Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. Index of 
Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of Insurance. 
Commercial Failures 20 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months. 

Metals— Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, 
Zino. Fuels— Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas. Non- 
Metals — Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt. Struc- 
tural Materials— Cement, Clay Products, Lime . . 20 

Table 16. Weekly Factors or Economic Activity In 
Canada. 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Live Stock Sales and 
Prices, Car loadings, Common Stock Prices, Min- 
ing Stock Prices 21 



Pagb 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
In the Clearing House Centres of Canada and 
total Bank Clearings 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued In Sixty-one 
Cities 28 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices 24 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 
and Wholesale Prices In Other Countries. 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Ger- 
many, Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, 
Italy, Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New 
Zealand, Egypt 25 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 
by Groups, In Thousands of Dollars 20 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 
Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports »y 
Principal Commodities. 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 29 

Chart of Economic Conditions In Great 
Britain 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, 
Foreign Exchange and other Financial Factors. 

Common Stocks — Total. Industrials: Total, 
Iron and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, 
Textiles and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, 
Beverages, Miscellaneous. Utilities: Total, Trans- 
portation, Telephone and Telegraph, Power and 
Traction. Companies Abroad: Total, Industrial, 
Utilities, Banks. 

Mining Stocks— Total, Gold and Base Metals. 

Financial Factors — Preferred Stocks, Interest 
Rates, Bond Yields, Shares Traded, New Issues 
of Bonds, Brokers' Loans. Foreign Exchange— New 
YorkFunds, Sterling 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 
from Six Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. Canadian Public Finance, Revenue and 
Expenditure 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 
Kingdom 33 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 
States 34 

The Business Situation In Canada (In French) . . 35-38 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics 39 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, MARCH, 1936 No. 3 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.S.S. (Hon.) 
Business Statistician: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE CURRENT ECONOMIC SITUATION IN CANADA 

Economic conditions showed further slight improvement in February, advances in common 
stock and high-grade bond prices being the main constructive influences. The sharp advance 
in stock prices to a new high point since 1930 was at least temporarily interrupted in March; 
the entry of German troops into the Rhineland in the second week of March precipitated one 
of the most severe declines in the stock market for several years. 

High-grade bonds advanced from a temporary low point in September last, reaching in 
recent weeks a high point comparable with the peaks of the last two years. The deposit liabilities 
of the banks at the end of January showed the influence of the decline in demand accounts, a 
slight gain being recorded in notice deposits. Current loans, owing partly to the sale of wheat, 
dropped to a new low point. Further advances were shown in security holdings and in quick 
assets. 

The two factors representing developments in the business field were reactionary in February. 
The recession in wholesale prices was slight, in continuance of the zone of stabilization apparent 
for more than two years. The decline in business operations was unmistakable, despite the 
brilliant showing in the export trade. Exports at more than $60,000,000 were greater than in 
any other February since 1930. The gain over the same month of last year was 26 per cent 
and the adjusted increase over January amounted to nearly 18 per cent. The increase in imports 
was of moderate proportions. The exports of copper and nickel were extremely high in February, 
and mineral production recorded greater activity. The index of raw textile imports declined 
7-6 per cent, a rise in wool contrasting with a decline in cotton. The forestry group was more 
active. Declines predominated in the iron and steel industry, recessions being shown from the 
high level of January. Automobile production and crude petroleum imports showed adjusted 
declines of about 17 per cent each, while the gain in crude rubber imports was 14 per cent. 

The adjusted gain in building permits was 7 per cent, while contracts declined 51 per cent 
to the low point of $8,200,000. The adjusted gain in carloadings was about 9 per cent. 

Base Metals 

Metal mining, as measured by shipments, was decidedly active in February. The exports 
of copper were greater than in any other February, the total movement having been 32,952,000 
pounds against 19,182,000 in January. The adjusted index moved up from 199-6 in the first 
month of the year to 424-4 in February. Exports of nickel were greater than in any other 
month in history. The total was 17,088,000 pounds against 14,111,000 in the preceding month. 
The seasonally adjusted index at 490-2 was greater than in any month during the period of 
observation. This compares with 451-4, the preceding high point reached in April of last year, 
The 17,088,000 pounds shows a gain of 54-2 per cent over the same month of 1935, when the 
outward shipment was 11,082,000 pounds. The movement in the second month of last year 
was greater than in any preceding February in the post-war period. Current statistics of lead 
are unavailable but the production in January at 28,100,000 pounds was maintained after seasonal 
adjustment at the level of December and showed a considerable gain over the 22,673,000 produced 
in January 1935. The decline in zinc exports was contrary to seasonal expections, the index 
dropping from 162-4 in January to 134-6 in the month under review. 

The index of the stocks of three base metal companies was 230-4 in February compared 
with 131-2 in the same month of last year. The comparable number for the preceding month 
was 214-8. The index is based on the prices for Falconbridge, Hudson Bay and Noranda. 

The wholesale price index for non-ferrous metals was 69-2 in the week of March 6 against 
64-7 in the same period of 1935. The advance from the first week of the year, when the index 
stood at 68 • 7, was • 7 per cent. 

Forestry 

The operations of the forestry group showed acceleration in February over the preceding 
month. The production of newsprint at 221,569 tons showed a seasonally adjusted gain of 2-8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

per cent ceding month. The output was greater than in any other February, the increase over 
the same month of 1935 having been 22-9 per cent. The exports of wood pulp were greater 
than in any other February since 1930. The gain in the seasonally adjusted index over January 
was from 69-1 to 73-3. 

The lumber industry made a good showing with an export of 95,000,000 feet of planks and 
boards against 72,200,000 in the preceding month. The gain over February of last year was 
7-5 per cent and the seasonally adjusted index presented a gain of 25-0 per cent over January. 
A precipitous decline was shown in the export of shingles from the high level of January. 

The net result was that the forestry index advanced from 106-7 in January to 111-3 in 
February, the standing for February of last year having been 95-2. 

The wholesale price index of the wood and paper group was 67-8 in the week of March 6 
against 64-8 in the same week of last year. The index advanced two full points over the first 
week of the present year. 

The price index of six pulp and paper stocks, was 19-6 in the week ended March 12 against 
11-5 in the same week of last year. The index for January this year was 18-6. 

The exports of wood and paper was valued at $12,412,000 in February against $12,362,000 
in January and $10,618,000 in the same month of last year. 

Securities 

Despite a lull in the latter part of February, common stock prices registered appreciable 
net gains for the month and trading on an unusually broad basis was the heaviest in recent years. 
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics general price index number of common stocks advanced from 
120-7 for the week of January 30 to 126-7 for the week ending February 27. Moderate rises 
occurred in the first and third weeks, with little change in the second and fourth. With the 
exception of textiles, and the telephone-telegraph group, all sections of the index were higher 
for the month. The miscellaneous group dominated by International Nickel and Consolidated 
Smelters continued to lead the advance. Unusual strength among utilities was a feature of 
the February market. 

Gold stock. prices "marked time" for the most part, although minor declines were shown by 
the gold index. Base metals held firm, while trading in both sections was in large volume. 

Prices in the British Market 

The trend of wheat prices in the British market was downward during the first two months 
of the year. A slight advance was recently registered as a result of the French government's 
decision to cease exports and an improvement in Eastern demand. Later in the month millers 
began to show appreciable interest. The better tone was actuated by less favourable advices 
regarding the United States winter wheat crop, anxiety as to the effect of wintery weather in 
Europe with French prospects definitely unfavourable, and a revival of Far Eastern demand for 
Australian wheat. 

Quotations for raw cotton tended to sag, the next crop in the United States being expected 
to show an increase over the last harvest. Crop preparations were less forward than usual at 
the time of year, owing to the severity of the weather, but most reports indicated a good season 
in the ground and that purchases of fertilizers and farm implements pointed to intensive culti- 
vation for the purpose of increasing the yields per acre. Transactions in wool registered a general 
advance of 5 per cent, over the January level, the firmer conditions being due to scarcity and 
estimates that smaller quantities would be catalogued for March. 

An important element in the commodity markets was the steady rise in the prices of iron and 
steel materials. Moreover, in spite of the rapid increase of production, there was still a shortage 
of a number of materials. Internal demand for coal especially by industry was well maintained, 
but export trade hampered by the recent increase of prices was far from satisfactory. The 
opinion was becoming general that a general advance in steel prices would take place owing to 
the increasing costs of production. Consumers of basic billets continued to be embarrassed 
by lack of adequate supplies. A strong trend developed in non-ferrous metals upon the revival 
of demand. Spelter was marked up on rumours that the international zinc cartel would be 
revived. Lead prices disclosed a decided improvement toward the end of the month. The 
advance was due to a better Continental demand and in some measure to the revival in the 
British market, while the advance in other metals was also helpful. Copper advanced con- 
siderably during the month. World stocks of refined copper at the end of January amounted to 

5 14008—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

4S9,900 tons, a slight increase on the month. Trading in nickel was very satisfactory, prices 
being steadily maintained. 
Three Representative Factors 

The chart of three representative factors appearing on page four was revised for the present 
number. The line of the long term trend was recomputed for each factor, making use of the 
data for seventeen years from 1919 to 1935 inclusive. The inverted index of Dominion bond 
yields was substituted for the index of Ontario government bonds. The very close correlation 
between the adjusted indexes of business and common stock prices during the period from 1927 
to 1936 is an interesting feature displayed in the first section of the chart. The coefficient of 
correlation between the two factors on an annual basis from 1919 to 1935 with long-term adjust- 
ment was -95 compared with 1-00 representing a perfect correspondence. 

These factors have moved up since the low points were passed in 1932 and 1933, each of 
them in recent months being above the post-war trend line. Common stocks moved up sharply 
in February, while recessions were shown in business operations during December and January. 

The fluctuations of the inverted index of Dominion bond yields follow quite a different course. 
A marked decline was shown in 1928 anticipating the drop in stocks and business displayed in 
1930. An upward trend was shown from the beginning of 1933 to the latter part of 1934 when 
a new high point was reached for the period of observation. The decline of last September was 
offset by later recovery, the February position being practically as high as the other peaks of the 
last two years. 

Indexes of common stock prices and of Dominion government bond yields are published 
monthly by the Internal Trade Branch of the Bureau. The reciprocal of the index of Dominion 
bond yields is the factor used in this connection. As low yields are regarded as constructive 
from the viewpoint of general economic conditions, the inverted index of bond yields is used in 
the chart of three representative factors for ready comparison with other positive indexes. 
Wage Rates in Recent Years 

A general discussion of wage rates in Canada is given in a supplement to the Labour Gazette 
published in February last. 

Measured by index numbers prepared by the Labour Department, wage rates in 1920 
reached levels almost 100 p.c. higher than in 1913. In some groups the increase was over 100 p.c. 
while for the building and printing trades the increases were appreciably less, being only about 
80 p.c. Since 1920 all groups have shown decreases, although printing trades and coal mining 
reached the peak in 1921 instead of 1920, declining somewhat thereafter. The decreases in coal 
mining in 1925 were comparatively steep and tended to reduce the average for the six groups. 
There have been changes since 1925, raising the average for the six groups each year until 1931 
when the average declined. The trend was upward until 1930 in lumbering and until 1931 in 
common factory labour and in miscellaneous factory trades. 

Remuneration to wage earners in 1935 was greater as a result of increases in various industries 
and localities. Part-time and short-time work were less prevalent. In logging, wages advanced 
generally throughout the Maritime Provinces and Quebec, whereas in Ontario and British Colum- 
bia rates had risen considerably in 1934. In coal mining, wages increased appreciably in Nova 
Scotia and in Alberta, and there were some increases in metal mining. There was also improve- 
ment in manufacturing, especially in clothing and furniture factories. Rates were advanced in 
the construction trades in Quebec and Ontario, and railway wages also increased. Longshore- 
men's wages rose in most of the ocean ports and in some of the lake ports. 

Wage rates in the nine groups of the classification averaged higher in 1935 than in the 
preceding year. The index of wage rates in the building trades increased 3-2 p.c, while gains 
in other groups were as follows: metal trades 1-0 p.c; printing trades 0-5 p.c; electric railways 
0-7 p.c. The gain in steam railways averaged 5-9 p.c, and coal mining increased 1-8 p.c The 
average increase in the six groups was approximately 2 p.c. Common factory labour was up 
2-4 p.c, miscellaneous factory trades, 2-3 p.c, and logging and saw-milling 5-0 p.c. 

A chart showing the trend of wage rates in four industrial groups and an index number of 
six groups is given on page 15. 
The Weekly Economic Index 

The weekly economic index has been published in the Weekly Bulletin since the last quarter 
of 1933. It is based on six major factors representing price and volume in the three fields of 
business, speculation and money. Carloadings and wholesale prices represent the business field J 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

common stock prices and shares traded stand for speculative trading, while an inverted index of 
bond yields and bank clearings represent the field of money. The indexes, adjusted where neces- 
sary for seasonal tendencies, are weighted inversely as the standard deviations from the long- 
term trend of each. The standard deviations were computed from monthly data from January 
1919 to June 1932. 

While the long-term trends of the six factors differ greatly from each other, the weighting 
process only results in the downward trends practically offsetting the upward. As the trend 
element for all practical purposes is eliminated in this way, the residue measures the cyclical 
fluctuations, thus fulfilling the normal function of a weekly index. 

An annual economic index computed in a similar manner from the same factors and the 
same weights showed a correlation of • 93 with the index of the physical volume of business. 

Carloadings and wholesale prices have remained fairly steady during the last two years. 
Inverted bond yields, bank clearings and common stock prices advanced from 1933, especially in 
the last quarter of 1935. The net result was that in the week ended February 22, 1936, the 
economic index reached a new high point for the period of observation. 

The economic index and its six components are shown by weeks from January 1933 to the 
present in the chart appearing on page 10. The index of bank clearings was recently adjusted 
by taking the three weeks' moving average and dropping Ottawa from the compilation. The 
index of carloadings was recently readjusted for seasonal tendencies. The composite was recom- 
puted for the period of observation to give effect to these changes. The elimination of Ottawa 
clearings was necessitated by the breaking of comparability upon the commencement of the 
operations of the Bank of Canada in March 1935. 

LONG-TERM BRITISH ECONOMIC CONDITIONS 

There is presented in this number on page 30 a chart outlining economic conditions in Great 
Britain during the post-war period. The main feature of the general index for the period was 
the relative stability at a moderate level from 1922 to 1930, a depression in 1926 reflecting the 
strike of that year. The recent depression culminated in the fall of 1931, the general situation 
subsequently having shown improvement for more than four years. 

Business activity reached low points in 1921, 1926 and 1931. The expansion from 1921 to 
1929 was temporarily interrupted by the strike conditions of 1926. The greatest activity during 
the period of observation took place in 1935, the index after the first quarter having advanced 
above the 120 p. c. line. The low point of the depression was reached in the fourth quarter of 1931, 
a distinct gain being recorded during the last four years. 

The maximum of wholesale prices in the post-war period was reached in May, 1920, when 
the Board of Trade index on the base of 1926 was 219-8. By September, 1922, one of the most 
drastic declines in history had occurred leaving the index at 104-2, a decline of nearly 53 p.c. 
Moderate recovery was shown to the early months of 1925. Owing partly to the return to the 
gold standard at the pre-war parity, prices declined considerably between 1925 and 1929. The 
index stood at 89-5 in December, 1929, and fell to 67 in September, 1931, at the time of the 
departure from the gold standard. Since that time the price level has been well maintained, the 
index in December having been 72-6. 

The money factors used here have recently shown a tendency as favourable to business 
recovery as at any other time in the post-war period. The deposits of the nine London clearing 
banks have reached a high level in the current period and the three months bankers' rate of 
interest was lower in the last three years than at any other time in the seventeen years under 
review. Stock prices have traced two well-defined cycles, the first post-war cycle lasting from 
1919 to 1921. The maximum of the second cycle was reached in September, 1929, the minimum 
in June, 1932. The decline in the index on the 1926 base during the intervening period was from 
124-3 to 59-3, or 47-7 p.c. The recovery from the low point to December last was nearly 52 p.c, 
the standing in the last month of the year having been 90-2. 

The United Kingdom was numbered among the countries that made considerable progress 
toward recovery in 1935. Unemployment fell gradually and profits increased. Low money 
rates encouraged internal trade and there were signs of revival in capital industries. Building 
expanded and the turnover in retail trade was mantained. The index of economic conditions, 
which had advanced considerably in 1932, recorded further betterment in the last three years. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, March 21, 1936. 

14008— 2J 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly Average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 1 



Classification 



Physical Volume of Business. . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production 
Imports of Textiles 

Raw cotton imports 

Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports. . 

Automobile production . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports. . 

Construction 2 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 



1935 



1936 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec- Jan. Feb 



Agricultural Factors— 
GRAIN AND LIVE STOCK 

MARKETINGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
Inspected Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef- 

Powr 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



100-6 

101-1 

143-5 

278-1 

317-9 

123-1 

2190 

178-9 

62-8 

61-6 

97-8 

76-5 

92-5 



75' 



27-9 
35-5 
14-6 
85-9 

143-7 
73-2 

174-4 
97-2 

103-7 
65-7 
55-3 
94-8 

110-7 
95-2 

123-4 
65-8 
69-2 
70 
92-3 
89-6 
65-8 
61-1 

104-6 

117-5 

167 
72-0 
77- 
57-5 
86-1 

188-9 
99-4 

120-7 
78-3 
70-7 
79-2 



62-2 

55 

59 

67 

22 
1-9 
90 

93-4 

95-3 
146-5 

75-2 
147-2 

134-8 

150-0 

228-6 

116 

141-2 

200-7 

217 

87 
135-7 

91-3 
136-7 
187-2 

68-0 
150-7 



94 2 



143-4 

468-0 

193-3 

124-1 

133-5 

159-5 

56-6 

55-5 

142-1 

81-3 

86-8 

72-5 

64-6 

32-9 

27 

18 

61-1 
122-8 
72-7 
145-1 
105-5 
108-3 
81-9 
84-5 
103 
60-3 
931 
129 
701 
54-2 
58-6 
90-2 
78-5 
68 

53-6 
105-3 
117-9 
94-3 
48-0 
51 

40- 1 
86-0 
190 
96 

120-5 
73 

65-6 
73 



65 
57-7 
64-8 
28-3 
12-1 
1 
3 

100 

103-3 

109-1 
74 

241 

124 

129 

248-0 

110-7 

143 

199 

229- 

89- 
1270 

90-5 
150 1 
173 

80 
136-3 



98-3 

97-7 

156-4 

298-5 

451-5 

101-2 

217-8 

170-7 

52-5 

44-1 

105-2 

77-6 

940 

82-6 

72-2 

34-2 

63-1 

25-9 

74-8 

124-3 

81-7 

144-6 

64-5 

6 

4 

94-3 

1131 

134-8 

99-0 

140-3 

67-0 

51-9 

122-5 

92-2 

99-5 

67-1 

56-3 

102-9 

112 2 

135-3 

35-6 

33-5 

40 

85-7 

195-9 

100-0 

1210 

79-1 

71-5 

81-5 



123- 

101- 



92-0 



79 
72-2 



135-5 
131-3 
344-1 
120-8 
135-8 
125-5 
226-6 
105-3 
122-5 

93-8 
170-9 
169-9 

89-7 
134-4 



103-2 

104-4 
147-6 
361-8 
208-5 
115-4 
209-0 
200-5 
50-6 
63 

222-4 
81-3 
105-1 
88-2 
76-2 
46-9 
80 
35-4 
77-1 
143-5 
73 

174-2 
221-7 
121-5 
68-7 
65-7 
112-7 
68-6 
108-7 
148 
81-3 
68-4 
55-1 
83-2 
100-5 
66 
60 
87 
112 
237 
35 
38 
29-1 
85-7 
198-1 
100-5 
121-2 
73-4 
840 
84-1 



75-2 
2150 

129-3 
127 -"9 
285-6 
116 
123 

81 
229 
100 
120 

77 
169 
161-0 

59-4 
166-7 



99-2 

99-7 

138-4 

399-4 

157-3 

113.0 

96-9 

188-6 

88-4 

77-9 

1220 

75-6 

98-4 

84-9 

74.0 

61.7 

83-1 

19-9 

48-8 

140-2 

68-7 

170- 

860 

107. 

99-7 

82 

90-3 

193-3 

105-7 

147-5 

70 



107 
79- 

103 « 

68- 
53- 
81- 

114 

204- 
41-3 
44-5 
33-2 
85 

197-4 
97-8 

122-6 
70-6 
74-6 
69-9 



106-1 

112-3 

126 
15-0 
27-0 
18-3 
26-3 
78-2 
76-1 

118-6 
64-1 



117 
125 
249 
101 
125 

78 
226 

96-1 
120-8 

91-4 
155-1 
157-2 

73-1 
147-2 



104.0 

135.3 

339.9 

176.0 

129-7 

139.3 

175.6 

62.0 

53.0 

259.8 

80.7 

101.7 

89.6 

79-9 

56-8 

818 

23.1 

127.7 

134.0 

74.4 

160.6 

77.3 

1C4-3 

112 2 

115.2 

1091 

97.2 

100 7 

147.2 

58.9 

47 

150.5 
86 9 
142.8 
81.3 
53 
82.2 
115.3 
247. 5 
55-4 
64-6 
32-5 
85 

199.4 
100.2 
122.3 
75.0 
79.8 
78.6 



164 
183.4 
206.1 
105 2 

18.7 
9.0 

35 

80.4 

77.1 
132.8 

71.1 
137.0 

130.2 
132.2 
204.9 
122.5 
114.8 
75.3 



89.2 
173.9 
163.0 

64.1 
157.7 



107-9 

110-3 
165-8 
418-7 
220-8 
119-3 
189-4 
220-2 
147-8 

65:0 

325-0 
76-9 
102-7 
90-0 
94-8 
52-5 
87-1 
29-9 
120-2 
145-8 
66-3 
179-5 
177-6 
114-4 
97-4 
86-0 
123-4 
148-3 
111-8 
148-7 
59-9 
76-7 
138-3 
66-5 
133-5 
84-5 
56-0 
49-9 
113-7 
243-8 
66-5 
78-1 
37-5 
85-7 
206 
101-3 
122 
72-1 
80-5 
100-3 



163-9 

181 

202-5 

27-3 

741 

19-5 

57' 

86' 

83-3 
131-4 

82-8 
110-8 

118-9 
125-7 
162-4 
110-7 
117-0 

82-4 
182 

95-2 
114-2 

86-8 
238-1 
174-3 

66-8 
185-1 



101-9 

102-5 

144-7 

341-2 

242-1 

117-4 

121-7 

192-9 

59-9 

73-9 

181-9 

84-1 

100-0 

96-6 

94-9 

70- 1 

85-8 

67-1 

98-6 

143-8 

62-1 

178-0 

116-7 

103-4 

90-2 

84-8 

112-7 

110 

103-7 

147-5 

58-4 

57-0 

135 

62-2 

161-5 

93-7 

560 

34-7 

117-5 

225-3 

49-3 

56-7 

310 

85 

191 

100 

123-6 

69-6 

77 

92 



114-2 
119 

128 
178 

39 
5-2 

27 

90-2 

92-7 
139-5 

79 



110-6 
115-1 
120-0 
106-9 
117-2 

85-7 
188-0 

92 
112 

84-1 
234-3 
169-7 

74-3 
171 



107-2 

109-5 

169-6 

472-6 

199-1 

139-1 

280-6 

199-7 

77-6 

68-3 

289-3 

94-4 

105-4 
100-5 
82-6 
67-5 
91-1 
49-4 
123-9 
144-0 
63-2 
178-9 
49-8 
92-6 
107-1 
104-6 
104-0 
121-9 
114-5 
164-8 
58-1 
64-3 
127-7 
76-8 
150 
74-0 
73-0 
60-2 
126-9 
224-3 
50-7 
56-8 
35-7 
85- 

198-9 

100-7 
122-8 

71-0 

85 



86- 
86- 
90-5 

148-2 
35-2 
8-6 
32-3 
88-7 
88-3 

131 
82-6 
93-6 

123-5 

121-4 

125-9 

124 

119-7 

88-2 
195-7 

79-0 
125 

91-8 
216-5 
168-8 

95-7 
191-7 



110 ( 

113-5 

146-3 

264-5 

218-8 

146-2 

140-6 

181-5 

125-1 

72-1 

186-7 

95-4 

118-5 

971 

77-3 

62-8 

140-5 

41-3 

117-3 

151-9 

67-4 

188-5 

265-8 

93-1 

106-3 

990 

104-9 

1421 

114-8 

166-8 

68-4 

61-2 

112 8 

114-8 

148 6 

112 2 

801 

115-2 

130-2 

271 1 

370 

37-7 

35-5 

85-7 

199-0 

100-2 

124-1 

66-8 

93-7 

77-1 



43 3 

36-4 
39 4 
38-9 
9-8 
10-7 
110 
74-3 
74 3 
135-3 
64-5 



103-2 
1041 
104-8 
102-5 
127-1 

92-1 
193 

86-7 
148 
1130 
149 
165-2 
104-3 
200-3 



106-2 105 2 



108 
160-8 
306-6 
184-3 
122-7 
125-5 
216-9 
251-5 
126-2 
104-8 
85-2 



307-6 
122-8 
162-4 
191-4 
760 
96-2 
112-5 
89-9 



112-5 
93-1 
58-5 
33 

143-3 
18-5 
66-4 
152-2 
69-1 
187-9 
161-5 
97-6 
148-8 
152-1 
108-8 
145-5 
118-9 
163-6 
72-9 
70-9 
152-3 
128-6 
165-4 
127-1 
48-7 
138-9 
134-1 
120-5 
23-6 
21-8 
28-2 
86-2 

197- 
99-3 

128 
66-5 
70-2 
69-5 



340 
27-4 
29-3 
28-0 

6-5 
19-8 

8-7 
63-5 
58-1 
115-9 
62-9 
82-5 

108-0 
109-1 
128-9 
105-5 
133-4 
104-1 
207-2 
1000 
140-6 
111-9 
123-5 
174-3 
109-6 
194-5 



1 Consult the supplements of the Monthly Review dated Nor. 1932, May 1934 and June 1935 for description and post* 
war data 

2 Due to receipt of later information regarding wage rates, indexes of construction were revised for 1935. 

Indexes of construction for Jan. 1935 are: construction, 69-7; contracts awarded, 89-6; building permits, 16-9; cost of con- 
struction, 86-2. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Classi fication 



Production- 
Condensed milk output.000 lbs 
Evaporated milk output.000 lbs 

Creamer j' butter. . . 000 lbs. 

Newsprint production. .000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

B.C. timber scaled Mil. bd. ft. . 
Pic iron production.. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys production tons 

Steel ingots and cast- 
ings 0001. tons 

Shipments: — 

Gold 000 oz 

Gold bullion, n.o.p., 000 oz. 
exports. $000 

Silver 000 oz. 

Passenger automobile pro-. 

dtiction No. 

Truck production No 

Total cars and trucks No 

Coke production 000 tons 

Coal available 000 tons 

Gasoline sales 000 gal. 

Trade— 

Imports: — 

Cotton, raw 000 lbs 

P ubber, crude 000 lbs. 

Wool, raw 000 lbs. 

Petroleum, crude. .000,000 gal. 
Bauxite 000 lbs. 

E snorts:— 

Fish 000 lbs 

Fish $000 

Cheese exports 000 lbs. 

Canned salmon cwt. 

Planks and boards . . .mil. ft 

Wood pulp 000 cwt 

Shirgles squares 

Auto complete or chassis No 

Copper 000 lbs. 

Nickel 000 lbs. 

Zinc 000 lbs 

Transportation- 
Canal Cargo Traffic: — 

Pault Ste. Marie 000 tons 

Welland 000 tons 

St. Lawrence 000 tons 

Immigration— 

Total 

Returned Canadians from U.S. 

Labour Factors- 
Percentage unemployment in 

trade unions p.c. 

Employment. Applications No 

Vacancies No 

Placements.. No 
Strikes and Lockouts: — 

Disputes in existence No 

Number of employees. . . .No. 
Time loss in working days 



[1929= 



Industrial Production 1 
1001— 

Canada 

United Kingdom: Board of 
Trade, Quarterly 
Economist 

United States 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Jaran 

Austria 

Belgium 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Sweden , 

Norway 

Chile 



1935 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



487 
2,715 
7,079 
180-31 
160-86 
71-36 
92-9 
37-26 
2.700 

56-01 

245-8 

194 

6,761 

1,007 

13,885 
4,229 

18,114 

181 

1,464 

24.058 



6,193 
3,491 
1,378 
53-58 
11,201 

32,630 

1.855 

3,122 

35.847 

88-67 

915 

97,722 

4,842 

21,593 

11,082 

29.602 



18-2 
41.487 
25.453 
24,138 

7 
1.545 
6,116 



4,812 
8.735 
205 -6S 
198-57 
78-40 
181-3 
44-73 
2.715 

57-84 

246-5 

267 

9,322 

1.278 

18.179 
3,796 

21.975 

198 

1.536 

28,185 



11.242 
6,073 
1,135 
43-65 

21.321 

23.392 
1.754 
3.664 

29.253 

10012 
1.296 

129,143 
9.355 

45,838 
9.645 

22,228 



023 



16-7 
46.014 

24.788 
23,231 

13 
3,276 
12,043 



837 
7.379 
13,329 
222-24 
237-00 
63-55 
231-4 
43-39 
5,147 

68-53 

214-2 

279 
9,739 



3,435 

24,123 

180 

1,521 
39,052 



8,836 
2,380 
1,865 
40-45 
9,211 

13,505 
1,020 
2,485 
15, 802 
63-87 
769 
171,299 
6,356 
16,259 
11,895 
18,438 



17-0 
52.397 
27,183 
24,641 

11 
2.952 

14,900 



79-4 73-2 76-7 81 



745 

7,913 

23,140 

242-69 

251-01 

55-21 

252-4 

45-43 

4,978 

72-81 

278-7 

97 

3,398 

831 

17,093 
3.672 

20,765 

185 

2.386 

50,770 



6,316 

8,801 

902 

11313 

25,909 

19 0G1 

1,326 

1,204 

19.305 

129-52 

1,227 

135,974 

6,499 

34,597 

10,238 

26,337 



5,985 

1,122 

919 



1,030 

676 



15-9 
52.251 
30,847 
28,672 

22 
5,189 
32,357 



8,985 
36,602 
232 02 
228-20 
57-77 
259-7 
44-56 
3,845 

73-45 

257-0 
190 

6,636 
1,428 

12,276 
3,469 

15.745 

186 

2,398 

59,184 



7,397 
3,215 
2,498 
131-87 

15,866 

15,184 
1,578 
1,735 
9,103 

129-80 
1,209 

251,287 
4,829 

37,746 
9.951 

15.201 



7,058 
1,072 



1,081 



15-4 
51,129 
27,721 
25,889 

14 
4,997 
57,081 



78-3 



105-4 

99-1 
74-8 
66-7 
84-8 
89-0 

130- f, 
73-0 
65 
02 
64 

106-4 

108-6 

117- 



103-9 



97-8 


100-4 


101-3 


740 


72-3 


71-4 


66-7 


66-7 


66-0 


90-72 


93-4 


95-2 


95-3 


97-8 


104-1 


142-7 


143-0 


143-1 


730 


73-8 


771 


66-9 


71-8 


72-8 


64-9 


66-7 


65-2 


64-9 


66-1 


68-2 


109-1 


107-3 


109-1 


101-3 


103-4 


105-5 


115-9 


118-5 


119-6 



101-8 
72-3 
66-7 
92-4 
93-5 

137-2 
73-0 
700 
67-9 
680 



110- 

123- 



834 

7,230 

37,116 

234-27 

226-45 

65-71 

211-2 

50-51 

7,269 

86- 1 

270-5 

202 

7,047 

1,263 

9,471 

3,598 

13,060 

176 

2,358 
67.158 



9,913 
2,955 
1,161 
133-65 
26,792 

22,697 

2,096 

5,361 

27,297 

101-93 

968 

355,601 

5,070 

33,543 

12,222 

25,358 



7,503 
1,128 
1,007 



1,050 
521 



151 

55,778 
35,168 
33,043 

25 
7,355 

67,888 



655 

6,820 

33,157 

235-57 

225-74 

75-31 

241-5 

54-41 

3,893 



301-3 
142 

4,939 
2,999 

5.524 
2,168 
7,692 
175 
2.467 
64.427 



7.027 

6,304 

1,569 

126-73 

41,897 

27,171 
2,370 
6,480 
38,476 
164-45 
1.073 
339,300 
5,995 
42,408 
14,102 
28,481 



7,731 
1,334 
1,024 



94-3 
850 
141-7 
79-6 
69-3 
65-7 
67-4 



14-2 

60,363 
40,164 
37,566 

20 

7,573 

49,429 



103-2 
100-9 
74-0 
66-7 
95-2 
87-2 
139-9 
85-3 
70-7 
67-1 
68-1 



755 

6,287 

27,598 

223-89 

225-40 

73-82 

241-4 

54-36 

4,513 



282-3 

364 

12,694 

1,186 

3,819 
1,504 
5,323 
180 
2,517 
70,585 



5,857 

3,594 

1,053 

12702 

26,409 

27,770 
2,591 
15,950 
63,571 
112-41 
1,113 
319, H33 
4.777 
33,924 
14.265 
19,477 



7,148 
1,180 



1,160 
485 



130 
60,496 
38,410 
35,775 

18 
5,691 
48,351 



80-5 



86-0 
117-3 



100-3 
117-4 



103-1 

74-8 
67-4 
102-0 



141-0 
81-2 
73-2 
69-2 
72-6 



110-6 
121-5 



847 
5,267 
20,745 
266-52 
266-68 
73-58 
264-7 
45-52 
9.653 

95-02 

294-9 

160 

5.574 

1,483 

7,128 
1,185 
8,313 
205 
2,933 
59,638 



10,770 

1,819 

1,636 

133-73 

30,288 

42,060 
2,733 
13,050 
98,585 
138-12 
1,093 
340,354 
3.931 
48,089 
13,568 
30,417 



7,454 

1,151 

992 



1,160 
449 



13-3 

65,300 
35,464 
33,737 

19 
3,566 
35,279 



773 
3,469 
13,479 
262-85 
285-18 
50-99 
239-3 
64-56 
4,693 

94-07 

274-9 

296 

10,369 

2,120 

12,020 
1,454 

13,496 

206 

2,916 

47,022 



13,814 

9.832 

1,857 

137-40 

20,896 

53,702 

3,372 

8,654 

87,939 

121-44 

1,338 

252,451 

5,576 

26,788 

14,857 

24,236 



4,087 

1,313 

865 



13-3 

65,033 
32,196 
30,835 

13 

2,133 

24,733 



84- lj 89-1 



502 
2,930 
10.327 
244-73 
265-23 
30-14 
182-9 
70-6 
4.68S 

98-. 

285-4 

246 

8,681 

4,048 

11,370 
2,405 

13,775 

216 

2.. 087 



22,187 
5,746 
1,618 
55-64 

13,421 

35,183 
1,958 
2,070 
39,525 
111-52 
1,317 
261.18P 
5,515 
30,202 
10,498 
22,640 



440 



14-6 
51,983 
29,713 
28,144 



431 
3,152 



103-1 
79-8 
68-1 

100-7 



148-8 
83-7 
78-0 
68-7 
75-3 



110-9 

129-9 



103-1 
81-5 
68-1 
99-6 



81-9 
700 

78-5 



69-0 



115-2) 

129-2 



109- 



Jan. Feb 



588 
2.709 
9,388 
227-96 
181-40 
76-66 
171-9 
61-34 
4,324 

100-23 

3111 

295 

10,327 

1,239 

11,261 
2,043 

13,302 

212 

1,794 



19,940 
3,938 
1,948 
61-13 

14,242 

36,147 
1,977 
10,155 
28,455 
72-24 
1,090 
206,039 
6,607 
19,182 
14,111 
18,452 



148 
61,665 
29,270 
27,716 

4 

205 

1,105 



531 
3,064 
7,895 
221-57 
100-08 
92-08 

55 -7o 
5,114 

93-29 

283-4 

74 

2,660 

1,361 

10,853 
2,415 

13,268 

198 

1,953 



11,724 
4,256 
2,670 
3,965 

13,547 

29,588 

1,806 

7,111 

34,096 

25-36 

1,019 

75,916 

4,573 

32,952 

17,088 

18,202 



49,618 
24,983 
23,687 



•Source- Monthly Bulletin League of Nations, unless otherwise stated. 
2 Since March 1935 includes Saar. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



IJ/J-IOO 



/50 



/OO 



SO 




'fide/ Number of fibfes of Wages 
Ifor/ous cfoffefoffa6oar-/n Canada 

fVomdres-//7c//cer c/e fer/re/Ze 
c?er oooer 
c/e d/ffere/7f<?f cZarrer c/e fr&i/a/Z. — 

Seepage S Hfaoes arte/ Hoars of labour /n Canoc/o' 



200 
/SO 

rob 
so 



2 00 



rso 



















-^* . . 






Su//c/r/7(7 Trac/ef 








/We hers a / tj63f//77enf 
1 






100 



200 



/50 



roo 











_ jr - 










^~ - 








Pr/nfrhq 


Trades 








/mp r/'/n e r/ e 

1 




200 



rso 



roo 



J4JS 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 3 


. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain. Thousand Bushels. 






1935 


1936 




Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Receipts Country 
Elevators and 
Platform 
Loadings- 
Wheat 


8,815 

2,734 

498 

13 

11 

240,802 

15,368 

11,502 

407 

3,878 

7,207 

1,012 

305 

2 

1 

•791 
•427 
•468 

1-422 
•506 


8,427 

2,881 

440 

14 

9 

229,752 

13,576 

10,322 

413 

3,794 

8,906 

741 

223 

4 

17 

•818 
•411 
•480 

1-425 
•490 


6,280 

2,096 

333 

19 

8 

214,255 

9,447 

8,570 

409 

3,777 

5,027 

348 

312 

39 

20 

•876 
•422 
•458 

1-408 
•516 


5,626 

1,532 

329 

17 

11 

202,120 

7,126 

6,608 

373 

3,659 

11,990 
1,593 
1,380 


9,334 

1,510 

243 

28 

14 

197,183 

5,772 

5,268 

288 

3,432 

6,494 

1,475 

970 


13,347 

1,296 

156 

31 

9 

196,984 

5,986 

3,856 

282 

2,946 

9,158 
1,070 
1,098 


12,494 

808 

1,123 

17 

368 

194,890 

5,750 

3,834 

197 

3,301 

21,698 
651 
721 


73,178 

6,211 

4,496 

169 

698 

246,109 

11,407 

8,719 

396 

3,913 

17,272 
820 
241 


60,000 

6.406 

2,913 

466 

538 

270,749 

13,925 

10,308 

795 

4,459 

28,919 

1,386 

159 

1 

9 

•907 
•340 
•338 

1-411 
•422 


21,043 

2,215 

1,080 

84 

230 

265,823 

12.485 

9,054 

626 

4,585 

26,575 

2,961 

1,028 

4 

17 

-857 
•318 
•332 

1-411 
•411 


14,217 

1,679 

629 

34 

127 

260,746 

12,433 

9,179 

474 

4,688 

17,044 

1,184 

486 

7 

28 

•846 
•297 
•338 

1-457 
1 -416 


3.203 

1,169 

430 

10 

61 

244,540 

11,672 

8,838 

452 

4,662 

7,557 

261 

81 


2,093 


Oats 


1,585 




525 


Flax 


10 


Rye 


r 54 


Visible Supply 1 — 
Wheat 


222,694 


Oats 


10,986 




8,392 


Flax 


421 


Rye 


4,678 


Exports- 
Wheat 


14,241 


Oats 


477 




155 


Flax 


4 




17 

•857 

•408 
•422 

1-340 
•460 


252 

•817 
•397 
•391 

1-213 

•411 


215 

•813 

•428 
•355 

1-226 
•361 


75 

•845 
•363 
•338 

1-237 
•365 


52 

•902 
•360 
•357 

1-363 
•905 




Average Cash Price, 
dollars per bush. 

Wheat, No. 1 Nor. 

Oats, No. 2 C.W. . 

Barley, No.3,C.W. 

Flax, 
No. 1 N.W.C.... 

Rye, No. 1 C.W... 


•847 
•336 
•342 

1,596 

•425 


•821 
•355 
•361 

1-590 
•428 



1 First of following month. 



Table 4. Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Bank of Canada, 1936. 


Classification of Accounts 


Feb. 12 


Feb. 19 


Feb. 26 


Feb. 29 


Mar. 4 


Mar. 11 


Liabilities— 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

87,175,383 

20,163,390 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

85,995,388 

32,042,552 


5,000,000 

173,092 

85,291,701 

25,765,471 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

84,604,881 

23,988,765 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

85,108,723 

21,282,454 


$ 
5,000,000 




173,092 




85,479,333 


4. Deposits— 


24,628,335 








180,063,548 
1,344,367 


179,831,625 
559,320 


186,095,679 
1,090,411 


186,933,256 
1,084,312 


186,452,356 
1,788,025 


183,635,603 


(d) Other 


1,630,930 






Total 


201,571,305 


212,433,496 


212,951,561 


212,006,332 


209,522,834 


209,894,867 






6. All other liabilities 


553,333 


1,177,329 


601,307 


1,029,386 


1,336,461 


1,006,610 


Total 


294,473,113 


304,779,304 


304,017,661 


302,813,692 


301,141,111 


301,553,903 






Assets— 

1. Reserve—^ 


180,149,491 
1,496,267 
1,515,519 
6,336,656 

4,909 


^180,305,308 
1,496,267 
1,612,097 
6,901,748 

5,169 


180,318,843 
1,496,267 
1,284,738 
9,228,457 

5,167 


180,565,048 

1,496,267 

96,359 

8,355,365 

5,907 


180,410,313 

1,511,959 

106,980 

7,314,751 

7,129 


180,309,470 




1,528,640 




806,264 




8,601,573 


Reserve in funds of other countries 
on a gold standard 


8,858 


Total 


189,502,783 


190,320,588 


192,333,471 


190,518,945 


189,351,132 


191,254,806 




250,207 


259,995 


245,140 


248,006 


261,527 


273,221 






4. Advances to— 




























(c) Chartered Banks 














Total 




























6. Investments — 

(a) Dom. Govt, short securities 

(b) Prov. Govt, short securities 

(c) Other Dom. Govt, securities 


21,623,947 
'*79,'976,'i86 


26,109,508 
"83! 829 ',944 


26,109,508 
"82 ,'540,' 022 


26,124,968 
"82 ,'540,' 022 


26,124,968 
"82 ,'502 ,'992 


26,124,968 
"82;385!i6i 


(e) U.K., other British Dominions 
or U.S.A. securities more than 














Total 


101,600,114 


109,939,452 


108,649,530 


108,664,990 


108,627,960 


108,510,129 




111,947 
3,008,062 


111,970 
4,147,299 


113,760 
2,675,759 


113,760 
3,267,990 


116,794 
2,783,698 


119,171 


8. All Other Assets 


1,396,576 


Total 


294,473,113 


304,779,304 


304,017,661 


302,813,692 


301,141,111 


301,553,903 


Ratio of Net Reserve (Item 1 of Assets less 
Item 5 of Liabilities) to Notes and 
Liabilities 


p.c. 

65-63 


p.c. 

63-77 


p.c. 

64-48 


p.c. 
64-23 


p.c. 
64-26 


p.c. 
64-73 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Oats 



Corn 



Barley 



Mixed 
grain 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Quan- 
tity 



Oatmeal 



Rolled 
oats 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Wheat 

flour 

exported 



1933 

September.. 

October 

November. 
December. . 

1934 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August , 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1935 
January . . . 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October.... 
November. 
December , 

1936 
January 



Bushels 

6,179.626 
7.345,792 
8,158,446 
4,327,524 

4,676,474 
4,887,102 
4,740,844 



,866,537 

,258,707 

,066.622 

,815,792 

,749.909 

,202,164 

7,426,566 

7,659.805 

4,360,882 

4,622,088 
4,220,917 
4,675,022 
4,313,600 
5,188,296 
4,431,823 
4.460.608 
5,230,795 
6,932,568 
8,261,087 
7,262,558 
4,358.625 



Bushels 

900,766 
1,153,701 
1,262,294 

631,497 

844,482 

786,180 

694,721 

681,909 

578,306 

713,298 

782,307 

783,208 

1,024.845 

1,260,471 

1,162,272 

715,529 



754,909 

744,621 

618,422 

621,952 

699,498 

823,174 

656.006 

733,282 

1,151,068 

1,543,665 

1,513,259 

1,026,706 



Bushels 

151,413 
153,862 
168,662 
124,216 

143,794 
157.303 
156,800 
152,057 
144,344 
189,875 
225,727 
235,382 
156.337 
152,965 
149,553 
111,141 

120,984 
172,875 
166,872 
148,932 
241,095 
204,197 
235,119 
229,976 
218,914 
218,229 
166,813 
174,963 



Bushels 

62,141 
74,011 
81,383 
59.925 

78,195 
99,837 
80,562 
62,432 
47,978 
43,865 
47,291 
51,325 
71.113 
75,673 
60,079 
62,243 

73,467 
74, 196 
55,325 
57,588 
44,710 
42,455 
47.758 
59,523 
68,880 
99,278 
128,150 
98,350 



Bushels 

1,127.286 
1,353,384 
1,588,189 
1,501,845 

1,259,377 

1,379,894 

1,154,072 

1,092,036 

726,298 

552,371 

490,552 

713,438 

1,035.672 

1,330,138 

1,473,878 

1,636,179 



512,919 

937,664 

355,148 

401,247 

066,167 

793.098 

736,232 

913,719 

134,815 

627, 

778,718 



4,460,277 924,352 175,800 104,313 1,837,8901 



50-6 
62-2 
68-8 
37-7 

39-5 
47-0 
42-4 
47-4 
47-9 
47-7 
45*1 
53-3 
61-7 
66-8 
68-7 
41-2 

42-4 
41-7 
43-5 
41-2 
48-4 
44-7 
41-9 
48-9 
68-3 
750 
68-3 
41- 

40- 



Barrels 

1,392,683 

1,650,557 

1,827,340 

967,284 



,042,505 
,102,043 
,064,428 
,088,785 
,175,433 
,127,477 
,072,747 
,282,214 
.383,205 
,654,189 
,703,831 
969,482 

,024,958 
941,417 
,046,087 
965,765 
,164,322 
991,559 
992,340 
,161,389 
,535,189 
,824,7-54 
,603,803 
957,219 



Pounds 

598,044 
751,566 
927,171 
441,557 

803,504 
558,853 
569,533 
629,032 
614,693 
319,089 
553,201 
416,383 
717,964 
1,065,990 
1,119.776 
458,890 

649,896 
636,312 
533,046 
531.438 
816,112 
871,222 
491,472 
493,528 
902,388 
1,700,720 
1,549,038 
692, 



Pounds 

12,093,243 
15,676,287 
16,416,025 
7,468,493 



Pounds 

1,320,404 
2,153,041 
2,109,060 
1,347,928 



261,459 
338,950 
866,835 
397,869 
132,154 
556,820 
292,971 
644,925 
521,725 
697,250 
345,997 
587,664 



8,379,451 
8,739,753 
6,424,542 
6,513,572 
7,538,950 
9,223,425 
7,650,617 
7,977,920 
13,911,445 
19,488,481 
17,448,402 
11,375,644 



988 652,865 9,098,636 1,772,118 314.311 



,428,968 
.447,127 
881,990 
,141,966 
,398.166 
,726,506 
,748.106 
,215,458 
,894,880 
.725,600 
,570,810 
,036,210 

894,306 
491,528 
560,504 
448,836 
013,518 
914,815 
182,370 
321,082 
312,180 
842,570 
944,746 
543.590 



Barrels 

552,556 
514,368 
547,602 
418.183 

448,498 
328,376 
493,327 
340,621 
481.725 
441,064 
408.028 
412.089 
369,320 
485.549 
504.384 
340,751 

346,099 
309,729 
497,468 
276 907 
383,221 
429,561 
395,232 
376,562 
395,640 
501,442 
525.368 
443,828 



Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



4-week period 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 
at be- 
ginning 
of period 



Re- 
ceipts 



Melt 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



Refined Sugar 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



Total 
ship- 
ments 



1933 

September 9, 

October 7 

November 4 

December 2 

December 30 

1934 

January 27 

February 24 

March 24 

April 21 

May 19 

June 16 

July 14 

August 1 1 

September 8 

October 6 

November 3 

December 1 

December 31 

1935 

January 26 

February 23 

March 23 

April 20 

May 18 

June 15 

July 13 

August 10 

September 7 

October 5 

November 2 

November 30 

December 31 

1936 

January 25 

February 22 



106, 
102, 
132, 
130. 
91, 

84, 

82, 
103, 

91. 
101. 
124, 
131. 
121, 
105, 
103. 

84, 
102, 
120, 

132, 
119, 
141, 
150, 
117, 
145. 
115, 
146, 
113, 
102, 
97, 
85, 
86, 

79, 

89, 



58,725 
106,990 
63,618 
55,801 
26,830 

14,873 
40,595 
10,714 
57,294 
65,605 
97,455 
72,327 
84,535 
88.921 
68.649 
106.111 
83,713 
53,971 

4,240 
43,027 
35,548 
19,998 

107, 883 
63.993 

122,344 
66,816 
62,292 
69,367 
73,374 
98.491 
56,903 

30,480 
22,511 



63,270 
76,858 
65,532 
94,458 
34,406 

16,621 
20,070 
22,484 
46,733 
42,809 
90,495 
82,544 
100,373 
91,064 
87,893 
88,258 
59,114 
48.476 

17,134 
20,633 
27,020 
52,534 
80,171 
93,608 
91,171 
99,798 
74,223 
73,677 
86,100 
97,102 
63,640 

21,055 
20,435 



118,079 

95,104 

94,814 

140,587 

207,044 

214,486 
189,945 
161,406 
135.848 
135,013 
114,921 
113,663 
102,391 
109.420 
99,569 
87,142 
134.432 
173,898 

173.253 
156,031 
129,023 
105,374 

94,349 
103,253 
122,289 
116,100 
117.050 
103,912 

66,987 
108,403 
157,222 

189,289 
174,659 



53,386 
75,909 
105,177 
126,137 
50,117 

20,545 
17,269 
18,407 
35,730 
34,371 
70,923 
72,892 
85,557 
78,190 
76,926 
109,378 
94.646 
47,231 

25,546 
22,631 
21,094 
42,156 
68,455 
77,490 
78,954 
85,009 
65,085 
63.827 
116,294 
122,616 
77,429 

21,410 
17,753 



6,991 
11,708 

7,356 
12,864 

6,852 

2,112 
2,575 
2,953 
7,575 
7,260 
13,142 
10,652 
9,484 
10.489 
10,008 
17.044 
10,660 
8,646 

4,255 
3,048 
3,321 
7,457 
9,065 
9,874 
11,012 
10.065 
6,098 
10,230 
13,531 
14,823 
11,251 

2,635 
3,017 



60,378 
87,617 
112,533 
139,001 
56,968 

22,657 
19,845 
21,360 
43,305 
41,631 
84,064 
83,544 
95,042 
88,679 
86,934 
126,422 
105,306 
55.877 

29,801 
25,679 
24.415 
49,613 
77,520 
87.364 
89,976 
95,074 
71,183 
74,056 
129,825 
137,440 
88,680 

24,045 
20,770 



79,103 
83,186 
63,462 
70,342 
48,728 

46,593 
47,686 
46,246 
43,000 
60,349 
84,018 
93,754 
86,828 
95,281 
97,025 
78,247 
64,997 
66.1H 

46,756 
52,531 
47,758 
60,443 
68,377 
67,676 
95,670 
93.131 
81,727 
109,879 
87,194 
87,756 
56,397 

38,559 
48,695 



74,992 
78,669 
59,040 
62.004 
43,021 

41,336 
42,370 
40,730 
37,980 
54,434 
76,550 
86.799 
81,038 
88,784 
86.729 
68,057 
55,572 
48.674 

41.561 
45,916 
41,097 
52,772 
60,511 
60,817 
88,151 
87,671 
76,010 
99,353 
77,298 
73.417 
48,459 

33,585 
42,003 



9,237 
7,720 
10,541 
6,505 

5,862 
6,014 
6,188 
6.164 
7,407 
8.822 
8,018 
6,977 
9,749 
12,634 
11,099 
10,273 
7,847 

5,462 
6,816 
7,036 
7.867 
8,106 
7,515 
8,014 
6,454 
8,313 
11,641 
11,112 
15,204 
8,154 



83,353 
87,908 
66,761 
72,544 
49.526 

47,198 
48.384 
46,918 
44.144 
61,842 
85,373 
94,817 
88,015 
98,532 
99.363 
79,156 
65,846 
56,521 

47,024 
52,731 
48,133 
60.639 
68,617 
68.332 
96,166 
94,125 
84.323 
110,994 
88,409 
88,621 
56,613 

38,674 
48,893 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. — Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption 



13 



Year and Month 


Tobacco, 
cut 


Tobacco, 
plug 


Cigarettes 


Tobacco, 

Snuff 


Cigars 


Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 


1933 
July 


Pound 

1,599,257 

1,823,454 

1,329.411 

1,473.910 

1,561,675 

1,223,930 

1,156,731 
1,380.982 
1,529.343 
1,456.045 
1,731,922 
1,585,094 
1,495,730 
1,590,786 
1,514,766 
1,702.791 
1,533,982 
1,321,349 

1,324,374 
1,333,114 
1,396,416 
1,438,868 
1,647,792 
1,675,696 
1,644,869 
1,671,995 
1,557,787 
1,586,753 
1,694,618 
1,301,415 

1,326,050 

1,446,655 


Pound 
345,055 
397,770 
357,519 
350,617 
364,839 
290,671 

321,339 
306,407 
326,628 
353,109 
415,972 
381,019 
367,317 
380,339 
329.761 
370,555 
338,851 
284,916 

306,664 
285,667 
303,003 
336,628 
351,975 
338,704 
366,413 
323,818 
317,774 
356,978 
299,100 
300,057 

304,983 
250,528 


Number 
449,784,830 
410,553,620 
401,231,720 
379,614,915 
374,490,820 
355,920,395 

267,435,575 
312,784,585 
325,042,310 
348,658,920 
431,667,650 
468,990,240 
472,025.100 
509,045,040 
429,906.595 
448,758,930 
435,078,600 
373.011,520 

360,016,140 
337,960.370 
342.829.010 
367,428,910 
478,376,670 
479,028,135 
515,995.050 
517,502.390 
486,470,185 
463,276,145 
495,019,898 
461,468,601 

316,533,632 
357,942,801 


Pound 

65,224 
72,727 
74,667 
67,643 
68,499 
55,299 

64,245 
55,248 
56.870 
57,078 
74,322 
69.113 
65,246 
74,667 
67,601 
71,610 
67,503 
58,790 

66,773 
56,605 
58,274 
59,742 
67,429 
63,892 
63,881 
71,645 
68,061 
73,172 
67,131 
56,608 

66,328 
58,044 


Number 
11,661,814 
11,879,869 
11,506,697 
14,202,255 
13,935.402 
8,721,959 

5,069.775 
4,448.840 
6,711,960 
8,744,376 
10,325,277 
11,510,509 
10.773,621 
12,349,405 
9,890.762 
14,358,520 
15,480,850 
10,014,125 

6,789,935 
6,901,967 
8,378,494 
9,385,800 
11,030,725 
11,098,617 
11,751,025 
11,424,735 
11,504,975 
13,276,725 
13,492,260 
10,389,598 

4,953,520 
7,394,735 


Pound 
1,012,478 
990,819 






880,042 
838,879 
893,716 








635,474 
630,982 


1934 




621,222 




716,938 
731,018 
869,923 




May 




868,269 


Julv 


776,870 




817,495 




774,128 




783.839 




744,894 




538,257 


1935 


632,502 




545,650 




544.890 




649,987 




684.557 




669,217 


July 


685,684 




660,925 




610,444 




535,016 


December 


544,321 
521,489 

304,722 




436,195 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes in Pairs. 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



McKays 

and 

all 

imitation 

welts 



Nailed, 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



Stitch- 
downs 



Total 



Total footwear 



Men's 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



Women's 



Misses' 

and 

childrens 



Babies' 

and 
infants' 



Total 



1933 

June 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November.. 
December... 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
Decern ber. . . 

1935 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1936 
January 

14008—3 



323,774 
368.581 
363,232 
311,182 
257,370 
200,583 
147,622 

172.192 
216,094 
283,532 
263.511 
281,021 
239.527 
243,867 
323.442 
278.570 
242,808 
212,427 
238,238 

272,610 
288.265 
343,710 
346,346 
333,834 
301.746 
335.872 
401.446 
350.264 
331,647 
293,146 
287,180 

338.803 



921,428 
861.664 
1,007,916 
942,552 
712,195 
470.711 
329.554 

451,121 
685,693 
907.542 
890,772 
1,022,979 
903.804 
595.268 
980.677 
796.344 
707.633 
416.798 
416,502 

632.884 

821.770 

1.013,566 

1,049.365 

1,041,300 

826,313 

709,529 

1,007.599 

882,828 

677,857 

509,734 

534,393 

669,563 



167,448 
199.168 
260,289 
227,428 
159,127 
117,437 
88.699 

100.757 
122,254 
116,220 

97,129 
137,581 
135,140 
101,228 
146.229 
164,952 
163.530 
107.421 

90.887 

126.909 
153,222 
171.798 
159. 769 
148.123 
141.613 
159,274 
193,793 
165,558 
170.650 
122.546 
102,887 

149,690 



318,003 
264,433 
210.696 
182,023 
202.590 
195.675 
141,100 

178,045 
201,233 
257,724 
266,910 
292,018 
280,461 
165,815 
161,403 
169.725 
205.207 
166,578 
127,350 

186,101 
207.598 
253,267 
304,889 
316.095 
295.873 
224, 42R 
157.390 
149,349 
185,925 
184,940 
176,866 

237,601 



1,785,434 
1.746.992 
1.919.069 
1,729,685 
1.388.574 
1,020,654 
731.474 



934.606 
,257.824 
.607,076 
,569,912 
.778,700 
,608,131 
,152,142 
,672,013 
.460.998 
.420.320 
964.078 
911,919 

254,078 
520,012 
844,805 
912,398 
899,077 
619.932 
488.628 
826,595 
604,476 
447,039 
168,136 
154,631 

,430,971 



566,993 
634.980 
659.556 
583.038 
484,141 
391,663 
299.534 

294.330 
367,456 
433.720 
414,050 
497,158 
509.337 
423.022 
541,093 
487.584 
503.290 
405.870 
425,074 

413,686 
465,240 
567,637 
588,324 
577,122 
527.336 
568,016 
619.319 
579,213 
552,372 
501.224 
504,713 

486,388 



120,308 
101,253 
133,747 
138,087 
146,894 
112,024 
59,553 

42,529 
79,586 
75,023 
80,184 
102,058 
85,297 
53,584 
98,513 
111,681 
131,669 
88.522 
67,190 

55.159 
75.213 
98.521 
119.623 
120.009 
104,186 
95,099 
123,479 
115,297 
131,243 
105,951 
80,337 

94,367 



949,938 
909,760 
1.085,425 
1,003,719 
870,948 
572,204 
403,164 

467,609 
637,047 
846, 800 
814,106 
929,823 
845,128 
648,401 
980,634 
832.734 
801.952 
536,304 
488,128 

619,293 
759.011 
946,195 
985,026 
984,808 
797,640 
754 084 
1.093.443 
992,901 
863,081 
758,389 
741,227 

639,393 



229,827 
232.910 
263,552 
218,096 
232.164 
203,292 
132.344 

160.666 
160,198 
232,597 
271,414 
266,661 
204,527 
154.707 
177.839 
189.107 
259.002 
220,878 
143.954 

186,011 
206.465 
243,249 
256,370 
269.737 
250,740 
228,332 
236.522 
218,887 
273,186 
268.495 
165,889 

225,124 



98.581 
95,964 
95.299 
92,585 
99.624 
92,070 
50.221 

65.533 
79.761 
98.095 
72.736 
89.296 
82,240 
54,093 
79.582 
83.571 
86,259 
64,544 
45,664 

55,731 
74.112 
83,198 
77.121 
81,075 
76,402 
82,661 
81,192 
76,153 
91,831 
72.090 
73,820 

68,687 



1.965.647 
1.974,867 
2,237,179 
2,035,525 
1.833.771 
1.371.253 
944,816 

,030,906 
,326,216 
,686,235 
.652.490 
.884.996 
.726,526 
.333,807 
,877,661 
.704,677 
.782,172 
.316,118 
,170,010 



.329.880 
,580.041 
,938.800 
.026.464 
.032,751 
,756,304 
,728,192 
,153,955 
,982,451 
,911,713 
.706,149 
,565,986 

1,513,959 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Tabic 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



Sales on Stock Yds: 

(Current month 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep 

Lambs 

Swine 

Av. Retail Prices, In 
cents, of Food In 
Canada: 
Beef, chuck... lb. 

Veal, roast " 

Mutton, roast. " 
Pork, fresh.... " 
Bacon, break- 
fast " 

Lard, pure " 

Eggs, fresh.... doz. 

Milk qt. 

Butter, cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour " 

Rolled oats... " 

Rice " 

Beans " 

Apples, evap. . " 

Prunes " 

Sugar, gran... " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



1935 



Feb. 



50,093 
21,339 
88,679 
13,895 



53,401 
29,947 
4,228 
33,013 
254,944 



280 
19-7 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-9 
51 
15-1 
12-5 
6-5 
52-4 
38-2 
16-5 



Mar. April May June July Aug 



53,440 
28,536 
65,177 
15,312 



56,234 
49,246 
3,474 
36,458 
242,820 



11-6 
12-9 
20-9 
200 

31-5 
15-1 
31-4 
10-5 

29-6 
19-9 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
8-0 
1 

5 
4 



e 

14 
12 
6 

52-3 
38-1 
16-8 



64,114 
41,444 
81,331 
23,060 



57, 189 
72,252 
42,006 
1,302 
255,666 



12-6 
12-7 
21-5 
200 

31-2 
15-2 
24-3 
10-5 

28-1 

20-0 

5-7 

3-3 

5-2 

7-8 

5-2 

15-3 

12 3 

6-4 

51-8 

37-7 

16-9 



56,948 
40,880 
68,159 
13,572 



63,713 

76,381 

30,630 

7,080 

244,893 



13-4 
12-6 
21-6 
20-4 

30-3 
15-2 
22-0 
10-5 

28-6 
20-2 
5-6 
3-4 
5-2 
7-8 
5-2 
15-6 
12-3 



44,195 
39,968 
57,513 
27,163 



52,063 
65,056 
13,911 
40.097 
194,613 



14-0 
12-7 

21-5 
21-3 

30-1 
15-3 
22-6 
10-5 



20-0 
5-7 
3-4 
5-3 
7-9 
5-3 

15-9 

12-4 
6-5 

52-0 

37 

16-7 



58,158 
41,840 
60,430 
43,217 



56,047 
57,360 
8,292 
65,176 
191,088 



14-0 
12-8 
21-4 
22-4 



30-1 
15-5 
24-7 
10-3 



51-8 
37-1 
16-3 



74,229 
33,859 
49,536 
49,524 



66,679 
47,505 
6,799 
90,391 
175,542 



13-2 
12-7 
21-1 
22-6 

30-5 
15-9 
27-7 
10-3 



25- 




19-7 

5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-8 
5-3 
161 
12-3 
6-4 
51-5 
37-5 
27-5 



Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



101,949 
41,602 
50,115 

62,488 



72,313 
46,007 
8,276 
96,807 
176,786 



12-8 
12-9 
20-9 
23-1 

31-6 
17-2 



25-4 
19-6 
5-6 
3-2 
5-2 
7-9 
5-2 
15-7 
12-1 
6-4 
52-4 
37-1 
20-4 



122,298 
43,075 
74,847 
95,248 



92,844 
49,115 
13,213 
157,324 
262,599 



12-7 
13-4 
20-3 
22-7 

31-6 
18-1 
35-8 
10-6 

27-1 
19-9 



7 

5 

15 
12-0 

6-3 
51-8 
371 
22-1 



94,010 
35,009 
68,228 



88,942 
39,515 
12,943 
95,532 
256,361 



12-3 
13-4 
19-9 
21-9 

31-2 
18-3 
41-5 
10 

28-6 

20-5 
5-7 
3-5 
5-2 
7 
5-3 

15-4 

11 
6-2 

52-3 

36 

22-0 



59,926 
20,991 
80,835 
28,771 



62,570 
26,325 
8,084 
45,744 
268,824 



12-1 
13-4 
20-2 
20-8 



30 
20-5 

5 

3 

5 

7 

5 

15 
11 

6-2 
51 
36 
23-6 



Jan. Feb 



64,496 
19,133 
78,446 
16,833 



69,810 
27,060 
9,365 
39,069 
275,775 



12-6 
14-1 
21-6 
21-1 

29-3 
17-9 
41-5 
10-7 

30-6 

20-6 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-8 

5-4 

15-4 

11-4 

6-2 

52-2 

36-6 

24-2 



59,541 



75,056 
13,634 



62,097 
29,099 
9,845 
33,553 
245,049 



12-9 
14-7 
22-0 
21-3 



17-2 
33-8 
10-7 

30-1 

20-5 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-9 

5-4 

16-0 

11-2 

6-2 

51-9 

36-3 

25-4 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter — 

Creamery 

Dairy 

Totals 

Cheese 

Eggs— 

Cold Storage 

Fresh 

Frozen 

Pork— 

Fresh, frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Cured or in cure 

Totals 

Lard 

Beef— 

Fresh, frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Cured 

In process of cure 

Totals 

Veal — 

Fresh, frozen 

Fresh, not frozen 

Totals 

Mutton and Lamb — 

Frozen 

Not frozen 

Totals 

Poultry 

Fish— 

Fresh frozen 

Smoked, etc 

Fresh frozen during preced- 
ing month 



Mar. 



14,749 

290 

15,039 

12,899 

562 

266 

1,459 

13,008 
4,088 
16,085 
33,181 
3,195 

11,226 

5,174 

332 

176 

16,909 

945 

337 

1,282 

5,168 

288 

5,456 

fl.396 

12,809 
3,721 

1,971 



April 



6,833 

263 

7,096 

12,422 

287 

654 

1,149 

14,931 

3,511 

18,191 

36,633 



9,170 

5,172 

396 

148 

14,885 

712 

403 

1,115 

4,708 
202 

4,909 
7,589 

6.734 
3,184 

900 



May 



3,466 

20fi 

3.668 

10,909 

2,238 

655 

1,625 

13,661 

2,915 

14,919 

31,495 

2,671 

6,722 

5,240 

518 

259 

12,739 

780 

864 

1,644 

3,103 

203 

3,306 

6,542 

6,807 
3,684 

1,750 



June 



5,785 

153 

5,938 

11,685 

6,237 

588 

2,785 

16,188 

3,276 

16,449 

35,912 



5,631 

5,120 

349 

214 

11,314 

1,039 

594 

1,633 

1,539 

208 

1,746 

4,275 

7,666 
2,649 

2,150 



July 



22,344 
285 

22,629 
18,836 

7,858 

614 

3,733 

13,501 
2,691 
15,949 
32,141 
3,400 

4,200 

4,466 

299 

209 

9,174 

1,294 

550 

1,844 

705 

332 

1,037 

3,538 

9,826 
3,347 

3,833 



Aug. 



40,129 

540 

40,669 

29,410 

9,797 

355 

4,216 

9,657 
2,586 
14,571 
26,813 
3,699 

3,331 

4,975 

298 

207 

8,811 

1,467 

716 

2,183 

569 

332 

901 

2,901 

16,301 
4,908 

8,499 



Sept. 



51.271 

868 

52,139 

34,626 

10,076 

427 

4,221 

6,812 
2,105 
12,964 
21,881 
3,198 

3,968 

5,097 

253 

237 

9.555 

1.604 

483 

2,087 

546 

279 

825 

2,213 

20,162 
5,356 

5.448 



Oct. 



54,820 

362 

55,182 

29,431 

9,430 

542 

3,946 

5,181 
1,820 
13,027 
20,028 
3,068 

5,700 

6,137 

190 

255 

12,282 

1,992 

562 

2,553 

1,081 

449 

1,530 

1,983 

21,312 
4,717 

3,950 



Nov. 



47,474 

367 

47,841 

28,237 

6,458 

243 

3,383 

5,334 
3,159 
14,575 
23,069 
2,435 

11,611 

7,544 

180 

214 

19,549 

2,358 
1,033 
3,391 

3,890 

620 

4,510 

2,630 

25,913 
5,585 

5,870 



Dec. 



39,236 

437 

39,673 

25,052 

3,404 

285 

2,994 

7,708 
3,149 
15,168 
26,026 



17,377 

6,986 

264 

203 

24,829 

3,123 

489 
3,612 

5,633 

249 

5,881 

5,941 

23,580 
5,516 



,672 



Jan. 



31,751 

219 
31,970 
23,472 

1,252 

316 

2,543 

12,576 

2,740 

15,120 

30,436 

3,387 

16,719 

4,658 

283 

272 

93;; 



027 



Feb. Mar 



24,251 

121 

24,372 

21,957 



424 



13,430 
3,409 
15,973 
32,813 
3,609 

13,32£ 

6,272 

371 

265 

20,237 

1,851 

329 

2,180 

4,507 

268 

4,775 

11,095 

16,679 
3,869 



,876 



16,1901 



16,282 
19,038 



87 
1,641 

14,921 

3,414 

17,326 

35,660 

2,792 

9,963 

6,226 

444 

277 

16,910 

1,127 

498 

1,626 

3,379 

241 

3,621 

9,973 

12,780 
3,154 



^his figure includes approximately 320,000 pounds of butter reported by creameries added to the list in the provinces 
of Quebec and Ontario since June 1, 1935. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



l¥ee£//fcof?o/wc /nc/grw///? f/ie f/f Components 

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14008—31 



16 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations and Railway Operating Statistics 



OUTPUT OF CENTRAL 
ELECTRIC STATIONS 
000 KILOWATT HOURS 

Monthly Data 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

Provincial Consumption- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Total 

Deliveries to Boilers- 
New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 

Total 

Daily Average 

Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 



1935 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Dec 



1772812 
30,635 
1803447 

39,961 
962,720 
544,279 
113,686 
112,166 

16,796 
13,839 
109.524 

52,037 
754,543 
644,611 
131,734 
110,998 
1693923 



RAILWAYS 

Car loadings 000 cars 

Operating Revenues — 
Canadian National .... 1 000 
Canadian Pacific $000 



Canadian National- 
Operating Expenses. . . $000 

Operating Income $000 

No of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried 

one mile.... 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll .$000 

Number of employees. .000 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll. $000 

Number of employees. .000 
All Railways- 
Operating Re venues... $000 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

miie 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers, carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total payroll 1000 

Number of employees. . 000 

x Deficit. 



353,556 
118,017 
28,162 
S68 
500,103 



63,315 
1,094 



1,427 
34,383 
19,439 
4,060 
4,006 



494 
3,912 



179-89 

10,280 
8,667 



1912931 
30,624 
1943555 

43.416 
1032363 
578,285 
125,713 
133,154 

16,633 

13,991 

103,956 

55,561 
808,771 
699,713 
143,840 
131,713 
1839598 

181 

315,157 

122,117 

30,121 

477 
518,053 



61,707 

988 
62,695 

1,401 

33,302 
18.654 
4.055 
4,295 

536 

452 

3,353 



186-68 



11,477 
9.463 



1854252 
26,777 
1881029 

53,065 
1028940 
533,740 
118,689 
119,818 

12,755 
14,022 
97,475 

65,564 
805,219 
661,467 
133,026 
118,278 
1783554 

3,775 

372,817 

114,637 

24,184 

365 

515,778 



61,808 

893 

62,701 

1,769 
34,298 
17,791 
3,956 
3,994 

425 

468 

3,249 

184-61 

11,566 
9.957 



1896121 
26,950 
1923071 

57,830 
1061757 
535,894 
113,655 
126,985 

13,143 
13,807 
94,256 

70,173 
835,323 
669,512 
128,295 
125.513 
1828816 

5,867 

383,242 

117,385 

16,934 

493 

523,922 



61,165 

869 

62,034 

1,866 

34,250 

17,287 

3,666 

4,096 

424 

445 

3,041 

188-35 
11,696 



1788045 
28,205 
1816250 

57,871 
982,233 
530,315 

97,157 
120, 

12, 

15,342 
107,994 

71,962 
772,604 
633,155 
111,311 
119,224 
1708256 



339,864 

110,351 

5,879 

324 

462,598 



59,601 

941 

60,542 

1,929 
32,741 
17,677 
3,239 
4,015 



185-88 



11,273 
10,162 



1762747 
28,796 
1791543 

56,564 
979,105 
499,736 
102,789 
124,553 

12,936 
15,860 
93,348 

70,773 
765,661 
621,431 
117,108 
123,222 
1698195 

5,642 

310,078 

96,637 

14,645 

326 

427,328 



56,883 

928 

57, 792 

1,825 

31,584 

16,121 

3.316 

4,018 

417 

511 

3,011 



194-98 



12,527 
11,119 



1820892 
30,261 
1851153 

49,761 
1003785 
529,590 
107,891 
129,865 

14,154 

16,107 

130,305 

64,160 
766,772 
637,955 
123,618 
128,343 
1720848 

1,892 

304,742 

96,263 

10,903 

338 

414,138 



58,738 

976 

59,714 

1,605 

32,380 

17,084 

3,480 

4,189 

457 

519 

4,203 



196-92 



12,006 
10.924 



1888013 
31,201 
1919214 

44,442 
1045369 
546,865 
124,220 
127,117 

14,849 
16,352 
142,177 

59,125 
801,002 
650,675 
140,719 
125,516 
1777037 

1,419 

337,569 

99,256 

21,149 

331 

459,724 



62,934 

1,040 

63,974 

1,481 
34,846 
18,229 
4,141 
4,237 

495 

545 
4,739 



220-58 



13,616 

13,296 



2122992 
39,577 
2162569 

46,811 
1176353 
626,559 
137,698 
135,571 

21,149 
18,428 
146,530 

63,761 
940,676 
717,072 
160,457 
134,073 
2016039 

445 
445,043 
123,501 
30,716 

438 
600,143 



68,484 

1,277 

69,761 

1,510 

37,947 

20,212 

4,442 

4,373 



595 
4,727 



251-08 



15,124 
14,115 



2217404 
39,121 
2156525 

44,149 



1 

681,644 
156,681 
134, 

21,452 
17,689 
112,838 

60,536 
925,472 
745,410 
179,643 
132,627 
2043688 



1,036 
449,528 
132,113 
49,549 
364 
632,590 560 



68,303 

1,262 

69,565 

1.424 
35,512 
21, 
5,054 
4,325 



570 
3,640 



173-53 



12,305 
11.581 



2051660 
39,381 
2091041 

38.572 
1045702 
675,429 
159,899 
132,058 

21,051 
18,330 
118,050 

55,234 
865,741 
738,665 
182,485 
130.865 
1972990 



1936 



Jan. Feb 



380,023 
128 

51,586 
345 
,848 



66,182 

1,270 

67,452 

1.244 

33,732 

21,788 

5,158 

4,260 

679 
591 



172-90 



10.153 
9,323 



1899821 
37,729 
1937550 

34,049 
984,744 
612,932 
151,637 
116,459 

19,713 
18,016 
110,685 

49,622 
795,547 
692,905 
172,983 
115,808 
1826865 



355,538 
123,733 
50,226 
486 
529,983 



65,511 
1,301 

66,812 

1,174 

33,957 

21,135 

5,229 

4,016 



621 

3,127 



180-23 



10,618 
9,280 



Jan. 


Feb 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


10.944 
1,200' 
2,223 


10.440 

434' 

2,333 


10,828 

385 

2,424 


10,452 

823 

2,252 


11,433 

16 

2,290 


12,163 
1,168' 
2,227 


11,676 

503 

2,400 


11,596 

91 

2,279 


11,718 
1,615 
2,869 


12.018 
2.823 
3,382 


10.958 
1.406 
2,767 


10,866 
1,226 
2,340 


751 
913 


823 
849 


894 
960 


860 

863 


794 
642 


873 
657 


1,002 

792 


823 
834 


1,250 
620 


1,386 

558 


1,068 

669 


925 
881 


53 

7,241 

64 


49 

6,754 

62 


60 

7,022 

65 


60 

6,716 

59 


61 

7,493 
64 


59 

7,459 

67 


74 

7,944 

69 


81 

7,970 

70 


60 

7,838 
70 


50 

8,091 

70 


44 

7,514 

65 


64 

7,370 

63 


7,705 

204 

1,867 


7,436 

850 

1,908 


8,119 
1,047 
1,986 


8,223 
1,413 
1,958 


8,419 
1,144 
1,966 


8,434 
1,404 
1,897 


9,254 
1,526 
2,036 


10,097 

508 

2,025 


9,829 
3,290 
2,663 


9,621 
4,249 
3,258 


8,074 
3,455 
2,554 


7,948 
3,306 
2,057 


641 
755 


680 
682 


759 
817 


743 
624 


746 
522 


822 
554 


888 
654 


799 
683 


1,287 
521 


1,351 
454 


993 

487 


814 
672 


49 

5,279 

46 


45 

4,900 

45 


62 

5,058 

44 


53 

5,047 

45 


54 

5,527 

49 


62 

5,423 

49 


70 

5,808 

50 


87 

5,884 

51 


59 

5,679 
49 


47 
5,737 

48 


47 

5,278 
44 


62 

5,039 

43 


20,953 

20,475 

419' 

5,659 


21,579 

19,676 

937 

5,765 


23,847 
20,865 
2,114 
5,836 


24,482 

20,563 

2,990 

5,725 


24,529 

21,839 

1,781 

5,822 


24,049 

22,455 

691 

5,796 


26,187 
22,754 
2,442 
5,975 


25,520 

23,435 

1,134 

5,703 


29,585 

23,436 

5,380 

7,031 


32,279 

23,598 

7,730 

8,349 


27,154 
20,854 
5,290 
6.876 


26,656 

21,333 

4,289 

5,876 


1,576 
1,846 


1,685 
1.696 


1,858 
1,959 


1,797 
1,674 


1,720 
1,332 


1,860 
1,396 


2,341 
1,644 


2,101 
1,741 


2.712 
1,333 


2,937 
1,150 


2,240 
1,295 


1,934 
1,732 


115 

13,340 
116 


105 

12,441 

113 


133 

12,928 

116 


125 

12,590 
111 


124 

13,900 

120 


134 

13,749 

123 


157 

14,682 
127 


185 

14,781 
129 


137 

14,388 

127 


119 

4,751 

124 


101 

13,655 

116 


140 

13,262 
113 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons, 



17 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products — 

Wheat 

Com 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw -. , 

Cotton , 

Apples (fresh) , 

Other fruit (fresh) , 

Potatoes , 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products.. 
Animal Products — 

Horses 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs v 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mine Products — 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates. . 

Base bullion and matte 

Gravel, sand, stone (crushed). 

Slate — Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products— 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 

Ties 

Pulpwood 

Lumber, timber, box, crate 
and cooperage material 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous — 

Gasoline, petroleum and its 
products 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Iron and steel (bar, sheet, 
structural, pipe) 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone . . . 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos. . 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books. 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products, except meats) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 

Grand Total, 000 tons. . 



1934 



Dec. 



415,909 

3,114 

66,352 

36,626 

1,136 

780 

2,743 

86,094 

69,676 

79,224 

528 

19,707 

798 

20,617 

7,966 

38,425 

4,108 

28,905 

1,562 

19,190 

10,740 

7,906 
3,796 
6,397 

665 
1,699 

628 
3,930 

3,742 

1,875 

521,050 

307,106 

77,993 

183 

154,659 

56,882 

46,004 

1,314 

930 

2,762 

11,558 

120,252 

236,428 

2,031 

111,093 

153,198 
37,788 



101,068 
19,823 
6,606 
1,608 

21,453 
4,283 
7,984 
5,744 

11,347 
956 

4,236 

4,699 

3,079 

1,554 

23,355 

26,289 

188,816 

57,894 

7,023 

9,932 

150,533 

103,258 

3,548 



1935 



Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


503,979 


525,595 


586,688 


888,457 


660,405 


1,314,096 


1,573,000 


765,425 


520,368 


4,956 


98 


21 


466 


1,859 


2,316 


1,398 


7,458 


10,300 


87,761 


65,844 


38,178 


59,497 


20,558 


71,110 


136,969 


77,629 


46,826 


21,469 


22,272 


17,843 


15,082 


25,372 


91,860 


88,619 


30,810 


31,464 


584 


1,499 


2,259 


2,724 


3,717 


11,982 


11,166 


3,355 


2,450 


975 


863 


1,624 


2,571 


354 


705 


5,042 


5,569 


4,376 


2,401 


1,628 


1,691 


786 


1,323 


634 


2,195 


3,523 


1,077 


79,027 


78,759 


74,528 


76,394 


81,963 


109,849 


127,446 


119,589 


89,465 


73,951 


80,714 


67,053 


72,263 


77,589 


100,34? 


116,863 


106,078 


85,864 


54,309 


23,409 


9,621 


4,396 


8,630 


15,665 


15,163 


15,912 


15,256 


738 


1,083 


736 


678 


495 


1,973 


912 


1,125 


488 


5,759 


1,685 


478 


50 


1,554 


28,589 


70,446 


51,396 


24,329 


790 


840 


762 


2,243 


7,445 


23,122 


8,933 


863 


1,034 


32,328 


30,597 


15,009 


8,005 


2,352 


9,911 


37,500 


32,579 


20,476 


6,155 


3,251 


3,499 


5,289 


9,375 


13,406 


16,847 


11,877 


8,349 


20,273 


17,272 


13,152 


17,410 


16,867 


15.118 


134,878 


103,703 


57,760 


9,601 


3,497 


2,337 


5,075 


3,707 


3,253 


2,973 


4.185 


3,669 


37,479 


32,534 


23,884 


29,070 


42,317 


53,984 


72,514 


58,814 


30,687 


1,594 


1,055 


862 


1,716 


. 2,768 


3,423 


9,518 


5,929 


1,822 


16,644 


15,141 


12,931 


11,157 


10,745 


9,734 


13,914 


15,850 


17,207 


8,924 


8,318 


7,401 


8,208 


7,393 


8,357 


9,316 


9,325 


10,600 


6,621 


8,250 


6,001 


6,515 


5,021 


3,864 


5,173 


6,135 


5,792 


5,032 


5,987 


4,877 


5,287 


5,669 


5,228 


6,769 


6,382 


5,825 


353 


199 


142 


85 


150 


119 


294 


519 


4,787 


1,334 


2,151 


1,678 


1,333 


864 


830 


1,116 


750 


358 


1,869 


1,684 


3,738 


5,445 


4,343 


5,062 


5,576 


2,933 


1,964 


362 


498 


485 


2,696 


723 


738 


965 


1,013 


601 


4,005 


5,595 


4,810 


4,685 


3,725 


4,407 


4,616 


4,801 


4,998 


3,157 


3,717 


3,370 


3,802 


5,484 


4,974 


5,201 


4,463 


3,965 


801 


1,129 


1,800 


1,318 


2,691 


5,040 


4,740 


1,896 


1,866 


404,213 


576,742 


698,768 


656,113 


573,495 


514,687 


655,034 


595,021 


484,524 


111,740 


55,691 


45,593 


42,051 


89,157 


203,834 


372,809 


515,685 


304,302 


50,767 


40,073 


43,868 


48,845 


40,544 


68,836 


99,990 


86.872 


101,952 


480 


451 


1,472 


2,244 


1,111 


969 


1,235 


327 


327 


188,904 


175,263 


155,342 


133,447 


146,004 


142,815 


148,545 


158,920 


148,976 


53,722 


57,842 


62,234 


59,767 


59,523 


66,326 


73,874 


67.850 


57,956 


41,313 


133,873 


191,999 


204,900 


230,587 


264,586 


325,573 


131,897 


61,856 


4,870 


12,198 


9,696 


12,557 


10, 172 


12,288 


10,862 


8,176 


4,645 


1,091 


1,841 


1,404 


1,768 


1,857 


3,271 


2,606 


1.411 


1,347 


3,732 


9,602 


25,833 


28,298 


32,678 


29,583 


22,494 


5,638 


1,937 


17,077 


19,622 


14,509 


17,622 


14,219 


14,088 


14,259 


18,181 


14,247 


153,165 


186,364 


167,963 


189,628 


218,253 


205,795 


259,492 


212,501 


174,525 


190,289 


174,086 


164,866 


124,111 


147,184 


173,411 


232,301 


246,803 


200,756 


3,056 


5,525 


5,011 


7,521 


8,100 


5,114 


2,398 


15,482 


1,152 


160,567 


128,260 


127,887 


136,552 


110,042 


109,021 


91,760 


59,141 


121,231 


210,628 


224,488 


259,509 


270,889 


251,046 


231,313 


246,329 


210,156 


180,666 


15,842 


18,881 


27,063 


25,524 


21,274 


21,111 


20,372 


16,565 


39,578 


122,759 


165,947 


154,199 


175,398 


201,074 


187,978 


168,440 


133,366 


96,298 


19,266 


18,476 


16,734 


26,954 


21,950 


24,732 


27,368 


19.652 


21,456 


12,220 


15,115 


8,455 


12,326 


11,263 


14,177 


20,036 


19,494 


8,456 


2,589 


20,340 


11,715 


9,003 


5,529 


2,613 


6,802 


1,960 


1,627 


34,869 


37,507 


28,086 


29,748 


32,28? 


35,234 


43,277 


46,574 


34,696 


5,512 


4,796 


4,387 


5,186 


5,940 


5,558 


6,401 


5,580 


4,968 


28,936 


46,095 


55,675 


53,683 


53,383 


58,627 


58,953 


25,336 


10,756 


7,231 


10,003 


13,154 


13,605 


16,929 


15,667 


13,258 


11,060 


5,968 


18,832 


18,510 


18,044 


18,826 


17,829 


16,665 


17,090 


14,784 


14,072 


808 


2,626 


3,241 


2,585 


2,720 


3,068 


4,520 


1,620 


464 


10,660 


8,841 


10,300 


16,341 


11,462 


4,8991 3,795 


3,517 


4,270 


45,056 


34,706 


26,110 


21,093 


13,832 


10,009 


13.717 


24,448 


22,592 


9,362 


3,786 


1,707 


1,946 


1,395 


2,127 


5,323 


5,172 


3,288 


1,762 


1,686 


1,501 


2,509 


2,024 


2,197 


2,785 


2,369 


1,406 


15,457 


15,913 


15,919 


18,908 


16,983 


14,230 


16,826 


19,356 


18,164 


77,276 


105,313 


23,729 


14,858 


13,580 


20,974 


30.453 


42,746 


35,067 


187,609 


160,299 


150,734 


149,026 


148,847 


145,389 


179,197 


165,379 


204,660 


66,785 


65,956 


54,378 


59,388 


61,817 


60,314 


71,798 


72.929 


65,491 


3,365 


2,355 


2,713 


2,455 


2,779 


3,912 


6,396 


6,903 


7,607 


13,324 


13,752 


12,338 


13,373 


12,897 


16,005 


20,058 


24,055 


11,090 


194,378 


210,233 


225,027 


255,524 


257,623 


232,527 


232,519 


186,621 


186,621 


149,260 


134,897 


123,426 


123,793 


130,939 


130,057 


137,994 


107,849 


107,849 


3,634 


3,863 


3,874 


4,226 


4,015 


4,995 


6,158 


3,781 


3,781 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 12. Indexes ot Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries— First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products— edible 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products. .. 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods — 
Garments and personal fur 

nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distilledand malt liquors. 
Wood distillates and extracts 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 
Electric light and power.. . 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements.. 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts. . 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products., 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous 

Logging 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex 

cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Trvnsportation 

Street railways and cartage. 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries) . 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1935 



Mar. 



96-4 
92 7 
101-7 
75-4 
104 
63-3 
51-2 
721 
93-4 
33 
90-9 
911 
78-4 
106-4 
102-6 
94-1 
1101 
125-7 
114-9 

97-7 

93-8 
120-2 
118-5 
120-9 
129-6 
123-2 

55-5 
105-8 
105-2 

82-9 

91-8 

85-5 
56-0 
88-4 
152-0 

65- 

88-5 

63 
88-4 

77-3 
114-2 
126-7 
114-2 
166-9 
118 

91-5 
204-6 

77-0 
77-5 
85-6 
75-4 
76-5 

108-2 
69- 
66-1 
94-2 
43-3 

183-4 
63-0 

111-7 

108 

123 

113 

116 

122-5 

103 



April 



93-4 
93-9 
102-5 
79-5 
107-3 
63-0 
49-8 
72-6 
96-7 
29-9 
90-4 
92-7 
80-8 
107-1 
103-5 
92-7 
111-9 
123-6 
118-4 

102-4 
96-7 
118-9 
114-5 
122-9 
120-2 
128-0 
59-9 
106-9 
106-0 
84-3 



87-4 
59-6 
89-4 
156-6 

66 
90-0 

.67-9 

89-6 

80-9 
116-2 
126 
117-4 
104-3 
117-7 

88-3 
207-2 

78-4 
77-7 
85 

75-6 
76-3 
108-3 
69-4 
66-7 
80-2 
45-2 
143-4 
56 

111-4 
106-3 
126-7 
116-4 
117-4 
123-5 
103-4 



May 



95-2 
95-6 

111-1 
84-8 

108-8 
67-2 
56-3 
70-9 
98-2 
29-0 
92-6 
93-4 
81-6 

108-0 

104 
91-2 

111-9 

124 

117 

102-9 
95-2 

109-7 
94-1 

130-4 

111-8 

130-6 
69-4 

109 

106 



98-7 



154 



72-1 

92-7 

80-2 
119 
129-3 

118 

93 
1162 

82 
211 

85-4 

77 

85 

75 

80-1 
109-8 

69 

90-3 

84-7 

47-2 
154 

580 
116-4 
110-9 
127-3 
122-7 
119-3 
126-0 
104-0 



June July 



97-6 

98-4 

120-6 

99-0 

108-1 

75-6 

68-1 

72-4 

101-6 

27-4 

98-9 

96-7 

86-7 

109-7 

105-5 

91-3 

112-4 

127-3 

117-9 

101-0 
94-3 
115-5 
104-1 
130-1 
118-8 
131 
77-9 
1110 
108-1 
86-2 

104-0 

90 
61-8 
86-9 
145-8 

64-2 
97-4 

76-0 

92-9 



121-3 
134-6 
123-5 

96-0 
119-2 

83-2 
216 

92-8 

79-2 

89 

76 

79 
111 

70-4 

83 

89 

54 
146 

72-9 
118-5 
113 
125 
125-1 
119 
126-2 
105-5 



Aug. Sept 



99-5 
98-5 
125-7 
96-8 
102-8 
80-8 
75-8 
73-3 
102-4 
35-1 
103-3 
96-6 
87-8 
108-8 
104-2 
91-8 
110-4 
125-3 
118-8 

98-5 

89-7 
117-5 
106-3 
129-5 
103-1 
132-0 

81 

113-5 
110-6 

83-4 

100-7 

91-2 
59-6 
82-7 
131-0 

58-5 
98-3 

76-1 

91 

81-8 
122-6 
138-1 
123 

82-2 
121-5 

81-9 
223-2 

101-7 

80- 

92- 

77- 

82-7 
114 

72 

89-9 
101 

57 
170 

81 
123 
122 
122-8 
1260 
122-1 
128 
106 



101 
99-8 
142-3 
100-3 
107-4 
82-6 
78-6 
76-6 
99-7 
41 

114-3 
98-3 
90-3 
110-4 
104-8 
88-2 
109-9 
1280 
1171 

94-3 

92-7 
117-9 
103-3 
135-4 
101-2 
128-7 

83-6 
115-4 
118 

810 

100-6 



591 

77-6 

109-2 

62-5 



76 

87-2 

80-9 
122 
140-3 
119 

79 
125 

83 
230 

106 5 

81-6 
930 
78-6 
85-4 

1171 
74-7 
94-7 

104-7 
60-6 

179-0 



127-9 
129-4 
126-9 
125-7 
120-7 
126-4 
107-5 



102-7 
100-8 
134-6 
•99-7 
Lll-0 
81-7 
77 5 
75-9 
99-1 
47-4 
126-4 
98-2 
89-9 
113-0 
104-2 
91-2 
112 
129-0 
117-9 



Oct. 



92-6 
121-0 
109-0 
133-5 
107-5 
129-5 

80-6 
118-8 
122-3 

79-7 

100-0 

91-8 
52-8 
75-1 
100-1 

58-4 
100-9 

79-1 

87-9 

83-0 
123-2 
141-6 
128-3 

77-7 
128-6 

86-5 
233-0 

112-8 
82-1 
94-2 
78-9 
85 

118-3 
75-4 
92-1 
110-9 
63-2 
191 
84-5 
127-8 
129 
124-0 
125-3 
121-8 
126-8 
110-2 



106-1 
103-3 
124-6 
103-2 
110-1 
79-9 
72-5 
82-0 
101-1 
50-1 
136-2 
98-5 
89-1 
115-9 
105-0 
92-3 
116-9 
131-7 
123-5 

105-6 
97-2 
120 
107 
138-4 
139-0 
132-0 
84-5 
119-6 
128-4 
84-7 

112-0 

94-9 
53-0 
79 
110-8 

68-0 
112-1 



97-1 

86-4 
125-8 
142-7 
130-2 
115-8 
129 

89 
230 

1131 

82-1 

93-6 

79-0 

86 
118-7 

75 

94 
117 

67 
213-3 

79-3 
120-5 
117-3 
123-5 
125-1 
123-8 
128-9 
112-2 



Nov. I Dec. 



107-7 
103-5 
120-5 
100-4 
106-3 
76-2 
66-5 
86-6 
97-8 
51-8 
126-5 



117-8 
105-1 
96-3 
118-9 
134-8 
127-2 

105 

97-7 
122-3 
106-2 
144-6 
145- 
134- 

80- 
117- 
131 - 



116-7 

95 
55-9 
85-4 
131-5 



113- 



97- 

88-5 
126- 
139- 
124- 

158- 
132-5 
92 

234 

110-6 

81 

94-8 

77-8 

84 
117-4 

74 

89 
119-9 

70 
226-3 

71-5 
117-1 
113-3 
123-0 
122-2 
124-6 
130-2 
111-6 



1936 



104-6 
101-4 
115-4 
101-5 
103 
69-8 
57-2 
85-4 
96-2 
51-8 
114-7 
98-7 
87-4 
118-1 
106-9 
98-3 
117-0 
136-9 
127-6 

99-4 
94-5 
143-8 
144-1 
141-0 
140-0 
135-5 
75-8 
116-2 
124-5 



115-7 

93-6 
52-5 
83 
1200 

5 ( J-5 
105-3 



9-i- 

87- 
125 
137- 

125-0 
183-5 
131-1 
93-7 
230-3 

104-8 
81-0 
91-7 
78-1 
84-0 
115-2 
731 
93-7 
95-9 
67-3 
1710 
55-3 
116-3 
112-0 
122-4 
1220 
1310 
140- 
110-1 



Jan. 



99-1 
96-8 

1100 
94-5 
96-1 
63-3 
51-2 
79 

88-0 
51 

97-6 
96-7 
85-3 

110 

106 
92 

113 

135 

123 



93-9 

S9 

139-2 
137-0 
140 
127-0 
131-1 

67-6 
111-5 
120- 

84-9 

108 



83 
119-9 

47-7 
86-2 

82-9 

92-1 

83 

122-1 
134 
116-8 
183 
129-9 

94 



99-4 

79 

87 

77 

77-9 
111 

71-7 

63 

74-8 

560 
119-4 

52-4 
118-0 
114-6 
122-7 
122-5 
135-9 
147-9 
107-8 



Feb. 



98-4 
98-5 

108-5 
81-3 

104-5 
65-9 
55-3 
78-7 



Mar. 



41 



83-9 
112-8 
106-8 

94-0 
115-2 
134-8 
120-4 

100-8 
92-3 
135-6 
135-7 
133-3 
148-2 
130-2 
64 

110-7 
115-4 
89-8 

113- 

95-5 
65-5 
90-3 
138-2 

59-0 
95-1 

83- 



85 

123-2 
130-3 
116-7 
173-1 
129-4 

94 
228 

93 

77-2 

84-9 

75-2 

78 
113 

71 

03 

74 

53 
109 

63-4 
116 
112 
126 
120-3 
121-6 
128-0 
106-8 



Cargo Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Five Canadian Ports 




1935 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


June 


36.970 
39,434 
51,571 
54,183 

44,082 
48,267 
69,407 

58,072 
82,431 


21,528 
19,860 
29,183 
25,353 
37,491 
12.355 
105,553 

193,404 
172,355 


77.013 
100,307 
81,796 
62,555 
130.561 
100,591 
117,985 

137,815 
67,324 


31,740 
55,658 
64,160 
54,925 
58,502 
63,768 
93, 087 

105,039 

88,683 


72,646 
83,660 

144,579 
91,144 
92,492 

124,831 
1,602 


27,798 
14,867 
21,087 
15,879 
18,172 
69.181 
24,358 


353,669 
363,215 
337,330 
365,002 
334,955 
423,247 
73.903 


22,152 
30,748 
30,623 
25,792 
21,143 
26,171 
6,434 


274,666 
281,992 
318,651 
298,404 
340,129 
278,738 
256,331 

265,480 
246,800 


180,589 


Julv 


236,554 




215,554 


September 


236,849 




244,024 




288,326 


December 


268,020 


1936 
January 


302,496 


February 










469,704 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 13. Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 

and Automobile Financing. 



19 




Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries . 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron ar d steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals (except 
coal) 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and crnEs — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes or Retail Sales— 

1930=100 

Boots and shoes (16) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing, men's (15) 

Clothing, women's (12) . . 

Departmental (37) 

Drugs (23) 

Dyers and cleaners (8) . . . 

Furniture (7) 

Groceries and meats (34) 

Music and radio (9) 

Restaurants (14) 

Variety (9) 

General index (206) 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars- 

Number 

Percentage change 1 

Financing in dollars $000. 
Percentage change 1 



First of Month 



101 


990 


97 


9 


96-2 


95-9 


96-8 


98-5 


101 1 


103-5 


103-4 


106-1 


103-9 


94-4 


950 


95 


1 


95-7 


95-9 


970 


98-1 


100-6 


102-5 


102-4 


104-9 


102-4 


101-1 


1050 


109 


9 


111-0 


104-9 


109-9 


112-3 


109-6 


104-6 


101-2 


98-5 


102-7 


68-3 


62-8 


58 


9 


57-7 


59-4 


60-5 


61-3 


60-5 


64-6 


68-9 


73-8 


76-1 


710 


71-2 


69 


4 


71-8 


73-3 


77-5 


78-1 


81-2 


84-5 


82-8 


87-7 


78-6 


33-4 


30-6 


29 


S 


28-8 


36-9 


43-4 


48-4 


47-9 


47-1 


47-1 


51-4 


42-6 


81-4 


83-7 


82 





83-5 


84-9 


86-3 


85-9 


87-0 


87-9 


89-1 


90-5 


87-7 


106-9 


106-7 


107 


7 


109-5 


109-8 


112-2 


112-9 


112-6 


114-6 


113-4 


118-3 


114-2 


102-4 


104-3 


104 


6 


105-8 


104-5 


105-2 


105-6 


106-0 


105-0 


106-4 


104-7 


105-1 


91-1 


900 


90 


2 


89-1 


90-5 


88-2 


93-5 


94-8 


98-2 


97-7 


99-4 


91-7 


107-8 


109-1 


109 


4 


112-3 


112-1 


112-6 


114-8 


116-6 


116-7 


116-2 


118-9 


114-3 


123-4 


123-4 


123 


1 


127-3 


127-5 


129-9 


132-2 


131-8 


133-5 


134-9 


135-6 


134-4 


113-5 


117-2 


115 


8 


117-9 


120-5 


120-1 


120-4 


123-1 


122-9 


122-2 


130-8 


120-2 


62-6 


64-0 


70 





73-8 


75-5 


76-S 


74-8 


80-2 


76-7 


74-8 


76-0 


73-1 


112-3 


112-9 


112 


5 


109-6 


109-3 


109 1 


112-1 


114-9 


114-5 


116-3 


116-0 


117-1 


104-7 


107-0 


106 


5 


109-0 


111-9 


123-5 


123-2 


126-5 


126-9 


120-6 


120-8 


115-6 


80-3 


82-6 


83 


8 


82-9 


82-2 


80-4 


80-3 


85-6 


89-6 


87-5 


92-6 


91-6 


89-6 


85-1 


93 


1 


98-2 


100-0 


100-0 


102-0 


112-6 


118-4 


117-9 


117-8 


120-7 


85-4 


86-4 


86 


6 


90-8 


90-7 


91-2 


91-0 


94-2 


96-4 


94-3 


98-1 


95-8 


53 


55-5 


58 


4 


59-1 


57-2 


59-2 


58-3 


59-2 


58-0 


52-3 


65-5 


64-2 


1340 


134 1 


125 


1 


122-3 


124-4 


124-5 


103-2 


115-2 


145-5 


142-2 


171-3 


144-1 


121-4 


134-1 


124 





117-2 


123-8 


134-1 


1151 


137-2 


137-0 


126-9 


130-7 


115-9 


120-2 


121-2 


119 


3 


121-6 


122-9 


126-3 


128-6 


127-3 


128-6 


127-8 


127-2 


127-7 


212-2 


214-7 


215 


3 


215-2 


219-9 


223-1 


226-9 


224-5 


228-0 


228-0 


232-9 


234-8 


88-9 


88-8 


87 


3 


88-4 


93-5 


96-6 


102-9 


102-5 


103-9 


103-7 


111-3 


108-4 


76-9 


77-0 


75 


7 


76-3 


76-8 


77-1 


77-1 


77-7 


77-6 


77-9 


77-8 


77-4 


81-8 


80-9 


83 


2 


79-1 


80-7 


82-8 


82-7 


82- 1 


80-2 


80-9 


80-6 


82-8 


114-3 


114-6 


111 


i) 


110-2 


112-1 


113-5 


114-5 


113-2 


112-8 


113-7 


115-6 


118-0 


73-0 


72-7 


72 


9 


71-2 


71-4 


72-9 


73-1 


73-0 


71-3 


71-4 


72-1 


73-7 


88-4 


82-7 


98 


fi 


71-8 


79-2 


84-3 


81-7 


81-4 


77-8 


82-8 


80-2 


85-0 


142-5 


119-7 


101 


7 


83-9 


79-8 


76-6 


83-2 


92-2 


101-8 


99-2 


105-6 


110-2 


58-8 


57-5 


53 


2 


53-4 


51-5 


49-8 


50-8 


54-9 


60-0 


64-8 


69-8 


69-9 


550-8 


419-3 


318 


6 


161-4 


110-9 


99-7 


111-4 


135-4 


169-0 


179-2 


198-0 


263-9 


85 


77-7 


62 





59-9 


61-2 


60-8 


68-7 


69-6 


68-1 


65-6 


71-4 


88-1 


120-5 


117-3 


121 


5 


111-4 


107-0 


109-9 


110-6 


109-2 


118-1 


128-1 


125-7 


117-8 


120-7 


120-5 


121 





121-2 


122-6 


122-3 


122-8 


123-6 


122-8 


124-1 


128-8 


124-0 


126-8 


126-4 


127 


8 


128-3 


130-9 


129-6 


130-5 


131-0 


129-2 


129-3 


135-7 


129-3 


106-2 


106-3 


105-9 


106-7 


106-5 


106-6 


107-8 


108-6 


108-5 


108-2 


108-6 


109-0 


102-1 


99-9 


99-4 


100-4 


100-9 


101-0 


102-0 


108-8 


111-2 


110-5 


112-3 


107-2 


104-1 


91-6 


92-8 


91-0 


91-9 


92-2 


94-8 


97-6 


100-0 


101-8 


104-3 


101-5 


106-7 


105-1 


103-6 


99-9 


99-9 


99-8 


100-8 


103-8 


104-9 


105-1 


109-8 


106-3 


94-1 


96-1 


93-2 


91-8 


91-7 


92-8 


95-4 


98-2 


101-5 


97-3 


99-3 


99-2 


98-2 


96-0 


92-8 


94-2 


95-3 


99-9 


100-9 


100-4 


98-4 


99-8 


102-7 


102-7 


92-9 


87-7 


87-4 


84-5 


83-7 


83-8 


85-3 


87-3 


87-7 


89-1 


92-4 


95-5 


101-3 


97-0 


99-9 


99-6 


96-8 


97-1 


98-6 


95-7 


94-6 


96-4 


95-7 


97-5 


98-2 


97-1 


971 


97-8 


97-4 


96-7 


97-0 


98-2 


98-6 


97-0 


102-0 


100-6 


108-7 


107-4 


101-9 


98-4 


99-3 


97-8 


98-2 


98-7 


101-6 


105-6 


110-3 


109-0 


89-0 


89-3 


900 


92-4 


92-2 


93-4 


93-6 


97-9 


99-2 


98-7 


98-8 


101-7 


118-0 


139-0 


121-4 


111-1 


111-1 


104 


101-5 


107-9 


121-9 


122-0 


155-8 


117-8 


87-3 


87-8 


88-6 


88-5 


89-1 


89-6 


87-3 


87-5 


87-9 


89-9 


90-5 


95-1 


94-4 


91-6 


93 


1 


96-8 


98-9 


97-4 


100-8 


99-5 


99-3 


98-8 


101-5 


104-9 



7 
5 
5 
88-1 
115-1 
105-1 
92-5 
114-5 
129-8 
121-5 
76-2 
118-3 
115-3 
87-8 

107-9 
97-9 
62-1 
119-7 
106-9 
130-7 
243-7 

103-7 

77-1 

84-4 

120-0 

76-0 

84-6 

118-3 

70-8 

338-1 

98-4 

130-0 

127-3 

135-0 

109-5 



105-8 
101-0 
107-0 
102-6 
98-7 
95-3 
112-7 



101-7 



1935 



Jan. 



43-9 
39-8 
44-8 
38-3 
56-3 
72-1 
51-7 
44-8 
71-7 
37-2 
49-0 
53-2 
58 



2,729 
+26-5 

1,164 
+430 



Feb. Mar. April 



36-4 
55-6 
39-6 
39-4 
54-3 
68-9 
44-7 
55-6 
67-6 
36-1 
44-9 
57-7 
56-4 



4,249 
+55-4 

1,984 
+75-8 



61-2 
52-2 
53-2 
51-6 
61-1 
76-8 
64-1 
63-7 
75-2 
39-7 
51-4 
67-5 
64-8 



7,185 
+38-9 

2,981 
+39-3 



83-1 
78-9 
84-9 
70-0 
72-3 
71-7 
96-3 
74-8 
73-9 
35-5 
50-7 
77-9 
72-9 



12,749 
+50 1 
5,373 
+53-7 



May June 



80-9 
60-8 
71-4 
60-9 
70 8 
72-0 
93-7 



14,736 
+24-8 
6,147 
+27-9 



109-8 
471 
75-3 
69-5 
70-8 
70-7 
900 
70-8 
71-4 
301 
49-8 
88-6 
71-6 



12,821 
+22-2 
4,956 
+16-1 



July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 



700 
44-0 
57-7 
56-3 
56-9 
71-4 
77-6 
59-2 
69-9 
26-6 
51-2 
82-8 
630 



11,965 
+27-6 
4,641 
+28-0 



62-6 
59-2 
50-3 
50-5 
59-5 
74-2 
76-5 
78-6 
71-5 
35-2 
55-4 
83-7 
64-9 



9,081 
+21 

3,405 
+18-8 



68-7 
52-6 
59-5 
521 
71-8 
69-8 
83 2 
85-0 
69-6 
52 3 
530 
77-9 
69-7 



7,285 
+21-9 

2,806 
+17-2 



70-7 

57-4 
880 
62-1 
88-4 
74-4 
88-1 
93 -6 
77-3 
66-6 
54-3 
90-4 
81-2 



6,323 
+15-7 

2,364 
+ 17-8 



79-6 
52-3 
93-4 
62-9 
88-1 
76-8 
71-1 
84-7 
75-4 
66-0 
52-5 
91-3 
80-0 



5,849 
+40-0 

2,293 
+54-1 



117-2 

116-8 

100 

122-5 

116-3 

87 

56-7 

85 

80 

67-3 

55-7 
164-0 



5,206 

+84-7 

2,228 

110-2 



1936 
Jan 



41-0 

44-7 
47-2 
400 



54-4 
72-7 
53-7 
47-9 
75-6 
44-4 
51-1 
53-9 
59-7 



4,796 
+75-7 

2,011 
+72-7 



*To same month in preceding year 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada — 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .. Number 
Liabilities $000 

Maritime Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926 = 100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Ontario — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures .. Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures .. Number 

British Columbia— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 



1935 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



10,672 

3,598 

96-4 

2,089 

28.476 

130 

1,189 

504 

56 
98-6 
36-9 

1.998 



1,485 

521 

91-3 

573 

8.236 

65 

6,792 
2,399 
103-5 
1,064 
12,645 



980 

378 

87-2 

298 

3,575 

26 

911 

245 

91-9 

118-1 

2,022 

1 



8,499 

4,010 

93-4 

2,236 

31,167 

124 



353 

41 

95-8 

39-S 

2,173 

7 

i,3ie 

248 

85-9 

706 

9,190 



5,273 
1,725 
100-7 
1,061 

13,785 
44 

962 

1,781 

86-9 

296 

3,836 

13 

593 

216 

91-8 

133-4 

2,183 



11,379 

6,292 

95-2 

2,367 

28,649 

107 

1,685 

795 

116 
97-4 
42-4 
1,849 

7 

2,402 

1,806 

89-7 

656 

8,520 

35 

5,079 
3,518 
101-7 
1,043 
12,646 
40 

2,473 

583 

87-9 

486 

3,312 

18 



270 

92-6 

140-1 

2,322 

7 



16,302 

4,825 

97-6 

3,132 

27,141 

101 

1,295 

1,987 
178 
101-6 
47-5 
1,639 
4 

2,418 

1,688 

93-8 

858 

8,195 

52 

6,166 
2,152 
101-6 
1,360 
11,974 
30 

2,644 

499 

92-2 

730 

3,497 

12 

3,087 
307 
96-6 
136-7 
1,836 
3 



18,521 

5,117 

99-5 

2,710 

31,810 

109 

1,879 

3,447 

154 

106-7 

52-6 

1,762 



3,935 

1,497 

94-8 

806 

9,020 

50 

8,137 
2,339 
102-7 
1,264 
14,559 
32 

1,347 

541 

96-3 

451 

4,230 

19 

1,656 

586 

99-5 

136-5 

2,239 



18,549 
4,266 
101-1 
2,545 

31,832 

110 

1,638 

1,464 
124 
106-7 
51-5 
1,989 
5 

5,123 

689 

97-2 

740 

9,738 

54 

8,819 
1,610 
102-4 
1,118 
13,385 
38 

2,454 

338 

98-7 

492 

4,454 

11 



1.505 
106-8 
143-7 
2,266 
2 



23,837 
4,293 
102-7 
2,498 

26,639 

94 

1,255 

2,973 
998 
107-0 
48-5 
1,895 
8 

11,314 

331 

99-3 

677 

8,552 

41 

6,763 
2,325 
103-9 
992 
10,841 
30 

1,337 
253 

100-5 
638 

3,341 
13 

1,451 
387 
108-0 
141-9 
2,010 
2 



14,743 
3,322 
106- 1 
2,426 

26,442 

98 

1,565 

1,111 
114 
112-9 
46-7 
1,827 
4 

4,682 
584 

103-1 
702 

7,721 
50 



1,616 

108 1 

982 

11,454 

33 

1,828 
714 

102-7 
564 

3,269 



740 

294 

106-0 

131-4 

2,171 

3 



14,925 
4,020 
107-7 
2,908 

30,184 

115 

1,859 

624 
115 

111-1 

50-7 

1,844 

10 

6,712 
1,257 
105-0 

788 

8,594 

48 

4,9 
2,1 
1100 
1,102 
13,269 
37 

2,000 
217 

108-1 
820 

4,268 
18 

622 

313 

101-8 

147-3 

2,209 

2 



8,291 
3,315 
104-6 
3,022 
34,767 
107 
1,501 

376 

105 

107-5 

62-5 

2,300 

4 

2,231 

519 

103-8 

878 

9,540 

57 

4,063 
2,306 
107 
1,301 
15,599 
28 

1,132 
117 

101-3 
630 

4,708 
16 

490 

268 

99-3 

149-9 

2,620 

2 



4,365 
2,402 
99-1 
2,932 
36,134 



305 
39 

108-1 
51-3 
2,761 



1, 

928 

95-5 

813 

9.83C 



1,854 
1,140 
102-7 
1.301 
15,487 



768 

77 

951 

606 
1,995 



358 

219 

92-4 

161-2 

3,055 



1936 



Jan. Feb 



13,610 
1,284 
98-4 
2,492 

34,051 



150 

67 

102-2 

50-4 

1,970 



5,741 
457 
102-4 
1,312 
[6,746 



975 

48 

93-7 

635 
1,012 



2,086 
428 
94-1 
165-3 
2,454 



1,912 

98-9 

2,767 

30,310 



48 
101-7 
43-8 
2,093 



3,679 

203 

95-1 

866 

8,452 



3,376 
439 
103-8 
1,258 
13,742 



495 

38 

95-1 

428 

3,532 



1,184 

92-4 

171-8 

2,491 



1 Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 



Mineral Production— 

Metals — 

Gold OOOoz. 

Silver OOOoz. 

Nickel tons 

Copper tons 

Lead tons 

Zinc tons 

Fuels — 

Coal 000 tons 

Petroleum 000 bbls. 

Natural Gas 000 M cu. ft. 

Non-metals — 

Asbestos tons 

Gypsum 000 tons 

Feldspar tons 

Salt (commercial) tons 

Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products .... $ 000 
Lime tons 



1935 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



238-7 
1,244 
4,695 
16,740 
11,336 
12.424 



1,519 
124-7 
3,562 



10,506 
3-6 
730 

11,136 



63 

80 

28,873 



229-3 
1,019 
4,395 
16,734 
13,689 
10,306 



1,017 
111-5 
2,585 



11.844 
3-3 
566 

10,853 



71 

89 

29,018 



249-5 
1,279 
5,309 
18,914 
15,786 
13,468 



1,038 
120-5 

2,666 



11,816 
4-5 
778 

13,794 



131 
137 
32,616 



245-7 
1,014 
5,918 
19,424 
12,406 



892 
113-7 

2,282 



14,702 

26-5 

492 

21,407 



244 
191 
35.149 



269-2 
1,613 
5,665 
17,886 
13,389 
13,694 



925 
123-8 

1,666 



18.562 

58-3 

1,013 

22,748 



260 
34,214 



285-8 
1,505 
5,833 
17,807 
13,677 
14.082 



120-1 
1,178 



15,316 

75-5 

1,700 

16,432 



431 

288 
32,451 



285-4 
1,163 
5,095 
15,483 
14,552 
13,784 



980 
118-8 



15,398 

91 5 

2,371 

23,728 



453 

317 

33,126 



294-4 
1,585 
5,435 
16,302 
13,235 
14,419 



987 
117-7 
1,020 



23.119 

81-2 

1,714 

15,711 



475 
311 
,597 



280-4 
1,312 
6,448 
16,971 
13,161 
13,519 



1,117 
123-9 

1,176 



20,344 

48-1 

1,042 

18,139 



477 

311 

34,471 



301-7 
1,300 
6,679 
17,717 
16.400 
13,743 



1,555 
122-5 
1,830 



27,105 

59-3 

1,517 

20,303 



513 
340 
38,263 



293-2 
1,614 
6,072 
17,270 
16,181 
14,409 



1,618 
116-8 
2,247 



25,528 

67-7 

2,822 

26,379 



246 
36,846 



307-3 

1,700 
7,499 
18,278 
15,284 
14,155 



1,287 
125-7 
2,91 



15.924 

21-2 

1,072 

13,260 



117 
165 
32,338 



1936 



Jan. 



277-6 
1,213 
7,026 
17,145 
14,053 
13,580 



1,382 
121-2 
3,499 



17,016 
4-9 



11,013 



97 
117 
30,206 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity in Canada, 1935-1936 



21 





Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 




28 


4 


11 


18 


25 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


7 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators— 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 


1,799 

298 

121 

5 

26 

261-8 
12,341 
9,102 
503 
4,662 

•945 
•309 
•354 
1-529 
•426 

3,530 

671 

4,505 

954 

695 

925 

1,828 

1,167 

1,039 

9,105 

5,827 

30,246 

18,694 

46-00 
56-34 
71-78 
208-30 
33-22 
50-77 
88-91 
59-18 
80-79 
72-95 
70-42 
68-14 
71-33 
63-Ot 

72-6 
67-5 
72-9 
69-6 
65-5 
87-2 
69-4 
85-4 
77-5 

176-1 

124-3 

16-3 

77-6 
212-0 

70-7 
148-8 
154-3 
291-5 

49-4 
27-6 

106-5 
62-7 

110-2 

117-0 
199-8 
133-3 

74-2 


1,064 

262 

129 

2 

17 

261-1 
12,492 
9.162 
474 
4,681 

•852 
-322 
•356 
1-572 
•433 

3,164 

1,218 

5,619 

931 

879 

1,098 

2,092 

1,287 

1,405 

9,835 

6,930 

34,458 

20,244 

43-14 
75-28 
95-33 

230-45 
45-40 
48-63 

108-73 
67-56 

109-08 
80-95 
83-53 
74-63 
76-20 
73-87 

72-8 
67-9 
73-4 
69-6 
65-8 
87-2 
68-7 
85-4 
77-5 

178-3 

125-3 

17-3 

78-6 

212-6 

72-1 

149-5 

155 1 

297-9 

49-8 
28-6 

107-5 
624 

111-4 

116-7 
200-4 
133-1 

73-3 


424 
169 

69 
3 

15 

256-9 
12,268 
9,077 
482 
4,689 

•851 
•333 
•356 
1-603 
•422 

3,680 

1,513 

6,896 

769 

1,031 

1,508 

2,071 

1,653 

1,503 

11,588 

8,009 

40,221 

22,305 

39-08 
63-65 
95-64 

162-24 
43-16 
48-80 
84-39 
63-38 

109-47 
81-28 
82-51 
73-53 
75-68 
71-21 

73 
68-2 
73-3 
69-7 
66-5 
87-2 
68-6 
85-4 
77-5 

180-2 

128-8 

18-6 

79-5 

217-5 

74-9 

152-1 

152-6 

295-9 

50-8 
29-6 

110-3 
63-2 

112-8 

118-3 
205-5 
135-4 

73-1 


795 

274 

108 

3 

17 

252-3 
12,111 
8,883 
477 
4,687 

•846 
•336 
•349 
1-605 
•421 

3,780 

1,664 

6,218 

874 

1,050 

1,422 

2,228 

1,917 

1,339 

11,947 

7,643 

40,082 

21,785 

43-65 

77-61 
92-21 
181-70 
38-98 
36-73 
88-62 
60-06 
95-03 
82-34 
74-20 
71-25 
71-99 
71-16 

72-9 
67-8 
73-0 
69-7 
66-9 
87-2 
68-4 
85-3 
77-3 

187-2 

129-8 

18-9 

80-7 

232-2 

75-7 

152-9 

150-7 

301-8 

50-8 
28-8 

111-4 
63-7 

116-2 

124-0 
211-8 
141-2 

73-3 


668 
272 

91 
2 

10 

247-8 
12,043 
8,907 
461 
4,655 

•847 
•344 
•351 
1-581 
•426 

3,747 
1,320 
6,410 
1,070 
1,115 
1,333 
2,195 
1,715 
1,099 
11,547 
7,455 
39,006 
21,036 

48-91 
64-93 
99 -8S 
220-16 
40-78 
32-33 
88-58 
52-33 
80-40 
78-16 
73-85 
70-17 
69-02 
73-16 

72-9 
68-0 
72-5 
69-8 
67-1 
87-2 
68-1 
85-3 
77-3 

190-6 

128-2 

19-1 

80-4 

236-9 

76-5 

155-5 

152-1 

308-5 

50-6 
28-1 

112-5 
63-7 

117-8 

125-7 
215-6 
143-3 

71-9 


645 
323 

98 
2 

11 

244-5 
11,701 
8,845 
455 
4,658 

•839 
•343 

•348 

1-601 

•425 

3,424 
1,429 
6,345 
1,145 
1,168 
1,690 
2,043 
1,963 
1,583 
11,081 
7,630 
39,501 
22,249 

44-43 
72-87 
99-87 

232-25 
39-59 
36-66 
82-08 
52-14 

114-79 
74-74 
71-24 
70-06 
70-08 
70-68 

72-6 
67-6 
71-6 
69-5 
67-1 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-3 

194-4 

131-6 

19-4 

81-5 

241-9 

74-9 

156-1 

151-0 

315-9 

52-7 

30-6 
112-8 

65-9 
120-7 

131-3 
226-2 
149-9 

71-1 


552 

363 

100 

3 

15 

239-6 
11,623 
8,793 
445 
4,672 

•830 
•347 
•348 
1-599 
•425 

3,574 
1,281 
7-181 
1,085 
1,204 
1,643 
2,174 
1,794 
1,565 
11,931 
8,135 
41,567 
22,307 

45-39 
67-4/ 
121-65 
230-36 
40 04 
33-75 
85-47 
46-83 
110-37 
79-25 
74 00 
73-18 
71-99 
75-79 

72-4 
67-1 
71-5 
69-5 
67-4 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-3 

199-3 
136-4 
200 
81-9 
250-9 
73-4 
157-5 
150-7 
320-7 

550 
32-9 

113-7 
68-6 

124-2 

131-1 
229-2 
150-3 

70-7 


325 

215 

80 

1 

7 

234-8 
11,362 
8,562 
429 
4,683 

•811 
•357 

•367 

1-583 

•431 

3,941 
1,483 
7,740 
1,106 
1,361 
1,653 
2,321 
1,953 
1,475 
12,066 
8,157 
43,256 
22,727 

50-50 
80-47 
132-56 
205-19 
43-54 
33-68 
87-98 
49-95 
101-03 
78-40 
72-54 
74-32 
72-86 
77-61 

72-4 
66-6 
72-1 
69-5 
67-4 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-2 

199-5 

137-4 

21-2 

84-8 

249-7 

74-4 

159-2 

150-4 

322-5 

55-0 
32-4 

112-1 
69-5 

124-3 

129-7 
226-3 
148-6 

71-0 


347 

271 

123 

1 

12 

228-3 
11,241 
8,511 
421 
4,675 

•813 
•352 
•360 
1-590 
•430 

4,372 

1,548 

7,ol4 

896 

1,256 

1,487 

2,347 

2,157 

1,186 

12,268 

8,535 

43,566 

22,787 

60-65 
87-76 
128-89 
177-43 
33-60 
30-90 
93-77 
54-05 
80-68 
80-03 
76-57 
74-86 
73 07 
79-75 

72-6 
66-4 
72-5 
69-4 
67-8 
87-3 
69-0 
85-9 
77-2 

202-1 

142-5 

20-8 

85,9 

247-8 

72-8 

159-6 

150-6 

336-3 

57-9 
36-6 

113-1 
71-5 

126-9 

130-4 
231-5 
150-2 

t 70-8 


608 

577 

178 

3 

16 

222-9 
10,924 
8,424 
420 
4,677 

•825 
•365 
•373 
1-586 
•428 

5,745 

1,660 

7,262 

695 

1,327 

1,610 

2,190 

1,740 

1,503 

12,648 

8,883 

45,263 

24,737 

73-18 
85-39 
123-88 
148-19 
40-58 
33-15 
85-02 
43-10 
101-08 
80-22 
76-28 
76-43 
72-39 
85-01 

72-5 
66-6 
71-7 
69-3 
67-8 
87-3 
69-1 
85-9 
77-2 

201-1 

143-0 

20-0 

85-6 

245-2 

74-3 

160-0 

152-5 

335-5 

58-5 
37-6 

111-0 
72-4 

126-7 

129-6 
234-8 
150-2 

70-7 




Barley 000 bushels 




Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply — 
Wheat 000,000 bushels 


219-3 


Oats 000 bushels 


11,028 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Aver^. Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 

ARTHUR — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor $ per bush. 

Oats No 2 C.W " 


8,375 

417 

4,685 

•819 
•369 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


•376 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 1 C.W " 


1-583 
•433 


Carloadings, Totals- 


6,325 




1,194 


Coal 


5,531 




589 




1,423 




1,690 




2,535 




2,454 


Ore 


1,123 


Mdse. L.C.L 


13,178 
9,368 




45,110 


Total cars received from connections 

Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100 — 


24,900 
84-31 




58-10 


Coal 


103-19 




145-43 




42-13 




36-97 




98-22 




62-71 


Ore 


76-97 




81-00 




80-56 




76-90 




73-17 




85-26 


Indexes of Wholesale Prices- 
Total 


72-5 




66-5 




71-9 


Textiles 


69-3 




67-8 




87-3 




69-2 




85-9 




77-2 


Industrials — 
Total (89) 


202-2 


Iron and steel (15) 


141-3 
19-9 




85-7 


Oils (5) 


247-9 




75-4 




158-5 




149-1 




337-5 


Utilities— 
Total (23) 


580 




36-6 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


111-6 




72-0 


Grand total (112) 


127-0 


Mining Stocks— 
Gold (20) 


127-7 


Base Metals (3) 


234-5 


Total Index (23) 


148-6 


Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields 
(1926= 100) 


70-0 




1 





22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,159 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5.507 


1.725 


1925 


28,126 


292 


208 


7,768 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


573 


8,475 


11,236 


6.000 


1.842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3,877 


1,553 


605 


9.910 


11,998 


5,886 


1.960 


1927 


36,094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,644 


14,642 


6.127 


2.053 


1928 


43,477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1,982 


745 


14,913 


17.313 


8.007 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4,789 


2,366 


798 


16,484 


18.543 


7,923 


2.923 


1930 


37,491 


362 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13,137 


15.044 


6,279 


2.323 


1931 


31,586 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13.377 


5,201 


1.806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


188 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11.259 


4,797 


1.503 


1933 


29,981 


254 


154 


7,944 


10,222 


4,798 


1,207 


481 


8,567 


13,027 


6,414 


1.492 


1934 


32,867 


276 


171 


8,835 


11,389 


4,682 


1,321 


534 


9,450 


14,920 


6,337 


1,626 


1935 


31,546 


310 


173 


8,307 


10.643 


4,633 


1,350 


574 


8,978 


13,877 


6,445 


1,672 



Clearing House 












1935 












1936 


Centres 


Feb. 


March 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept, 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 


1 

19-1 
6-7 
11-1 


$ 

20-8 
6-4 
12-7 


$ 

22-5 

6-8 

13-2 


* 

23-4 

7-6 

16-4 


* 

26-2 

8-8 

17-6 


$ 

291 

7-9 
14-5 


I 

26-2 

7-5 

14-8 


S 

25-6 
7-3 

13-8 


1 

280 
8-0 
14-7 


% 

37-9 
8-3 
16-3 


28-3 
8-6 
14-4 


29-5 
7-3 
13-6 


$ 
21-7 




7-3 


Saint John 


14-9 


Totals 


36-9 


39-9 


42-4 


47-5 


52-6 


51 5 


48-5 


46-7 


50-7 


62-5 


51-3 


50-4 


43-8 


Quebec — 


536-9 

31-8 

3-9 


637-9 

63-3 

4-6 


609-6 

41-2 

4-7 


808-4 

44-8 

5-3 


733-6 

66-6 

60 


685-7 
48-6 

5-2 


625-7 

46-1 

5-3 


652-3 

44-4 

4-9 


732-0 

49-3 

6-5 


801-9 
70-2 
6-1 


757-2 

50-5 

5-7 


780-9 

42-8 

5-3 


808-7 




52-3 


Sherbrooke 


4-8 


Totals 


572-6 


705-8 


655-5 


858-5 


806-2 


739-5 


677-1 


701-6 


787-8 


878-2 


813-4 


829-0 


865-8 


Ontario— 

Brantford 


6-5 

5-5 

3-8 

37-6 

3-9 

8-2 

24-3 

128-4 

3-4 

4-6 

3-8 

813-1 

20-6 


70 
5-9 
3-6 

39-4 
3-8 
8-5 

24-7 

106-2 

4-1 

51 

4-3 

825-7 

22-6 


7-5 

5-4 

3-9 

41-5 

4-1 

8-6 

27-4 

108-0 

4-7 

4-8 

4-3 

800-3 

22-3 


8-4 
6-4 
3-7 

49-5 
4-5 

10-6 

32-0 

140-5 

50 

60 

4-8 

1,062-3 

261 


8-7 

6-6 

4-8 

52-6 

4-8 

9-9 

39-4 

134-3 

4-9 

6 G 

4-8 

962-8 

23-5 


9-3 

7-0 

3 9 

46-8 

4-8 

9-6 

31-5 

129-8 

6 5 

6-4 

4-5 

838-3 

20-0 


6-7 

5-4 

4-7 

42-9 

4-3 

8-9 

28-1 

89-2 

4-5 

60 

4-r. 

770-0 
17-2 


7-4 
5-7 

4-2 

46-8 

4-3 

8-7 

27-1 

92-8 

5-1 

5-7 

4-7 

751-6 

18-4 


8-4 
6-2 
4-4 

50-3 
5-5 

10-9 

29-2 

117-7 

5-5 

61 

4-8 

823-8 

29-0 


7-9 

10-1 

4-5 

58-4 

5-2 

10-2 

35-5 

121-7 

5-6 

6-0 

5-6 

999-2 

30-9 


9-7 

9-0 

4-9 

51-7 

6-1 

11-3 

34-3 

129-7 

6-3 

6-4 

5-5 

986-3 

39-4 


7-9 

11-3 
3-9 

49-9 
5-0 
9-9 

36-0 

108-6 

5-1 

6-6 

4-8 

1,017-7 

45-6 


70 

6-8 


Fort William 


3-8 
46-7 




4-5 




9-7 




31-0 


Ottawa 

Peterborough 


90-9 
4-6 
5-3 




4-8 




1,012-6 




30-6 






Totals 


1,063-5 


1,060-8 


1,042-8 


1.3G0-0 


1,263-7 


1,118-4 


992-4 


982-4 


1,101-8 


1,300-9 


1,300-6 


1,312-4 


1,258-2 


Prairie Provinces- 


1-9 

35-8 

26-4 

2-9 

1-7 

3-4 

1-6 

19-1 

7-1 

198-2 


1-9 

38-3 

30-3 

31 

1-9 

3-3 

1-8 

30-3 

6-9 

178-1 


21 

49-8 

431 

3-5 

1-9 

3-6 

2-2 

31-5 

8-8 

339-5 


2-2 

46-6 

34-7 

3-7 

20 

41 

2-2 

72-5 

9-6 

552-2 


21 

48-6 

34-6 

4-2 

21 

4-3 

2-3 

33 7 

8-8 

310-5 


2-0 

491 

33 7 

4-6 

2-2 

4 6 

2-2 

39-5 

9 6 

344-6 


1-9 

48-2 

310 

4-4 

2-3 

4-5 

1-9 

38-0 

8-6 

497-0 


2-1 

49-2 

29-6 

5-3 

31 

5-0 

1-9 

45-6 

9-8 

412-2 


2-5 

82-8 

35-2 

50 

3-4 

5-8 

2-4 

65-2 

13-2 

604-3 


2-5 

63-9 

31-8 

4-5 

2-5 

5-5 

2-1 

48-1 

10-6 

458-4 


2-2 

59-5 

32-6 

4-4 

2-6 

5-4 

2-2 

46-6 

100 

440-4 


2-1 

49-3 

37-6 

3-6 

2-1 

4-5 

1-9 

33-5 

8-5 

491-9 


1-8 




44-7 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 


24-3 
3-0 
1-7 
3-5 
1-7 

30-5 


Saskatoon 


7-0 
3100 






Totals 


297-9 


295-9 


485-9 


729-8 


451-3 


4920 


637-8 


563-8 


819-9 


629-9 


605-8 


635-0 


427-8 


British Columbia- 
New Westminster 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


3-8 
94-4 
200 


4-6 
108-5 
20-3 


4-6 
114-2 
21-2 


4-7 
1130 
190 


4-8 
106-9 

24 8 


5-4 
113-7 
24-5 


5-3 
116-3 
20-3 


5-4 
104-1 
21-8 


6-1 
118-1 
23-1 


5-7 
121-5 
22-7 


5-5 
129-8 
25-9 


5-0 
137-7 
22-6 


4-6 
139-8 
27-4 


Totals 


118-1 


133-4 


140-1 


136-7 


136-5 


143-7 


141-9 


131-4 


147-3 


149-9 


161-2 


165-3 


171-8 


Totals Canada 


2,0890 


2,235-8 


2,366-7 


3,132-2 


2,710-3 


2,545 1 


2,497-6 


2,425-9 


2,907-5 


3,021-5 


2,932-3 


2,992-1 


2,767-4 


Bank clearings 


1.038 


1,230 


1,252 


1,654 


1,561 


1,380 


1,376 


1,334 


1.583 


1,695 


1,516 


1,551 


1,462 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 



1st of Month 












1935 
















1936 




Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Employ- 
ment- 


84-8 
88-9 
95-8 
97-5 
83-0 
88-4 
85-6 
88-7 


81-6 
900 
93 
98-2 
84-6 
109-1 
82-6 
88-0 


86-3 
94-0 
94-0 
99-0 
85-8 
127-0 
83-3 
900 


83-8 
93-4 
94-8 
99-3 
87-7 
132-6 
83-5 
89-7 


86-3 
96-7 
96-7 

101-3 
90-3 

133-5 
85-5 
93-4 


87-2 
95-8 
97-9 

103-5 
93-5 

123-5 
870 
96-5 


86-8 
99-0 
97-7 

106-2 
93-9 

113-4 
89-1 
99-9 


87-2 
100-9 

97-2 
104-3 

95-4 
106-6 

90-6 
101-7 


88-7 
102-8 

98-7 
103-9 

95-2 
105-2 

901 
105-7 


91-5 

101-8 
101-1 
105-6 
100-1 
106-8 
911 
103-5 


91-7 

100-5 
101-7 
104-0 
101-4 
115-4 
91-4 
101-3 


91-9 
99-0 
100-8 
103-6 
100-4 
118-7 
94-1 
100-3 


86-4 
93-5 
100-6 
103-2 
95-7 
116-4 
91-9 
97-2 


87-6 
92-0 
96-4 
99-5 
96-8 
120-0 
91-2 
97-8 


88-5 




93-3 




97-8 


Ottawa 


101-4 
97-1 




117-7 




94-1 


Vancouver 


96-9 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Tabic 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-one Cities in 


Canada in Thousands of Dollars 




1935 


1936 


City 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Building Permits— 

Prince Edward Isd 
Charlotte town 


10 




20 


25 


42 


24 


5 


23 


15 


4 


2 


3 


11 


Nova Scotia 


35 


26 


58 


114 


77 


65 


969 


62 


85 


81 


32 


53 


33 


Halifax 


30 
3 
2 


25 

i 


56 
2 
1 


104 
3 

8 


68 
2 
7 


50 

1 

15 


963 
5 


52 
5 
5 


84 
1 


71 
2 

8 


32 


51 


33 


New Glasgow 

Sydney 






2 




New Brunswick... 


10 


15 


37 


40 


35 


35 


25 


29 


16 


20 


4 


11 


4 


Fredericton 








1 
21 
18 


17 

18 


8 
13 
14 


6 

18 


5 
8 
16 


2 
2 
12 










8 
3 


4 
11 


18 
19 


10 
10 


4 


11 




Saint John 


4 


Quebec 


521 


248 


1,806 


1,688 


1,497 


689 


331 


584 


1,257 


519 


928 


284 


203 


Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


488 
17 

7 

4 
6 


192 
25 

2 
11 

6 
13 


1,681 

60 

1 

35 

5 

25 


567 
1,053 
14 
31 
12 
10 


1,408 

35 

3 

20 
14 
18 


547 
88 

3 
20 

5 
26 


257 

55 

6 

1 

11 


360 

168 

1 

16 

2 

' 36 


675 

530 

27 

15 

2 

7 


428 
60 

'"l6 

13 


740 

27 

1 

135 

3 

23 


266 
2 

io 

2 
5 


159 

8 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


2 
5 
1 

28 


Ontario 


2,397 


1,725 


3,518 


2,152 


2,339 


1,610 


2,325 


1,616 


2,119 


2,306 


1,140 


457 


439 


Belleville 


9 

21 

i 

3 
56 

io 

48 
22 

"i,'i5i 

l 

i 

4 

2 
1,025 

33 

io 


3 

28 
13 
8 
9 
4 
48 

20 
100 

1 
332 
5 
3 
3 
1 
5 
1 
3 
7 
1,022 

72 
11 
15 

2 

1 


14 
13 

7 
16 

6 

24 

916 

23 

55 

1,065 

1 

3 
250 

6 
12 
28 

9 
23 

2 

9 

17 
616 

274 

12 

99 

3 

8 

7 


11 
31 
14 

8 
11 
11 
109 
48 
95 
57 

5 

6 
259 

5 

15 
42 

2 
17 

3 

10 

15 

1,179 

141 

6 

33 

1 

6 

13 


8 
33 

7 
43 
' 262 
158 
86 
24 
24 
62 

1 

15 
203 
13 
63 
20 

5 
25 

7 
15 

9 
1,027 

188 
5 
18 
2 

3 

11 


10 
33 

6 
34 

7 

27 
100 
35 
91 
59 
10 

6 
100 

1 

15 
16 

8 
27 
60 
11 

9 
736 

173 
8 
15 
3 

4 

6 


86 

32 

9 

12 
42 
12 

142 
11 

106 
30 

72 
753 

5 
38 
11 

5 
55 

'"9 

27 
702 

133 

4 

11 

1 

2 

2 

13 


1 
18 

4 

16 
44 
11 
143 
19 
16 
52 
43 
17 
63 

7 
13 
25 

5 
31 
14 

8 

10 
630 

126 

4 

286 


12 

35 

5 

11 

3 

14 

51 

37 

61 

89 

6 

2 

590 

1 

24 

11 

10 

8 

4 

7 

9 

783 

155 
22 
156 


i(> 

2 

4 
2 

16 

142 

15 

78 

253 

2 

358 
4 

10 
5 
1 

41 

5 

6 

1,098 

220 
3 
18 


1 

17 
22 


1 

17 
3 


4 




2 






Fort William 

Gait 




1 

1 
48 

32 

13 

1 

25 

1 
3 
1 
5 
5 

36 

3 

17 

740 

139 


2 

5i 

3 

8 
17 

1 

1 

22 

3 

2 
1 


3 


Guelph 


7 
29 




10 




7 




13 


Niagara Falls 


"5 




19 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 


5 
5 
2 
2 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 








4 

1 

201 

53 


4 


Sault Ste. Marie... 


16 
252 


York and East 
Townships 


19 
1 


Windsor 1 


9 


63 


30 


East Windsor.... 

Riverside 

Sandwich 

Walkerville 

Woodstock 




1 


3 




















9 


6 


8 


6 


20 


2 


7 


Manitoba 


306 


1,523 


116 


181 


189 


158 


103 


117 


115 


56 


42 


34 


20 




4 
10 

292 


1 

2 

1,520 


53 
4 
59 


8 

4 

169 


3 
5 

182 


11 
27 
119 


27 
1 

74 


2 

30 
85 


1 
18 
95 


2 
55 


6 

33 


4 




St. Boniface 

Winnipeg 




30 


20 


Saskatchewan 


8 


45 


59 


143 


39 


25 


28 


491 


18 


30 


c, 


5 


6 


Moose Jaw. ...... . 


8 


4 

21 
20 


21 
18 
20 


88 
18 
36 


1 
31 

7 


1 

15 
10 


5 

7 

16 


5 

479 
7 


5 

7 
6 






4 


5 


23 

7 


1 

8 




Saskatoon 


1 


1 


Alberta 


63 


213 


409 


175 


312 


156 


122 


106 


84 


31 


26 


9 


12 


Calgary 


56 
6 

1 


181 
19 
11 
2 


108 

280 

16 

4 


72 

72 

28 

3 


238 
66 

8 


78 
63 
12 

3 


58 
53 
10 


55 

42 

9 


18 

50 

16 

1 


16 
6 
5 
4 


14 
11 

1 


7 
2 


8 


Edmonton 

Leth bridge 

Medicine Hat 


2 




1 












British Columbia... 


251 


216 


270 


307 


586 


1,505 


387 


294 


313 


268 


219 


428 


1,184 




3 
2 

26 

2 

168 

3 

48 


2 

3 

6 

3 

168 

33 


3 

3 
33 

2 
199 

4 
28 


7 

4 
16 

3 
203 

5 
69 


29 

3 
18 

"'"508 

1 

27 


6 

5 
27 

2 
1,377 

3 
84 


2 

1 

11 

22 

309 

1 

41 


5 
3 
9 
1 
246 
1 
27 


5 

3 
24 

3 
248 

1 
29 


3 
3 

16 

3 

217 


3 

6 

20 

'"m 


1 

7 
17 

2 
359 

1 
40 


1 


Nanaimo 


1 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 
Victoria 


18 

* "i*io8 


25 


25 


56 






Total 61 cities... 


3,602 


4,010 


6,292 


4,825 


5,117 


4,266 


4,293 


3,322 


4,020 


3,315 


2,402 


1,284 


1,912 



1 Includes East Windsor, Sandwich and Walkerville, formerly shown separately, amalgamated with Windsor as from 
September, 1935. 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose— Consumers' goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin — Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field Origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODUCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its products 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Li ve stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton . raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Clay and allied material prod'ts 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



1935 



1936 



Feb 

71 9 

67 

69-4 

71-3 

64-8 

87-2 

63-9 

86-4 

80-4 

74-0 
69-9 
69-3 
89-7 
66-5 

81-6 
63-9 

65-2 

74-4 

55-8 

73-9 

65-5 

69-7 

70-4 

70-1 

55 

72-6 

620 

66-3 

75-4 

72-9 

75-0 

56-0 

64-9 

780 

85-9 

82 

75-5 

57-7 

70 

57 

83-5 

41-4 

73-5 

52-3 

57-7 

75-3 

85-3 
74-3 
66-5 
71-4 
57-1 
73-4 
82-3 
81-3 
23-8 
50-8 

44-1 
79-9 
54-0 
77-4 
69-2 
83 
91-9 
60-9 
81-2 
54-7 

41-0 
88-3 
41-3 
88-4 
91-7 
931 
75-7 
99-7 
105-2 

8J-3 

75-8 



Mar. 



720 

67 
69 
70 
64 
87 
65 
85 



105 



81-3 
75 



April 



72 



81-3 
75-8 



May 



723 



75-8 
75-8 



June 



71 5 



75-8 
75 



July 



71-5 



75-8 
75-8 



Aug. 



71-6 



87 



73 



75-8 
75-8 



Sept. 



72-3 



75-8 
75 8 



Oct 



73 1 



66 



75-8 
75 



Nov. 



Dec. 



Jan. 



72 7 



72 6 



67 



75-8 
75- 



72-9 

67- 

72- 
69- 
67- 
87- 



87 
78 
71 
72 
68 
69 
82 
82 
32 
47 

62 
8-1 
55 

83 

68 
83 
92 
57 
76 
64 

54 
76 
47 
88 
92 
93 
71 
102 
105 



75-8 
75-8 



75- 

75-8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description! 


1935 


1936 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Wholesale Prices of Important 


S 


1 


$ 


1 


S 


s 


$ 


$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


s 


$ 


Commodities— 




























Oats, No. 2 C.W bush. 


•427 


•411 


•422 


•408 


•398 


•429 


•363 


•360 


•340 


•319 


•298 


•337 


•355 


Wheat, No.l Man. Northern " 


•795 


•819 


•876 


•857 


•817 


•814 


•845 


•903 


•908 


•857 


•847 


•848 


•821 


Flour, First Patent 2-98's 




























jute 


5-300 


5-400 


5-700 


5-300 


4-900 


5 100 


5-300 


5-700 


5-800 


5-700 


5-700 


5-800 


5-600 


Sugar, Br. West Indies, 




Montreal 2 cwt. 


1-850 


1-900 


1-940 


1-980 


1-900 


1-770 


1-875 


1-850 


1-968 


1-901 


1-950 


1-950 


1-950 


Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


Rubber, Ceylon, ribbed, 




























smoked sheets, N.Y.* — lb. 


•129 


•116 


•116 


•121 


•126 


•121 


•120 


•117 


•129 


•133 


•133 


•144 


•155 


Cattle, steers, good, over 




























1,050 lbs cwt. 


5-950 


6-800 


7110 


7-200 


6-760 


6-400 


6-550 


6-800 


6-010 


5-800 


6-330 


6-290 


6-290 


Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 


8-600 


8-170 


8-740 


9-390 


9-920 


9-660 


9-920 


9-380 


8-940 


7 990 


8-400 


8-450 


8-590 


Beef hides, packer hides, 




























native steers lb. 


•100 


•093 


•105 


•115 


•115 


•120 


•120 


•128 


-153 


•153 


•148 


•153 


•130 


Leather, green hide crops... " 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•320 


•340 


•360 


•360 


•370 


•370 


Box sides, B, Oshawa ft. 


•200 


•200 


•2u0 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•220 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


Butter, creamery, finest, 




























Montreal lb. 


•268 


•259 


•250 


•232 


•220 


•219 


•226 


•247 


•263 


•274 


•278 


•277 


•251 


Cheese, Canadian, old, large, 




























Montreal " 


•150 


•160 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•140 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


Eggs, Grade "A", Montreal doz. 


•308 


•239 


•213 


•221 


•244 


•268 


•304 


•364 


•403 


•435 


•424 


•319 


•324 


Cotton, raw 1-11/16", Ham- 




























ilton lb. 


•145 


•134 


•137 


•143 


•138 


•143 


•139 


•126 


•133 


•145 


•139 


•136 


•135 


Cotton yarns, 10's white 






























•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•275 


•290 


•290 


•290 


•290 


Blenched flannelette, 4-50 




























yds. to lb " 


•489 


•484 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


•473 


Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 




yds. to lb " 


•959 
1-729 


•959 
1-608 


•959 
1-738 


•959 
1-720 


•959 
1-644 


•959 
1-724 


•959 
2-008 


•797 
2-090 


•797 
2-337 


•797 
2-337 


•797 
2-208 


•797 
2-130 


•797 


Silk, raw, New York* " 


1-899 


Wool .eastern bright i blood " 


•140 


•130 


•130 


•140 


•150 


•165 


•165 


•160 


•160 


•180 


•180 


•190 


•200 


Wool, western range, semi- 




























bright, * blood " 


•130 


•130 


•130 


•140 


•150 


•185 


•180 


•180 


•180 


•190 


•190 


•200 


•210 


Pulp, ground wood No. 1 ton 


19-732 


19-688 


19107 


19-063 


18-995 


18-434 


19-060 


18-922 


19-027 


20-653 


19-593 


20-485 


20-099 


Pig iron, malleable " 


19 000 


19-000 


19-030 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


Steel, merchant bars, mill 100 lb. 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


Copper, electrolytic, domes- 




























tic cwt. 


7-238 


7-474 


8-252 


8-718 


8-221 


8-316 


8-677 


9-129 


9-540 


9-413 


9-407 


9-279 


9-452 


Lead, domestic, Montreal " 


3-250 


3-321 


3-426 


3-686 


3-711 


3-882 


4-164 


4-298 


4-716 


4-740 


4-655 


4-362 


4-516 


Tin ineots, Straits, Toronto, lb. 


•543 


•525 


•565 


•573 


•568 


•570 


•535 


•540 


•560 


•570 


•555 


•528 


•535 


Zinc, domestic, Montreal., cwt. 


3-640 


3-636 


3-690 


3-943 


3-816 


3-905 


4-080 


4-224 


4-467 


4-490 


4-364 


4-221 


4-400 


Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 


12-454 


11021 


10-730 


10-898 


11-178 


11-469 


11-760 


12-050 


12-340 


12-340 


12-340 


12-342 


12-342 


Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 




























of-mine " 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-260 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•140 


5-250 


Gasoline. Toronto gal. 


•150 


Sulphuric acid, 66°Beaume, net ton 


16 000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16- 000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


Indexes of Wholesale Prices in 




























Other Countries 4 — 




























United States— 




























F;shor,200: 1026 


82-0 
79-5 


81-3 

79-4 


81-6 

80-1 


82-3 
80-2 


820 

79-8 


82-1 
79-4 


83-8 
80-5 


85-1 
80-7 


85-4 
80-6 


84-7 
80-6 


84-2 

80-9 


84-0 








Annalist, 72; 1913 


124-3 


123-5 


125-8 


1260 


123-2 


123-6 


126-8 


127-6 


129-2 


128-3 


129-4 






United Kingdom — 






Board of Trade. 150: 1930. . . . 


88.0 


86.9 


87.5 


88-2 


88-4 


88-0 


88-4 


89-6 


911 


91-2 


91-4 


91-8 






66-4 


661 


66-7 


68-6 


68-1 


68-1 


67-6 


69-9 


71-5 


71-3 








France. Statistique General, 




























126: 1913 


343 


335 


336 


340 


330 


322 


330 


332 


342 


348 


354 


359 




Germany, Federal Statistical 




























Office, 400: 1913 


100-9 


100-7 


100-8 


100-8 


101-2 


101-8 


102.4 


102-3 


102-8 


103-1 


103-4 


103-6 




Belgium , Ministry of Labour, 




























130: 1914 


466 


464 


531 


552 


555 


553 


552 


560 


574 


582 


579 






Netherlands, Central Bureau 






Statistics. 48: 1913 

Norn-ay, Official. 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 


77 


75 


76 


75 


75 


74 


73 


75 


78 


78 








125 


126 


125 


125 


126 


127 


128 


128 


130 




































1913 


115 

278 


115 

288 


115 

296 


115 
302 


116 
308 


116 
310 


115 
323 


115 

330 


117 


118 


118 






Italy, P.aehi. 150: 1913 

Finland. Official, 139: 1926.... 






90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 


91 


'"92 


**'91 


'"91 


""96 




India, Dept. of Statistics, 72: 




























1914 


90 
139-1 


87 
138-6 


88 
137-7 


91 
137-8 


91 

136-2 


91 

136-2 


89 
138-2 


89 
142-7 


93 
146-6 


92 
146-3 








Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 


H5 


































133.4 


132.6 


132-7 


134-0 


134-7 


135-9 


137-7 


137-4 


137-8 










New Zealand, Official, 180: 




























1909-1913 


1360 


136-5 


136-7 


1371 


138-3 


139-5 


140-3 


143-0 


144-6 


142-8 








Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 




Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 


100 


96 


92 


92 


94 


95 


96 


92 


96 


94 


94 













J For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 
cation for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 
5 For month of nearest delivery when spot quotations not available. 
'Canadian Funds. 
4 The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



Appli- 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 









Imports of Merchandise for Consu 


mption in Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1933 


$000 

33.619 
35,698 
38,747 
38,698 
41,070 
43,712 
35,368 

32,391 
33,592 
47,519 
34,815 

52,887 
46,186 
44,145 
43,507 
42,208 
47,229 
49,884 
39,108 

37.229 
37,014 
48,191 
36,637 
54,540 
46,732 
48.414 
49,560 
44,689 
52,751 
55,958 
38,569 

40,590 
41,597 


$000 

7.855 
7,061 
7,676 
7,575 
8,329 
10,517 
8,215 

5,825 
7,429 
8.737 
7,528 

10,629 
9,141 

10,171 
8,970 
8,646 

10,632 

11,728 
9,766 

7,020 

6,791 

8,397 

6,427 

13,399 

10,405 

10,162 

8,949 

8,072 

9,292 

12,451 

8,334 

6,203 
7,093 


$000 

1,670 
1,608 
1,979 
1,778 
1,934 
1,588 
1,351 

1,639 
1,538 
2,335 
1,646 
1.747 
1,678 
1,635 
1,716 
1,731 
1,606 
1,615 
1,350 

1,581 
1.574 
2,078 
1,600 
2,216 
1.707 
1,809 
2,070 
1,930 
2,061 
2,235 
1,766 

1,854 
2,241 


$000 

5,441 
6,452 
7,272 
6,749 
7,302 
7.241 
7,254 

6,521 

7,202 
9,928 
6,085 
8,140 
6,896 
6,215 
6,620 
6,254 
6.254 
7,372 
6,387 

6,781 
6,250 
8,546 
6,293 
5,833 
6.197 
7.074 
9,163 
6,691 
7,350 
7,759 
7,261 

8,402 
8,195 


$000 

1,497 
1,615 
1,743 
1,690 
1,933 
1,903 
1,565 

1,536 
1,394 
1,981 
1,369 
1,878 
1,657 
1,668 
1,766 
1,852 
1,984 
2,027 
1,743 

1,584 
1,611 
2,061 
1,577 
1,974 
1,763 
1,819 
1,902 
1,963 
2,267 
2,301 
1,641 

1,783 
1,959 


$000 

5,540 
5,636 
6,046 
5,353 
5,328 
5,929 
6,228 

5,763 
5,804 
9,324 
7,800 
12,196 
9,368 
8,525 
7,138 
6,782 
6,770 
7,282 
6,864 

7,384 
8.322 

11,626 
9,192 

11,903 
9,421 
8,855 
9,389 
8,625 

10,556 

10,780 
6,084 

9,088 
8,668 


$000 

1,498 
1,307 
1,516 
2,117 
2,180 
2,091 
1,641 

1,571 
1,613 
2,235 
1,681 
2,478 
2,651 
1,936 
2,261 
1,851 
2,460 
2,745 
2,577 

2,454 
2,392 
3,110 
2,073 
3,226 
2,571 
3,684 
3,019 
2,340 
2,867 
3,307 
2,571 

2,487 
2,557 


$000 

5,977 
7,116 
7,753 
8,371 
9,013 
9,181 
6,351 

6,012 
5,423 
7,926 
4,760 
10,230 
9.881 
9,131 
10,357 
10,428 
10,546 
11,089 
6.207 

6,553 

6,299 

6,943 

5,411 

10,313 

9,946 

9,967 

9,472 

10,218 

11,479 

10,731 

6,504 

6,720 
6,525 


$000 

2,144 
2.358 
2.054 
2,544 
2.347 
2,727 
1,946 

1,880 
1,578 
2,448 
2,043 
3.052 
2,722 
2,204 
2.194 
2,201 
2,637 
3,118 
2,078 

2.134 
2.012 
2.482 
2,056 
2,990 
2.420 
2,227 
2,455 
2,364 
3,064 
3,483 
2,071 

2,144 
2,047 


$000 
1 995 


July 


2 545 




2,708 
2,523 
2 704 






November 


2,536 
1,818 

1,644 
1,612 


1934 






2,606 
1,903 
2,537 


April 




2.292 


July 


2.660 




2,485 


September 


2,463 
4,341 
2,907 
2,135 






1935 


1,740 




1.793 


March 


2.933 
2,008 




2,693 




2,310 


July 


2,817 
3,140 




2,486 




3,814 




2,911 


December 

1936 


2,338 
1,910 


February 


2,313 











Exports of Merchandise from Canada 












Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 


Domestic Produce 


Balance 

of 
Trade 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1933 


$000 

46,472 
51,866 
45,135 
58.329 
61,035 
60,926 
51,624 

47,118 
38,365 
58,364 
32.047 
58.543 
58.643 
56,787 
55,837 
58.815 
68.313 
65,677 
61,395 

44,374 
47.677 
59,026 
38,296 
62,947 
52,763 
57,786 
71,700 
66,152 
85,749 
85,317 
70, 565 

54,417 
1 60,198 


$000 

45,968 
51,345 
44,723 
57,785 
60.489 
60.385 
50,929 

46,652 
37,842 
57,637 
31.582 
57,900 
58,046 
56. 121 
55,249 
58.135 
67,748 
65,125 
60,850 

43,902 
46.719 
58,098 
37,575 
62,101 
51,869 
56.239 
70,738 
64,565 
84,953 
84,115 
68,419 

53,538 
59,474 


$000 

15.942 
17.746 
12,386 
22,520 
25,348 
26,016 
20,628 

14,694 
11,903 
15.807 
6,866 
20,143 
19,743 
16,519 
19.197 
22.799 
29.950 
26,016 
25,743 

11,053 
12,609 
15.595 
9.389 
17,606 
11,819 
14,231 
23,159 
20,965 
35,943 
34.489 
22,963 

12,795 
19,659 


$000 

5.569 
6.816 
6,324 
7,326 
6.911 
6,679 
7,012 

8,272 
5,321 
8,064 
3,902 
5,815 
6,786 
7.719 
7.061 
6,617 
7,650 
7.517 
7,846 

9.159 
8,337 
8.440 
5.157 
7,820 
6,954 
7,408 
7,527 
8,551 
9.9G0 
9,614 
8,293 

10,249 
8,938 


$000 

634 
754 
783 
1,168 
859 
701 
488 

410 

428 
836 
303 
810 
823 
616 
601 
614 
799 
627 
468 

531 
556 
774 
366 
939 
838 

1,168 
883 
968 
982 

1,010 
626 

703 

849 


$000 

11,175 
13,000 
13,937 
13,567 
12,903 
11,935 
11,899 

11,567 
9,447 
15,596 
9.300 
13.773 
13,684 
15,013 
14.680 
13,879 
14,402 
14,444 
14,924 

11.685 
10.618 
14,104 
9,795 
15,360 
15.409 
15,092 
17,141 
15,667 
17,255 
16,578 
17,167 

12,362 
12,412 


$000 

2,198 
2,225 
1,750 
2,336 
2,901 
1,902 
2,032 

1,967 
2,505 
3,856 
2,581 
3.741 
3,909 
4,240 
2,926 
2,585 
3,950 
2,458 
2,683 

1,846 
3,861 
5.955 
4,362 
5,020 
3,742 
5,010 
4,091 
3,956 
3,911 
4,035 
4,238 

4,576 
3,460 


$000 

7,393 
7,343 
6,184 
7,291 
7.733 
9,056 
5,722 

6,861 
6,680 
9,452 
6,248 
9,298 
9,031 
8,395 
7.626 
8,203 
7,373 
10,142 
5,368 

6,628 
7,434 
8,873 
5,786 
10,810 
8,980 
9,649 
14,196 
10,358 
12,832 
13,681 
10,763 

8,993 
10,545 


$000 

971 
1,373 
1,232 
1,408 
1,647 
1,943 
1,466 

1,076 
836 
1,404 
766 
1,456 
1.612 
1,253 
1.245 
1,464 
1,390 
1.633 
1,623 

957 
1,068 
1,187 

803 
1,636 
1,592 
1,565 
1,665 
1,692 
1,734 
1,987 
2,013 

1,445 
1,360 


$000 

1,257 
1,059 
1,017 
1.142 
1,024 
1,224 
941 

1,147 

1,117 

1,682 

948 

1,473 

1,316 

1.082 

921 

870 

1,048 

1,361 

1,386 

1,436 
1,456 
1.974 
1.034 
1,550 
1,409 
960 
1,036 
1,185 
1,235 
1,682 
1,417 

1,436 
1,268 


$000 

829 
1,029 
1,111 
1.027 
1,162 
928 
741 

657 

607 

941 

667 

1,391 

1,141 

1,283 

993 

1,103 

1,186 

926 

809 

605 

781 
1,197 

886 
1,359 
1,127 
1,155 
1,039 
1,223 
1,100 
1,040 

941 

979 
982 


$000 
(+)12,854 


July 

August 

September.... 

October 

November 

December. . . . 
1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 


(4->16,167 
(+) 6,388 
(-B19.630 
(+)19,965 
(+J17.215 
(+)16,257 

(+)14,727 
(+) 4,773 
(+)10,845 
(-) 2.768 
(+) 5,657 


June 

July 


(+)12.457 
(-H12.642 


August 

September. . . . 

October 

November... . 

December 

1935 

January 

February 

March 

April 


(+)12,330 
(+)16,607 
(-H21.084 
(+115,793 
(+)22,713 

(+) 7.144 
(+)10,634 
(+) 10,835 
(+) 1,660 
(+) 8,408 




(+) 6,031 


July 


(+) 9,372 


August 

September 

October 

November . . 

Decern her 

1936 

January 

February 


(+)22,140 
(+)21,463 
(-B32.998 
(+)29.359 
(+)31,995 

(+)13,827 
(+)18,601 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 27 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living and Cost per Week of a Family Budget. 


Classification 


1935 


1936 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


< Eiports of • Canadian Produce— 

' Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


537 
1,221 
6,158 

206 
5,536 

1,123 

53 

159 

1,167 

494 

52 

1,843 

2,111 

155 

347 

2,703 

4 
108 
46 
39 

5,585 

1,558 

306 

229 

103 

1,986 

1,739 
199 
312 
146 
488 
152 
45 

480 

1,444 
177 
524 

2,705 
629 

330 

186 

11 

285 

239 
451 
356 

262 
231 
136 

78-9 
69-2 
88-8 
80-3 
71-0 
921 

7-59 

2-89 
5-54 
16-06 


910 
1,182 
7,956 

144 

7,458 

1,289 
37 
158 

1,868 

1,045 

57 

1,741 

1,532 

227 

446 

2,601 

33 

186 
61 
36 

7,686 

1,822 

410 

314 

144 

2,798 

3,719 
323 
412 
169 
508 
212 
124 

414 

3,136 
321 
459 

2,314 
707 

445 

116 

17 

332 

312 
842 
366 

251 
400 
165 

78.8 
69-5 

88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
92-1 

7-63 
2-89 
5-54 
16-10 


1,123 
131 

4,687 

234 

4,288 

962 

35 

108 

1,051 

1,067 
40 

1,010 
623 
117 
183 

1,561 

9 

69 
36 
12 

5,708 

1,199 

140 

410 

88 

1,669 

2,774 

290 

501 

88 

326 

78 

47 

174 

1,066 
125 
355 

2,724 
424 

306 
59 
11 

299 

204 

308 
288 

252 

244 

167 

78-6 
68-6 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
921 

7-50 
2-88 
5-55 
15-97 


1,102 
222 

11,588 
865 

10,081 

885 

105 

394 

1,486 

1,337 
162 

1,289 

1,007 
237 
366 

2,365 

311 

185 
39 
57 

8,737 

2,337 

316 

327 

163 

2,620 

2,598 
306 
602 
217 
474 
199 
49 

2,497 

2,546 
354 
636 

2,400 
565 

623 

96 

213 

439 

221 
469 
397 

196 
575 
289 

78-6 
68-7 
85-9 
81-4 
70-3 
921 

7-52 
2-84 
5-57 
15-97 


618 

97 

6,383 

521 
5,149 

1,027 
157 
333 

1,664 

747 
196 

1,570 
749 
280 
393 

2,147 

364 

72 
62 
5 

8,182 

2,444 

703 

647 

110 

2,433 

1,628 
265 
710 
104 
412 
64 
71 

302 

2,981 

312 

369 

2,294 

1,027 

649 

160 

38 

437 

159 
392 
326 

221 
386 
249 

78-8 
69-3 
84-8 
81-4 
69-9 
92-6 

7-54 
2-81 
5-57 
15-95 


964 
151 

8,257 

502 

7,214 

1,119 
170 

394 
1,460 

365 
582 

2,082 
835 
251 
336 

2,114 

321 

211 

56 

131 

7,911 

2,249 

948 

964 

115 

2,128 

1,732 
276 

1,124 

200 

563 

212 

72 

363 

2,541 
525 
529 

3,309 
855 

517 
185 
130 
543 

98 
171 
320 

266 
315 
327 

78.8 
69.3 
84.7 
81.4 
69.9 
92.4 

7-53 
2-80 
5-57 
15-94 


715 
183 

18,237 

327 

17,604 

1,056 

72 

163 

1,405 

310 

675 
2,308 
968 
175 
297 
1,768 

27 
155 

58 
195 

8,101 
3,206 
1,231 
986 
82 
2,356 

1,868 
235 
507 
170 
634 
127 
CI 

1,518 

3,187 

528 

900 

4,080 

1,979 

594 
175 

36 
452 

267 
94 
253 

236 
266 
248 

79-4 
71-3 
85-4 
81-4 
69-9 
92-5 

7-73 
2-80 
5-57 
16-15 


908 
586 

15,091 
104 

14,670 

1,022 

43 

408 

1,489 

342 

1,745 

2,514 

720 

383 

324 

1,462 

22 
181 

49 
220 

7,737 

2,263 

942 

928 

118 

2,221 

1,670 
319 
419 
166 
503 
299 
61 

567 

2,636 
525 
566 

3,676 
752 

688 
161 

125 
482 

259 
102 
341 

205 
279 
387 

79-6 
70-9 
85-4 
81-4 
71-6 
92-6 

7-74 
2-81 
5-57 
16-16 


1,512 
2,733 

26,277 
322 

25,474 

1,005 
111 

771 
2,009 

488 

1,630 

2,647 

343 

227 

375 

1,690 

12 
106 

89 
232 

8,727 

2,842 

899 

957 

180 

2,269 

1,373 
186 
376 
178 
499 
267 
83 

744 

3,892 
586 
823 

3,641 
947 

747 
82 
89 

448 

255 

150 
365 

323 

163 
299 

80-4 
72-4 
86-5 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

7-93 
2-83 
5-63 
16-42 


2,262 
2,803 

23,239 
437 

21,743 

1.121 
112 

984 
2,218 

250 

989 
3,266 
344 
302 
436 
2,424 

5 

120 

93 

270 

8,882 

2,660 

445 

658 

138 

2,651 

1,632 
162 
340 

274 

464 

472 

88 

2,827 

2,246 

366 

797 

3,959 

1,363 

777 
184 
203 
562 

278 
403 
445 

327 
174 
285 

80 6 
73-2 
87-0 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

8-04 
2-83 
5-63 
16-54 


1,641 

1,968 

14,298 

207 

13,672 

943 
101 

627 
1,867 

150 
255 

1,898 

2,699 

433 

319 

1,616 

"i04 
76 
116 

9,942 
2,129 

448 

669 

96 

2,426 

1,612 
257 
370 
163 
492 
365 
175 

606 

2,572 

298 

781 

2,621 

2,497 

976 

246 

39 

432 

250 

383 
356 

297 

207 
214 

80-6 
73-7 
87-2 
82-6 
70-6 
92-5 

8-14 

2-84 
5-63 
16-65 


1,195 
1,166 
6,636 
40 
6,497 

953 

45 

239 

1,311 

506 

139 

1,881 

3,947 

401 

304 

2,185 

3 
125 
63 
172 

6,949 

1,446 

303 

522 

137 

2,094 

2,304 
336 
416 
209 
431 
247 
59 

120 

1,664 
406 
892 

3,541 
608 

615 

176 

65 

335 

203 
630 
288 

293 
337 
140 

80-7 
73-9 
87-2 
82-6 
70-6 
92-4 

8-17 
2-84 
5-63 
16-68 


2 352 


Fruits : 


634 


Grains (Total) 


12 184 




73 


Wheat 


11,946 


Rubber (chiefly tires and 


1,084 
194 






138 


Wheat flour 


1,430 


Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts — 
Cattle 


637 




103 


Fish 


1,730 




2,270 




349 


Leather, unmanufactured 


451 

2,267 


Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts — 


4 




148 




59 




183 


Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 

Planks and boards 

Pulp-wood 


6,745 

2,008 

315 

203 




85 




2,213 


Iron and Its Products— 


1,747 




146 




392 


Hardware and cutlery 


165 
411 




196 




48 


Non-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts — 


136 


Copper, (chiefly ore and 


2,720 




352 




752 




4,120 




596 


Non-Metallic Mineral Pro- 
ducts — 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 


608 
108 


Petroleum and products 


13 
344 


Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 


203 




393 




299 


Miscellaneous Commodities — 


277 


Films 


361 




132 


indexes of Retail Prices, Bents 
and Costs of Services- 
Total, 1926=100 


80-4 


Food 


72-9 


Fuel 


87-3 


Rent 


82-6 




70-6 




92-5 


Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light S 

Rent J 




Totals $ 






28 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 



Classification 


1935 


1936 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products — 


872 
121 
409 
1,185 
166 
148 
610 
154 
466 
464 
376 

101 
409 
267 
250 
178 

210 

863 

197 

1,085 

662 

59 
117 
349 
129 

59 
215 
351 
175 
457 
638 

682 
458 

178 

212 

31 

50 

204 

2,590 

178 

792 

387 

197 

1,380 

62 

705 

470 

77 

122 

111 

116 

207 
181 
80 
48 
624 
471 
193 

423 

2.472 
418 
409 

1,635 
106 
223 

238 

433 

38 

28 

14 

169 


776 
186 
328 
1,425 
146 
247 
947 
257 
857 
626 
614 

113 
594 
271 
272 
270 

244 

1,587 

249 

1,571 

782 

67 

90 

411 

151 

92 

189 

437 

197 

476 

760 

873 
541 

254 

263 
41 
73 

363 

3,692 
280 

1,078 
698 
267 

2,003 
42 
859 
599 
96 
179 
124 
119 

391 
222 
130 
62 
743 
512 
255 

556 
2,461 
475 
558 
1,347 
387 
327 

304 
407 
50 
40 
43 
203 


430 
67 
242 
1,086 
112 
166 
506 
235 
975 
571 
633 

53 

406 
306 
210 

177 

120 

1,134 

191 

1,133 

613 

55 

56 

303 

96 

58 

261 

489 

139 

327 

415 

633 
385 

237 
212 
57 
52 

337 
2,569 
183 
871 
692 
184 
1.742 

22 
827 
398 

91 
100 

73 
110 

124 
178 
121 
45 
597 
336 
143 

447 
1,937 
257 
456 
1,250 
132 
258 

249 
287 
88 
29 
35 
139 


623 
309 
346 

1,970 
134 
401 

1,221 
337 

2,041 
680 
865 

140 

522 
286 
230 
116 

128 
871 
211 
1,116 
599 

43 
183 
352 
109 

44 
139 
295 
198 
284 
436 

801 
489 

313 

212 

40 

98 

391 

2,678 

233 

958 

662 

211 

1.879 

50 

2,133 

710 

124 

208 

117 

137 

575 
215 
128 
47 
625 
754 
207 

598 
3.269 
311 
608 
3 491 
470 
382 

255 
477 
248 
32 
41 
206 


984 
157 
360 

2,050 

149 

277 

556 

73 

2,259 
576 
703 

108 
377 
195 
232 

72 

135 

976 

191 

971 

575 

19 

64 

387 

83 

24 

357 

472 

196 

269 

431 

755 

477 

220 

236 

25 

20 

244 

1,803 
167 
744 
642 
190 

1,676 
30 

1,507 
482 
118 
135 
103 
117 

271 
183 
130 
69 
674 
540 
146 

541 

2,952 
139 
436 

3,956 
501 
291 

242 
344 
111 
32 
43 
158 


520 
155 
227 

2,532 

164 

144 

529 

16 

2,165 
681 
271 

168 
379 
257 
284 
100 

139 

1,368 
199 
972 
704 

24 
175 
383 
186 

26 
201 
483 
222 
290 
657 

744 
489 

239 

212 

51 

47 

236 

1,159 

179 

602 

594 

158 

1,758 

41 

2,028 

421 

83 

127 

83 

119 

405 
196 
128 
60 
640 
1.454 
209 

488 
2,925 
116 
397 
3,931 
560 
495 

227 

402 

65 

46 

26 

212 


615 

106 

253 

1,940 

101 

155 

889 

26 

2,012 

2,915 

86 

172 
360 
240 
296 
200 

189 

939 

206 

1,232 

837 

75 

87 

1,772 

323 

62 

276 

548 

236 

432 

927 

799 
508 

242 

227 

48 

34 

193 
934 
180 
479 
740 
178 

1,661 
110 

2,493 
469 
103 
150 
149 
121 

689 
188 
126 
48 
815 
360 
156 

618 

2,737 

95 

422 
3,734 

251 

311 

221 
455 
170 
31 
52 
194 


584 
103 
221 

1,935 

123 

219 

641 

24 

1,613 
640 
80 

163 
375 
396 
240 
227 

192 
794 
191 
1,196 
788 

71 
193 
132 
213 

74 
186 
485 
196 
322 
739 

898 
479 

246 

210 

43 

61 

126 

1.385 

216 

576 

430 

215 

1,754 

22 

1,483 

493 

82 

133 

105 

109 

288 
187 
173 
57 
730 
159 
190 

474 
3,073 
128 
462 
3,889 
456 
469 

206 
478 
174 
35 
34 
211 


737 

128 
282 

1,520 
202 
411 
477 
128 

1,847 
804 
96 

187 
321 
446 
305 
206 

240 

1,334 

201 

1,203 

720 

28 

208 

323 

169 

89 

301 

638 

261 

258 

655 

981 
573 

293 

304 

51 

55 

140 

2,309 
201 
675 
179 
209 

1,818 
46 

2,020 
738 
118 
147 
161 
143 

262 
204 
208 
69 
919 
226 
195 

614 

3,817 
132 
520 

4,067 
587 
419 

275 
542 
403 
42 
53 
259 


1,086 
126 
324 

1,894 
208 
609 

1,383 
96 

2,602 
785 
246 

175 
326 
623 
290 
133 

157 

1.754 

229 

1,027 

887 

23 

93 

346 

116 

68 

357 

523 

232 

234 

629 

662 
949 

286 
277 
55 
63 

224 

1,868 

243 

578 

158 

270 

1 902 

' 163 

2,680 

641 

98 

150 

172 

115 

492 
223 
211 
79 
899 
396 
264 

746 
2,815 
197 
669 
4,139 
423 
484 

231 
652 
417 
47 
85 
276 


190 
114 
322 

1,609 

111 

373 

884 

79 

1,378 
557 
286 

137 
368 
586 
262 
87 

138 

2,869 

187 

718 

560 

19 

206 

193 

79 

45 

313 

479 

210 

212 

476 

718 
368 

247 

213 

47 

33 

165 

1,164 

1S9 

358 

114 

173 

1,086 

71 

982 

456 

65 

87 

95 

83 

238 
133 
187 
46 
595 
591 
199 

485 
2,442 
173 
363 
1,724 
145 
205 

177 
467 
145 
40 
37 
146 


616 
170 
284 
1,189 
136 
160 
714 
238 
565 
581 
339 

151 
651 
430 
259 

79 

165 

2,482 

230 

1,191 

589 

24 

226 

279 

153 

35 

346 

566 

245 

450 

705 

788 
457 

237 

212 

41 

44 

335 

2,398 

171 

777 

343 

172 

2,127 

42 

672 

448 

84 

101 

105 

106 

282 
205 
93 
55 
677 
423 
208 

498 
2,301 
334 
433 
1,835 
309 
422 

255 
497 
188 
22 
25 
173 


483 




185 




347 




1 077 




142 




298 




745 




236 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


756 
697 




426 


Animal Products — 
Fish 


139 




876 


Hides 


294 


Leather, unmanufactured 


273 
188 


Textile Products — 


162 




1,470 




247 




1,224 




695 




57 




376 


Silk— Raw 


275 




152 




49 




518 




583 




236 


Worsted and serges 


515 

787 


Wood and Paper — 
Books and printed matter 


825 
523 


Wood— Furniture and other 
manufactured wood 


250 

257 




63 


Other unmanufactured wood 
Iron and Steel — 


40 

263 




2,023 




182 




709 




464 




204 




1,986 




46 




659 


Other rolling mill products 

Stamped and coated products. . 
Tools. 


568 
91 
147 




128 


Wire 


69 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


252 




200 




103 




65 


Electric apparatus 


688 
359 


Tin 


202 


Non-Metallic Products— 


475 


Coal 


2,889 


Coke 


525 




446 




1,217 




84 




236 


Chemicals— 


253 


Dyeing and tanning materials. . 


469 
71 




23 




37 




145 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



29 



Classification 



Banking— 

Readily Available Assets 

Spacie 

Dominion notes 1 

Deposits with Bank of Canada 
In United Kingdom banks.. 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets 

Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments— 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadia n call loans 

Current loang 

Current !oan 8 abroad 

Provincial lo ans 

Municipal 1 oans 

Total 1 oans, etc 

Other Assets — 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Prem ises 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits 

Inter-bank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks 

B al an ces due by other banke 

Grand total assets 

Liabilities to the Public — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advances 

Deposits by public- 
Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Total deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities.... 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Percentage of current loans to 

notice deposits, p.c 

All notes in hands of public .. 
Security holdings 



1935 



Jan I Feb. I Mar. I April I May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. Nov. Dec 



I July I Aug. I Sept. I 



Jan. 



End of Month 



50-65 
177-36 



27-50 
58-39 
20-36 
795-18 
93-45 
1,236 



Index Numbers— 

(With teaaonal adjustment 
19X6 = 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Security holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans, elsewhere 

Notes in hands of public. . . 



138-84 

39-14 

91-36 

819 

131-99 
34 02 

104-84 
1,360 

14-12 
7-60 
5-50 
77-77 
54-94 
12-83 
2-33 
6-72 

7-32 
91-55 

4-39 
2,881 

124-73 

i 00 

89 

35-20 

1,412 

529-92 

1,942 

314-69 

6-37 

26 00 
•87 
54-94 
2-52 
2,580 
12-29 

950 

132-75 
145-50 
2,871 

+593 

580 
148-92 

973 



95-7 
105-3 
89-3 
183-3 
65-0 
37-3 
85- 1 



5111 

178-45 



30-54 
61-82 
20-89 
807-09 
90-35 
1,252 



137-36 

39-47 

85-58 

815 

136-31 
31-22 

110-39 
1,356 

14-32 

7 

5-50 
77-73 
54-52 
12-75 

2-35 

6-72 

7-28 
78-07 

5-17 
2,880 

125-98 

25 OS 
33-73 
34-84 

1,428 
516-24 

1,945 
321-87 

6-92 

26 37 
•67 

54-52 

2-54 

2,577 

11-32 

2,94 
132-75 
145-50 

2,870 

+613 

571 
153-93 



K 
51 

149-03 
29-61 
60-95 
20-71 

797-73 
94-12 



132-07 

40-31 

80-52 

819 

137-53 

28-19 
117-43 

1,355 

14-52 
7-90 
5-51 
77-50 
53-83 
13-29 
2-75 
6-72 

6-36 
77-76 

3-76 
2,845 

124-68 
14-35 
32-79 



106-3 
88-9 

184-6 
610 
351 
86-5 



1,447 
512-50 

1 
322-95 

6-64 

26 00 

•47 

53-83 

2-27 
2,543 
10 03 

807 
132-75 
145-50 
2,832 

+628 

56 
164-23 
970 



93-7 
107-8 
87-9 
182-6 
57-5 
38-2 
90-6 



15-83 
43-47 

163-71 
24-76 
71-59 
20-52 

825-70 
77-00 
1.243 



135-69 

39-03 

81-33 

823 

144-33 
29-65 

127-84 
1.381 

14-48 
7-99 
5-52 
77-40 
52-46 
13-27 
2-78 
6-73 

7-19 

112-97 

4-22 

2,929 

121-42 
15-14 
37-06 



1,452 
581-86 

2,034 
328-41 

6- 
24- 

•73 
52-46 

2-39 
2,623 
13-62 

1,847 
132-75 
145-50 

2,916 

+ 629 

56-7 
15813 
1.000 



105-4 
107-9 
86-6 
187-2 
58-5 
31-6 
89-1 



15-32 
30-92 

166-97 
22-48 
93-80 
20-64 

835-41 
71-21 
1.257 



129-52 

39-58 

81 

824 
147-81 

26-87 
120-43 

1,370 

14-46 

8-64 

5-52 

75-71 

52-96 

13 12 

3-16 

6-73 

5.97 
96-95 

3-49 
2,915 

122-45 
23-73 
32-45 



14-02 
28-38 

172-90 
13-26 
88-52 
21 02 

838-74 
67-45 
1,244 



135-86 

43-32 

85-24 

831 

156-45 
16-37 

107-19 
1,375 

14-45 
8-72 
5-45 
76-61 
52-65 
13-10 
3-04 
6-84 

7-84 
96-82 
4-22 



129-57 
32-16 
35-52 



1,446 
561-21 

2 
339-86 

804 

24-28 

•89 

52-96 

2-40 
2,615 
11-61 

2,946 
132-75 
145-50 

2 

+622 

57-0 
160-39 
1,005 



1, 

545-41 

1,971 

340-95 

15-25 
26-65 
•75 
52-65 
2-40 
2,607 
13-78 

802 
132-75 
145-50 
2,900 

+595 

58-3 
169-07 
1,018 



14-41 


13-84 


33-07 


30-58 


169-92 


192-35 


14-35 


19-29 


96-48 


93-62 


21-33 


22-63 


847-48 


854-23 


59-93 


68-55 


1,257 


1,295 


136-63 


139-43 


46-67 


46-99 


77-04 


77-44 


813 


829 


154-26 


155-91 


17-82 


25-20 


107-18 


101-05 


1,352 


1,375 


14-50 


14-50 


8-67 


8-75 


5-46 


5-46 


76-62 


76-47 


57-97 


55-78 


13-02 


12-84 


2-60 


2-24 


6-91 


6-86 


6-90 


7-47 


84-92 


96-90 


4-95 


5-89 


2,892 


2,963 


121-26 


129-97 


16-02 


38-85 


34-77 


38-19 



1,428 
553-01 

1,981 
338-25 

12-72 
24 03 

1-35 
57-97 

2-40 
2,590 
12-56 

2,541 
132-75 
145-50 

2,883 

+615 

56 9 

158-43 
1,031 



102-6 
106-5 
87-2 
192-1 
56-6 
24-4 
90-9 



1,434 
553-82 

1, 
360-70 

13-17 

26-63 

1 
55-78 

2-38 
2,655 
15 05 

2,950 
132-75 
145-50 

2,952 

+606 

57-8 
171-93 
1,041 



103-8 
106-8 
89-3 
194-9 
56-4 
27-4 
97-5 



15-26 
33-28 

183-83 
20-55 

115-38 
22-02 

910-87 
60 01 
1,361 



140-55 

51-79 

75-6 

839 

147-02 
28-52 
97-48 
1,380 

14-45 

8-83 

5-45 

76-27 

53-40 

12-96 

2-32 

6-87 

9-?l 
99-27 

5-65 
3,036 

131-75 
55-81 
41-24 



16-53 
38-66 

190 
1901 
99-31 
22 91 

917-64 
52 13 
1,357 



142-85 

55-38 

73-76 

856 

153-04 
29-63 
96-67 
1,407 

14-25 

8 

5-45 
76-39 
54-33 
12-91 

1-91 

6-87 

5-71 

102-80 

5-23 

3,059 

126-47 
12-91 

47-10 



1,444 
59001 

2,034 
370-41 

11-44 
27-71 

1-70 
53-40 

2-47 
2,730 
13-67 

811 
132-75 
145-50 
3,023 

+605 

58-1 
174-31 
1,103 



1,465 
625-21 

2,091 
376-66 

9-91 

28-09 
2-06 

54-33 
2-34 

2,750 

15-08 

2,545 

132-75 
145-50 
3.04C 

+610 

58-4 
178-16 
1,116 



109-6 
109-9 
90-5 
207-9 
52-5 
21-7 
93-4 



14-79 

36 
186-72 

21-73 
109-89 

23-24 
945-30 

59-71 

1,398 



138-91 

52-79 

95-90 

857 

138-97 
22-59 

100-20 
1,406 

13-47 
8-61 
5-33 
76-11 
59-43 
10-98 
1-71 
6-87 

6-43 
93-21 

5 
3,092 

130-53 
38-59 
47-54 



1,474 
613-27 

2,087 
382-66 

12-30 
27-73 

1-47 
59-43 

2-71 
2,790 
12-25 

2,950 
132-75 
145-50 

3,084 

+617 

58-1 

182-65 
1,137 



106-0 
109-9 
91-3 
217-3 
68-0 
22-6 
96-6 



15 

40-58 
181-64 
17-20 
94-52 
24-29 
955 
64-74 
1,395 



145-47 

53-27 

82-98 

820 

144 
19-40 

105-67 
1,371 

13-13 

8-59 
5-31 
75-96 
58-19 
10-81 
1-62 
6-88 

7-89 

119-49 

5-27 

3,079 

118-93 
11-87 

40-72 



1,486 
640-92 

2,127 
379-48 

8-54 

27-40 
1-46 

58-19 
3-13 

2,777 

14-33 

794 
132-75 
145-50 
3.070 

+666 

55-2 
170-14 
1,155 



16-48 
34-58 

178-74 
25-38 

100-89 
23-80 

993-55 
59-40 
1,433 



152-32 

60-83 

77-49 

756 

144-61 
18-08 
99-74 
1,309 

13-56 
8-64 
5-31 
76-08 
58-66 
10.77 
1-94 



5-68 

106-58 

5-37 

3,042 

117-38 
22-76 
45-75 



1,499 
576-30 

2,075 
381-05 

8-28 
27-25 

1-23 
58-66 

3-07 
2,741 
13-08 

2,541 
132-75 
145-50 

3,034 

+742 

50-5 
165-09 
1,207 



104-1 
111-8 

82-4 
227-4 
55-1 
23-7 
94-4 



beginning with March, 1935, there is given in this line the amount of Bank of Canada notes in the hands of the 
chartered banks at the end of the appropriate month. The sum of this amount and the "deposits with the Bank of 
Canada" in the next line is approximately comparable with the previous figures of Dominion notes. 



30 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MJNTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 



Classification 














935 












1936 




Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Security Prices— 






























Common Stock Prices— 






























Total (121) 




87-8 
128-8 
126-4 

13-4 

67-4 
179-7 

75-6 


84 4 
125-6 
117-0 

11-6 

560 
176-0 

74-1 


86-4 
130-8 
119-4 

11-1 

56-9 
178-6 

731 


93-6 

144-4 
121-9 
10-8 
59-9 
211-7 
70-3 


93-8 

145-2 

118-6 
10-5 
58-4 

217-9 
67-2 


92-4 

143-8 

122-2 

10-6 

57-4 

210-6 

66-7 


94-7 

146-1 

122-1 

12-0 

59-3 

210-0 

65-5 


93-6 

147-1 

118-7 

12-4 

61-2 

206-6 

61-8 


961 

152-9 
123-0 
12-6 
60-9 
215-1 
63-5 


105-8 

170-3 

127-8 

14-6 

66-9 

228-7 

69-0 


107-4 

178-2 
125-0 
15-9 
76-7 
214-8 
70-4 


112-9 

187-7 
130-3 
18-6 
80-0 
231-0 
75-5 


120-7 

200-0 


Industrials, total (89) 




140-5 
20-2 




Milling (5) 


84-3 


Oils (5) 


246-5 


Textiles and Clothing (11) .... 


74-0 


Food and Allied products (18) 


131-3 


126-5 


125 1 


127-8 


127-0 


128-5 


130-1 


128-7 


134-4 


145-7 


148-5 


153-6 


158-7 






109-1 
168-6 
49-4 
30-8 
102-4 


101-6 
168-7 
451 
25-3 
100-1 


99-0 
185-1 
43-8 
25-8 
94-8 


102-4 
200-0 
44-4 
27-0 
95-5 


104-7 
198-1 
45-0 
26-5 
97-6 


116-7 
195-4 
44-7 
25-0 
98-6 


122-9 
202-0 
47-7 
26-7 
99-9 


126-5 

209-6 

46-3 

25-7 

100-3 


133-2 
217-5 
45-6 
23-4 
100-0 


157-3 
254-4 
50-9 
27-9 
105-1 


161-0 

294-5 

50-1 

28-6 

108-0 


151-7 
307-1 
52-4 
29-8 
111-4 


151-7 




331-2 


Utilities total (23) 


57-0 




35-0 


Telephone and telegraph (2) . . 


112-3 






59-8 
79-9 


56-4 
76-8 


53-9 
75-0 


53-8 
731 


55-3 
72-0 


56-0 
71-7 


60-8 
70-6 


58-6 
65-9 


59-6 
68-4 


66-1 
73-0 


62-7 
75-1 


66-0 
78-6 


711 


Banks (9) 


82-6 


Mining Stock Prices— 






Total(23) 




124-2 
123-4 
131-2 


128-2 
127-5 
135-3 


128-7 
124-5 
149-1 


128-3 
121-4 
159-2 


123-0 
116-3 
153-2 


117-9 
110-1 
151-9 


115-6 
106-2 
155-4 


119-1 
109-5 
159-6 


118-6 
106-3 
169-7 


125-5 
111-8 
181-9 


133-6 
116-9 
201-7 


142-4 
124-8 
214-8 


149-8 


Gold (19) 


130-2 


Base Metals (4) 


230-4 


Financial Factors- 










73-8 


71-2 


69-2 


68-4 


68-4 


69-6 


70-9 


69-2 


69-5 


72-5 


73-8 


74-9 


77-2 


Long-term bond vields,1926 


= 100 








73-2 
78-3 


71-4 
79-5 


72-2 
80-8 


71-4 

78-5 


73-4 
80-4 


72-1 
80-2 


71-6 
79-7 


79-8 
88-3 


78-9 
85-4 


74-5 
80-8 


75-5 
82-7 


72-4 
85-5 


70-8 




80-6 


Yield on Ontario Government 




bonds 


p.c. 


3-75 


3-81 


3-87 


3-76 


3-85 


3-84 


3-82 


4-23 


4-09 


3-87 


3-96 


4-10 


3-86 


Shares traded. Montreal 


No 


220, 


288, 


282, 


350, 


228, 


248, 


318, 


273, 


352, 


809, 


590, 


857, 


973, 






365 


842 


672 


738 


433 


645 


960 


798 


172 


693 


284 


056 


102 


Brokers' loans' $000. 000 


18-98 


18-81 


18-24 


18-32 


17-70 


16-93 


17-33 


16-86 


16-76 


18-09 


18-59 


17-37 


17-84 


New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 


25-73 


16-38 


76-57 


70-54 


63-37 


03-20 


121-92 


194-63 


65-92 


147-73 


119-93 


136-66 


138-91 


Sales on Toronto Stock 


Ex- 




























Industrials 


..000 


423 


457 


440 


761 


397 


537 


606 


578 


807 


1,590 


926 


1,431 


1,538 


Values 


$000 


7.613 


8,930 


10,440 


19,019 


8.893 


11,436 


12,414 


12,999 


17,351 


31,951 


29,555 


29,151 


36,399 


Mining 


,000 


10,749 


20,303 


20,977 


18,105 


8,240 


7,141 


10.218 


11,964 


9,179 


15,695 


19,530 


36,822 


48,752 


Values 


.*000 


10.011 


20,286 


15,222 


15,931 


8,457 


6,230 


8,870 


8,987 


10,728 


16,554 


24,503 


33,543 


28,095 


Market values 1 $000,000 


3,743 


3,663 


3,764 


3,908 


3,842 


3,880 


3,880 


3,858 


4,088 


4,366 


4,507 


4,933 


5,033 


Foreign Exchange — 






























New York Funds in Montreal 




























High 


...$ 


1-003 


1-016 


1-008 


1-005 


1-003 


1-004 


1-006 


1-017 


1-020 


1-012 


1-012 


1-004 


1-000 


Low 


...$ 


1-001 


1-003 


1-003 


1-000 


1001 


1-001 


1-001 


1-002 


1-010 


1-009 


1-006 


0-996 


0-996 


Average 


...$ 


1-001 


1-010 


1-005 


1-001 


1001 


1-002 


1-003 


1-008 


1-014 


1-011 


1-009 


1-000 


•999 


Close 


...$ 


1-002 


1-008 


1-005 


1-001 


1-002 


1-002 


1-006 


1-012 


1-012 


1-011 


1-006 


0-998 


•999 


London Sterling in Montreal- 




























High 


s 


4-895 
4-855 


4-853 
4-808 


4-875 
4-835 


4-945 
4-855 


4-955 
4-915 


4-975 
4-955 


4-998 
4-965 


5 000 
4-943 


4-993 
4-956 


4-988 
4-967 


4-990 
4-959 


4-994 
4-941 


5-019 


Low 


$ 


4-975 


Average 


$ 


4-883 


4-825 


4-862 


4-896 


4-943 


4-967 


4-985 


4-970 


4-978 


4-978 


4-976 


4-966 


4-994 


Close 


...$ 


4-855 


4-825 


4-860 


4-935 4-950 


4-968 


4-993 


4-970 4-973 


4-988 


4-959 


4-993 


4-988 



Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 


Year and 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec Montreal 8 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Month 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared! Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 


Entered | Cleared 



000 Tons 



1928 


1,918 


1,930 


1927 


1,757 


1,799 


1928 


1,639 


1,592 


1929 


1,772 


1,742 


1930 


1,827 


1,865 


1931 


2,013 


2,003 


1932 


2,083 


2,040 


1933 


2.257 


2,253 


1934 


2,502 


2,462 


1935 







3,659 


3,603 


4,047 


3,205 


4,222 


4,017 


1,753 


1,739 


3,716 


3,800 


4,278 


3,375 


4,993 


4,865 


1,738 


1,744 


4,333 


4,429 


4,572 


3,792 


5,493 


5,460 


1,765 


1,750 


4,848 


4,896 


4,273 


3,531 


4,638 


4,583 


1,993 


1,938 


4,971 


4,918 


4,235 


3,474 


4,436 


4,417 


2,100 


2,017 


4,503 


4,480 


5,003 


4,321 


7,840 


7,760 


2,554 


2,560 


4,221 


4,159 


2,861 


2,868 


8,013 


7,993 


2,678 


2,683 


4,333 


4,306 


3,342 


3.330 


8,415 


8,427 


2,923 


2,924 


4,407 


4,362 


2,715 


2,831 


7,856 


7,819 


3,362 


3,382 


3,809 


3,797 


3,379 


3,388 


8,515 


8,543 


3,289 


3,296 



9,866 
10,306 
11,743 
11,971 
12,606 
12,137 
11,083 
10,354 
11,487 
11,212 



9,872 
10,390 
11,729 
11,930 
12,588 
12,304 
11,172 
10,388 
11,467 
11,203 



Tons 



1935 

Feb 

Mar 

April.. .. 

May 

June 

July 

August. . 

Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

1936 

Jan 

Feb 



233,942 
267,370 
187,976 
145,957 
150,963 
183,292 
188,876 
179,380 
155.315 
142,810 
270,966 

264,755 
272,597 


255,715 
248,779 
211,365 
152,934 
143,001 
184,719 
182,272 
174,571 
164,617 
123,008 
240,420 

276,517 
267,254 


470, 792 
519,575 
322,870 
152,908 
180,318 
221,221 
255.954 
218,894 
229,988 
234,741 
463,768 

445,838 
472,151 


469,787 
519,075 
328,614 
151,634 
181,592 
217,995 
254,634 
218,684 
228.998 
233,179 
454,584 

442,139 
470,804 














777,803 
905,380 
875,224 
934,847 
865,864 
1,121,992 
1,175,89(3 
974,870 
952,357 
861,926 
881,401 

795,728 
851,857 














98,896 
633,926 
355,415 
350,111 
502,58' 
416,697 
339,132 
630,958 

51,284 


101,102 
636, 888 
359,643 
339.530 
519,486 
412,089 
344,197 
632,390 
42,916 


266,480 
1,076,888 
1,149,237 
1,392,080 
1,330,599 
1,186,847 
1,076,378 

987,460 
48,938 


146,966 
1,102,976 
1,140,492 
1,331,383 
1,422,728 
1,099,401 
1,091,955 
1,130,575 
76,859 


110,087 
357,561 
507,570 
564,539 
604,873 
399,384 
310,299 
352,270 
81,994 


146,306 
351,118 
518,164 
568,687 
604,894 
405,364 
307,449 
343,246 
50,669 















808,652 
890,642 
864,579 
945,453 
864,972 
1,115,755 
1,182.793 
987,101 
928,986 
878,269 
853,548 

810,106 
899,575 



'Last day of each month. 

'Month end values of all listed stocks. 



3 Re3ord3 of inland shipping unavailable from 1926 to 1930 inclusive. 



32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 28. Canadian Public Finance. Revenue and Expenditure in Dollars. 



Classification 


Month of 

February, 

1935 


Month of 
February, 

1936 
(unrevised) 


April 1, 1934 

to 

February 

28, 1935 


April 1, 1935 

to 

February 

29, 1936 

(unrevised) 


Receipts— Ordinary Revenue— Customs Import Duty 


5,766,577 
2,939,793 
7,544,585 
2,254.656 
644,260 
2,400,249 
1,742,789 


5,402,094 
2,779,547 
8,559,205 
2,174,312 


68,778,982 
39,875,038 
99,906,637 
59,613,814 
6,507,168 
27,870,328 
20.136,138 


67,312,086 
40,837,208 


Excise Taxes, Sales, Stamps, etc 


100,407,159 
79 246 568 


Gold Tax 


1,412 825 




2,400.063 
1,707,832 


28,789,329 




19,360,771 








23,292,909 
3,425 


23,023,053 

13,059 

78,101,250 

54,300,000 


322,688,105 

2,855,968 

20,570,583 

511,800,654 


337,365.946 




295.642 




89,933,250 


Loan Account Receipts 


18,300,000 


919,668,124 


Grand Total 


41,598,334 


155,437,361 


857,915,311 


1,347,262,962 




485,166 

32,581 

18,286 

76,695 

2,651,980 


651,582 
34,756 
20,856 
72,312 
2,036,226 


6,369,714 
337,713 
199.830 

1,309,988 

122,794,764 

14,963,578 

11,607,344 

1.396,038 
179,295 
791,819 

1,282,669 
577,101 
456,098 

1,363,353 
114,405 

1,161,282 

3,871,495 
132,351 

2,476,711 

2,297,182 

2,257,185 
429,269 

2,087.181 

1,300,340 

4,943,381 

1,131,835 

857,284 

1,849,694 

12,026,765 

343,629 

9,202,738 

49,184,450 

26,410,950 

41,918 

190,310 

305,397 

8,646,394 

3,458,733 

1,786,600 

5,437,698 

348,249 

681.231 

5,527,945 


8,502,501 
378 871 






234 466 




1 156 395 




116,755,645 
16 588.578 




375,219 

127,230 

50,001 

77,096 

110,394 

22,070 

42,974 

96,676 

8,008 

97,638 

233,281 

24,922 

174,788 

230,047 

196,677 

24,684 

276,216 

146,375 

412,344 

113,208 

75,933 

108,967 

1,050,201 

31,885 

836,198 

4.476.073 

2,667,525 

3,825 

13,241 

97,973 

592,670 

188,126 


-741 

138,976 

37,441 

68,490 

35,140 

11,048 

40,231 

94,015 

7,758 

101,537 

263,251 

37,225 

176,503 

229,918 

171,561 

56,346 

256,451 

137,401 

394,694 

108.898 

80,417 

176,319 

1,480,213 

52,926 

905,509 

4,600,886 

2,910,965 

3,954 

13,135 

10,043 

967,506 

254,381 

144,207 

490,141 

56,490 

55,490 

440,968 


12,806,576 




1,518,526 




650,069 


Superannuations and Miscellaneous Pensions 

Miscellaneous Grants 


720,563 
643,034 
842,372 
409,397 




1,409.293 


Governor General's Secretary's Office 


127,816 
1,196,314 




4,322,305 




148,333 




2,646,249 


Justice 

Penitentiaries 

Labour 

Legislation — 


2,307,338 

2,122,418 

565,245 

1,738,055 




1,462,381 


Marine 


5,089,185 
1,370,349 




959,530 




1,672,362 




14,036,387 




413,711 




9,958,731 




49,796,013 


Post Office 


27,502,585 




41.778 




142,459 




133,377 


Public Works 


11.394,690 
3,603,158 




1,833,871 




460,786 
31,935 
55,733 

431,187 


5.383,131 




596,449 


Soldier Settlement 

Trade and Commerce 


704,444 
6.036,991 


Total Ordinary Expenditure 


17.226,811 


17.825,425 


312,131,906 


319,921,941 


Special Fxpenditure— 


679,477 
3,711,558 
2,089.460 


1,631,673 

4,552,606 

148,157 


7,303,135 

43,342,775 

4,029,022 


26,672,822 




37,914,542 


Sundry Charges to Consolidated Fund 


922,404 


Total Special Expenditure 


6,480,495 


6,332,437 


54,674,932 


65,509,767 






Capital Expenditure and Non- Active Loans— Marine 

Public Works 


112,155 

569 

11,899 

114,440 


288,215 

21 

7,227 

-25,301 


5,754,386 
315,345 
702,410 

1,117,339 


4,808,576 
205,942 
551,162 




1,533,687 


Total Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans 


239,064 


270,162 


7,889,480 


7,099.367 




23,946,371 


24,428,023 


374,696,318 


392,531,075 






Other Disbursements— Loans and Advances— Active Assets. 
Provincial Governments (under Relief Act) 


2,713,580 

73 ,'666 

100,000 


6,386,240 
1,623.676 


26,146,238 


40,931,344 


Railways (Under Supp. P.W.C.A., 1935) 


5,008,804 




392,659 
253,492 


341,971 




1,050,000 
30,723 
11,012 

3,000,000 


6,225,012 


Dominion Housing Act, 1935 


60,332 




74,952 
2,999,955 
6,831,000 


472,520 
52,248.365 
27,401,583 


156,566 


Canadian National Railways (Temporary Loan) 


51.000,000 
85.145,975 




12,792,487 


12,101,650 


106,914,857 


188,870,004 






Redemption of Debt— Redemption of Debt 


2,363,530 


93,405,424 


435,958,223 


715,320,190 






Grand Total 


39,102,38? 


129,935,097 


917,569,398 


1,296,721,270 






MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 













1 


935 












1936 


Classification 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Production— 


























Iron 000 metric tons 


491 

782 

18,608 


562 

855 
19,593 


535 

822 
17.863 


568 

867 

19,589 


538 

782 

16,397 


556 

816 

17,721 


552 

772 

17,165 


538 

870 

18,007 


553 

922 

20,152 


538 

918 

20,605 


568 

825 

19,968 






Steel 000 metric tons 


927 




Coal 000 metric tons 




Electricity 






Generated mill, k.w.h. 


1,478 


1,507 


1,330 


1,326 


1,147 


1.216 


1,189 


1,320 


1,650 


1,758 


1,929 


1,970 




New orders received. 1920=100 


107 
18-4 


102 
201 


105 
23-8 


110 
20-4 


109 
251 


101 
15 9 


85 
16-9 


71 
17-3 


70 
23-5 


79 
12-3 


89 
19-4 






Copper Available 000 tons 


20-2 




Raw Cotton Delivered to 




























Mill mill. lb. 


103 


113 


105 


115 


98 


116 


93 


90 


120 


132 


111 


134 




Production, Artificial SaK 




























Yarn and Waste. . mill. lb. 


9-61 


10-73 


9-79 


11-10 


9-95 


10 91 


7-54 


9-74 


12-52 


11-80 


9-96 


11-94 




NaturalSilkDeliveriesOOO lb. 


366 


481 


409 


449 


375 


447 


407 


407 


508 


481 


423 


476 




Crude Rubber 






























7-84 


8-26 


7-22 


9-86 


7-79 


6-72 


10-52 


10-97 


9-51 


7-18 


6-63 


7-09 




Building Plans 




Approved l 1924 = 100 


201-6 


176-8 


185-8 


198-6 


142-9 


183-6 


126-8 


160-5 


185-6 


199-2 


141-9 


157-5 






159-5 


132-7 


117-2 


171-3 


102-8 


134-1 


98-0 


165-9 


123-2 


129-3 


133-3 


129-6 




Employment — 




























Insured Workers in 




























Employment 2 mill. 


10 08 


10 20 


10-32 


10-33 


10-36 


10-38 


10-42 


10-44 


10-49 


10-54 


10-60 


10-35 


10-48 


Number Unemployed 2 000 


2.285 


2,154 


2,044 


2,045 


2,000 


1,973 


1,948 


1,959 


1,916 


1,919 


1,869 


2,160 


2,025 


Percentage Unemployed 


17-5 


16-5 


15-7 


15-6 


15-3 


15-3 


14 9 


150 


14-6 


14-6 


14-2 


16-3 




Coal mining 


18-7 


18-5 


18-7 


18-9 


18-8 


17-6 


17-9 


18-6 


18-5 


18-2 


17-8 


17-6 






24-4 
14-6 

7-7 


23 

140 

7-6 


22-5 

13-9 

7-2 


23-5 
13-2 
6-9 


22-4 
12-8 
6-8 


21-8 
12-6 
6-3 


20-3 
12-1 
6-3 


20-1 
12-4 
5-9 


20-0 
11-5 
5-6 


18-9 
11-1 
5-6 


17-6 
10-7 
5-2 


19-3 
11-3 
5-9 












Shipbuilding and marine en- 






41-8 
120 
22 5 
15-2 
21-6 
48-9 


41 3 

12-4 
21 8 
150 
170 
46-8 


40-2 
11 -8 
21-4 
13-5 
15 2 
46-3 


40-3 
12-6 
20-9 
13-6 
14-2 
44-9 


38-9 
11-4 
21-0 
13-7 
140 
43-6 


38-5 
10-7 
21-4 
12-8 
14-7 
460 


37-1 
10-6 
21-2 
12-1 
14-4 
46-2 


38-0 
10-4 
22-0 
10-2 
14-5 
46-5 


36-7 
11-2 
19-2 
7-9 
14-9 
46-9 


33-9 

10-5 
17-5 
7-8 
16-7 
47-6 


33-3 
9-7 

16-6 
7-5 

17-9 

47-4 


32-7 
11-4 
17-6 
8-9 
27-9 
51-6 












Woollen 








Public works contracting 




Trade— 




























Imports, Total £ mn. 


56-3 


60-5 


59-8 


64-5 


57-8 


61-8 


59-1 


60-8 


73-4 


71-5 


74-5 


70-0 




Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 


26-3 


28-6 


271 


30-1 


27-5 


29-0 


27-0 


29-6 


37-5 


34-4 


34-4 


31-3 




Raw materials £ mn. 


16-2 


16-5 


16-9 


18-4 


15-7 


170 


16-0 


15-3 


18-0 


19-7 


23-6 


22-4 




Manufactured £ mn. 


13-6 


15-2 


15-5 


15-8 


14-4 


15-5 


15-8 


15-5 


17-6 


16-9 


16-0 


16-0 




Total, net imports £ mn. 


51-9 


560 


55-6 


59-0 


52-6 


57-9 


550 


57-0 


68-7 


66-9 


69-0 


65-7 




Exports, Domestic,Total£ mn. 


34-1 


360 


330 


35-2 


32-9 


36-4 


34-9 


34-1 


39-9 


39-4 


34-9 


34-5 




Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 


2-1 


2-4 


2-2 


2-5 


2-4 


2-6 


2-5 


2-8 


3-4 


3-8 


2-7 


2-8 




Raw materials £ mn. 


4-2 


4-6 


4-0 


4-7 


40 


4-6 


4-1 


3-7 


4-7 


5-1 


4-2 


4-1 




Manufactured £ mn. 


26-8 


28-0 


25-9 


27-1 


25-5 


28-4 


27-2 


26-7 


30-6 


29-3 


26-2 


26-6 




Bank Clearings— 




























Provincial £ mn. 


109-2 


108-1 


97-7 


103-0 


97-6 


117-8 


100-3 


95-3 


110-9 


108-7 


110-6 


123-0 




Postal Receipts, Daily. . £ 000 


131 


140 


134 


131 


136 


129 


140 


144 


145 


145 


190 


139 




Transportation— 




























Shipping — 




























Entrances mill, net tons 


4-22 


4-71 


506 


5-55 


5-44 


6-07 


5-93 


5-83 


5-61 


5-24 


5-39 


5 00 






3-98 


4-62 


4-42 


5-04 


4-71 


5-20 


5-31 


4-88 


515 


4-94 


4-38 






Index of shipping 






freights! 1924 = 100 


58-1 


92.6 


950 


93-8 


92-9 


98-3 


95-8 


98-1 


1151 


109-9 


117-7 


111-0 




Railwa ys — 




























Average weekly 




























railway receipts £000 


2.640 


2,705 


3,813 


2,769 


3.013 


3.155 


3.432 


3,074 


2,891 


2,831 


2,753 


2,675 




Freight traffic total.mill. tons 


21-8 


22-3 


220 


20-6 


191 


19-8 


19-8 


17-7 


20-3 


20-9 


23-6 


23-3 




Merchandise mill, tons 


3-6 


3-7 


3-7 


3-7 


3-5 


3-6 


3-7 


3-5 


3-9 


4-2 


4-2 


4-4 




Coal mill, tons 


14-3 


14-6 


14-3 


131 


11-7 


12-3 


12-2 


10-7 


12-9 


13-2 


151 


14-8 




Minerals and other 




























merchandise mill, tons 


3-9 


3-9 


40 


3-8 


3-8 


3-8 


3-9 


3-6 


3-7 


3-8 


4-3 


4-4 




Prices— 




























Wholesale Prices 1913 = 100 — 




























Board of Trade* 


880 

91-3 

98-1 

124 

142 


86-9 

90-9 

97-5 

122 

141 


87-5 

91-8 

98-9 

119 

139 


88-2 

94-3 

100-2 

118 

140 


88-4 

93-7 

98-5 

120 

143 


880 

93-7 

99-2 

126 

143 


88-4 

93-0 

98-9 

126 

143 


89-6 

96-1 

100-1 

125 

145 


91-1 

98-5 

100-9 

128 

147 


91-2 

98-2 

101-5 

131 

147 


91-4 

98-3 
102-0 


91-8 
98-1 








Statist 










Cost of living 


147 


147 




Banking— 




























Bane or England — 




























Private deposits £ mn. 


142 


149 


140 


141 


138 


142 


123 


130 


117 


130 


117 


148 


140 


Bank and currency notes £ mn. 


375 


379 


392 


390 


399 


400 


406 


398 


400 


401 


419 


398 


399 


Gold reserve £ mn. 


192-4 


192 5 


192-6 


192-6 


192-7 


192-7 


192-8 


193-5 


193-7 


196-5 


200-1 


200-2 


200-5 


Nine Clearing Banks— 






























1,916 


1,885 


1,902 


1,923 


1,966 


1.982 


1,976 


1,986 


1,998 


2,002 


2,054 


2,127 




Discounts £ mn. 


263 


205 


198 


216 


242 


272 


285 


298 


295 


292 


320 


344 






741 


752 


760 


755 


740 


760 


750 


748 


759 


759 


764 


797 




Investments £ mn 


590 


598 


601 


604 


608 


599 


599 


602 


610 


604 


589 


615 




Treasury Bills £ mill 


812 


788 


813 


843 


881 


887 


880 


893 


902 


898 


866 


895 


796 


Money- 




























DAT to Day Rate p.c. 


•63 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


•75 


Three Months Rate p.o. 


•41 


•50 


•59 


•59 


•69 


•63 


•61 


•56 


•61 


•56 


•75 


•52 


•52 


Security Values— 




























Fixed Interest 1921 - 100 


131-6 


130-3 


131-3 


131-3 


130-3 


131-5 


129-8 


124-3 


125-5 


128-9 


129-5 


130-1 




Variable Dividend . .1921 = 100 


113-7 


1100 


111-5 


114-4 


115-6 


115-6 


117-5 


112-7 


112-6 


118-3 


120.1 


123-9 




Total 1921 = 100 


125-8 


123-7 


124-9 


125-8 


125-5 


126-4 


125-8 


120-6 


121-3 


125-5 


126-4 


128-1 




Exchange, New York $ to £.... 


4-870 


4-834 


4-785 


4-836 


4-923 


4-942 


4-956 


4-956 


4-906 


4-914 


4-931 


4-929 


5-005 


Exchange, Francn to £ 


74-22 


72-71 


72-53 


73-28 


74-72 


74-50 


74-91 


75-16 


74-47 


74-53 


74-84 


74-44 


74-84 

























1 Beginning with March 1935. this factor is expressed as a percentage of 1930. 
'Number of persons on the Registers of Employment Exohanges in Great Britain only. 
<ndex is revised, being placed on the base of 1930. 



•The Board of Trade price 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States 



Classification 



United States Statistics— 

Industrial Produc- 
tion 1923-5 = 

Mineral Production. . 1923-5 

Manufacturing Pro- 
duction 1923-5 = 100 

Wheat, Visible Supply.MU. bush 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Shipments, principal 

markets 000 bush 

Exports, including 
wheat flour 000 bush 

Wheat Flour Produc- 
tion OOObbls 

Sugar Meltings, 8 
Ports 000 long tons 

Tobacco Consumption, 

Cigars Millions 

Cigarettes Millions 

Cattle Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Hog Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Cotton Consumption . . . 000 bales 

Newsprint Produc- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Newsprint Consump- 
tion 1 000 8. tons 

Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 

Steel Ingot Produc- 
tion 000 1. tons 

Automobile Produc- 
tion 000 cars and trucks 

Zinc Production a. tons 

Stocks s. tons 

Lead Production s. tons 

Petroleum Produc- 
tion 000 bbls 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls 

Gasoline Production. .000 bbls. 
Consumption 000 bbls 

Contracts Awarded $000,000 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Electric Power Pro- 
duction mill, k.h 

Index Factory Employ- 
ment 1923-5 = 100 

Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 

Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . .$000 

Imports $000,000 

Exports $000, 00( 

F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 
counted Mil. Dolls 

Reserve Ratio p.c 

Total Loans Mil. Dolls 

Demand Deposits, 
adjusted 2 Mil. Dolls 

Interest Rates, Time Loans.p.c 

Call loans renewal p.c 

Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months p.c 

Bond Prices High Grade 

Rails (10) 

Forty bonds 

Prices Common Stocks 
(421) 1926=100 

(Copyright Standard Siatittics Co.) 

Industrials (351) 

Railways (33) 

Utilities (37) 

Automobiles (13) 

Tires and rubber goods (7) 

Chain stores (16) 

Copper and brass (8) 

Oil (15) 

Railway equipment (9) 

Steel and iron (11) 

Textile (28) 

Amusement (7) 

Tobacco (11) 

Stock Sales, N.Y Mil. Shares 

Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 

Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Bank Debits, N.Y....Mil. Dolls. 

Outside, 140 centres... Mil. Dolls 



1935 



Feb. Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 



89-0 
96-0 

88-0 
63 

3.771 



1,301 

7,599 

301 

321 
9,306 

1,381 

1,823 

478 

70- 



88-0 
97-0 



6,355 
1,502 



7,! 



328 



2,748 

335-7 
33, 

116,276 
25,103 

72,763 

70,817 
32,702 
26,432 
751 
2,326 

7,494 

81-9 

41,573 

34.479 

152-5 

163-0 



72-2 
3,061 

11,793 
•88 

CO 

•75 

112-52 
83-16 

67-8 

80-0 

31-8 

54-5 

85-6 

36-9 

72 

54-3 

69-9 

47-9 

45-8 

47-6 

107 

130-7 

14-4 

220-3 

816 

12,549 

13,181 



352 
10,200 



1,470 



73-3 



171-1 

1,777 



429-8 
36,735 
111, 
30,118 

81,488 

76,630 
35,314 
31,997 
123-0 
3,015 

8,012 

82-4 

54,763 

38,950 

177-3 

185-0 



72-3 

8,084 

11,688 

00 



111-42 
79-00 

63-9 

75-4 

27-8 

53-2 

77-2 

30-7 

69-9 

49-4 

65-9 

40-4 

39-2 

43-4 

10-2 

126- 1 

15-9 

310-7 

773 

15,895 

15,849 



860 
87-0 



86-0 
43 



7,971 

1.281 

7,787 

341 

374 
10,697 



1,650 
463 

74-7 

166-1 
1.663 

2,641 

477 
35,329 

108,680 
29,857 

78,427 

75,066 
34,728 
36,076 
124 
2,303 

7,819 



59,644 
43,368 

170 

164-4 



73-0 
8,155 

12,231 
•63 

•64 

■75 

112-58 
78-37 

67-5 

78-9 
29-4 
59-1 
80-7 
31-2 
71-8 
56-6 
71-1 
41-2 
41-4 
42-8 
10-9 
127-2 
22-4 
266-0 
805 
15,905 
15,746 



850 
890 

84 
32 

8,298 

8,683 

1.426 

7. 

437 

408 
11,709 

1.636 

1,551 

469 

84-1 

202-0 
1.727 

2,636 



34,572 
107,625 
33,202 

82,454 

80,412 

37,583 

39,089 

126-7 

2,327 

8,021 

81-2 

58,105 

40,468 

170-6 

165-5 



73-3 
8,111 

12,556 
•25 
•25 

•75 

113-57 
79-60 

73-1 

85-5 

310 

64-5 

86-8 

31-9 

75-6 

68-9 

80-9 

40-8 

44-5 

450 

12-5 

136-5 

30-4 

284-2 

793 

14,551 

15,655 



86-0 
98-0 

84-0 
24 

10,024 

11.217 

1,195 

7,381 

323 

402 
12,120 

1,402 

1,301 

386 

77-0 

161 
1,553 

2,231 

361 

34,637 
112, 
29,332 

82,338 

81,724 
38,180 
37,884 
1480 
3,035 

7,873 

79-9 
58.953 
40,678 

156-8 

170 



86-0 
84-0 

86-0 
37 

28,895 

11,233 

1,231 

7,387 

414 

432 
13,138 



74-2 
8,037 

12,921 
•25 
•25 



11507 
81-08 

760 

88-0 

32-7 

704 

88-5 

31-3 

78-8 

65-7 

82-7 

43-9 

44-9 

45-0 

130 

140-5 

22-3 

263-4 

809 

15.667 

15,914 



1,336 
392 

72-8 

153-8 
1,520 

2.270 

337-0 
35, 120 
115.723 
30.488 

85.485 

84,903 
40,667 
41,203 
159-2 
2,226 

8,370 

80-4 

49,887 

38,550 

177-7 

173-4 

7 
74-5 
7,811 

12,962 
•25 

•25 

•75 

116-65 
81-95 

79-4 

91-7 
34-1 
73-8 

101-9 
32-4 
80 
69-7 
80-5 
48-5 
53-3 
47-3 
14-7 

148-3 
29-4 

235-7 

769 

16,737 

16,657 



87-0 
810 

88 
64 

48,169 

14,997 

1,278 

8,082 

331 

422 
11,975 

1,943 

1,278 
408 

75-2 

148-1 
1,761 

2,919 

240 1 
35,547 
112,445 
30,807 

84,816 

84,584 

40 

42,836 
168-6 
3,102 

8,573 

81-7 

52,402 

40,914 

1690 

172-2 

11 

74-9 
7,817 

13,263 

25 

25 



113-83 
81-90 

83-3 

95-2 
35-9 
81-6 

117-6 
341 
81-7 
79-9 
80-8 
48-1 
60-4 
49-9 
150 

151-8 
42-9 

286-9 

772 

14,733 

15.643 



90-0 
87-0 

91-0 

79 

42,289 

15,595 

1,324 

9,055 

302 

431 
10,774 

2,257 

1,220 
449 

71-3 

160-6 
1,776 

2,830 

89 
36,221 
,316 
29,358 

84,109 

83,347 
39,817 
37,862 
167-4 
2,632 



81-9 
59,474 
39,008 

161 

198-2 

10 
75-3 

8,030 

13,246 
25 

25 



113-83 
81-82 

85-0 

97-5 

37-0 

81-9 

127-3 

33-8 

81-5 

88-9 

77-2 

45-6 

64-2 

51-3 

17-8 

153-2 

34-7 

249-8 

781 

14,014 

15,127 



95-0 
93-0 

95-0 
82 

27,883 

14,695 

1,489 

9,897 

314 

524 
12,711 

2,545 

1,652 
552 



179-8 
1,978 

3,146 

275 
36,716 
95,969 
37,844 

88,160 

85.132 

41 

41,401 
200-6 
2,882 

8,844 

83-6 
79,945 
4,911 
189-2 
221-2 



76-4 
7, 

13,598 
■25 

■75 

•75 

112-55 
79-51 



99-5 
34-5 
82 

137-4 
31-7 
78-6 
92-0 
78 

41-7 
63-1 
54-8 
18-3 

153-0 
46-7 

275-7 

792 

15,733 

16,962 



98-0 
92-0 

98-0 
80 

14,501 

12,403 

1,602 

8,274 

240 

457 
10,801 

2,037 

1,671 
508 

87-3 

187-4 
2, 

3,153 

398-0 
37,469 
85.266 
36,229 

86,476 

83,180 
40,260 
35,956 
188-2 
3,179 

8,693 

84 

71,777 

45 
169-4 
J69-3 

e 

77 
3,152 

14,018 

1-00 

•75 

•75 

114-32 

83-52 

94-2 

108-4 
38-3 
91 

159-9 
38-2 
79-1 

100-2 
86-7 
49-8 
71-2 
59-3 
20-6 

156-5 
57-5 

302-0 

846 

15,542 

16.802 



104-0 
101-0 

104-0 
75 

9,943 

7,181 

1,132 

7,175 

242 

313 
9,841 

1,809 

2,036 

498 

79-0 



2,106 

3,082 

407-8 
40,463 
83,758 
37,958 

88,711 

84,992 
40,667 
33,734 
264-1 
2,319 

9,131 

85-6 
90,813 
80,995 
186-9 
223-5 

5 

77-6 
8,249 



1936 



Jan. Feb 



99-0 
102-0 

98-0 
68 

9,277 

7, 

1,202 

8,644 

322 

337 
12,725 

1,785 

2,524 
591 

74-3 



5,474 
6,782 



79-4 



2,026 

3,049 

367-3 
41,917 
79,116 
34 

88,820 

85,776 
39,544 
32,553 

204 

2,353 

9,257 

85-0 
46,180 



186-9 
198-4 

9 
78-1 
7,999 



13,887 14,017 



1-00 
•75 



•75 



116-92 
86-50 



109 
41-4 
92-0 

157-6 
43-4 
76-1 

109-2 
91-0 
52-3 
70-8 
62-2 
21-9 

150-2 
45-6 

314-4 

938 

17,684 

18,816 



■75 



101-7 

116-0 

45-2 

99-1 
159-1 

49-3 

74 
116 
104 

5S 

73 

67 



155-9 

67-2 

476-1 

925 

17,925 

17,499 



36,228 






142-1 
3,135 



7 

78-1 






15,806 
15,766 



1 Based on sample of 422 publishers. 

1 Method of computing net demand deposits was changed by the Banking Act of 1935, approved Aug. 23, 1935. 
Consequently figures since that date are not comparable with those for earlier periods. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



Vol. XI OTTAWA, MARS 1936 N° 3 

Statistician du Dominion: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 
Statibtiqubs FjConomiques: Stone? B. Smith, M.A. 



LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE AU CANADA 

Les conditions economiques montrent une plus ample amelioration en fevrier, F avance des 
actions ordinaires et des obligations de tout repos etant la principale influence constructive. 
La vive allure du cours des actions a une nouvelle cime depuis 1930 a ete au moins temporairement 
interrompue en mars; 1' entree des troupes allemandes en Rhenanie la deuxiemc semaine de mars 
a precipite un des plus violents declins sur le marche des titres depuis plusieurs annees. 

Les obligations de tout repos ont avance d'un bas temporaire en septembre dernier pour 
atteindre en ces dernieres semaines un point eleve comparativement aux cimes des deux dernieres 
annees. Les depots des banques a la fin de Janvier refletent rinfluence du declin des comptes a 
demande et les depots a terme montrent un gain leger. Les prets courants, partiellement a la 
suite des ventes du ble, ont baisse a un nouveau bas. Le portefeuille et l'actif liquide montrent 
de nouvelles avances. 

Les deux facteurs representant les mouvements dans le domaine des affaires ont ete reac- 
tionnaires en fevrier. La recession des prix de gros a ete legere, restant dans les limites de la 
stabilisation visible depuis plus de deux ans. Le declin des operations commerciales a ete indis- 
cutable malgre la bonne posture du commerce d'exportation. Les exportations, a plus de $60,- 
000,000, ont ete plus grandes que tout autre mois de fevrier depuis 1930. Le gain sur le meme 
mois de Tan dernier est de 26 p.c. et l'augmentation ajustee sur Janvier est de pres de 18 p.c. 
L'augmentation des importations est de proportion moderee. Les exportations de cuivre et 
nickel ont ete extremement lourdes en fevrier et la production minerale montre une plus grande 
activite. L'indice des importations de textiles bruts a decline de 7-6 p.c, une avance de la laine 
contrastant avec le declin du coton. Le groupe des produits forestiers a ete plus actif. Les declins 
ont predomine dans Findustrie du fer et de Facier, montrant des recessions comparativement 
au haut niveau de Janvier. La production d' automobiles et les importations de petrole brut 
montrent des declins d'environ 17 p.c. chacun et le gain dans les importations de caoutchouc 
brut est de 14 p.c. 

Le gain ajuste des permis de batir est de 7 p.c, tandis que les contrats ont decline de 51 p.c 
au bas point de $8,200,000. Le gain ajuste des chargements de wagons est d'environ 9 p.c. 
Metaux communs 

Les mines metalliques, a en juger par les expeditions, ont ete decidement actives en fevrier. 
Les exportations de cuivre sont plus considerables qu'en tout autre fevrier, donnant un mouve- 
ment global de 32,952,000 livres comparativement a 19,182,000 en Janvier. L'indice ajuste a 
monte de 199-6 le premier mois de Fannee a 424-4 en fevrier. Les exportations de nickel ont 
ete plus considerables qu'en tout autre mois dans l'histoire. Leur total est de 17,088,000 livres 
comparativement a 14,111,000 le mois precedent. L'indice ajuste a 490-2 est plus eleve qu'en 
tout autre mois de la periode sous observation. Ceci se compare a 451-4, la plus haute cime 
anterieure atteinte en avril de Fan dernier. Les 17,088,000 livres montrent un gain de 54-2 p.c 
sur le meme mois de 1935, alors que les expeditions etaient a 11,082,000 livres. Le mouvement 
du deuxieme mois de Fan dernier avait ete plus grand que celui de tout autre mois d'apres-guerre. 
Les statistiques courantes du plomb ne sont pas encore etablies mais la production de Janvier, 
a 28,100,000 livres, s'est maintenue apres ajustement saisonnier au niveau de decembre et montre 
un gain considerable de plus de 22,673,000 livres sur la production de Janvier 1935. Le declin 
des exportations de zinc est contraire aux attentes saisonnieres, l'indice tombant de 162-4 en 
Janvier a 134-6 le mois sous revue. 

L'indice du cours des actions de trois compagnies de metaux communs est de 230-4 en 
fevrier comparativement a 131-2 le meme mois de Fannee derniere. Ceci se compare a 214-8 le 
mois precedent. Cet indice est base sur les cours de Falconbridge, Hudson Bay et Noranda. 

L'indice des prix de gros des metaux non ferreux marque 69-2 la semaine du 6 mars com- 
parativement a 64-7 a la meme date de 1935. L'avance sur la premiere semaine de Fannee, 
quand l'indice etait a 68-7, est de 0-7 p.c 
Industries forestieres 

Les operations du groupe forestier montrent de Faccelcration en fevrier. La production de 
papier a journal, a 221,569 tonnes, montre un gain ajuste de 2-8 p.c sur le mois prec6dent. Cette 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

production depasse celle de tout autre mois de fevrier, raugmentation sur fevrier 1935 etant de 
22-9 p. c. Les exportations de pulpe de bois ont ete les plus volumineuses depuis le mois de fevrier 
1930. Le gain de l'indice ajuste pour variations saisonnieres est a 69-1 comparative ment a 73-3. 

L'indice du bois d'ceuvre a fait bonne figure avec une exportation de 95,000,000 de pieds 
comparativement a 72,000,000 le mois precedent. Le gain sur fevrier de Fan dernier est de 
7-5 p.c. et l'indice ajuste montre un gain de 25-0 p.c. sur Janvier. Les exportations de bardeaux 
ont eu un recul violent depuis Janvier. 

Comme resultat net l'indice des industries forestieres a avance de 106-7 en Janvier a 111-3 
en fevrier, comparativement a 95 • 2 en fevrier de l'an dernier. 

L'indice des prix de gros du groupe bois et papier marque 67-8 la semaine du 6 mars com- 
parativement a 64-8 la meme semaine de Fan dernier. L'indice a done avance de deux points 
entiers sur la premiere semaine de Fannee courante. 

L'indice du cours des actions ordinaires de six compagnies de pulpe et papier, a 19-6 la 
semaine terminee le 12 mars, se compare a 11-5 la meme semaine de l'an dernier. L'indice 
de Janvier de cette annee est a 18-6. 

Les exportations de bois et papier sont evaluees a $12,362,000 en Janvier et a $10,618,000 le 
meme mois de Fan dernier. 
Les prix sur le marche anglais 

La marche des prix du ble sur le marche anglais a ete a la baisse les deux premiers mois de 
Fannee courante. II y a eu une faible hausse recemment a la suite de la decision du gouvernement 
frangais de discontinuer ses exportations et d'une amelioration dans les demandes de FOrient. 
Plus tard dans le mois les minoteries ont commence a, manif ester un interet visible. Ce meilleur 
ton a ete accentue par des rapports moins favorables sur la recolte du ble d'hiver des Etats- 
Unis, les inquietudes causees par la temperature de l'hiver en Europe, et des perspectives defa- 
vorables en France en meme temps qu'une reprise de la demande pour le ble australien dans 
F Extreme-Orient. 

La hausse continue des prix des articles en fer et acier a ete un element important dans le 
marche des marchandises. De plus, malgre une rapide expansion de la production il y a encore 
rarere de certains materiaux. La demande interieure pour charbon, specialement pour Findus- 
trie, s'est bien maintenue mais le commerce exterieur a ete retarde par la recente hausse de prix 
et est loin d'etre satisfaisant. L'opinion devient generale qu'une avance des prix de Facier est 
inevitable a la suite de la hausse du cout de production. Les consommateurs de billes basiques 
continuent de souffrir du manque de ravitaillement. Les metaux non ferreux montrent de la 
force a la suite d'une reprise de la demande. Le zinc a ete affecte par la rumeur que le cartel 
international du zinc sera prochainement reconstitue. Les prix du plomb montrent une amelio- 
ration decidee vers la fin du mois. L'avance est due a, une meilleure demande continentale et 
dans une certaine mesure a la reprise du marche anglais, tandis que l'avance des autres metaux 
a aussi aide. Le cuivre a avance considerablement au cours du mois. Les stocks mondiaux de 
cuivre affine a la fin de Janvier etaient de 489,900 tonnes, une legere amelioration au cours du 
mois. Les achats de nickel sont tres satisfaisants, les prix restant stables. 
Valeurs mobilieres 

Malgre un peu de tranquillite la plus grande partie de fevrier, les actions ordinaires ont fait 
des gains nets appreciables au cours du mois et le volume des actions traversant le comptoir a 
ete le plus lourd de ces dernieres annees. L'indice des actions ordinaires prepare par le Bureau 
Federal de la Statistique a avance de 120-7 la semaine du 30 Janvier a 126-7 la semaine terminee 
le 27 fevrier. II y a eu des hausses moderees la premiere et la troisieme semaines et tres peu de 
changements les deuxieme et quatrieme semaines. A Fexception des textiles et du groupe t<§16- 
phones-telegraphes toutes les sections de l'indice sont plus elevees pour le mois. Le groupe des 
divers dominait mais F International Nickel et Consolidated Smelters ont garde la t£te de l'avance. 
Le marche de fevrier a eu pour caracteristique une force nouvelle dans les services publics. 

Les prix de For semblent dans Fattente d'un mouvement bien que l'indice des mines d'or 
montre un faible recul. Les metaux communs sont rested fermes et les operations dans les deux 
sections ont ete d'un fort volume. 
Trois facteurs representatifs 

Le graphique de trois facteurs representatifs paraissant a la page 4 a 6te" revis^ pour la pr£- 
sente livraison. La ligne de course a long terme a ete recalcul£e pour chaque facteur en employant 
les donnees portant sur les dix-sept annees de 1919 a 1935 inclusivement. L'indice inverti du 






REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

rendement des obligations du Dominion a ete substitue a celui des obligations de 1' Ontario. 
La tres etroite correlation entre les indices ajustes des affaires et le cours des actions ordinaires 
pendant la periode de 1927 a 1936 est un trait interessant de la premiere section du graphique 
et le coefficient de correlation entre les deux facteurs sur une base annuelle de 1919 a 1935 avec 
ajustement pour long terme est de -95 comparativement a 100 representant une concordance 
parfaite. 

Ces facteurs ont monte depuis les points les plus bas en 1932 et 1933 et chacun d'eux a 
depasse ces derniers mois la ligne moyenne d'apres-guerre. 

Les actions ordinaires ont monte vivement en fevrier et il y a des recessions dans les opera- 
tions commerciales en d^cembre et Janvier. 

Les fluctuations de l'indice inverti des obligations du Dominion suivent une direction bien 
differente. II y a un declin marque en 1928 faisant anticiper la baisse des actions et des affaires 
de 1930. Un mouvement de hausse est visible depuis le commencement de 1933 jusqu'a la der- 
niere partie de 1934 quand a ete atteinte la nouvelle cime de la periode sous observation. Le 
declin de septembre dernier a ete absorbe" par la reprise subsequente, la position de fevrier etant 
pratiquement aussi elevee que les autres cimes des deux dernieres annees. Des indices des actions 
ordinaires et du rendement des obligations du Dominion sont publies mensuellement par la 
Branche du Commerce Interieur du Bureau. La reciproque de l'indice du rendement des obli- 
gations du Dominion est employee comme facteur. Comme les faibles rendements sont considered 
comme constructifs au point de vue des conditions economiques generates, l'indice inverti du 
rendement des obligations est employe dans le graphique des trois facteurs representatifs pour 
comparaison rapide avec les autres indices positifs. 
Taux des gages en ces dernieres annees 

Le supplement de la Gazette du Travail paru en fevrier dernier donne une etude generale 
des echelles de salaires au Canada. 

Mesures par les nombres-indices prepares par le ministere du Travail, les taux de salaires 
en 1920 ont atteint des niveaux de presque 100 p.c. plus eleves qu'en 1913. Dans quelques groupes 
l'augmentation depasse 100 p.c, tandis que dans les metiers du batiment et de l'imprimerie, ces 
augmentations sont appreciablement plus faibles, etant d'environ 80 p.c. seulement. Depuis 
1920 tous les groupes montrent des reculs bien que les metiers de l'imprimerie et les mines de 
charbon aient atteint leur cime en 1921 au lieu de 1920, pour decliner ensuite. Les declins dans 
les mines de charbon en 1925 sont comparativement rapides et tendent a reduire la moyenne des 
six groupes. II y a eu des changements depuis 1925, haussant la moyenne des six groupes chaque 
annee jusqu'en 1931 alors que cette moyenne a flechi. La tendance a ete* a la hausse jusqu'en 
1930 dans les operations forestieres et le sciage du bois et jusqu'en 1931 dans la main-d'ceuvre 
et les metiers des manufactures. 

La remuneration du travail en 1935 est plus grande a la suite d'augmentations dans les 
diverses industries et localites. Le travail a temps partiel ou a heures reduites est moins visible. 
Dans l'abatage du bois les gages ont avance generalement dans les Provinces Maritimes et le 
Quebec tandis que dans l'Ontario et la Colombie Britannique il y avait eu une hausse conside- 
rable en 1934. Dans les mines de charbon les gages ont augmente considerablement en Nouvelle- 
Ecosse et en Alberta et il y a eu aussi quelques augmentations dans les mines metalliques. II y a 
aussi amelioration dans les manufactures, specialement le vetement et le meuble. Les taux ont 
avance dans les metiers de la construction du Quebec et de l'Ontario et les gages des chemins de 
fer ont aussi avance. Les gages des debardeurs ont augmente dans la plupart des ports oceaniques 
et dans quelques ports des Lacs. 

Les gages dans les neuf groupes de la classification sont en moyenne plus Aleves en 1935 que 
1'annee prec6dente. L'indice des gages des metiers de la construction a augmente* de 3-2 p.c. 
tandis que les gains des autres groupes sont comme suit : metallurgie 1-0 p.c; imprimerie • 5 p.c; 
tramways electriques, 0-7 p.c; chemins de fer, 5-9 p.c. et mines de charbon, 1-8 p.c L'avance 
moyenne dans les six groupes est d'environ 2 p.c; main-d'ceuvre des manufactures de 2-4 p.c; 
metiers des manufactures 2-3 p.c; et abatage et sciage du bois 5-0 p.c 

Un graphique montre les fluctuations des salaires dans quatre groupes industriels et un 
nombre-indice de six groupes parait a la page 15. 
L'indice economique hebdomadaire 

L'indice economique hebdomadaire parait dans le Bulletin Hebdomadaire depuis le dernier 
trimestre de 1933. II est base sur six facteurs majeurs repr6sentant le prix et le volume dans les 
trois domaines des affaires, de la speculation et de l'argent. Les chargements de wagons et les 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

prix de gros representent les affaires en cours; les actions ordinaires et le volume d'actions passant 
par le comptoir reprcsentent la speculation; et l'indice inverti du rendement des obligations et 
les compensations bancaires representent le domaine de l'argent. Les indices ajustes, quand 
c'est necessaire pour tendances saisonnieres, sont ponderes a l'inverse des deviations standardises. 
Les deviations standardises sont computees des donnees mensuelles de Janvier 1919 a juin 1932. 

Bien que les lignes a long terme des six facteurs s'eloignent grandement les unes des autres 
la ponderation a pour resultat de faire compenser presque toutes les baisses par les hausses. 
Comme de cette maniere l'element tendance, pour toute fin pratique, se trouve elimine, le rCsidu 
donne la mesure des fluctuations cycliques, remplissant ainsi la fonction normale d'un indice 
hebdomadaire. 

Un indice economique annuel calcule de la meme maniere sur les memes facteurs et les 
memes ponderations montre une correlation de • 93 avec l'indice du volume physique des affaires. 

Les chargements de wagons et les prix de gros sont restes assez stables au cours des deux 
dernieres annees. Le rendement inverti des obligations, les compensations bancaires et le cours 
des actions ordinaires ont avance depuis 1933, specialement le dernier trimestre de 1935. Comme 
resultat net la semaine terminee le 22 fevrier 1936 l'indice economique avait atteint une nouvelle 
cime pour la periode sous observation. 

L'indice Economique et ses six facteurs sont montrCs par semaine, de Janvier 1933 jusqu'a 
date dans la graphique de la page 10. L'indice des compensations bancaires a ete recemment 
ajuste en prenant la moyenne mobile de trois semaines et en eliminant Ottawa de la compilation. 
L'indice des chargements de wagons a ete recemment rajuste pour tendances saisonnieres. Le 
composite a ete recalcule pour la periode d'observation en tenant compte de ces changements. 
L'elimination d'Ottawa dans les compensations bancaires etait devenue necessaire parce que la 
comparabilite en etait infirmee depuis le commencement des operations de la Banque du Canada 
en mars 1935. 

LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE EN ANGLETERRE 

Le graphique de la page 30 decrit les conditions economiques en Grande-Bretagne au cours 
de la periode d'apres-guerre. Le principal trait de l'indice general de la periode se trouve dans 
la stabilite relative a un niveau modere de 1920 a 1930, la depression de 1926 refletant la greve 
de cette annee. La recente depression a culmine" a l'automne de 1931, la situation generale subse- 
quente montrant de l'amelioration pendant plus de quatre ans. 

L'activite* commerciale a atteint son plus bas point en 1921, 1926 et 1931. L'expansion 
de 1921 a 1929 a ete interrompue temporairement par la greve de 1926. La plus grande activite 
de la periode sous observation se trouve en 1935, l'indice apres le premier trimestre ayant avance 
au-dessus de la ligne de 120 p.c. Le point le plus bas de la depression a et6 touche dans le qua- 
trieme trimestre de 1931, le gain etant visible et continu au cours des quatre annees suivantes. 

Le maximum des prix de gros au cours de la periode d'apres-guerre a ete atteint en mai 1920 
alors que l'indice du Board of Trade sur une base de 1926 marquait 219-8. En septembre 1922 
se produisait un des declins les plus violents de l'histoire, laissant l'indice a 104-2, un dEclin de 
pres de 53 p.c. Une reprise moderee les premiers mois de 1925 a suivi. Partiellement a cause 
du retour de l'etalon or a sa parite d'avant-guerre, les prix ont decline considerablement entre 
1925 et 1929. L'indice marquait 89-5 en decembre 1929 et 67 en septembre 1931 alors que fut 
abandonne l'etalon or. Depuis cette date le niveau des prix s'est mieux maintenu, l'indice de 
decembre marquant 72-6. 

Le Royaume-Uni est compte parmi les pays qui ont fait des progres considerables de releve- 
ment en 1935. Le chomage.a diminue graduellement et les profits ont augmente. Le faible loyer 
de l'argent a ete un encouragement pour le commerce interieur et les industries capitales donnent 
des signes de plus grande vigueur. La construction a pris de l'expansion et le roulement du 
commerce de detail s'est maintenu. L'indice des conditions economiques, qui avait avance 
considerablement en 1932, a continue ses progres les trois dernieres annees. 

Bureau federal de la statistique, 21 mars, 1936. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

MARCH 16, 1936 

Administration.— Canada 1936 (edition f rancaise) — manuel officiel des conditions presentes et des progres 
recents. 205 p. illus. map. 25 cents. 

Population. — Third-annual report of mental institutions, 1934 (Eng. and Fr.) 60 p. 

Production. — Agricultural Products. — Seventh census of Canada, 1931, New Brunswick, census of 

agriculture, 104 + 65 p. charts (Eng. and Fr.) 25 cents Manitoba, census of agriculture, 112 + 67 p. 

charts (Eng. and Fr.) 25 cents. (Annual report on the farm values for the year 1935), 2 p. Survey 
of livestock and poultry, December, 1935, 8 p. Stocks and consumption of unmanufactured tobacco 
during the quarter ending December 31, 1935, 7 p. (Eng. and Fr.). Animal Products Statistics. — 
The fur goods and fur dressing industries, Canada, 1934, 30 p. Statistics of dairy factories, 1934 (Eng. 
and Fr.) 104 p. illus., 25 cents. Forest Products. — Preliminary report on the lumber industry in 
Canada, 1934, 17 p. (Eng. and Fr.). 

Manufactures. — Geographical distribution of the manufacturing industries of Canada, 1933, 68 p. 
Textiles. — Report on the hosiery, knitted goods and fabric glove and mitten industries in Canada, 
1934, 36 p. Forestry Products. — The printing and publishing industry in Canada, 1934, 1 p. (Eng. 
and Fr.). Chemicals and Allied Products.— Sulphuric acid, 1935, 1 p. The natural gas industry in 
Canada, 1934, 10 p. Petroleum and natural gas production in Canada, December 1935, and gasoline 
sales in Canada, 1935, 3 p. Lron and Steel Manufactures.— Cream separators, 1935, 1 p. The 
miscellaneous iron and steel industry, 1934, 7 p. Lawn mowers, 1935, 1 p. The boilers, tanks and 
engines industry in Canada, 1934, 13 p. Non-Metallic Minerals. — The miscellaneous non-metallic 
mineral products industry, 1934, 7 p. Final summary statistics, 1934, 3 p. Electrical Industries. — 
Incandescent electric lamps, 1935, 1 p. 

External Trade.— Trade of Canada, fiscal year ended March 31, 1935, 869 p. (Eng. and Fr.) $3. 

Internal Trade. — Current trends in wholesale trade (Feb. 1936) 2 p. Price movements in other countries, 
the fourth quarter of 1935, 13 p. Seventh census of Canada, 1931, census of merchandising and service 
establishments, wholesale trade, Quebec (Eng. and Fr.) 25 + 99 p. 25 cents. 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities.— Telephone statistics for 1934, 26 p. Central 
electric stations in Canada, 1934, 35 p. 

Justice. — 59th annual report of statistics of criminal and other offences for the year ended September 30, 
1934: offences by adults; juvenile delinquency; court proceedings; police statistics; prison statistics; 
pardons and commutations. 18 + 174 p. (Eng. and Fr.), 50 cents. 

2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER. 

Daily Bulletins.— The daily bulletin— $1.50 per year. 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian grain statistics. Carloadings of revenue freight. Investors' indexes of 
security prices. Index number of 20 mining stocks. The weekly bulletin — $1.00 per year. Weekly 
index numbers of wholesale prices. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural statistics. The wheat situation: review; statistical supplement — $1.00 
per year. Canadian milling statistics. Cold storage holdings. Preliminary summary of price move- 
ments. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and shoes, (d) Automobiles, (e) Iron 
and steel, (f) Coal and coke, (g) Leading mineral products, (h) Asbestos, (i) Asphalt roofing, 
(j) Cement. (k) Clay products. (1) Copper. (m) Feldspar. (n) Gold. (o) Gypsum. 
(p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, (v) Silver, (w) 
Zinc, (x) Concentrated milk products, (y) Creamery butter. Rigid insulating board industry. 
Building permits. Summary of the trade of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of 
Canada's domestic exports. Summary of Canada's imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements 
and machinery. Footwear trade. Exports: Fertilizers, Grain and flour; Hides and skins; Lumber; 
Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; 
Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Pipes, tubes and fittings; Pulpwood, wood pulp 
and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vegetable oils; Vehicles (of iron). Imports: 
Canada's imports from Empire and foreign countries. Coffee and tea; Fertilizers; Hides and skins; 
Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and 
smelter products; Paint and varnishes; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Petroleum and its products; 
Pipes, tubes and fittings; Rubber; Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vegetable oils, 
Vehicles (of iron). Canada's monthly trade trends. Canada's monthly trade trends with Empire 
countries. Canada's monthly trade trends with foreign countries. Railway operating statistics. 
Traffic of Canadian railways. Canal statistics. Output of central electric stations in Canada. Prices 
and price indexes. Automobile financing. Bank debits. Changes in the value of retail sales. Com- 
mercial failures. The employment situation as reported by employers. New motor vehicle sales. 
Outstanding facts and figures gathered from reports, statements, bulletins and radio broadcasts. 
Review of business statistics — Price $1.00 per year. Sales and purchases of securities between Canada 
and other countries. Vital statistics, births, marriages and deaths, by provinces. 

Quarterly Reports. — Trade of Canada — Price $2.00 per year. Coal and coke. Factory sales of electric 
storage batteries. Galvanized sheets. Price movements in other countries. Production and sales 
of radio receiving sets. Stocks and- consumption of unmanufactured tobacco. Vital statistics. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Statistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 

The complete service of all publications issued by the Bureau (with the exception of new bulletins) 
may be obtained for a special rate of $15 per annum. 



Volume XI 




Num6ro 3 



CANADA 



BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE G£n£RALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 



MARS, 1936 



Publie par ordre de FHon. W. D. Euler. M.P., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA 
J.-O. PATEN AUDE, O.S.I. 

IMPRIMEUR DE 8A TRES EXCELLENTE MAJESTE LE ROl 
1936 



PHK Un dollar par an 



(W.^- Librarian, ^ JPublk ^- 

University of Toronto Library, 
Toronto, 5, Ont. 
// 95 



<o-iO 




Volume XI qImh? Number 4 



CANADA 

JDOMtNION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



APRIL, 1936 




~/TY f ' 



Published by Authority of the Honourable W. D. Euler, M.P. 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J.O. PATENAUDE, I.8.O. 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1936 



Price: One Dollar ver year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



SUMMARY OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Chart of Three Representative Factors 4 

The Business Situation in Canada 3-7 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical 

Volume of Business 8 

Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 9 

Production, Trade, Transportation, Immigration, 
Labour Factors, Industrial Production in other 
countries. 

The Relationship of Five Pairs of Significant 

Factors 10 

Table 3. Receipts, Visible Supply, Exports and 

Cash Price of Canadian Grain 11 

Table 4. Report of the Bank of Canada 11 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production 

by the Milling Industry 12 

Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of 

Sugar 12 

Table 7. Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered 

for Consumption 13 

Tobacco, cut. Tobacco, plug. Cigarettes. To- 
bacco snuff. Cigars. Foreign raw leaf tobacco. . 

Table 8. Production of Boots and Shoes 13 

Table 9. Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, 

Retail Food Prices and Cold Storage Holdings . 14 

Chart of Economic Conditions in Three Coun- 
tries 15 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations 

and Railway Operating Statistics 16 

Table 11. Railway Freight Loaded at Stations. . 17 

Table 12. Index Numbers of Employment by 

Industries and Cargo Tonnage 18 

Table 13. Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of Em- 
ployment, Indexes of Retail Sales and Auto- 
mobile Financing 19 

Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic 

Areas 20 

Canada, Maritime Provinces, Quebec, Ontario, 
Prairie Provinces, British Columbia — Construc- 
tion Contracts Awarded. Building Permits. 
Index of Employment. Bank Debits. Sales of 
Insurance. Commercial Failures. 

Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 20 

Metals — Gold, Silver, Nickel, Copper, Lead, Zinc. 
Fuels — Coal, Petroleum, Natural Gas. Non- 
Metals— Asbestos, Gypsum, Feldspar, Salt. 
Structural Materials — Cement, Clay Products, . 
Lime. 

Table 16. Weekly Factors of Economic Activity in 

Canada 21 

Grain Receipts and Prices, Carloadings, Whole- 
sale Prices, Common Stock Prices, Mining Stock 
Prices. 



Page 

Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts 
in the Clearing House Centres of Canada and 
total Bank Clearings 22 

Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities 22 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued In Sixty-one 

Cities 23 

Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices. ... 24 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities 

and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries 25 

United States, United Kingdom, France, Germany, 
Belgium, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Italy, 
Finland, India, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, 
Egypt. 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, 

by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 26 

Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports by Principal 
Commodities 27 

Indexes of Cost of Living and Cost per Week of a 

Family Budget 27 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports by 

Principal Commodities 28 

Table 25. Banking and Currency 29 

Chart of Economic Activity and Population 30 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, 

Foreign Exchange and other Financial Factors. 31 

Common Stocks — Total. Industrials: Total, Iron 
and Steel, Pulp and Paper, Milling, Oils, Textiles 
and Clothing, Food and Allied Products, Bever- 
ages, Miscellaneous. Utilities: Total, Trans- 
portation, Telephone and Telegraph, Power and 
Traction. Companies Abroad: Total, Industrial, 
Utilities, Banks. 

Mining Stocks — Total, Gold and Base Metals. 

Financial Factors — Preferred Stocks, Interest 
Rates, Bond Yields, Shares Traded, New Issues 
of Bonds, Brokers' Loans. Foreign Exchange — 
New York Funds, Sterling 31 

Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared 

from Six Canadian Ports 31 

Table 28. Economic Indexes and Components. . . 32 

Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United 

Kingdom 33 

Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United 

States 34 

The Business Situation in Canada (in French). . 35-38 

List of Current Publications of the Dominion 

Bureau of Statistics 39 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Vol. XI OTTAWA, APRIL, 1936 No. 4 



Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C, F.S.S. (Hon.) 
Business Statistician: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE CURRENT ECONOMIC SITUATION IN CANADA 

A slight recession was shown in economic conditions during March. Most of the major 
factors reached lower levels than in the preceding month. Wholesale prices were nearly main- 
tained, the index having been 72-4 against 72-5. A reaction occurred on the stock markets, 
the index of common stock prices having been 117-4 in March against 120-7 in February. The 
advance in the price of Dominion Government bonds continued in the month under review, 
reaching a new high point for nearly thirty years. The inverted index of Dominion bond yields 
was 143 • 1 against 141-2. The deposit liabilities of the banks were slightly lower at the beginning 
of the month, the recession being due to the change in demand deposits. The gain in notice 
deposits was from $1,499,000,000 to $1,517,000,000. 

Business operations showed minor recession from February, after seasonal adjustment. 
While several important gains were recorded in the forty-five factors used in the compilation, the 
majority were at a lower level than in February. The index of mineral production was 158-2 
against 186-2 in February. Zinc exports, silver shipments and bauxite imports showed gains 
over the preceding month. The gains in the exports of copper and nickel were less than normal 
for the season. Nickel exports at 18,531,000 pounds were greater than in any other March. 
The exports of copper were only exceeded for the month by the high level of last year. Zinc 
exports were 31,184,000 pounds, a seasonally adjusted gain of more than 43 p.c. Exports of zinc 
were greater than in any other March in history. Gold shipments from Canadian mines were 
at a lower level than in February, the index receding from 206 to 176. Asbestos exports of the 
better grades were 9,645 tons against 9,250, but the gain was less than normal for the season. 
The imports of bauxite for the manufacture of aluminium showed an adjusted gain of more than 
6 p.c. The coal output showed a considerable decline, amounting to 1,026,000 tons against 
1,449,000 in February. 

Bright spots in manufacturing production included foodstuffs and forestry. The index of 
the production of foodstuffs increased from 77-0 to 84-7. Flour production in the latest month 
for which statistics are available, was 1,000,000 barrels against 982,000. The index moved up 
from 59-4 to 69 • 7. The gain in the manufacture of sugar was less than normal for the season 
and the industry is operating at low levels. A gain was shown in hog slaughterings, but other 
classes of live stock recorded declines after seasonal adjustment. The exports of cheese and 
canned salmon were heavy, recording gains much in excess of seasonal expectations. The 
exports of cheese were 2,065,000 pounds, recording a new high point for the month since 1927. 
The release of tobacco showed gains less than normal for the season. The index of cigar releases 
rose from 78-4 to 76-9, and the release of cigarettes were 371,000,000 against 358,000,000 in 
February. 

The imports of crude rubber were 4,052,000 pounds against 4,256,000 pounds, a contra- 
seasonal decline being shown. The manufacture of pneumatic casings was nearly maintained 
in the latest month for which statistics are available. A further gain was shown in the manu- 
facture of leather boots and shoes, the index advancing from 115-1 to 118-5. The imports of 
raw materials by the textile industry showed gains less than normal for the season, the index 
receding from 121 -2 to 117-0. The imports of raw cotton were 13,558,000 pounds against 11,724,- 
000 in February. The inward movement of raw wool and wool yarn was 3,831,000 pounds against 
2,670,000. 

An excellent showing was made by the paper and lumber group. The production of news- 
print was greater than in any other March. The index advanced from 151-6 to 152-9, the pro- 
duction in March having been 243,900 tons. The export of planks and boards increased from 
95,357,000 feet to 142,062,000. The seasonally adjusted index consequently advanced from 74-4 
to 76-9. The export of shingles was again at a high level, the total having been 158,862 squares. 
The advance in the seasonally adjusted index was from 54-9 to 72-1. The net result for the 
forestry industry was an increase in the index from 111 -3 in February to 114-4. 

16703— If 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 






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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

While some recession was shown in the operations of the primary iron and steel industry, the 
output was greater than in any March for some years. The index of steel ingot production de- 
clined from 149-4 in February to 137-9 in March and the output was greater than in any March 
since 1931. The output of pig iron was 55,009 tons against 55,751 in February. The auto- 
mobile industry was more active, the output having been 17;974 units against 13,268. The 
seasonally adjusted index advanced from 76-6 to 86-1. Petroleum imports in March were 
65,383,000 gallons against 39,655,000 in the preceding month. The index, after seasonal adjust- 
ment, advanced from 124-2 to 141-3. 

The new business obtained by the construction industry, after seasonal adjustment, was 
nearly maintained in March from the preceding month. Contracts awarded were valued at 
$10,289,000 compared with $8,228,000 in February. The gain over the same month of last year 
was about $2,000,000. For the first quarter of the year, the total was $32,127,000 against 
$29,391,000 in the same period of 1935. The cost of building materials showed moderate ap- 
preciation from the same month of last year. The official index based on 111 commodities ad- 
vanced during the twelve months from 81 -4 to 84-2. No change was shown between February 
and March. After emerging from an exceptionally hard winter, the construction industry is 
favoured with better prospects. 

The use of hydro-electric power has grown rapidly in Canada, playing a prominent part in 
the development of Canadian industries. The index of electric power production with seasonal 
adjustment reached in March a new high point in the history of the industry. The index based on 
the average daily output was 209-3 against 196-0 in the preceding month. The previous high 
point at 206 • 2 was reached in August of last year. 

The gain in the railway freight movement was less than normal for the season. The March 
total was 192,123 cars against 180,232 in February, but the adjusted index declined from 78-4 
to 75-4. 

The external trade showed marked betterment over March of last year, but seasonally ad- 
justed recessions were shown from the preceding month. Imports were $52,900,000 against 
$41,597,000 in February. The adjusted index declined from 78 • 9 to 71 • 6. The value of exports 
was placed at $73,166,000 compared with $60,198,000 in February, but the seasonally adjusted 
index was 91-0 in March against 99-3 in the preceding month. Exports were greater than in 
any March since 1929. 

Economic Conditions 

The interpretation of economic conditions is facilitated by the analysis of six major factors. 
These include measures of volume and price in the three important fields of general business, 
money and speculation. A composite of the six major factors of Canada has been computed for 
the post-war period. The procedure was to weight each of the factors inversely as the standard 
deviation from the long-term trend. The composite was expressed as multiples of the standard 
deviation from the post-war trend determined by the method of least squares. The factors used 
in this connection and the weights were as follows: physical volume of business, 14-62; wholesale 
prices, 18-47; bank deposits (seasonally adjusted index of notice and demand deposits), 31-39; 
inverted index of bond yields (the reciprocal of the Bureau's index of Dominion government 
bond yields), 27-30; shares traded on the Montreal and Toronto stock exchanges, 2-47; and com- 
mon stock prices, 5-75. The indexes of bank deposits and of shares traded are given on page 32. 
The inverted index of bond yields was inserted on page 11 of the last August number of the 
Monthly Review and the other factors were published in the supplements of November 1932 
and May 1934. 

According to the present compilation, conditions of depression occurred in Canada from 1921 
to 1925 and from 1931 to 1934. The major prosperity period since the war lasted from the latter 
part of 1925 to the end of 1930. The recent depression was the most severe for the period of 
observation, extremely low levels having been shown in 1932 and the early months of 1933. 
Recovery since that time has been substantial. The economic index was consequently above the 
line of long-term trend during the greater part of 1935. 

In the chart on page 15, the cyclical fluctuation of the economic index is shown for the post- 
war period. The indexes of economic conditions in Great Britain and the United States presented 
in the February and March numbers of the Monthly Review, are repeated in a form suitable for 
comparison with the Canadian index. 

16703—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Commodity Prices 

Commodity prices were unsteady during March, the official index having been 72-4 against 
72-5 in the preceding month. Most commodities fluctuated narrowly with signs of weakness 
evident in the latter part of the month. 

The index of the cost of living which has fluctuated within very narrow limits during the last 
six months was 80-5 compared with 80-4 in February. Retail prices of foods rose from 72-9 to 
73-4, and the fuel index moved up from 87-3 to 87-5. The latter index was still more than a 
point above the level of a year ago. 

Common Stock Prices 

Owing to the definite setback in common stock prices during March, the index receded from 
120 • 7 to 117-4. The advance which was sharply in evidence from last October had resulted in a 
gain in the weekly industrial index from 144 to 202, before the reaction occurred. The March 
decline was of short duration being confined chiefly to the second and third weeks. 
Long Term Progress and Growth of Population 

The rapid economic development of Canada since the first of the century is illustrated in 
the chart appearing on Page 30. Measured by an index of economic activity with the average 
for 1913 as a base equalling 100, the growth of Canada in the last part of the nineteenth century 
was slow. In the late nineties, owing partly to the rapid settlement of the western provinces, the 
curve of activity turned sharply upward. Since that time the expansion, despite temporary 
setbacks, has been satisfactory. While decline was shown from 1929 to 1933, the reaction was 
of a cyclical nature, not necessarily affecting the long term outlook. 

The index was constructed without weighting from eight prominent factors adjusted where- 
ever necessary for price changes. 

The gain in population correlates roughly with the trend of economic development. From 
1871 to 1901 the gain in population was 45-6p.c, while from 1901 to 1931 the increase was 93-2 p.c 

The Relation of Significant Factors 

The relation of statistical factors is bound to play an important part in economic interpreta- 
tion. There is presented on page 10 a chart showing the relative movements of five pairs of 
factors essential to Canadian progress. In the first section, the close correlation of industrial 
production and employment in industries other than agriculture is shown for the long cycle 
from 1921 to 1933. While the index of industrial production was below that of employment in 
1931 and 1932, the greater advance of the former during 1933 has resulted in close proximity for 
the last three years. 

The index of common stock prices was much higher than the index of industrial production 
from 1927 to 1930, but the sharper decline in common stocks placed the index of production in 
the ascendancy from the early months of 1931 to July 1933. Owing to the rapidity of the re- 
covery in common stock prices after March 1933, the two indexes have not been far apart in the 
last three years. 

Sharp fluctuations have been shown in the values of imports and exports. From 1921 to 
1928, the heavy export of grain products, especially in the latter part of each year, led to a con- 
siderable excess of exports over imports. From 1929 to 1931, the seasonal importance of the grain 
exports was not so pronounced, although a favourable balance of trade developed in the latter 
part of 1931, and has existed through the last four years. 

The course of current loans in the post-war period consists of three distinct movements. 
There was decline from 1921 to about the end of 1925, followed by a pronounced gain from that 
time to the last quarter of 1929. The decline has been rather severe in the last six years. Notice 
deposits, on the other hand, reached the highest point in 1928 and subsequently the recession was 
moderate, a considerable increase having been shown since the summer of 1934. This leaves a 
wide disparity between notice deposits and current loans, a condition which strengthens the liquid 
position of the banks. 

The relation of bank deposits and bank debits, illustrating the turnover of deposits, is re- 
garded as an excellent barometer of general business conditions. 
World Industrial Production 

The widespread nature of the economic recovery was indicated by the gains in the indexes 
of industrial production in the last twelve months. Of the eighteen principal countries considered 
in this connection only one show r ed a decline in the latest available month from the same month 
of the preceding year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

While the methods of compilation vary from country to country, the index of industrial 
production may be considered as an accurate indicator of cyclical fluctuations. The almost 
general nature of the advance .in productive operations is notable. 

The gain in the Canadian index during the twelve-month period was 8-6 per cent. The 
index of the United Kingdom moved up 7 • 3 per cent and the index for the United States compiled 
by the Federal Reserve Board recorded an increase of 8 -8 per cent. Gains from 19 to 22 per cent 
were recorded by Hungary, Belgium, Germany and Czechoslovakia. 

The indexes are expressed as a percentage of the base of 1929, and it is noteworthy that in 
seven out of the eighteen countries productive operations are now more active than in the base 
year. The marked recovery in most of the principal countries during the last twelve months is 
a constructive factor, presenting an excellent foundation for further advance. The return to 
more prosperous conditions in other countries is one of the most effective generators bearing upon 
the trend in Canada. Consequently, the reading from these indexes is unmistakably favourable. 

Short Term Interest Rates 

The low level of interest rates prevailing in principal countries during the last twelve months 
is characteristic of the present phase of the major economic cycle. The trend has been downward 
for five years, and current rates are as low in most countries as at any time since the pre-war 
period. 

Low money rates are regarded as a constructive factor in the encouragement of productive 
operations. During depression financial policy is directed toward creating conditions favourable 
to easy credit and low interest rates. Such action tends to be successful, as it is supplemented 
by normal developments. Thus the marked reduction of productive operations, and the lower 
level of prices characteristic of a period of depression, naturally lead to a decline in the use of 
liquid funds. 

Interest rates usually average lower in the early years of revival than in the last year of the 
depression, moving upward before the revival has been long in progress. The cause of this ad- 
vance in money rates is obvious, but what requires explanation is the slowness with which the 
rise begins. Bank loans are among the facilities required by nearly every business enterprise. 
The volume of loans demanded increases not with the physical but with the pecuniary volume of 
business and the latter type of expansion may be deferred by a relatively small change in commod- 
ity prices for some time after the physical volume of business has expanded. Moreover, the banks 
have reserves at this stage of the economic cycle that permit them meeting an increasing demand 
for some time without greatly altering their strong liquid position. 

Short term interest rates in London were lower in 1935 than at any time in recent years, 
three months bankers' drafts having been as low as 0-38 p.c. The highest point in the last six 
years was reached in October, 1929, when the rate was 6-13 p.c. 

Four-to-six months prime commercial paper in New York averaged • 75 p.c. in recent months, 
the highest point since July 1929 having been 6-13 p.c. prevailing in September and October of 
that year. 

The private discount rates of Germany and Italy are at moderate levels, while those of France 
advanced to 4-26 p.c. in January. 

High-grade bond yields in Canada, representing long-term interest rates, were lower recently 
than at any time in 29 years. The yield on government bonds averaged 3-39 p.c. in March 
compared with 5-05 p.c, the high point of 1929. 

Banking Operations 

The banking situation was characterized during February by further gain in notice deposits, 
security holdings and liquid assets. The seasonally adjusted index of notice deposits advanced 
from 111-8 at the end of January to 113-0 on February 29. Security holdings and liquid assets 
reached new high points in the history of Canadian banking. 

The repayment of current loans continued, the index on the base of 1926 declining from 82-4 
to 80 • 9. Demand deposits reached a lower level than at the end of January, but were still some- 
what greater than on the same date of last year. 

A favourable development was the gain in notes in the hands of the public. The sum of the 
chartered bank and Bank of Canada notes in circulation after deducting the holdings of the 
chartered banks was $171,600,000 against $165,100,000 on January 31. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, April 21, 1936. 

16703-2* 



8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly Average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 1 



Classification 



Physical Volume of Business. . . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments. . . , 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production . 
Imports of Textiles 

Raw cotton imports 

Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production 

Iron and steel imports... 

Automobile production . . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports. 

Construction 2 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 

Agricultural Factors— 
GRAIN AND LIVE STOCK 

MARKETINGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Live Stock Marketings 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
INSPECTED Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings... 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

Porx 

Mutton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar 



94-2 



65-4 

57-7 

64-8 

28-3 

121 

1-3 

3-4 

1000 

103-3 

109 1 

74 4 

241-2 

124-3 
129-2 
248 
110-7 
143-2 
199 
229-1 

89 
1270 

90-5 
150 1 
173 e 

809 
136? 



98-3 



91-8 

91-7 
104-7 

15-4 

12-6 
1-4 
6-9 

920 

88 

79-6 

72-2 
299-3 

135-5 
131-3 
344-1 
120-8 
135-8 
125-5 
226-6 
105-3 
122-5 

93-8 
170-9 
169 

89-7 
134-4 



1C3-2 

104 
147 

361 



86-3 
85-4 
97 

6 

9 

1 

11 
90 
90-3 



75-2 
2150 

129-3 

127-9 

285 

116-9 

123-2 

81-7 
229-0 
100-0 
120-5 

77-4 
169-6 
1610 

59-4 
166-7 



99-2 



106- 1 

112-3 

126-7 

150 

270 

18-3 

26-3 

78-2 

76-1 

118-6 

64-1 

169-2 

117-5 
125-2 
249-4 
101-2 
125-0 

78 
226-9 

96-1 
120-8 

91-4 
155-1 
157-2 

731 
147-2 



104.0 
135.3 
339.9 
176.0 
129-7 
139.3 
175.6 

.62.0 

53 
259 

80 
101.7 

89 

79 

56-8 

81 8 

23.1 
127.7 
134.0 

74.4 
160.6 

77.3 
104-3 
112.2 
115 2 
1091 

97.2 
100 7 
147.2 

58.9 

47.4 
150.5 

86 9 
142 

81 

53 

82 
115 



247.5 



55-4 
64-6 
32-5 
85-8 
199.4 
100.2 
122.3 
75.0 
79 
78 



164.7 

183.4 

206.1 

105 2 

18.7 

9.0 

35.8 

80.4 

77.1 

132.8 

71.1 

137.0 

130.2 

132.2 
204.9 
122.5 
114.8 

75.3 
192.7 

86.5 
116.4 

89.2 
173.9 
163.0 

64.1 
157.7 



107 9 



163-9 

181-2 

202-5 

27-3 

741 

19-5 

57-7 

86-6 

83-3 

131-4 

82-8 

110-8 

118-9 
125-7 
162-4 
110-7 
117-0 

82-4 
182-8 

95-2 
114-2 

86-8 
238-1 
174-3 

66-8 
185-1 



101-9 



114-2 
119-5 
128-0 
178-0 
39-3 
5-2 
27-3 
90-2 
92-7 
139-5 
79-0 
88-6 

110-6 

115-1 
1200 
106-9 
117-2 

85-7 
188-0 

92-8 
112-5 

84-1 
234-3 
169-7 
'74-3 
1710 



107-2 

109-5 

169-6 

472-6 

199-1 

139-1 

280-6 

199-7 

77-6 

68-3 

289-3 

94-4 

105-4 
100-5 
82-6 
67-5 
91-1 
49-4 
123-9 
144-0 
63-2 
178-9 
49-8 
92-6 
107-1 
104-6 
104-0 
121-9 
114-5 
164 -S 
58-1 
64-3 
127-7 
76-8 
150-8 
74-0 
730 
60-2 
126-9 
224-3 
50-7 
56-8 
35-7 
85-6 

198-9 

100-7 
122-8 
71-0 
85-4 
88-6 



86-1 
90-5 

148-2 
35-2 
8-6 
32-3 
88-7 
88-3 

131-8 
82-6 
93-6 



195-7 
79-0 

125-5 
91-8 

216-5 



95-7 
191-7 



110 



43-3 
36-4 
39-4 
38-9 
9-8 
10-7 
110 
74-3 
74-3 
135-3 
64 5 
80-6 

103-2 
104-1 
104-8 
102-5 
127-1 

921 
193-7 

86-7 
148-7 
1130 
149-7 
165-2 
104-3 
200-3 



1936 



106 2 

108 

160 
306 
184 
122 
125 
216 
251 
126 
104 

85 
112 

93 

58 

33 
143 

18 



340 
27-4 
29-3 
28-0 

6-5 
19 

8-7 
63-5 
58-1 
115-9 
62-9 
82-5 

108 

109 

128 

105-5 

133 

104 

207-2 

100-0 

140-6 

111-9 

123-5 

174-3 

109-6 

194-5 



39-8 
29-5 
32-7 
24-9 
2-7 
5-3 
4-3 
85-7 
93-3 
147-3 
62-3 
94-3 

133-0 

150-7 
185-4 
107-5 
143-4 
126-6 
233-1 
103-7 
123-8 
115-7 
113-9 
187-4 
119-5 
167-4 



l Consult the supplements of the Monthly Review dated Nov. 1932, May 1934 and June 1935 for description and post- 
war data 

2 Due to receipt of later information regarding wage rates, indexes of construction were revised for 1935. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Classification 



Production- 
Condensed milk output. 000 lbs 
Evaporated milk output. 000 lbs 

Creamery butter 000 lbs 

Newsprint production. .000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

B.C. timber scaled Mil. bd. ft 
Pie; iron production.. .000 1 tons 

Ferro-alloys production tons 

Steel ingots and cast- 
ings 000 1. tons 

Shipments: — 

Gold 000 

Gold bullion, n.o.p., 000 
exports. $000 

Silver 000 oz. 

Passenger automobile pro- 
duction No. 

Truck production No 

Total cars and trucks No. 

Coke production. 00^ tons 

Coal available 000 tons 

Gasoline sales 000 gal. 

Trade- 
Imports - — 

Cotton, raw 000 lbs 

Rubber, crude 000 lbs 

Wool, raw 000 lbs. 

Petroleum, crude.. 000,000 eal 

Bauxite 000 lbs 

Exports: — 

Fish 000 lbs 

Fish $000 

Cheese exports 000 lbs 

Canned salmon cwt 

Planks and boards .. .mil. ft 

Wood pulp 000 cwt 

Shirgles Bquares 

Auto complete or chassis. No 

I Copper 000 lbs 
Nickel 000 lbs 

Zinc 000 lbs 

Transportation- 
Canal Cargo Traffic: — 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 torn 

Wetland 000 tons 

St. Lawrence 000 tons 

Immigration- 
Total 

Returned Canadians from U.S. 

Labour Factors- 
Percentage unemployment in 

trade unions p.c. 

Employment. Applications. No 

Vacancies .. . No 
Placements.. No. 
Strikes and Lockouts: — 

Disputes in existence No 

Number of employees. . . . No. 
Time loss in working days 

Industrial Production! [1029 = 

100]- 

Canada 

United Kingdom: Board of 
Trade, Quarterly 

Economist 

United States 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Japan 

Austria 

Belgium 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Sweden 

Norway 

Chile 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. I Dec 



823 
4.812 
9.014 
205 68 
198 57 
78-40 
181-3 
44 73 
2.715 

57-84 

246-5 

26 

9,32; 

1,278 

18.179 
3.796 

21,975 

198 

1,536 

28.185 



11,242 
6,071 
1,135 
43-65 

21,321 

23,392 
1.754 
3.664 

29,253 

10012 
1.296 

129,143 
,355 

45.838 
9,645 

22,228 



16-7 

46,014 
24,788 
23,231 



837 
7,379 
13,329 
222-24 
237-00 
63-55 
231-4 
43-39 
5,147 

68-53 

214-2 

279 
9,739 



20, 

3,435 

24,123 

180 

1,521 
39,052 



8,836 
2,380 
1,865 
40-45 
9,211 

13,505 
1,020 
2,485 
15,802 
63-87 
769 
171,299 
6,356 
16,259 
11,895 
18,438 



830 



17-0 
52.397 
27,183 
24,641 



13 11 
3,276 2.952 
12,043 14,900 



73-2 



745 

7,913 

23,140 

242-69 

251-01 

55-21 

252-4 

45-43 

4,978 



8,985 
36.602 
232 02 
228-20 
57-77 
259-7 
44-56 
3,845 



72-81 73-45 



278-7 

97 

3,398 

831 

17,093 
3,672 

20,765 

185 

2.38: 

50,770 



6. 310 

8,801 

902 

113 13 

25,909 

19 0G1 

1,326 

1,204 

19.305 

129-52 

1,227 

135,974 

6,499 

34,597 

10,238 

26,337 



5,985 

1,122 

919 



1,030 
676 



15-9 

52 251 
30,847 
28,672 

22 

5,189 

32,357 



76- 



257-0 

190 

6,636 

1,428 

12,276 
3,469 

15.745 

186 

2,398 

59,184 



7,397 
3,215 
2.498 



834 

7,230 

37,116 

234-27 

226-45 

65-71 

211-2 

50-51 

7,269 

S6-1 



655 

6,820 

33,157 

235-57 

225-74 

75-31 

241-5 

54-41 

3,893 

82-49 



270-5 301-3 

202 142 

7,047 4,939 

1,263 2 



131-87 133-65 
15,866 26,792 



15.184 
1,578 
1,735 
9,103 

129-80 
1,209 

251.267 
4,829 

37.746 
,951 

15,201 



7,058 
1,072 



1,061 
601 



15-4 
51,129 
27,721 
25,889 

14 
4,997 
57,081 



97-8 
74-0 
66-7 
90-7 
95-3 
142-7 
730 
66 -!i 
66-8 
64-9 
1091 
101-3 
115-9 



100-4 


101-3 


72-3 


71-4 


66-7 


660 


93-4 


95-2 


97-8 


104- 1 


143-0 


143 1 


73-8 


77-1 


71-8 


72-8 


66-6 


650 


66-1 


68-2 


107-3 


109-1 


103-4 


105-5 


118-5 


119-6 



101-8 

72-3 
66-7 
92-4 
93-5 
137-2 
730 
70-0 
67-5 
68-0 



110-9 

123-8 



9.471 
3,598 
13,069 
176 
,358 
67,158 



9,913 
2,955 
1,161 



22,697 

2,096 

5,361 

27,297 

101-93 

968 

355,60; 

5,070 

33,543 

12,222 

25,358 



7,503 
1,128 
1,007 



1,050 
521 



151 

55,778 
35,1 1)8 
33,043 

25 

7,355 

67,888 



81-6 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
94-3 
850 

141-7 
79-6 
69-3 
65-9 
67-4 



86-0 
117-3 



5,524 
2,168 
7,692 

1 
2,467 
64,427 



7,027 

6,304 

1,569 

126-73 

41,897 

27,171 

2,370 

6,4 

38,476 
164-45 

1 , 073 
339,300 

5.995 
42,408 
14,102 
28,481 



7,733 
1,334 
1,024 



1,324 
523 



14-2 

60,363 
40,1 4 
37,566 

20 

7.573 
49,429 



755 

6,287 

27,598 

223-89 

225-40 

73-82 

241-4 

54-36 

4,513 

90-95 

282-3 

364 

12,694 

1,186 



1,504 

5,323 

180 

2,517 



5.267 
20,745 
266-52 
266-68 
73-58 
264-7 
45-52 
9.653 

95-02 

294 

160 
5,574 
1,483 

7,128 
1,185 
8,313 
205 
2.933 
70,585 59,638 



5,857 
3,594 
1,053 

12702 

26, 

27,770 

2,591 

15,950 

63,571 

112-41 

1,113 

319.633 

4.77 

33,924 

14,265 

19,477 



7,148 

1,180 

983 



,160 
485 



130 

,496 
38,410 
35,775 

18 

5,691 
48,351 



100-3 
117-4 



103-1 
74-8 
67-4 

1020 



141-0 
81-2 
73-2 
68-3 
72-6 



110-6 
121-5 



10,770 
1,819 
1,636 

133-73 

30. 

42,060 

2,733 

13,050 

98,585 

138-12 

1,093 

340,354 

3, 

48,089 

13,588 

30,417 



7,454 

1,151 

992 



4:9 



13-3 

65,300 
35,464 
33,737 

19 
3,566 
35,279 



773 

3 

13,479 
262-85 
285-18 

50 

239-3 

64-56 

4, 

94-07 

274 

296 
10,369 
2,120 

12.020 
1,454 

13,496 

20 

2,916 

47,022 



13,814 

9,832 

1,857 

137-40 

20,896 

53,702 

3,372 

8,654 

87,939 

121-44 

1,338 

252,451 

5,576 

26,788 

14,857 

24,236 



4,087 

1,313 

865 



347 



13-3 

65,033 
32,196 
30,835 

13 
2,133 

24,733 



502 
2,930 
10,32 
244-73 
265-2: 
3014 
182 
70-6 
4,688 

98 -8< 

285-4 

24f 

8,681 

4,048 

tl,37( 
2,40; 

13,77? 

21C 

2. 



22,1 

5,746 

1,618 

55-64 

13,421 

35,183 

1.958 

2,071 

39,526 

111-52 

1,317 

61,181 

5,51.1 

30,202 

10,498 

22,64( 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



588 
2.709 
9,388 
227-96 
181-40 
76-66 
171-9 
61-34 
4,324 

100-23 

311-1 

295 
10.327 
1,239 

11,261 
2,041 

13,302 

212 

1,794 



531 
3,064 
7,895 
221-57 
106-08 
92-08 
279-4 
55-75 
5,114 

93-29 

283-4 

74 

2,660 

1,361 

10.S53 
2,415 

13,268 

198 

1,953 



84- lj 89-1 85-4 



14-6 
51,983 
29,713 
28,144 



431 
3,152 



103-1 

79-8 
68-1 
100-7 



148-8 
83-7 
78-0 
67-3 
75-3 



110-9 

129-9 



112-2 

104-5 
82-4 
68-1 
99-7 



147-8 
88-6 
81-9 
67-7 
78-5 



106-2 
87-4 
68-8 
96-6 



89-4 

81-3 
68-6 
80-5 



115-2! 109-6 
129-2 107-8 

I 



19,940 
3, 
1,948 
61-1 

14,242 

36,147 
1,977 
10,155 
28,455 
72-24 
1,090 
206,039 
6,607 
19,182 
14,111 
18,452 



14 

61,665 
29,270 
27,716 

4 

205 

1,105 



83-4 



104-5 
83-2 
69-5 



67-5 



11,724 
4,256 
2,670 
39-65 



660 
4,470 
9,558 
243-90 
239-25 
96-25 
208-4 
55-01 
54-55 

101-09 

271-7 

40 

1,416 

1,958 

14,488 
3,486 

17,974 

202 

1,491 



13,547 18,887 



29,588 

1,806 

7,111 

34,096 

95-36 

1,019 

75,916 

4,573 

32,952 

17,088 

18,202 



13-8 
49,618 
24,983 
23,687 



2,902 

IS, 987 



82-3 



104-5 



13,558 
4,052 
3,831 
65-38 



20,654 
50,567 
142-06 

1,509 
158,862 

7,603 
35,307 
18,531 
32,184 



51,395 
24,050 
22,181 



81-7 



1 Source: Monthly Bulletin League of Nations, unless otherwise stated 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 






Tfie/Pe/a/io/ifh/p of five Pa/rscfJ/f/i/f/ctf/yf/vc/ors 

Por//ec/e course de c/r?q coop/er c/e fac/evrs j/?r//f/ca//fs 



/^6'/00 




(OOOOOO) 



/9Z4 /9?3 /9?(? /9?7 /9?0 J$?9 /930 793/ 733? 7333 7SJ4 793S 7936 




/9Z4 79 PS /9?6 79P7 79P& 79 F9 /930 7937 793? /2JJ /934 APJS Z936 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain. Thousand Bushels. 



Receipts Country 
Elevators and 
Platform 
Loadings — 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley . 

Flax 

Rye 

Visible Supply 1 — 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Exports — 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barlev 

Flax.: 

Rye 

Buckwheat 

Average Cash Price, 
dollars per bush. 

Wheat, No. 1 Nor. 

Oats, No. 2C.W.. 

Barley, No.3,C.W 

Flax, 

No. 1 N.W.C.... 

Rye, No. 1 C.W... 



1935 



Mar. April May June July 



8,427 

2,881 

440 

14 

9 

229,752 

13,576 

10.322 

413 

3.794 



214, 



3,777 

5.027 

348 

312 

39 

20 



•876 
•422 
•458 

•408 
•516 



5.626 

1,532 

329 

17 

11 

202, 120 

7.126 

6,608 

373 

3,659 

11,990 
1,593 
1,380 



•857 
•408 
•422 



1-340 
•460 



9,334 

1,510 

243 

28 

14 

197,183 

5,772 

5,268 

288 

3,432 

6,494 

1,475 

970 



252 



•817 
•397 
•391 

1-213 
•411 



13,347 

1,296 

156 

31 

9 

196,984 

5,986 

3,856 

282 

2,946 

9.158 
1,070 
1,098 



215 



Aug. 



12,494 

808 

1,123 

17 

368 

194,890 

5,750 

3,834 

197 

3,301 

21,698 
651 
721 



•845 
•363 
•338 

•237 
•365 



Sept. 



73,178 

6,211 

4,496 

109 

698 

246,109 

11,407 

8,719 

396 

3,913 

17,272 
820 
241 



52 



•902 
•360 
•357 

1-363 
•905 



Oct. 



60,000 

6,406 

2,913 

466 

538 

270,749 

13,925 

10,308 

795 

4,459 

28,919 

1,386 

159 

1 

9 

20 



•907 
•340 
•338 

1-411 

•422 



Nov. 



21,043 

2,215 

1,080 

84 

230 

265,823 

12,485 

9,054 

626 

4,585 

26,575 

2,961 

1,028 

4 

17 

127 



•857 
•318 
•332 

1-411 
•411 



Dec. 



14,217 
1.679 



1* 

260.746 

12.433 

9,179 

474 

4,688 

17,044 

1,184 

486 

7 

28 

27 



1-457 

•41(i 



1936 



Jan. 



3,203 

1,169 

430 

10 

61 

244,540 

11,672 

8,838 

452 

4,662 

7,557 

261 

81 



20 



•847 
•336 
•342 



Feb. 



2,093 

1,585 

525 

10 

54 

222,694 

10,986 

8,392 

421 

4,678 

14,241 

47.7 

155 

4 



1,596 1-590 157/2 
•425 -428 43/3 



Mar. 



7,169 

4,377 

1,581 

38 

156 

204,435 

12,504 

8,951 

435 

4,791 

13,146 
514 



82/12 
35/7 
37/6 



1 First of following month. 

2 For March and thereafter grain prices are given in cents and eighths of a cent per bushel. 



Table 4. Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Bank of Canada, 1936. 


Classification of Accounts 


Mar. 11 


Mar. 18 


Mar. 25 


Mar. 31 


April 1 


April 8 


Liabilities— 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

85,479,333 

24,628,335 


$ 
5,000,000 
173,092 
85,520,457 

21,521,811 


5,000,000 
173,092 

85,662,285 

25,432,538 


5,000,000 

173,092 

85,518,128 

21,116,157 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

85,982,923 

21,653,762 


$ 
5,000,000 


2. Rest fund 


173,092 




89,648,231 


4. Deposits— 


23,358,316 








183,635,603 
1,630,930 


188,817,898 
1,567,171 


184,907,356 
1,634,914 


188,202,917 
1,549,322 


184,174,343 
1,594,729 


182,263,015 


(d ) Other 


1,762,525 






Total 


209,894,867 


211,906,880 


211,974,808 


210,868,396 


207,422,833 


207,383,856 








1,006,610 


904,905 


1,018,685 


1,673,609 


3,482,002 


1,625,738 






Total 


301,553,903 


303,505,334 


303,828,870 


303,233,225 


302,060,850 


303,830,917 






Assets— 

1. Reserve — 


180,309,470 

1,528,640 

806,264 

8,601,573 

8,858 


180,001,683 

1,589,626 

307,725 

9,381,688 

8,367 


180,013,319 
1,589,626 
2,694,057 
8,726,645 

7,487 


180,416,732 

1,589,628 

387,214 

7,097,401 

4,643 


180,383,315 

1,627,818 

337,109 

8,476,799 

6,230 


180,298,589 




1,636,496 




930,699 




10,598,617 


Reserve in funds of other countries 
on a gold standard 


3,010 


Total 


191,254,806 


191,289,088 


193,031,134 


189,495,617 


190,831,271 


193,467,412 






273,221 


290,626 


301,892 


276,956 


278,820 


294,131 


3. Bills discounted 




4. Advances to — 

(a) Dominion Government 














(b) Provincial Governments 














(c ) Chartered Banks 














Total 




























6. Investments — 

(a) Dom. Govt, short securities 


26,124,968 


26,360,611 


26,865,092 


29,660,729 


26,901,968 


26,973,664 


(c) Other Dom Govt, securities 


82,385,161 


82,396,650 


81,852,786 


81,143,810 


81,143,810 


80,931,628 


(e) U.K., other British Dominions 
or U.S.A. securities more than 
three months 














Total 


108,510,129 


108,757,261 


108,717,878 


110,804,539 


108,045,778 


107,905,292 




119,171 
1,396,576 


119,455 
3,048,905 


119,474 
1,658,492 


119,474 
2,536,640 


119,474 

2,785,508 


119,477 


8. All Other Assets 


2,044,605 


Total 


301,553,903 


303,505,334 


303,828,870 


303,233,225 


302,060,850 


303,830,917 


Ratio of Net Reserve (Item 1 of Assets less 
Item 5 of Liabilities) to Notes and 
Liabilities 


p.c. 
64-75 


p.c. 
64-31 


p.c. 
64-85 


p.c. 
63-93 


p.c. 
65 04 


p.c. 
65 13 



12 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



19.13 

October 

November. 
December. . 

1934 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July........ 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1935 
January . . . 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December , 

1936 

January 

February . . 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Bushels 

7.345.792 
8.158.446 
4,327,524 

4.676,474 
4.887.102 
4.740.844 
4.866.537 
5,258.707 
5.066.622 
4.815.792 
5,749.909 
6,202.164 
7.426,566 
7,659,805 
4.360,88? 

4,622,088 
4,220,917 
4,675.022 
4,313,600 
5,188,296 
4,431.823 
460.608 
5,230,795 
6,932,568 
8,261,087 
7.262,558 
4,358.625 



Oats 



Bushels 

1.153,701 

1,262,294 

631.497 

844.482 

786, 180 

694,721 

681.909 

578.306 

713.298 

782.307 

783. 208 

1.024.845 

1.260,471 

1,162.272 

715,529 

754,909 

744,621 

618.42? 

621,952 

699,498 

823,174 

656 006 

733,282 

1,151,068 

1,543,665 

i.513, 259 

1,026,706 



Corn 



Bushels 

153,862 
168.662 
124,216 

143,794 
157,303 
156,800 
152,057 
144,344 
189,875 
225.727 
235.382 
156 337 
152.965 
149.553 
111.141 

120.984 
172,875 
1 6.872 
148,932 
241.095 
204,197 
235.119 
229,976 
218,914 
218,229 
166,813 
174,963 



4,460,277 924,352 175,800 104,313 1,837.890 
4,614,569 933,981 214,960 87,505 1,668,912 



Barley 



Bushels 

74,011 
81,383 
59.925 

78,195 
99,837 
80,562 
62,432 
47,978 
43,865 
47.291 
51.325 
71113 
75.673 
60,079 
62,243 

73,467 

74,196 
55.325 
57, 588 
44,710 
42,455 
47.758 
59,523 
68,880 
99,278 
128.150 
98,350 



Mixed 
grain 



Bushels 

1,353,384 
1,588,189 
1.501.845 



.259.377 
,379,894 
.154.072 
,092,036 
726.298 
552,371 
490.552 
713. 43S 
.035 672 
.330,138 
,473,878 
,636,179 

,512,919 
,937,664 
.355,148 
,401,247 
,056,167 
793.098 
736.232 
913.719 
,134,815 
,627,948 
,778,718 
,969,230 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



62-2 
68-8 
37-7 



39 

47 

42 

47 

47 

47 

45 

63-3 

61-7 

66-8 

68-7 

41-2 

42-4 
41-7 
43-5 
41 2 
48-4 
44-7 
41-9 
48-9 
68-3 
75-0 
68-3 
41-6 

40-8 
44-5 



Quan- 
tity 



Barrels 

1,650,557 

1,827,340 

967.284 



,042.505 
,102,043 
.064.428 
.088,785 
,175,433 
.127.477 
.072,747 
,282,214 
,383,205 
,654,189 
,703,831 
969,482 

,024,958 
941,417 
,046,087 
965,765 
,164,322 
991,559 
992.340 
,161,389 
,535.189 
.824,754 
,603,803 
957,219 



981,988 
1,019,017 



Oatmeal 



Pounds 

751,566 
927,171 
441.557 



803, 
558 
569, 
629 
614 
319, 
553 
416 
717 
1.065 
1.119 
458, 



649,896 
636,312 
533,046 
531,438 
816,112 
871,222 
491.472 
493,528 
902,388 
700,720 
549.038 
692,986 



Rolled 
oats 



Pounds 

15,676,287 
16,416.025 
7.468.493 



,261,459 
,338,950 
,866,835 
.397,869 
,132,154 
,556,820 
.292,971 
,644,925 
,521,725 
,697,250 
,345,997 
,587.664 

8,379,451 
8,739,753 
6,424,542 
6,513,572 
7,538,950 
9.223,425 
7.650,617 
7,977,920 
13,911,445 
19,488,481 
17.448,402 
11,375,644:1 



Corn 

flour and 
meal 



Pounds 

2,153,041 
2,109,060 
1,347.928 



428,968 
447,127 
881,990 
141,966 
398.166 
726,506 
748.106 
215,458 
894,880 
725,600 
570,810 
036,210 

894,306 
491,528 
560,504 
448,836 
013,518 
914,815 
182,370 
321,082 
312.180 
842,570 
944.746 
543,590 



652,865 9,098.636 1,772.118 314.311 
495,282 10,642,54411,607,494 340,102 



Wheat 

flour 
exported 



Barrels 



Table 6. Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 



4-week period 



Raw Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



Re- 
ceipts 



Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 



Refined Sugar 



Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 



Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 



Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 



Total 
manu- 
factured 



Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 



Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 



Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 



1933 

October 7 

November 4 

December 2 

December 30 

1934 

January 27 

February 24 

March 24 

April 21 

May 19 

June 16 

July 14 

August 11 

September 8 

October 6 

November 3 

December 1 

December 31 

1935 

January 26 

February 23 

March 23 

April 20 

May 18 

June 15 

July 13 

August 10 

September 7 

October 5 

November 2 

November 30 

December 31 

1936 

January 25. 

February 22 

March 21. 



102,398 
132,530 
130,616 
91,959 

84,383 

82,635 
103,160 

91,390 
101,951 
124,747 
131,708 
121,490 
105.652 
103.510 

84.266 
102,119 
126,718 

132,212 
119,318 
141,712 
150,238 
117,702 
145,413 
115,797 
146.970 
113,989 
102,057 
97,747 
85,022 
86,410 

79,673 
89,098 
91,174 



106,990 
63,618 
55,801 
26,830 

14, 
40,595 
10.714 
57.294 
65,605 
97,455 
72,327 
84.535 
88.921 
68.649 
106.111 
83.713 
53.971 

4.240 
43,027 
35,548 
19,998 

107, 883 
63,993 

122,344 
66.816 
62,292 
69,367 
73,374 
98.491 
56,903 

30,480 
22,511 
45,709 



76,858 
65,532 
94,458 
34,406 

16,621 
20,070 
22.484 
46,733 
42,809 
90,495 
82.544 
100,373 
91.064 
87. 893 
88.258 
59,114 
48.476 

17.134 
20,633 
27.020 
52,534 
80,171 
93,608 
91,171 
99,798 
74.223 
73,677 
86,100 
97.102 
63,640 

21,055 
20,435 
22,936 



95,104 

94,814 

140,58 

207,044 

214,486 
189,945 
161.406 
135,848 
135,013 
114,921 
113,663 
102.391 
109.420 
99,569 
87.142 
134.432 
173,898 

173.253 
156,031 
129,023 
105,374 

94,349 
103,253 
122,289 
116,100 
117.050 
103.912 

66.987 
108,403 
157,222 

189,289 
174,659 



75,909 
105,177 
126,13 

50,117 

20.545 
17,269 
18,407 
35,730 
34,371 
70,923 
72.892 
85,557 
78,190 
76.926 
109.378 
94.646 
47,231 

25,546 
22,631 
21,094 
42,156 
68.455 
77,490 
78,064 
85,009 
65,085 
63,827 
116,294 
122.616 
77,429 

21.410 
17.753 
19,320 



11.708 
7,356 

12,864 
6,852 

2,112 
2,575 
2,953 
7,575 
7,260 
13,142 
10,652 
9,484 
10.489 
10,008 
17.044 
10,660 
8,646 

4,255 

3,048 

3,321 

7,457 

9,065 

9.874 

11,012 

10.065 

6,098 

10,230 

13,531 

14.823 

11,251 

2,635 
3,017 
3,011 



87,617 
112.533 
139.001 



22.657 
19.845 
21,360 
43.305 
41.631 
84,064 
83,544 
95.042 
88.679 
86.934 
126,422 
105,306 
55.877 

29,801 
25,679 
24.415 
49,613 
77.520 
87.364 
89,976 
95,074 
71,183 
74,056 
129.825 
137.440 
88.680 

24,045 
20,770 
22,331 



83,186 
63,462 
70.342 
48,728 

46,593 
47,686 
46.246 
43,000 
60,349 
84,018 
93,754 
86,828 
95.281 
97,025 
78,247 
64,997 
56. 114 

46,756 
52,531 
47,758 
60,443 
68,377 
67,676 
95,670 
93.131 
81,727 
109,879 
87,194 
87.756 
56,397 

38,559 
48,695 
56,130 



78,669 
59,040 
62,004 
43,021 

41,336 
42,370 
40,730 
37,980 
54,434 
76.550 
86.799 
81,038 
88,784 
86,729 
68,057 
55.572 
48.674 

41.561 
45,916 
41,097 
52,772 
60,511 
60,817 
88.151 
87.671 
76,010 
99.353 
77.298 
73.417 
48,459 

33.585 
42,003 
48,595 



9,237 
7,720 
10,541 
6,505 

5.862 
6.014 
6.188 
6.164 
7.407 
8,822 
8,018 
6,977 
9.749 

12,634 

11, 

10.273 
7.847 

5,462 
6,81< 
7,036 
7.8(57 
8,106 
7,515 
8,014 
6.454 
8.313 
11,641 
11.112 
15.204 
8,154 

5,090 
6.890 
7,651 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 7. — Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption 



13 



Year and Month 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Cigarettes 



Tobacco, 

Snuff 



Cigars 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. 



January 

February.., 

March 

April , 

May 

! June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December.. 



January 

February.., 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December.. 



1933 



1934 



1935 



January . . 
February. 
March 



1936 



Pound 

1,823,454 

1,329,411 

1,473,910 

1,561,675 

1,223,930 



1,156,731 
1,380,982 
1,529,343 
1,456,045 
1.731,922 
1,585,094 
1,495,730 
1,590,786 
1.514,766 
1.702.791 
1,533,982 
1,321.349 



1,324,374 
1,333,114 
1,396.416 
1,438,868 
1,647,792 
1,675,696 
1,644,869 
1,671,995 
1,557,787 
1,586,753 
1,694,618 
1,301,415 

1,326,050 
1,446,655 
1,511,704 



Pound 
397,770 
357,519 
350,617 
364.839 
290,671 



321.339 
306,407 
326,628 
353,109 
415,972 
381,019 
367,317 
380.339 
329.761 
370,555 
338,851 
284,916 



306,664 
285,667 
303,003 
336,628 
351,975 
338,704 
366,413 
323,818 
317,774 
356,978 
299,100 
300,057 

304,983 
250,528 
291,352 



Number 
410.553.620 
401,231.720 
379.614,915 
374.490.820 
355,920,395 



267.435.575 
312,784,585 
325,042,310 
348,658,920 
431.667.650 
468.990.240 
472,025.100 
509.045.040 
429,906.595 
448,758.930 
435,078,600 
373.011,520 



360.016,140 
337,960,370 
342.829.010 
367,428,910 
478,376.670 
479,028.135 
515,995,050 
517.502,390 
486,470.185 
463,276,145 
495,019,898 
461,468,601 

316,533,632 
357,942,801 
371,089,599 



Pound 
72,727 
74,667 
67,643 
68.499 
55,299 



64,245 
55,248 
56,870 
57.078 
74,322 
69,113 
65,246 
74,667 
67,601 
71,610 
67,503 
58,790 



66,773 
56,605 
58,274 
59.742 
67,429 
63,892 
63,881 
71,645 
68,061 
73,172 
67,131 
56, 608 

66,328 
58,044 
54,187 



Number 
11.879,869 
11,506.697 
14,202,255 
13,935.402 
8,721,959 



5,069.775 
4,448,840 
6,711,960 
8,744,376 
10,325,277 
11,510.509 
10.773,621 
12,349.405 
9.890.762 
14,358.520 
15.480.850 
10.014,125 



6,789,935 
6.901.967 
8.378.494 
9.385,800 
11,030.725 
11,098,617 
11,751.025 
11,424,735 
11,504,975 
13,276,725 
13,492,260 
10,389,598 

4,953,520 
7,394,735 

8,868,155 



Pound 
990.819 
880,042 
838,879 
893,716 
635,474 



630.982 
621.222 
716,938 
731,018 
869,923 
868,269 
776,670 
817,495 
774,128 
783,839 
744,894 
538,257 



632,502 
545,650 
544.890 
649,987 
684.557 
669,217 
685,684 
660,925 
610,444 
535,016 
544,321 
521,489 

304,722 
436, 195 
406,822 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes in Pairs. 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welts 



McKays 

and 

all 

mitation 

welts 



Nailed, 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



Stitch- 
downs 



Total 



Total footwear 



Men's 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



Women's 



Misses 
and 

childrens 



Babies' 

and 
infants' 



Total 



1933 

July 

August 

September... 

October 

November.. 
December... 

1934 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
December... 

1935 

January 

February.... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1936 

January 

February 

16703-3 



368,581 
363.232 
311,182 
257.370 
200.583 
147,622 

172.192 
216.094 
283,532 
263.511 
281.021 
239.527 
243.867 
323.442 
278,570 
242,808 
212.427 
238,238 

272,610 
288,265 
343,710 
346.346 
333,834 
301,746 
335,872 
401,446 
350,264 
331,647 
293,146 
287.180 

338.803 
350,494 



861,664 
1.007,916 
942.552 
712,195 
470.711 
329.554 

451,121 
685.693 
907,542 
890.772 
1.022,979 
903,804 
595,268 
980,677 
796.344 
707,633 
416.798 
416,502 

632,884 

821.770 

1,013,566 

1,049.365 

1,041,300 

826,313 

709.529 

1,007,599 

882,828 

677.857 

509,734 

534,393 

669,563 
898,858 



199,168 
260,289 
227,428 
159,127 
117,437 
88,699 

100,757 
122,254 
116.220 

97.129 
137,581 
135.140 
101.228 
146.229 
164.952 
163.530 
107.421 

90,887 

126.909 
153,222 
171,798 
159. 769 
148,123 
141,613 
159,274 
193.793 
165,558 
170,650 
122.546 
102,887 



155.110 



264,433 
210.696 
182.023 
202.590 
195,675 
141,100 

178,045 
201.233 
257.724 
266,910 
292,018 
280.461 
165,815 
161.403 
169.725 
205,207 
166.578 
127,350 

186,101 
207.598 
253,267 
304,889 
316.095 
295,873 
224.426 
157,390 
149,349 
185,925 
184.940 
176,866 



1.746.992 
1,919.069 
1,729,685 
1.388.574 
1.020.654 
731.474 

934,606 
,257,824 
.607,076 
,569,912 
.778.700 
,608,131 
.152,142 
.672,013 
.460.998 
,420.320 
964.078 
911,919 



,254.078 
.520.012 
.844.805 
,912,398 
.899.077 
,619.932 
.488,628 
.826.595 
,604,476 
.447,039 
,168,136 
.154,631 



237,601 1,430,971 
283,918 1,730,870 



634,980 
659.556 
583.038 
484.141 
391.663 
299.534 

294,330 
367,456 
433.720 
414,050 
497.158 
509.337 
423.022 
541,093 
487,584 
503.290 
405.870 
425,074 

413.686 
465.240 
567.637 
588.324 
577.122 
527,336 
568.016 
619.319 
579,213 
552.372 
501.224 
504,713 



544,063 



101,253 
133,747 
138,087 
146.894 
112.024 
59,553 

42,529 
79,586 
75,023 
80,184 
102,058 
85,297 
53.584 
98,513 
111.681 
131,669 
88.522 
67,190 

55.159 
75,213 
98.521 
119.623 
120.009 
104,186 
95,099 
123.479 
115.297 
131,243 
105,951 
80,337 

94,367 
92,338 



909.760 
1.085.425 
1,003,719 
870.948 
572.204 
403.164 

467.609 
637,047 
846.800 
814,106 
929,823 
845,128 
648.401 
980,634 
832.734 
801.952 
536,304 
488, 128 

619.293 
759.011 
946,195 
925,026 
984,808 
797,640 
754.084 
1.093,443 
992,901 
863,081 
758.389 
741,227 

639,393 
892,693 



232.910 
263,552 
218.096 
232,164 
203,292 
132.344 

160,666 
160,198 
232.597 
271,414 
268,661 
204,527 
154.707 
177.839 
189,107 
259,002 
220.878 
143.954 

186.011 
206.465 
243,249 
256.370 
269.737 
250,740 
228,332 
236,522 
218,887 
273,186 
268.495 
165,889 

225,124 
235,172 



95,964 
95,299 
92,585 
99.624 
92.070 
50,221 

65.533 
79,761 
98,095 
72,736 
89.296 
82,240 
54,093 
79.582 
83.571 
86,259 
64.544 
45.664 

55,731 
74,112 
83,198 
77,121 
81,075 
76,402 
82.661 
81,192 
76,153 
91,831 
72,090 
73,820 



1.974.867 
2,237,179 
2.035,525 
1.833.771 
1,371,253 
944.816 



030,906 
326,216 
686,235 
652,490 
884,996 
726,525 
333,807 
877,661 
704,677 
782,172 
316.118 
170,010 



580,041 
938,800 
026.464 
032.751 
756,304 
728,192 
153,955 
982.451 
911,713 
706, 149 
565,986 



68,687 1,513,959 
70,974 1,835,240 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 



Sales on Stock Yds: 

{Current monOt 
prelim.) 

Cattle 

Calves 

Flogs 

Sheep 

Inspected Slaugh- 
terings: 

Cattle 

Calves 

Sheep 

Lambs 

Swine 

Av. Retail Prices. In 
cents, of Food in 
Canada: 
Beef, ch«ck... lb. 

Veal, roast " 

Mutton, roast. " 

Pork, fresh " 

Bacon, break- 
fast " 

Lard, pure " 

Eggs, fresh doz. 

Milk qt. 

Butter, cream- 
ery lb. 

Cheese " 

Bread " 

Flour " 

Rolled oats... " 

Rice " 

Beans " 

Apples, evap. . " 

Prunes " 

Sugar, gran ... " 

Tea " 

Coffee " 

Potatoes peck 



1935 



53,440 
28,536 
65,177 
15.312 



56.234 
49,246 
3.474 
36,458 
242,820 



11-6 

12 9 
20-9 
20- 

31-5 
15 1 
31-4 
10 5 

29-6 



5 2 
80 
51 
14 9 
12 5 
6-4 
52 3 
381 
16-8 



64,114 
41.444 
81.331 
23,060 



57,189 
72,252 
42,006 
1.302 
255,666 



12-6 
12 7 
21 5 

20 

31-2 
15-2 

24-3 
10-5 

28-1 
20 
5-7 
3 3 
5-2 
7-8 
5-2 
15-3 
12 3 
6-4 
51-8 
37-7 
16-9 



56,948 
40.880 
68,159 
13,572 



63,713 

76,381 

30,630 

7.080 

244,893 



13-4 

12-6 
21-6 

20-4 

30-3 
15 2 
22 
10-5 



20-2 
5-6 
3-4 
•2 



5 

7-8 

5-2 
15-6 
12-3 

6-4 
52-2 
37-3 
16-6 



44 , 195 
39.968 
57.513 
27.163 



52,063 
65,056 
13.911 

40.097 
194,613 



140 
12 7 
21-5 
21-3 



30-1 

15-3 
22-6 
10 5 



26-3 

20-0 

5-7 

3-4 

5 3 

7-9 

5-3 

15-9 

12 4 

6-5 

520 

37-6 

16-7 



58,158 
41,840 
60,430 
43,217 



56,047 
57,360 
8,292 
65,176 
191,088 



140 
12-8 
21-4 

22-4 

301 
15-5 

24-7 
10-3 

24-8 
19-9 
5-7 
3-3 
5-2 
7-8 
5-4 
160 
12-3 
6-4 
51-8 
371 
16-3 



Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


74,229 


101,949 


122,298 


94,010 


33,859 


41.602 


43,075 


35,009 


49,536 


50.115 


74,847 


68,228 


49,524 


62.488 


95.248 


49,626 


66.679 


72,313 


92,844 


88,942 


47,505 


46,007 


49,115 


39,515 


6.799 


8,276 


13.213 


12,943 


90,391 


96.807 


157,324 


95,532 


175,542 


176.78o 


262.599 


256,361 


13 2 


12-8 


12-7 


12-3 


12 7 


12-9 


13-4 


13-4 


21 1 


20-9 


20-3 


19-9 


22 6 


231 


22-7 


21 9 


30 5 


31-6 


31-6 


31-2 


15 9 


17-2 


18-1 


18-3 


27-7 


31-2 


35-8 


41-5 


10 3 


10-4 


10-6 


10-6 


250 


25-4 


27-1 


28-6 


19-7 


19-6 


19-9 


20-5 


5-7 


5-6 


5-7 


5-7 


3-3 


3-2 


3-3 


3-5 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-2 


7 8 


7-9 


7-9 


7-8 


5-3 


5-2 


5-3 


5-3 


161 


15-7 


15-4 


15 4 


12-3 


121 


12-0 


11-6 


6-4 


6-4 


6-3 


6-2 


51-5 


52-4 


51-8 


52 3 


37-5 


371 


371 


36 6 


27-5 


20-4 


22-1 


220 



59,926 
20,991 
80,835 
28,771 



62,570 

26,325 

8,084 

45,744 

268,824 



12-1 
13-4 
20-2 
20-8 

29-9 
18-3 
43-4 
10-6 

30-3 
20-5 

5 

3 

5 

7 

5 
15 
11-3 

6-2 
51-G 
36-7 
23- 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



64,496 
19,133 
78.446 
16,833 



69,810 
27,060 
9,365 
39,069 

275,775 



12-6 
141 
21-6 
211 

29-3 
17-9 
41-5 
10-7 

30-6 

20-6 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-8 

5-4 

15-4 

11-4 

6-2 

52-2 

36-6 

24-2 



60.436 
19,844 
74,918 
13,502 



62,097 

29,099 

9,845 

33,553 

245,049 



12-9 
14-7 
22-0 
21-3 

29-1 
17-2 
33-8 
10-7 

30-1 

20-5 

5-8 

3-4 

5-2 

7-9 

5-4 

160 

11-2 

6-2 

51-9 

36-3 

25-4 



61,836 
30.051 
74.580 
12,704 



61,927 
48,588 
5,451 
37,112 
262,531 



12 9 
15-2 

22-3 
21-1 

29-0 
16-6 
38-1 
10-7 



20-6 
5-8 
34 
5-1 
7-8 
5-4 
15-8 
10-9 
6-2 
51-9 
36-2 
26-2 



Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or doz.) 
Butter— 

Creamery 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


19 
Feb. 


36 
Mar. 


April 


7.103 

260 

7.363 

13.024 

320 

578 

1,149 

14,931 
3,511 
18.191 
36.636 
3,566 

9,170 

5.172 

396 

148 

14.885 

712 

403 

1,115 

4.277 

202 

4.479 

7.589 

8 6ff6 
3.436 

900 


3,466 

202 
3.668 
10,909 

2,238 

655 

1.625 

13,661 

2,915 

14,919 

31,495 

2,671 

6.722 

5.240 

518 

259 

12.739 

78' 

864 

1,644 

3.103 

203 

3.306 

5,542 

6,807 
3,684 

1,750 


5,785 

153 

5,938 

11,685 

6,237 

588 

2,785 

16,188 
3,27e 
16,449 
35,912 
3,688 

5,631 

5.120 

349 

214 

11,314 

1,039 

594 

1,633 

1,539 

208 

1.746 

4,275 

7,666 
2,649 

2.150 


22,344 

285 

22,629 

18,836 

7,858 

614 

3,733 

13.501 

2,691 

15,949 

32.141 

3,400 

4.200 

4,466 

290 

200 

9,174 

1.294 

550 

1,844 

705 

332 

1,037 

3,538 

9,826 
3,347 

3,833 


40.129 

540 

40.669 

29,410 

9,797 

355 

4,216 

9,657 
2,586 
14,571 
26,813 
3,699 

3,331 

4,975 

298 

207 

8,811 

1,467 

716 

2,183 

569 

332 

901 

2,901 

16,301 
4,908 


51.271 

868 

52,139 

34,626 

10.076 

427 

4.221 

6.812 
2,105 
12,964 
21.881 
3.198 

3,968 

5.097 

253 

237 

9.555 

1.604 

483 

2,087 

546 

279 

825 

2,213 

20.162 
5.356 


54,820 

362 

55,182 

29,431 

9,430 

542 

3.946 

5.181 
1.820 
13.027 
20.028 
3,008 

5.700 

6.137 

100 

255 

12.282 

1,992 

562 

2,553 

1.081 

449 

1,530 

1,983 

21.312 
4.717 

3.950 


47,474 

367 

47,841 

28,237 

6,458 

243 

3.3S3 

5,334 
3,159 
14,575 
23,069 
2,435 

11.611 

7,544 

180 

214 

19,549 

2.358 
1.033 
3,391 

3,890 

620 

4,510 

2,630 

25,913 
5,585 

5,870 


39,236 

437 

39.673 

25.052 

3,404 

285 

2,994 

7,708 
3,149 
15,168 
26.026 
2,598 

17,377 

6,986 

264 

203 

24,829 

3,123 

489 

3,612 

5,633 

249 

5.881 

5,941 

23,580 
5.516 


31,751 

219 

31,970 

23,472 

1,252 

316 

2,543 

12,576 
2.740 
15,120 
30,436 
3,387 

16,719 

4,658 

283 

272 

21,933 

2,615 
244 

2,858 

5,314 

263 

5,577 

12,036 

16.369 

4.826 


24,251 

121 

24,372 

21,957 

526 

424 

2,093 

13,430 
3,409 
15,973 
32,813 
3,609 

13,32f 

6,272 

371 

265 
20,237 

1,851 

329 

2,180 

4,507 

268 

4,775 

11,095 

16,679 
3,869 

1,876 


16,190 

92 

16.282 

19,038 

6 

87 
1,641 

14,921 

3,414 

17,326 

35,660 

2,792 

9,963 

6.226 

444 

277 

16,910 

1,127 

498 

1,626 

3,379 

241 

3,621 

9,973 

12.780 
3.154 

1.262 


8.512J 
53 


Totals 


8.564 
16.640 2 

63 


Eggs— 


Fresh 


320 




1,234 


Pork— 


15 198 




3 544 




17,892 

36,634 

2,913 

10 119 


Totals 




Beef— 




5,704 
396 


Cured 




352 


Totals 

Veal- 


16,571 
921 




558 




1,478 

2,604 
218 


Mutton and Lamb — 






2.822 


Poultry 

Fish— 
Fresh frozen 


8,708 

11,024 
3,325 

3.045 


Fresh frozen during preced- 
ing month 


8.499 


5,448 


2,672 


1,627 



1 This figure includes approximately 200,000 pounds of butter reported by creameries added to the list in the provinces 
of Quebec and Ontario since June 1, 1935. 

? This figure includes approximately 180,000 pounds of cheese reported by firms added to the list since January 1, 1936. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



15 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations and Railway Operating Statistics 



OUTPUT OF CENTRAL 
ELECTRIC STATIONS 
000 KILOWATT HOURS 

Monthly Data 
Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel — 

Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

Provincial Consumption- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Qntario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Total 

Deliveries to Boilers — 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 

Total 

Daily Average 
Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel — 

Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Eiports 

RAILWAYS 

Car loadings 000 cars 

Operating Revenues — 
Canadian National .... 1000 
Canadian Pacific $000 



Canadian National- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried 

one mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll . .$000 

Number of employees.. 000 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried . 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll $000 

Number of employees. .000 
All Railways- 
Operating Revenues... $000 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No of tons carried. 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll 1000 

Num ber of employees. . 000 

'Deficit. 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Dec 



1912931 
30,624 
1943555 

43.416 
1032363 
578,285 
125,713 
133,154 

16.633 
13,991 
103,956 

55,561 
808,771 
699,713 
143,840 
131,713 
1839598 

181 
315,157 
122,117 
30,121 
477 
518,053 



61,707 

988 
62,695 

1,401 
33,302 
18.654 
4,055 
4,295 



452 
3,353 



186-68 



11,477 
9,463 



1854252 

26,777 
1881029 

53,065 
1028940 
533,740 
118,689 
119,818 

12,755 
14,022 
97,475 

65,564 
805,219 
661,467 
133,026 
118,278 
1783554 

3,775 

372,817 
114,637 
24,184 
365 
515,778 



61,808 

893 

62,701 

1,769 
34,298 
17,791 
3,956 
3,994 

425 

468 
3,249 



184-61 



11,566 
9.957 



1896121 
26,950 
1923071 

57,830 
1061757 
535,894 
113,655 
126,985 

13, 143 
13,807 
94,256 

70,173 
835,323 
669,512 
128,295 
125.513 
1828816 

5,867 

383,242 

117,388 

16,934 

493 

523,922 



61,165 

869 

62,034 

1,866 
34,250 
17,287 
3,666 
4,096 

424 

445 

3,041 



188-35 



11,696 

9,886 



1788045 
28,205 
1816250 

57,871 
982,233 
530,315 

97,157 
120,469 

12,863 
15,342 
107,994 

71,982 
772,604 
633,155 
111,311 
119,224 
1708256 

6,180 

339,864 

110,351 

5,879 

324 



59.601 

941 

60,542 

1,929 
32,741 
17,677 
3,239 
4,015 

429 

512 
3,600 



185-88 



11,273 
10,162 



1762747 
28,790 
1791543 

56,504 
979,105 
499,736 
102,789 
124,553 

12,936 
15,860 
93,348 

70,773 
765,661 
621,431 
117,108 
123,222 
1698195 

5,642 

310,078 

96,637 

14,645 

326 

427,328 



56,863 

928 

57,792 

1,825 
31,584 
16,121 
3,316 
4.018 

417 

511 

3,011 



194-98 



12,527 
11,119 



30,261 
1851153 

49.761 
1003785 
529,590 
107,891 
129,865 

14.154 

16,107 

130,305 

64,160 
766,772 
637,955 
123,618 
128,343 
1720848 

1,892 

304,742 

96,263 

10,903 

338 

414,138 



58,738 

976 

59,714 

1,605 
32,380 
17,084 
3,480 
4,189 

457 

519 

4,203 



196-92 



12,006 
10.924 



1888013 
31,201 
1919214 

44,442 
1045369 
546,865 
124,220 
127,117 

14,849 
16,352 
142,177 

59,125 
801,002 
650,675 
140,719 
125,516 
1777037 

1,419 

337,569 

99,256 

21,149 

331 

459,724 



62,934 

1,040 

63,974 

1,481 
34,846 
18,229 
4,141 
4,237 

495 
545 

4,739 



220-58 



13,616 
13,296 



2122992 
39,577 
2162569 

46,811 
1176353 
826,559 
137,698 
135,571 

21,149 
18,428 
146,530 

63,761 
940,676 
717,072 
160,457 
134,073 
2016039 

445 
445,043 
123,501 
30,716 
438 
600,143 



68,484 

1,277 

69,761 

1,510 

37,947 
20,212 
4,442 
4,373 

682 

595 

4,727 



251-08 



15,124 
14,115 



2217404 
39,121 
2156525 

44,149 
1100864 
681,644 
156,681 
134,066 

21,452 
17,669 
112,838 

60,536 
925,472 
745,410 
179,643 
132,627 
2043688 

1,036 

449,528 
132,113 
49,549 
364 
632,590 



68,303 

1,262 

69,565 

1,424 
35,512 
21,988 
5,054 
4,325 



570 
3,640 



173-53 



12,305 
11,581 



1936 



Jan. 



2051660 
39,381 
2091041 

38,572 
1045702 
675,429 
159,899 
132,058 

21,051 
18,330 
118,050 

55,234 
865,741 
738,665 
182,485 
130,865 
1972990 



380,023 
128,894 
51,586 
345 
560,848 



66.182 

1,270 

67,452 

1,244 

33,732 

21,788 

5,158 

4,260 



172-90 



10,153 

9,323 



Feb. Mar 



37,729 
1937550 

34,049 
984,744 
612,932 
151,637 
116,459 

19,713 
18,016 
110,684 

49,622 
795,547 
692,905 
172,983 
115,808 
1826865 



355,538 
123,733 
50,226 
486 
529,983 



65,511 

1,301 

66,812 

1,174 

33,957 

21,135 

5,229 

4,016 



621 
3,817 



180-23 



10,618 
9,280 



2101192 
34,268 
2135460 

47,439 
1101617 
667,679 
149,202 
135,255 

18,879 
15,389 
125,922 

60,954 
907,738 
737,446 
169,628 
133,772 
2009538 

6,781 
442,094 
130,016 
45,909 
472 
625,272 



67,780 
1,106 



1,530 

35,536 

21,538 

4,813 

4,363 

609 

497 

4,062 



192-12 



11,847 
10,678 



Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


10.440 

4341 

2,333 


10,828 

385 

2,424 


10,452 

823 

2,252 


11,433 

16 

2,290 


12,163 
1.168 1 
2,227 


11,676 

503 

2,400 


11,596 

91 

2,279 


12,018 
2,823 
3,382 


10,958 
1,406 
2,767 


10,866 
1,226 
2,340 


11,280 
1,523' 
2,275 


11,285 
1,077' 
2,394 


823 

849 


894 
960 


860 
863 


794 
642 


873 
657 


1,002 
792 


823 
834 


1,386 
558 


1,068 
669 


925 

881 


815 
926 


846 
992 


49 

6,754 

62 


60 

7,022 

65 


60 

6,716 

59 


61 

7,493 

64 


59 

7,459 
67 


74 

7,944 

69 


81 

7,970 

70 


50 

8,091 

70 


44 

7,514 

65 


64 

7,370 

63 


53 

7,663 

68 


52 

7,694 

75 


7,436 

850 

1,908 


8,119 
1,047 
1,986 


8,223 
1,413 
1,958 


8,419 
1,144 
1,966 


8,434 
1,404 
1,897 


9,254 
1,526 
2,036 


10,097 

508 

2,025 


9,621 
4,249 
3,258 


8,074 
3,455 
2,554 


7,948 
3,306 
2,057 


8,355 

613 

1,956 


8,054 

867 

2,051 


680 
682 


759 

817 


743 
624 


746 
522 


822 
554 


888 
654 


799 

683 


1,351 
454 


993 

487 


814 
672 


759 
719 


773 
779 


45 

4,900 

45 


62 

5,058 

44 


53 

5,047 

45 


54 

5,527 

49 


62 

5,423 

49 


70 

5,808 
50 


87 

5,884 

51 


47 

5,737 

48 


47 

5,278 

44 


62 

5,039 

43 


51 
5,474 

46 


53 

5,563 

49 


21,579 

19,676 

937 

5,765 


23,847 
20,865 
2,114 
5,836 


24,482 

20,563 

2,990 

5,725 


24,529 

21,839 

1,781 

5,822 


24,049 

22,455 

691 

5,796 


26,187 

22,754 

2,442 

5,975 


25,520 

23,435 

1.134 

5,703 


32,279 

23,598 

7,730 

8,349 


27,154 

20,854 

5,290 

6.876 


26,656 
21,333 

4,289 
5,876 


22,234 

21,440 

205' 

5,740 




1,685 
1.696 


1,858 
1,959 


1,797 
1,674 


1,720 
1,332 


1.860 
1,396 


2,341 
1,644 


2,101 
1,741 


2,937 
1,150 


2,240 
1,295 


1,934 
1,732 


1,763 
1,824 




105 

12,441 

113 


133 

12,928 
116 


125 

12.590 
111 


124 

13,900 

120 


134 

13,749 

123 


157 

14,682 

127 


185 

14,781 

129 


119 

4,751 

124 


101 

13,655 

116 


140 

13,262 

113 


117 

14,037 

121 





MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



17 



Commodities 



Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products — 

Wheat 

Corn 

Oats 

Barley 

Rye 

Flaxseed 

Other grain 

Flour 

Other mill products 

Hay and straw 

Cotton 

Apples (fresh) 

Other fruit (fresh) 

Potatoes 

Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products. . . 
Animal Products — 

Horses 

Cattle and calves 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Dressed meats (fresh) 

Dressed meats (cured, salted, 
canned) 

Other packing house products 
(edible) 

Poultry 

Eggs 

Butter and cheese 

Wool 

Hides and leather 

Other animal products (non- 
edible) 

Mink Products — 

Anthracite coal 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite coal 

Coke 

Iron ores 

Other ores and concentrates. . 

Base bullion and matte 

Gravel, sand, stone (crushed). 

Slate— Dimensions or block 
stone 

Crude petroleum 

Asphalt 

Salt 

Other mine products 

Forest Products— 

Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 

Ties 

Pulpvvood 

Lumber, timber, box, crate 
and cooperage material 

Other forest products 

Manufactures and Miscellan- 
eous— 

Gasolinp, petroleum and its 
products 

Sugar 

Iron, pig and bloom 

Rails and fastenings 

Iron and steel (bar, sheet, 
structural, pipe) 

Castings, machinery & boilers 

Cement 

Brick and artificial stone . . . 

Lime and plaster 

Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 
vehicles other than autos. . 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 

Household goods 

Furniture 

Liquor beverages 

Fertilizers, all kinds 

Paper, printed matter, books. 

Wood-pulp 

Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 

Canned goods (all canned food 
products, except meats) 

Other manufactures and mis- 
cellaneous 

Merchandise 

Grand Total, 000 tons. . 



1935 



Jan. 



225,546 

775 

40,437 

25,402 

5,421 

764 

2,440 

76.255 

69,124 

61,931 

949 
27,930 

670 
25,737 
10,382 
27,756 

2,606 
32,722 

1,274 
21,161 
10,872 

9,822 

4,117 
789 
541 

2,626 
412 

5,883 

3,521 

2,282 

584,042 

462,430 

89,094 

102 

161,588 

46,490 

18,525 

1,326 

1,167 

1,369 

10,367 

152,468 

190,985 

780 

264,148 

121,260 
17,865 



77,900 

16,790 

8,478 

872 

22,634 
3,029 
5,916 
3,689 

11,347 
326 

4,257 

18,086 

1,303 

2,133 

9,933 

30,418 

178,157 

56,020 

7,852 

8,971 

156,790 

108,491 

3,559 



Apr. May 



20 



9,601 
37,479 

1,594 
16,644 

8,924 

6,621 

5,032 
353 

1,334 

1,869 
362 

4,005 

3,157 

801 
404,213 
111,740 
50,767 
480 
188,904 
53,722 
41,313 

4,870 

1,091 

3,732 

17,077 

153,165 

190,289 

3,056 

160,567 

210,628 
15,842 



122,759 
19,266 
12,220 
2,589 

34,869 
5,512 

28,936 
7,231 

18,832 



10,660 

45,056 

9,362 

1,762 

15,457 

77,276 

187,609 

66,785 

3,365 

13,324 

194,378 

149,260 

3,634 



525,595 



3,497 
32,534 

1,055 
15,141 

8,318 

8,250 

5,987 
199 

2,151 

1,684 
498 

5,595 

3,717 

1,129 
576,742 
55,691 
40,073 
451 
175,263 
57,842 
133,873 

12,198 
1,841 
9,602 

19,622 
186,364 

174,086 

5,525 

128,260 

224,488 
18,881 



165,947 
18,476 
15,115 
20,340 

37,507 
4,796 
46,095 
10,003 
18,510 
2,626 

8,841 

34,706 

3,786 

1,686 

15,913 

105,313 

160,299 

65,956 

2,355 

13,752 

210,233 
134,897 



June 



586,688 

21 

38,178 

17,843 

2,259 

1,624 

1,691 

74,528 

67,053 

9,621 

736 

478 

762 

15,009 

3,499 

13,152 

2,337 

23,884 

862 

12,931 

7,401 

6,001 

4,877 
142 

1,678 

3,738 
485 

4,810 

3,370 

1,800 
698,768 
45,593 
43,868 
1,472 
155,342 
62,234 
191,999 



1,404 
25,833 
14,509 
167,963 

164,866 

5,011 

127,887 

259,509 
27,063 



154,199 
16,734 
8,455 
11,715 

28,086 
4,387 
55,675 
13,154 
18,044 
3,241 

10,300 

26,110 

1,707 

1,501 

15,919 

23,729 

150,734 

54,378 

2,713 

12,338 

225,027 

123,426 

3,874 



July 



888,457 

466 

59,497 

15,082 

2,724 

2,571 

786 

76,394 

72,263 

4,396 

678 

50 

2,243 

8,005 

5,289 

17,410 

5,075 
29,070 

1,716 
11,157 

8,208 

6,515 

5,287 
85 
1,333 
5,445 
2,696 
4,685 

3,802 

1,318 
656,113 
42,051 
48,845 
2,244 
133,447 
59,767 
204,900 

12,557 
1,768 
28,298 
17,622 
189,628 

124,111 

7,521 

136,552 

270,889 
25,524 



175,398 

26,954 

12,326 

9,003 

29,748 
5,186 
53.683 
13,605 
18,826 
2,585 

16,341 

21,093 

1,946 

2,509 

18,908 

14,858 

149,026 

59,388 

2,455 

13,373 

255,524 

123,793 

4,226 



Aug. 



660,405 

1,859 

20,558 

25,372 

3,717 

354 

1.323 

81,963 

77,589 

8,630 

495 

1,554 

7,445 

2,352 

9,375 

16,867 

3,707 
42,317 

2,768 
10,745 

7,393 



150 
864 

4,343 
723 

3,725 

5,484 

2,691 

573,495 

89,157 

40,544 

1,111 

146,004 

59,523 

230,587 

10,172 

1,857 

32,678 

14,219 

218,253 

147,184 

8,100 

110,042 

251,046 
21,274 



201,074 

21,950 

11,263 

5,526 

32,289 
5,940 
53,383 
16,929 
17,829 
2,720 

11,462 
13,832 
1,395 
2,024 
16,983 
13,580 
148,847 
61,817 
2,779 

12,897 

257,623 

130,939 

4.015 



Sept. 



1,314,096 

2,316 

71,110 

91,860 

11,982 

705 

634 

109,849 

100,34? 

15,665 

1,973 

28,589 

23,122 

9,911 

13,406 

15.118 

3,253 
53,984 
3,423 
9,734 
8,357 

3,864 

5,228 
119 
830 

5,062 
738 

4,407 

4,974 

5,040 

514,687 

203,834 

68,836 

969 

142,815 

66,326 

264,586 

12,288 
3,271 
29,583 
14,088 
205,795 

173,411 

5,114 

109,021 

231,313 
21,111 



187,978 
24,732 
14,177 
2,613 

35,234 
5,558 
58,627 
15,667 
16,665 
3,068 

4,899 
10,009 

2,127 

2,197 
14,230 
20,974 
145,389 
60,314 

3,912 

16,005 

232,527 

130,057 

4,995 



Nov. 



765,425 

7,458 

77,629 

30.810 

3,355 

5,569 

3,523 

119,589 

106,078 

15,912 

1,125 

51,396 

863 

32,579 

11,877 

103,703 

4.185 
58,814 

5,929 
15,850 

9,325 

6,135 

6,382 
519 
750 
2,933 
1,013 
4,801 

4,463 

1,896 

595,021 

515,685 

86.872 

327 

158,920 

67.850 

131,897 

8,176 
1.411 
5,638 
18,181 
212,501 

246,803 
15,482 
59,141 

210,156 
16,565 



133,366 
19.652 
19,494 
1,960 

46,574 
5,580 
25,336 
11,060 
14,784 
1,620 

3,517 

24,448 
5,172 
2,369 

19,356 

42,746 
165,379 

72.929 
6,903 

24,055 

186,621 

107,849 

3,781 



Dec. 



520,368 

10,300 

46,826 

31,464 

2,450 

4,376 

1,077 

89,465 

85,864 

15,256 

488 

24,329 

1,034 

20,476 

8,349 

57,760 

3,669 
30,687 

1,822 
17,207 
10,600 

5,792 

5,825 
4,787 

358 
1,964 

601 
4,998 

3,965 

1,866 

484,524 

304,302 

101,952 

327 

148,976 

57,956 

61,856 

4,645 

1,347 

1,937 

14,247 

174,525 

200,756 

1,152 

121,231 

180,666 
39,578 



96,298 

21,456 

8,456 

1,627 

34,i 

4,968 
10,756 

5, 

14,072 

464 

4,270 
22,592 

3,: 

1,406 

18,164 

35,067 

204,660 

65,491 

7,607 

11,090 

186,621 

107,849 

3,781 



1936 
Jan. 



400,458 

13,083 

39,932 

20,964 

1,235 

3,094 

1,108 

74,492 

70,116 

16,294 

722 

21,889 

521 

20,519 

11,463 

16,676 

3,381 
38,373 

1,509 
19,876 

11,188 

7,390 

5,496 
490 
469 

2,171 
936 

5,311 

4,959 

2,317 

513,891 

406,006 

109,771 

495 

184,500 

63,549 

26,705 

2,752 
1,443 
1,447 
9,371 
172,207 

184,405 

1,764 

179,830 

146,793 
15,571 



81,080 

12,378 

8,632 

1,690 

33,069 
4,332 

10,204 
3,647 

15,030 
171 

5,380 
23,074 

1,419 

2,079 
10,118 
25,273 
188,959 
64,238 

9,330 

9,395 

167,996 

109,979 

3,624 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 12. Indexes ot Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries — First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted- 
All Industries 

Manufacturing 

Animal products— edible. . . . 

Fur and products 

Leather and products 

Lumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products— edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments and personal fur 

nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Diatilledand malt liquors. . 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 
Electric light and power.. . 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements... 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous 

Logging 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex- 
cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Trvnsportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring. . . 
Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries) . . 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



93-4 

93-9 

102-5 

79-5 

107-3 

63-0 

49-8 

72-6 

96-7 

29-9 

90-4 

92-7 

80-8 

107 1 

103-5 

92-7 

111-9 

123-6 

118-4 

102-4 
96-7 
118- 
114- 
122- 
120-2 
1280 
59-9 
106-9 
106 
84-3 



87-4 
59-6 
89-4 
156-6 

66 

90-0 

67-9 
89-6 

80-9 
116-2 
126-8 
117-4 
104-3 
117-7 

88-3 
207-2 

78-4 
77-7 
85-4 
75-6 
76-3 

108-3 
69-4 
66-7 
80-2 
45-2 

143-4 
56-9 

111-4 

106-3 



95-2 

95-6 

111-1 

84-8 

108-8 

67-2 

56-3 

70-9 

98-2 

29-0 

92-6 

93-4 

81-6 

108-0 

104-1 

91-2 

111-9 

124-5 

117-1 

102-9 

95-2 
109 7 

94 

130-4 
111-8 
130-6 

69-4 
1090 
106-0 

86-0 

98-7 

88-7 
61-2 

89-1 
154-6 

691 
94-3 

72-1 

92-7 

80-2 
1190 
129-3 
118-7 

93-9 
116-2 

82-2 
2110 

85-4 
77-5 
85-5 
75-4 
801 
109-8 
69-8 
90 
84 
47 
1.54 
53 
116 
110 
127-3 
122- 7 
119-3 
1260 
104 



97-6 
98-4 

120-6 
99-0 

108-1 
75-6 
68-1 
72-4 

101-6 
27-4 
98-9 
96-7 
86-7 

109-7 

105-5 
91 

112-4 

127-3 

117 

1010 
94-3 

115 

104-1 

1301 

118 

1310 
77-9 

1110 

108-1 
86-2 

104 

90-1 
61-8 
86-9 
145-8 

64-2 
97-4 

760 

92-9 

83-7 
121-3 
134-6 
123-5 

96-0 
119-2 

83-2 
216-7 

92-8 
79-2 
89-4 



54 



72 
118 
113 
125 
125-1 
119-9 
126-2 
105-5 



99-5 

98-5 

125-7 

96-8 

102-8 

80-8 

75-8 

73-3 

102-4 

351 

103-3 

96-6 

87-8 

108-8 

104-2 

91-8 

110-4 

125-3 

118-8 

98-5 

89-7 
117-5 
106-3 
129-5 
103 
1320 

81-2 
113-5 
110 

83-4 

100-7 

91-2 
59-6 
82-7 
131-0 

58-5 
98-3 

76-1 

91-3 



81-8 
122-6 
138-1 
123-8 

82-2 
121-5 

81-9 
223-2 



101-7 

80-8 

92-4 

77-7 

82-7 

114-2 

72-5 

89-9 

101-1 

57-3 

170-2 

81-5 

123-6 

122-2 

122-8 

1260 

1221 

128-9 

106-4 



101-1 

99-8 

142-3 

100-3 

107-4 

82-6 

78-6 

76-6 

99-7 

41-1 

114-3 

98-3 

90-3 

110-4 

104 

88-2 

109-9 

1280 

1171 

94 

92 

117-9 
103 
135 
101 
128 

83-6 
115 
118 

81 

100-6 

92-6 

591 

77-6 

109 2 

62-5 
99 6 

76-3 

87-2 



122-3 
140-3 
119-3 

790 
125-2 

83-6 
230-0 

106-5 

81-6 

930 

78 6 

85-4 

1171 

74-7 

94-7 

104-7 

60-6 

179-0 

80-6 

127-9 

129-4 

126-9 

125-7 

120-7 

126-4 

107-5 



102-7 

100-8 

134-6 

99-7 

ill 

8'-7 

77 5 

75-9 

99-1 

47-4 

126-4 

98-2 

89-9 

1130 

104-2 

91-2 

112-3 

1290 

117-9 

99-9 
92-6 

121-0 

109 

133 
107 
129 

80 
118 
122-3 

79-7 

1000 

91 
52 
75-1 
100-1 



100-9 
791 
87-9 

83-0 
123 
141-6 
128-3 

77-7 
128-6 

86-5 
233-0 

112-8 
82-1 
94-2 
78-9 
85-8 
118-3 
75-4 
921 
110-9 
63-2 
191-8 
84-5 
127-8 
129-9 
124-0 
125-3 
121-8 
126-8 
110-2 



106-1 
103-3 
124-6 
103-2 
110-1 
79-9 
72-5 
82-0 
101-1 
50-1 
136-2 
98-5 
89-1 
115-9 
105-0 
92-3 
116-9 
131-7 
123-5 

105-6 

97 
120 
107-2 
138-4 
139 
132 

84 
119 
128-4 

84 

112-0 

94 

53-0 
79-0 
110-8 

68-0 
112-1 

83-9 
97-1 

86-4 
125-8 
142-7 
130-2 
115-8 
129-5 

89-0 
230-3 

1131 
82-1 
93-6 
79-0 
86-4 
118-7 
75-8 
94-0 
117-4 
67-2 
213-3 
79-3 
120-5 
117-3 
123-5 
125-1 
123-8 
128-9 
112-2 



107-7 

103-5 

120-5 

100-4 

106-3 

76-2 

66-5 

86-6 

97-8 

51-8 

126-5 

98-6 

88-6 

117-8 

105-1 

96-3 

118 

134 

127-2 

105 
97-7 
122- 

106- 
144-6 
145-5 
134-8 

80-1 
117-6 
131-2 

88-7 

116-7 

95 
55-9 
85-4 
131-5 

62-9 
113-1 



97-4 

88-5 
126-8 
139-8 
124-6 
158-4 
132-5 

92-9 
234-4 

110-6 
81-4 
94-8 
77-8 
84-5 
117-4 
74-2 
89-8 
119-9 
70-4 
226-3 
71-5 
117-1 
113-3 
123-0 
122-2 
124-6 
130-2 



111-6 



104-6 

101-4 

15-4 

101-5 



57-2 
85-4 
96-2 

51-8 
114-7 

98-7 

87 
118-1 



117-0 
136-9 
127-6 



94-5 
143 
144- 1 
141 
1400 
135 

75 

116-2 
124 

86-8 

115-7 

93 
52-5 

83-7 
120-0 

51-5 
105-3 

89-5 

94-8 

87-2 
125 
137-5 
1250 
183-5 
1311 

93-7 
230-3 1 

104 
810 
91-7 

78-1 
840 
115-2 
73-1 
93-7 
95 9 
67-3 
171-0 
55-3 
116-3 
11201 
122-4 
122-0 
131-0| 
1400 
1101 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. 



99-1 
96-8 
1100 
94-5 
96-1 
63-3 
51 2 
79-8 
88-0 
51 
97 

96-7 
85-3 
110-5 
106-9 
920 
113-3 
135-5 
123-3 



89 
139 
137 
140 
127 
131 

67 
111 
120-4 

84-9 

10S-0 

93 

62-2 
83-9 
119-9 

47-7 
86-2 



92-1 

83-2 
122-1 
134-6 
116-8 
183-4 
129-9 

94-7 
226-6 

99-4 
79-3 
87-9 
77-0 
77-9 
111-9 
71-7 
63 
74-8 
560 
119-4 
52-4 
1180 
114-6 
122-7 
122-5 
135-9 
147-9 
107-8 



98-4 
98-5 
108-5 
3 

5 



81 
104 
65-9 
55-3 
78-7 
88-9 
41-9 
96-4 
96-2 
83-9 
112-8 
106-8 
940 
115-2 
134-8 
120-4 

100 

92 

135-6 
135 
133-3 
148 
130-2 

64-4 
110 
115-4 



113-9 

95-5 
65-5 
90-3 
138-2 

590 
95 



92-7 

85-6 
123-2 
130-3 
116-7 
173- 1 
129-4 

94-6 
228-7 

93-9 

77-2 



99-5 

107-2 

81-3 

111-7 

65-9 

55-3 

77-6 

89-7 

42-0 

96-7 

96-3 

84-8 

114-5 

105-3 

95-5 

116-9 

132-3 

123-0 

105-9 
94-8 

136-4 

138 

129 

1460 

132-5 
67-5 

111-5 

115 
90 

110-6 

98-0 
65-5 
91-3 
135-8 

63-5 
99-e 

81-8 

4*8-6 

85-9 
127-1 
130-2 
117-7 
1470 
129-1 

92-1 
234-9 



75-2 

78-2 
113-5 

71-6 

63-8 

74-4 

53-6 
109-0 

63-4 
116-4 
112-5 
126-9 
120-3 
121-6, 
128-0 130-4 
106-8 106-3 



77-7 
85-6 
75-6 
78-9 
113-6 
72-7 
63-3 
78-2 
521 
112-6 
72-9 
117-5 
113-6 
129-8 
120-9 
123-1 





Cargo Tonnage 


of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Five Canad 


ian Ports 






1935 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Toronto 


Vancouver 




Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


July 


39,434 
51,571 
54,183 

44,082 
48.267 
69,407 

58,072 
82,431 
78,931 


19,860 
29,183 
25,353 
37,491 
12.355 
105,553 

193,404 
172,355 
192,674 


100,307 
81,796 
62,555 
130,561 
100,591 
117,985 

137,815 
67,324 
106,541 


55, 658 
64,160 
54,925 
58,502 
63,768 
93, 087 

105,039 
88,683 
109,366 


83,660 
144,579 
91.144 
92,492 
124,831 
1,602 


14,867 
21,087 
15,879 
18,172 
69.181 
24,358 


363,215 
337,330 
365,002 
334,955 
423,247 
73.903 


30,748 
30,623 
25,792 
21,143 
26,171 
6,434 


281,092 
318,651 
298,404 
340,129 
278,738 
256,331 

265,480 
246,800 


236,554 




215,554 


September 


23TJ.849 


October 


244.024 




288.326 


December 


268,020 


January 


1936 


302,496 












469,704 


March . .". 














MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. 



Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 
and Automobile Financing. 



1936 



Classification 



April | May ) June | July Aug. j Sept.| Oct. | Nov. | Dec. J Jan. I Feb. | Mar. | April 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
KmpSoyment— All Industries . 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical instruments 

Pulp and pnper 

Paper products. 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron ar J steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals (except 
coal) 

Telephones 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Puilding 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail.: 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

• Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales— 

1930=100 

Roots and shoes (16) 

Candy (6) 

"Clothing, men's (15) 

Clothing, women's (12) . .. 

Depart mental (37) 

Drugs (23) 

Dyers and cleaners (8) . . ., 

Furniture (7) 

Groceries and meats (34) , 

Music and radio (9) 

Restaurants (14) 

Variety (9) 

General index (206) 



Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars- 

Number 

Percentage change 1 

Financing in dollars $000. 
Percentage change 1 













First of Month 










99 


97 9 


96 2 


95-9 


96 8 


98-5 


..... 


103 5 


102 i 


106 1 


103 9 


103-7 


95 


951 


95-7 


95-9 


970 


98-1 


100-6 


102-5 


102 4 


104-9 


102-4 


101-3 


105 


109-9 


1110 


104-9 


109-9 


112 3 


109-6 


104-6 


101 2 


98-5 


102-7 


108-6 


62-8 


58-9 


57-7 


59-4 


60-5 


61-3 


60-5 


64-6 


68 9 


73-8 


76-1 


73-7 


71 2 


69-4 


71-8 


73-3 


77-5 


78-1 


81-2 


84-5 


82-8 


87-7 


78-6 


76-5 


30 6 


29-8 


28-8 


36-9 


43-4 


48-4 


47-9 


47 1 


47-1 


51-4 


42-6 


42-5 


83-7 


820 


83-5 


84-9 


86-3 


85-9 


87-0 


87-9 


891 


90-5 


87-7 


88-1 


106 7 


107-7 


109-5 


109-8 


112-2 


112-9 


112-6 


114-6 


113-4 


118-3 


114-2 


1151 


104-3 


104-6 


105-8 


104-5 


105-2 


105-6 


106-0 


105-0 


106-4 


104-7 


105- 1 


105-1 


90 


90-2 


89-1 


90-5 


88-2 


93-5 


94-8 


98-2 


97-7 


99-4 


91-7 


92-5 


109- 1 


109-4 


112-3 


112-1 


112-6 


114-8 


116-6 


116-7 


116-2 


118-9 


114-3 


114-5 


123-4 


123-1 


127-3 


127-5 


129 -f 


132-2 


131-8 


133-5 


134-9 


135-6 


134-4 


129-8 


117 2 


115-8 


117-9 


120-5 


1201 


120-4 


123-1 


122-9 


122-2 


130-8 


120-2 


121-5 


64 


700 


73-8 


75-5 


76-i> 


74-8 


80-2 


76-7 


74-8 


760 


73 1 


76-2 


112 9 


112-5 


109-6 


109-3 


1091 


112-1 


114-9 


114-5 


116-3 


1160 


117 1 


118-3 


107-0 


106-5 


109-0 


111-9 


123-5 


123-2 


126-5 


126-9 


120-6 


120-8 


115-6 


115-3 


82-6 


83-8 


82-9 


82-2 


80-4 


80-3 


85-6 


89-6 


87-5 


92-6 


91-6 


87-8 


85 1 


93 1 


98-2 


100-0 


1000 


102-0 


112-6 


118-4 


117-9 


117-8 


120-7 


107-9 


86-4 


86-6 


90 8 


90-7 


91 2 


91-0 


94-2 


96-4 


94 3 


981 


95-8 


97-9 


55 5 


58-4 


591 


57-2 


59-2 


58-3 


59-2 


58-0 


52-3 


65-5 


64-2 


62-1 


134 1 


1251 


122-3 


124-4 


124-5 


103 2 


115-2 


145-5 


142 2 


171-3 


144-1 


119-7 


134 1 


124-0 


117-2 


123-8 


134-1 


115-1 


137-2 


1370 


126-9 


130-7 


115-9 


106-9 


121 2 


119-3 


121-6 


122-9 


126-3 


128-6 


127-3 


128-6 


127-8 


127-2 


127-7 


130-7 


214-7 


215-3 


215-2 


219-9 


223-1 


226-9 


224-5 


228-0 


228-0 


232-9 


234-8 


243-7 


88-8 


87-3 


88-4 


93-5 


96-6 


102-9 


102-5 


103-9 


103-7 


111 3 


108-4 


103-7 


77-0 


75-7 


76-3 


76-8 


771 


771 


77-7 


77-6 


77 9 


77-8 


77-4 


77-1 


80-9 


83-2 


79-1 


80-7 


82-8 


82-7 


82-1 


80-2 


80-9 


80-6 


82-8 


84-4 


114-6 


111-9 


110-2 


1121 


113-5 


114-5 


113-2 


112-8 


113 7 


115-6 


1180 


120-0 


72 7 


72-9 


71-2 


71-4 


72-9 


73-1 


730 


71-3 


71 -4 


721 


73-7 


76-0 


82-7 


98-6 


71-8 


79-2 


84-3 


81-7 


81-4 


77-8 


*2 8 


80-2 


85-0 


84-6 


119-7 


101-7 


83-9 


79-8 


76 6 


83-2 


92-2 


101-8 


99 2 


105-6 


110-2 


118-3 


57-5 


53-2 


53-4 


51-5 


49-8 


50-8 


54-9 


600 


64-8 


69-8 


69-9 


70-8 


419-3 


318-6 


161-4 


110-9 


99-7 


111-4 


135-4 


169-0 


179 2 


1980 


263-9 


338-1 


77-7 


620 


59-9 


61-2 


60-8 


68-7 


69-6 


68-1 


65-6 


71-4 


881 


98-4 


117-3 


121-5 


111-4 


107-0 


109-9 


110-6 


109-2 


118-1 


126-1 


125-7 


117-8 


130 


120 5 


121-0 


121-2 


122-6 


122-3 


122-8 


123-6 


122-8 


124-1 


128-8 


124 


127-3 


126-4 


127-8 


128 3 


130-9 


129-6 


130-5 


1310 


129-2 


129-3 


135-7 


129-3 


135-0 


106 3 


105-9 


106-7 


106-5 


106 6 


107-8 


108-6 


108-5 


108-2 


108-6 


109-0 


109-5 


99-9 


99 4 


100-4 


100-9 


101 


102-0 


108 8 


111-2 


110 5 


112-3 


107-2 


105-8 


91 6 


92-8 


910 


91 9 


92-2 


94-8 


97-6 


100-0 


101-8 


104-3 


101-5 


101-0 


105-1 


103 6 


99-9 


99-9 


99 8 


100-8 


103-8 


104-9 


105-1 


109-8 


106-3 


107-0 


96-1 


93-2 


91-8 


91-7 


92-8 


95-4 


98-2 


101-5 


97 3 


99-3 


99-2 


102-6 


96-0 


92-8 


94-2 


95-3 


99-9 


100-9 


100-4 


98-4 


99 8 


102-7 


102-7 


98-7 


87-7 


87 4 


84-5 


83-7 


83-8 


85-3 


87-3 


87-7 


89 1 


92-4 


95-5 


95-3 


97-0 


99-9 


99-6 


96-8 


97 1 


98-6 


95-7 


94-6 


96-4 


95 7 


97-5 


112-7 


97-1 


971 


97-8 


97-4 


96-7 


970 


98 2 


98-6 


97 


102-0 


100-6 


102-2 


107 4 


101-9 


98-4 


99 3 


97-8 


98-2 


98 7 


101-6 


105- (i 


110-3 


1090 


111-3 


89-3 


90 


92-4 


92-2 


93-4 


93-6 


97 9 


99-2 


98 7 


98-8 


101-7 


100-7 


139 


121-4 


111 1 


111 1 


104 


101-5 


107-9 


121-9 


1220 


155-8 


117-8 


109-4 


87-8 


88-6 


88-5 


89 1 


89-6 


87-3 


87-5 


87-S 


89-9 


90-5 


95-1 


98-6 


91-6 


931 


96-8 


98-9 


97 4 


100-8 


99-5 


99-3 


98 8 


101-5 


104-9 


101-7 



103 2 

102-3 
109-2 
72-0 
75-7 
36-5 
88-9 
117-1 
107-1 
93-3 
115-7 
132-0 
123-5 
76-3 
118-8 
117-1 
91-4 



98-4 
620 
127-8 
131-9 
132-0 
246-1 

104-2 
76-9 

83-4 
119-8 

75-7 

79-1 
106-3 

66-4 
327-2 

74-9 
130-8 
124-2 
130-2 
109-7 



106-2 
97-4 
107-9 
100-2 
100-3 
92-5 
95-2 
101-5 
111 5 
98-6 
137-5 
92-6 
102-2 



1935 



Feb. 



44 

55 

67-6 

36-1 

44-9 

57-7 

56-4 



4,249 
+55-4 

1.' 
+75-8 



Mar. April 



61-2 
52-2 
53-2 
51-6 
611 
76-8 
641 
63-7 
75-2 
39-7 
51-4 
67-5 
64-8 



7,185 
+38-9 

2,981 
+39-3 



83-1 

78-9 
84-9 
70-6 
72-3 
71-7 
96-3 
74-8 
73 9 
35-5 
50-7 
77-9 
72-9 



12,749 
+50-1 
5.373 
+53-7 



May June July Aug. Sept. Oct 



71-4 

60-9 

70-8 

72-0 

93-7 

77 

74 

430 

51 -9 

79-5 

72-4 



14,736 
+24-8 
6,147 
+27-9 



471 
75-3 
69-5 
70 8 
70-7 
900 

70 8 

71 4 
30 1 
49 8 
88-6 
71 6 



12,821 
+22-2 
4,956 
+16-1 



700 
440 
57-7 
56-3 
56-9 
71-4 
77-6 
59-2 
69-9 
26-6 
51-2 
82-8 
63 



11.965 

+27-6 
4,641 
+28-0 



62 

59 

50 

50 

59 

74 

76 

78 

71 

35-2 

55-4 

83-7 

64-9 



9.081 
+21 

3.405 
+18-8 



68-7 
52-6 
59-5 
52-1 
71-8 
69-8 
83 2 
850 
69-6 
52-3 
530 
77-9 
69 7 



7.285 
+21-9 

2,806 
+ 17-2 



70 7 
57 4 
88 
62 1 
88-4 
74 4 
88-1 
93-6 
77-3 
66 6 
54 3 
90-4 
81 2 



Nov. 



79-6 
52 3 
94-1 
62-9 
88-1 
76-8 
71-1 
84-7 
75-4 
660 
52-5 
91-3 
800 



6.323 5 
+15 7+400 

2,3641 2,293 
+ 17-8+54-1 



Dec. 



117-2 
116 8 
100-4 
122-7 
116-3 
87 

56-7 
85-8 
80 3 
67-7 
55-7 
164-0 



5,206 
+84 
2.228 
110-2 



1936 



Jan 



410 

44-7 
47-7 
40-2 
54-4 
72-6 
51-9 
48-1 
75-3 
43-3 
50-4 
53-4 
59-5 



4,796 
+75-7 

2,011 
+72-7 



Feb. 



42-1 
61-4 

42-6 
41-7 
570 
72-6 
48-8 
60-5 
74-2 
40-2 
48-7 
60-7 
60-5 



4,593 
+8-1 
1,914 
-3-6 



>To same month in preced ng year 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada — 

Contracts awarded $000 

Building Permits 5000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . . Number 
Liabilities $000 

Maritime Provinces — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Ontario— 

Contracts A warded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. Jan. Feb. Mar 



8,499 

4,023 

93-4 

2,236 

31,167 

124 

968 

353 

48 

958 

39-S 

2,173 

7 

1,319 

248 

85-9 

706 

9,190 

60 

5,273 
1,725 
100-7 
1,061 
13,785 
44 

962 

1,781 

86-8 

296 

3,836 

13 



222 
91-8 
133-4 

2,183 



11,379 

6,292 

95-2 

2,367 

28,649 

107 

1, 

795 

116 

97-4 

42-4 

1,849 

7 

2,4i 

1,81 

89-7 

656 

8,520 

35 

5,079 
3,518 
101-7 
1,043 
12,646 
40 

2,473 

583 

87-9 

486 

3,312 

18 

630 

270 

92-6 

140-1 

2,322 

7 



16,302 

4,825 

97-6 

3,132 

27,141 

101 

1,295 

1,987 
178 
101-6 
47-5 
1,639 
4 

2,418 
1,688 
93-8 
858 
8,195 
52 



2,152 

101-6 

1,360 

11.974 

30 

2,644 

499 

92-2 

730 

3,497 

12 

3,087 
307 
96-6 
136-7 
1,836 
3 



18,521 

5,117 

99-5 

2,710 

31,810 

109 

1,879 

3,447 

154 

106-7 

52-6 

1,762 



3,935 

1,497 

94-8 

806 

9,020 

50 

8,137 
2,339 
102-7 
1,264 
14,559 



1,347 

541 

96-3 

451 

4.230 

19 

1,656 

586 

99-5 

136-5 

2,239 

2 



18,549 
4,266 
101-1 
2,545 

31,832 

110 

1,638 

1,464 

124 

106-7 

51-5 



5,123 

689 

97-2 

740 

9,738 

54 

8,819 
1,610 
102-4 
1,118 
13,385 
38 

2,454 

338 

98-7 

492 

4,454 

11 

690 
1,505 
106-8 
143-7 



23,837 
4,293 
102-7 
2,498 

26,639 

94 

1,255 

2,973 
998 
107-0 
48-5 
1,895 



11,314 

331 

99-3 

677 

8,552 

41 

6,763 
2,325 
103-9 
992 
10,841 
30 

1,337 
253 

100-5 
638 

3,341 
13 

1,451 
387 
108-0 
141-9 
2,010 
2 



14,743 
3,322 
106- 1 
2,426 

26,442 

98 

1,565 

1,111 
114 
112-9 
46-7 
1,827 
4 

4,682 
584 

103-1 
702 

7,721 
50 

6.383 

1.616 

108-1 

982 

11,454 

33 

1,828 
714 

102-7 
564 

3,269 



740 

294 

106-0 

131-4 

2,171 

3 



14,925 
4,020 
107-7 
2,908 

30,184 

115 

1,859 

624 

115 

1111 

50-7 

1,844 

10 

6,712 
1,257 
105-0 
788 
8,594 
48 

4,967 
2,119 
110-0 
1,102 
13,269 
37 

2,000 
217 

108-1 
820 

4,268 
18 

622 

313 

101-8 

147-3 

2,209 

2 



8,291 
3,315 
104-6 
3,022 
34,767 
107 
1,501 

376 

105 

107-5 

62-5 

2,300 

4 

2,231 
519 

103-8 
878 

9,540 
57 

4,063 
2,306 
107-0 
1,301 
15,599 
28 

1,132 
117 

101-3 
630 

4,708 
16 

490 

268 

99-3 

149-9 

2,620 

2 



1936 



4,365 

2,402 

99-1 

2,932 

36,134 

112 

1,291 

305. 

39 

108 1 

51-3 

2,761 

3 



928 

95-5 

813 

9,836 

56 

1,854 
1,140 
102-7 
1.301 
15,487 
29 

768 

77 

951 

606 

4,995 

21 

358 

219 

92-4 

161-2 

3,055 

3 



13,610 
1,284 
98-4 
2,492 

34,051 



150 

67 

102-2 

50-4 

1,970 



5,741 
457 
102 
1,312 
16,746 



975 

48 

93-7 

635 

4,012 



2, 

428 
94-1 
165-3 
2,454 



1.912 

98-9 

2,767 

30,310 



48 
101-7 
43-8 
2,093 



3,679 

203 

95-1 

866 

8,452 



3,376 
439 
103-8 
1,258 
13,742 



495 

3S 

95-1 

428 

3,532 



396 

1-.184 

92-4 

171-8 

2.491 



10,289 

2,361 

97-4 

2,599 

31,514 



249 
101 

101-8 
46-4 

1,917 



3,735 

468 

91-4 

823 

8,808 



4,384 
1,151 
103-4 
1,152 
14,251 



1,464 
145 



413 
L.125 



456 

497 

95-9 

165-0 

2,413 



1 Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 



Mineral Production— 

Metals — 

Gold OOOoz. 

Silver OOOoz. 

Nickel tons 

Copper. tons 

Lead tons 

Zinc tons 

Fuels— 

Coal 000 tons 

Petroleum 000 bbls. 

Natural Gas 000 M cu. ft 

Non-metals — 

Asbestos tons 

Gypsum 000 tons 

Feldspar tons 

Salt (commercial) tons 

Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbls. 

Clay products .... $ 000 
Lime tons 



1935 



Feb. 



229-3 
1,019 
4,395 
16,734 
13,689 
10,306 



1,017 
111-5 
2,585 



11,844 
3-3 



10,853 



71 

89 
29,018 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



249-5 
1,279 
5,309 
18,914 
15,786 
13,468 



1,038 
120-5 



11,816 
4-5 
778 

13,794 



131 
137 
32,616 



245-7 
1,014 
5,918 
19,424 
12,406 
11,806 



892 
113-7 

2,282 



14,702 

26-5 

492 

21,407 



244 
191 
35.149 



269-2 
1,613 
5,665 
17,886 
13,389 
13,694 



925 
123-8 

1,666 



18,562 
58-3 
1,013 

22,748 



260 
34.214 



285-8 
1,505 
5,833 
17,807 
13,677 
14.082 



929 
120- 1 
1.178 



15.316 

75-5 

1,700 

16,432 



431 

288 
,451 



285-4 
1,163 
5,095 
15,483 
14,552 
13,784 



118 



15,398 

91-5 

2,371 

23,728 



453 

317 

33,126 



294-4 
1,585 
5,435 
16,302 
13,235 
14,419 



987 
117-7 



23.119 

81-2 

1,714 

15,711 



475 
311 
32,597 



280-4 
1,312 
6,448 
16,971 
13,161 
13.519 



1.117 
123-9 
1.176 



20,344 

48-1 

1,042 

18.139 



477 

311 

34,471 



301-7 
1,300 
6,679 
17,717 
16,400 
13,743 



1,555 
122-5 
1,830 



27,105 

59-3 

1,517 

20,303 



513 

340 

38,263 



293-2 
1,614 
6,072 
17,270 
16,181 
14,409 



1,618 
116-8 

2,247 



25,528 

67-7 

2.822 

26,379 



264 

246 

36,846 



Ja,n 



1936 
Feb. 



307-31 277- 



1,700 
7,499 
18,278 
15,284 
14.155 



125-7 
2,983 



15.924 
21-2 
1,072 

13,260 



117 
165 
32,338 



1,213 
7,026 
17,145 
14,053 
13,580 



1,382 
121-2 
3,499 



17,016 
4-9 
901 

11,013 



97 
117 
30,206 



266-4 
1,235 
8,076 
16,456 
13,575 
10,339 



1,449 
107-9 
4,012 



17,038 
2-9 
937 

11,662 



95 

102 

28, 133 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



TabJle 16. Weekly Indicators of Econom 


ic Activity 


in Canada, 1936 






Items 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


1 


8 


15 


22 


29 


7 


14 


21 


28 


4 


11 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators— 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 


645 
323 

98 
2 

11 

244-5 
11,701 
8,845 
455 
4,658 

•839 
•343 
•348 
1-601 
•425 

3,424 
1,429 
6,345 
1,145 
1,168 
1,690 
2,043 
1,963 
1,583 
11,081 
7,630 
39,501 
22,249 

44-43 
72-87 
99-87 

232-25 
39-59 
36-66 
82-08 
52-14 

114-79 
74-74 
71-24 
70-06 
70-08 
70-68 

72-6 
67-6 
71-6 
69-5 
67-1 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-3 

194-4 

131-6 

19-4 

81-5 

241-9 

74-9 

156-1 

151-0 

315-9 

52-7 
30-6 

112-8 
65-9 

120-7 

131-3 

226-2 
149-9 

71-1 


552 

363 

100 

3 

15 

239-6 
11,623 
8,793 
445 
4,672 

•830 
•347 
•348 
1-599 
•425 

3,574 
1,281 
7,181 
1,085 
1,204 
1,643 
2,174 
1,794 
1,565 
11,931 
8,135 
41,567 
22,307 

45-39 
57-47 
121-65 
230-36 
40-04 
33-75 
85-47 
46-83 
110-37 
79-25 
74-00 
73-18 
71-99 
75-79 

72-4 
67-1 
71-5 
69-5 
67-4 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-3 

199-3 

136-4 

200 

81-9 

250-9 

73-4 

157-5 

150-7 

320-7 

550 
32-9 

113-7 
68-6 

124-2 

131-1 
229-2 
150-3 

70-7 


325 
215 
80 

1 
7 

234-8 
11,362 
8,562 
429 
4,083 

•811 
•357 
•367 
1-583 
•431 

3,941 

1,483 

7,740 

1,106 

1,361 

1,653 

2,321 

1,953 

1,475 

12,066 

8,157 

43,256 

22,727 

50-50 
80-47 
132-56 
205-19 
43-54 
33-68 
87-98 
49-95 
101-03 
78-40 
72-54 
74-32 
72-86 
77-61 

72-4 
66-6 
72-1 
69-5 
67-4 
87-2 
68-3 
85-3 
77-2 

199-5 

137-4 

21-2 

84-8 

249-7 

74-4 

159-2 

150-4 

322-5 

55-0 

32-4 
112-1 

69-5 
124-3 

129-7 
226-3 
148-6 

710 


347 
271 
123 

1 
12 

228-3 
11,241 
8,511 
421 
4,675 

•813 
•352 
•360 
1-590 
•430 

4,372 

1,548 

7,514 

896 

1,256 

1,487 

2,347 

2,157 

1,186 

12,268 

8,535 

43,566 

22,787 

60-65 
87-76 
128-89 
177-43 
38-60 
30-90 
93-77 
54-05 
80-68 
80-03 
76-57 
74-86 
73-07 
79-75 

72-6 
66-4 
72-5 
69-4 
67-8 
87-3 
69-0 
85-9 
77-2 

202-1 

142-5 

20-8 

85-9 

247-8 

72-8 

159-6 

150-6 

336-3 

57-9 
36-6 

113- 1 
71-5 

126-9 

130-4 
231-5 
150-2 

70-8 


608 

577 

178 

3 

16 

222-9 

10,924 

8,424 

420 

4,677 

•825 
•365 
•373 
1-586 
•428 

5,745 

1,660 

7,262 

695 

1,327 

1,610 

2,190 

1,740 

1,503 

12,648 

8,883 

45,263 

24,737 

73-18 
85-39 
123-88 
148-19 
40-58 
33-15 
85-02 
43-10 
101-08 
80-22 
76-28 
76-43 
72-39 
85-01 

72-5 
66-6 
71-7 
69-3 
67-8 
87-3 
69-1 
85-9 
77-2 

201-1 

143-0 

20-0 

85-6 

245-2 

74-3 

160-0 

152-5 

335-5 

58-5 
37-6 

111-0 
72-4 

126-7 

129-6 
234-8 
150-2 

70-7 


1,272 
949 
256 

7 
29 

219-3 
11,028 
8,375 
417 
4,685 

•819 
•369 
•376 
1-583 
•433 

6,325 

1,194 

5,531 

589 

1,423 

1,690 

2,535 

2,454 

1,123 

13,178 

9,368 

45,110 

24,900 

84-31 
58-10 
103-19 
145-43 
42-13 
36-97 
98-22 
62-71 
76-97 
81-00 
80-56 
76-90 
73-17 
85-26 

72-5 
66-5 
71-9 
69-3 
67-8 
87-3 
69-2 
85-9 
77-2 

202-2 

141-3 

19-9 

85-7 

247-9 

75-4 

158-5 

149-1 

337-5 

58-0 
36-6 
111-6 
72-0 
'127-0 

127-7 
234-5 
148-6 

700 


2,085 

1,543 

480 

12 

41 

214-3 
11,448 
8,513 
418 
4,678 

•832 
•366 
•378 
1-584 
•442 

5,837 

1,400 

4,348 

469 

1,275 

1,579 

2,509 

2,398 

1,479 

13,032 

9,497 

43,823 

23,469 

75-96 
67-28 
82-04 

121-19 
35-53 
35-35 
97-78 
62-03 

101-02 
80-00 
77-29 
72-94 
69-67 
80-47 

72-5 
67-0 
70-8 
69-5 
67-8 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-2 

195-2 

138-0 

19-6 

89-6 

237-9 

73-7 

154-8 

141-6 

327-5 

55-7 
33-9 

111-3 
69-7 

122-5 

123-8 
230-9 
144-8 

70-2 


1,548 

1,042 

399 

13 

31 

212-3 

11,983 

8,722 

430 

4,718 

•825 
•356 
•389 
1-580 
•437 

5,941 

1,778 

4,654 

455 

1,519 

1,712 

2,274 

2,187 

1,331 

12,628 

9,580 

44,069 

22,263 

82-66 
80-74 
95-98 
128-53 
41-61 
40-24 
91-77 
58-59 
90-24 
75-08 
73-75 
73-38 
69-45 
82-36 

72-4 
66-8 
70-4 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-3 

192-8 

133-3 

17-7 

92-5 

234-7 

71-9 

151-6 

134-5 

327-0 

54-2 
32-9 

110-1 
67-5 

120-6 

119-6 
226-1 
140-5 

70-4 


1,746 

783 

337 

9 

31 

209-3 
12,344 
8,998 
420 
4,760 

•811 
•348 
•379 
1-560 
•427 

5,467 

2,000 

4,136 

407 

1,534 

1,518 

2,524 

1,740 

1,465 

13,461 

9,797 

44,049 

25,303 

83-11 
86-62 
88-97 

111-81 
41-97 
40-03 

102-23 
50-07 
99-80 
78-76 
76-76 
74-97 
71-77 
82-44 

72-2 
66-4 
69-4 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-2 

197-4 

135-8 

18-5 

91-7 

242-9 

71-3 

151-2 

139-2 

331-4 

54-5 
32-6 

110-1 
68-5 

123-0 

121-2 
233-5 
143-2 

69-2 


1,146 

437 

303 

9 

31 

205-5 

12,499 

9,036 

422 

4,777 

•820 
•336 
•377 
1-497 
•411 

5,491 

1,976 

4,613 

387 

1,628 

1,229 

2,430 

1,729 

1,354 

13,255 

10,253 

44,345 

25,287 

89-15 
87-82 
106-54 
101-84 
45-20 
39-89 
98-90 
53-60 
90-81 
76-31 
80-33 
77-13 
75-15 
82-29 

72-1 
65-9 
69-8 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-2 
85-9 
77-2 

197-9 

134-6 

18-6 

91-2 

242-5 

71-0 

150-1 

139-4 

334-7 

54-3 
32-4 

110-4 
68-1 

123-1 

121-4 
236-0 
143-8 

69-7 




Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply — 

Wheat 000,000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 


200-3 
12,329 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 

Rye 000 bushels 

A.ver . Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor % per bush. 

Oats No. 2C.W " 


9,056 

438 

4,805 

•795 
•341 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


•380 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 2 C.W " 


1-485 
•417 


Carloadings, Totals- 


4,714 




1,640 




3,623 


Coke 


408 




1,546 




1,235 




2,441 




1,541 




1,250 


Mdse. L.C.L 


12,188 
9,649 




40,235 


Indexes of Carloadings, 1926=100 — 


24,411 
82-60 




83-55 




90-35 


Coke 


138-78 




44-11 




47-66 




101-58 




52-17 


Ore 


86-99 




78-03 




78-78 




76-06 




72-74 




81-00 


Indexes of Wholesale Prices- 
Total 


72-0 




65-6 




69-7 


Textiles 


69-7 




67-9 




87-3 




69-1 




85-9 




77-2 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 

Industrials — 


202-6 




137-7 




18-6 


Milling (5) 


93-2 


Oils (5) 


254-5 




71-8 




151-5 




134-2 




334-7 


UlTLITD3S— 

Total (23) 


54-7 




33-1 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


109-9 


Power and traction (19) 


68-4 


Grand total (112) 


125-5 


Mining Stocks — 
Gold (20) 


122-2 


Base Metals (3) 


245-9 




146-3 


Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields 
(1926= 100) 


69-7 











22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada in 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,159 


249 


262 


7,502 


7,659 


3,793 


1,410 


585 


8.133 


11,209 


5.507 


1.725 


1925 


28.126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7,588 


4,183 


1,475 


573 


8.475 


11.236 


6.000 


1.842 


1926 


30,358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8,210 


3.877 


1,553 


605 


9.910 


11.998 


5.886 


1.960 


1927 


36.094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12,644 


14,042 


6.127 


2.053 


1928 


43.477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12.673 


5.188 


1.982 


745 


14.913 


17.313 


8.007 


2,499 


1929 


46,670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4.789 


2.366 


798 


16.484 


18.543 


7,923 


2.923 


1930 


37,491 


362 


246 


12,271 


10,655 


3.712 


1,813 


708 


13,137 


15.044 


6,279 


2.323 


1931 


31,586 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3.280 


1,416 


653 


10,550 


13.377 


5,201 


1.806 


1932 


25.844 


258 


188 


7,136 


8,066 


3,138 


1,190 


519 


7,766 


11.259 


4,797 


1.503 


1933 


29,981 


254 


154 


7,944 


10,222 


4,798 


1,207 


481 


8,567 


13,027 


6,414 


1.492 


1934 


32.867 


276 


171 


8,835 


11,389 


4,682 


1,321 


534 


9,450 


14.920 


6,337 


1,626 


1935 


31,546 


310 


173 


8,307 


10,643 


4.633 


1,350 


574 


8,978 


13,877 


6,445 


1,672 



Clearing House 






1935 












1936 




Centres 


March 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


Bank Debits 

Maritime Provincef 

Halifax 

Moncton 

Saint John 


S 

20 8 
6 4 
12-7 


S 

22-5 
6-8 
13-2 


S 

23-4 

7-6 

16 4 


$ 

26-2 
8 8 
17-6 


$ 

29 1 
7-9 
14 5 


$ 

26-2 

7-5 
14-8 


25-6 
7-3 
13-8 


% 

28 
8-0 
14 7 


1 

37-9 
8-3 
16 3 


$ 

28-3 
8-6 
14-4 


S 

29-5 
7-3 
13-6 


21-7 
7-3 
14-9 


s 

25-2 
7-1 
141 


Totals 


39 9 


42-4 


47-5 


52 6 


51 5 


48-5 


46-7 


50 7 


62-5 


51-3 


50-4 


43-8 


46-4 






Quebec — 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Sherbrooke 


637-9 
63-3 

4-6 


609-6 

41-2 

4-7 


808-4 

44-8 

5-3 


733-6 

66 6 

6 


685 -7 

48 6 

6-2 


625-7 

46-1 
5-3 


652-3 

44-4 

4-9 


732-0 

49 3 

6-5 


801-9 
70-2 
61 


757-2 

50-5 

5-7 


780-9 

42-8 

5-3 


808-7 
52-3 

4-8 


769-9 

47-8 

50 


Totals 


705-8 


655-5 


858-5 


805 2 

8 7 
66 
4 8 

52 6 
4-8 

9 9 
39 4 

134 3 
4 9 
6-6 
4 8 

962-8 
23-5 


739 5 

9 3 
70 

3 9 
46 8 

4 8 
9 6 

31 5 

129 8 

6 5 

6 4 

4 5 

838 3 

200 

1.118-4 


677 1 


701-6 


787-8 


878-2 


813-4 


829-0 


865-8 


822-7 


Ontario— 
Brantford 


70 

5 9 

3 6 

39-4 

3-8 

8-5 

24-7 

106-2 

41 

5 1 

4-3 

825-7 

22-6 


7-5 

5-4 

3-9 

41-5 

41 

8-6 
27-4 
108-0 
4-7 
4-8 
4-3 
800-3 
22-3 


8-4 
6-4 
3-7 

49 5 
4-5 

10-6 

320 

140-5 

50 

60 

4-8 

1,062-3 

261 


6-7 
5-4 
4-7 

42-9 
4-3 
8-9 

28 1 

89-2 

4-5 

60 

4-5 

770-0 

17 2 


7-4 

5 7 

4-2 

46 8 

4 3 
8-7 

271 
92-8 

5 1 
5 7 
4-7 

751-6 
18-4 


8-4 

6-2 

4-4 

50-3 

5-5 

10-9 

29 2 

117-7 

5-5 

61 

4-8 

823-8 

29-0 


7-9 

10-1 

4-5 

58-4 

5-2 

10-2 

35-5 

121-7 

5-6 

6-0 

5-6 

999 2 

30-9 


9-7 

90 

4-9 

51-7 

61 

11-3 

34-3 

129-7 

6-3 

6-4 

5-5 

986-3 

39-4 


7-9 
11-3 

3-9 

49-9 

5-0 

9-9 

360 

108-6 

51 

6-6 

4-8 

1,017-7 

45-6 


70 
6-8 
3-8 

46-7 
4-5 
9-7 

310 

90-9 
4-6 
5-3 
4-8 
1,012-6 

30-6 


7-1 
6-9 


Fort William 


3-6 
43-8 




4-6 




9-3 




28-0 




88-3 


Peterborough 


4-6 

5-4 




50 




909-5 




360 






Totals 


1,060-8 


1,042-8 


1,3600 


1.263-7 

21 

48 6 

34-6 

4-2 

21 

4-3 

2-3 

33 7 

8-8 

310-5 


992-4 


982-4 


1.101-8 


1.300-9 


1.300-6 


1,312-4 


1,258-2 


1,1520 


Prairie Provinces- 

Brandon 

Calgary 

Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw 

Prince Albert 

Regina 


1-9 

38 3 

30 3 

31 

1-9 

3 3 

1-8 

30-3 

6-9 

178-1 


21 

49-8 

431 

3-5 

1-9 

3-6 

2-2 

31-5 

8-8 

339-5 


2-2 

46-6 

34-7 

3-7 

20 

41 

2-2 

72-5 

9-6 

552-2 


2 C 

49 1 

33 7 

4 6 

2 2 

4 6 

2-2 

39 5 

9 6 

344-6 


1-9 

48-2 

31 

4 4 

2-3 

4-5 

19 

38-0 

8-6 

4970 


21 

49-2 

29-6 

5-3 

31 

50 

1-9 

45-6 

9-8 

412-2 


2-5 
82-8 
35 2 

50 
• 3-4 

5-8 

2-4 

65 2 

13-2 

604-3 


2-5 

63-9 

31-8 

4-5 

2-5 

5-5 

21 

48-1 

10-6 

458-4 


2-2 

59-5 

32-6 

4-4 

2-6 

5-4 

2-2 

46-6 

10 

440-4 


2-1 

49-3 

37-6 

3-6 

2-1 

4-5 

1-9 

33-5 

8-5 

491-9 


1-8 

44-7 

24-3 

30 

1-7 

3-5 

1-7 

30-5 

70 

3100 


1-9 

47-3 

31-3 

3-2 

2-0 

3-9 

20 

33-5 

7-9 




279-7 






Totals 


295 9 


485-9 


729-8 


451-3 

4-8 
106 9 
24-8 


492 


637-8 


563-8 


819 9 


629-9 


605-8 


635-0 


427-8 


412-7 


British Colctmbia- 
New Westminster 

Vancouver 

Victoria 


4-6 
108-5 
20-3 


4-6 
114-2 
21 2 


4-7 

113 

190 


5 -I 
113 7 
24 5 


5-3 
116-3 
20-3 


5-4 
104-1 
21-8 


61 
118-1 
23-1 


5-7 
121-5 
22-7 


5-5 

129-8 
25-9 


50 
137-7 
22-6 


4-6 
139-8 
27-4 


51 
135-7 
24-2 


Totals 


133-4 


140-1 


136-7 


136-5 


143-7 


141-9 


131-4 


147-3 


149-9 


161-2 


165-3 


171-8 


165 


Totals Canada 


2,235-8 


2.368-7 


3.132-2 


2,710-3 


2,5451 


2,497-6 


2.425-9 


2,907-5 


3.021-5 


2,932-3 


2,992-1 


2,767-4 


2,598-8 


Bank clearings 


1.230 


1,252 


1,654 


1,561 


1.380 


1,376 


1.334 


1.583 


1.695 


1,516 


1,551 


1,462 


1.390 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 















1935 












1936 




1st of Month 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


Employment- 


86-3 

940 
940 
99-0 
85-8 
127-0 
83-3 
900 


83-8 
93-4 
94-8 
99-3 
87-7 
132-6 
83-5 


86-3 

96-7 
96-7 
101-3 

90-3 
133-5 

85-5 


87-2 
95-8 
97-9 

103-5 
93-5 

123-5 
87 
96-5 


86-8 
99-0 
97-7 

106-2 
93-9 

113-4 
891 
99-9 


87-2 
100-9 

97-2 
104-3 

95-4 
106-6 

90-8 
101-7 


88-7 
102-8 

98-7 
103-9 

95-2 
105-2 

90 1 
105-7 


91 5 

101-8 
101-1 
105-6 
1001 
106-8 
911 
103-5 


91-7 
100-5 
101-7 
104 
101-4 
115-4 

91-4 


91-9 
99-0 
100-8 
103-6 
100-4 
118-7 
94-1 


86-4 
93-5 
100-6 
103-2 
95-7 
116-4 
91 -9 
97-2 


87-6 
92-0 
96-4 
99-5 
96-8 
120-0 
91-2 
97-8 


87-3 
93-5 
97-8 

101-4 
97-1 

117-7 
941 


88-3 




91-7 




98-7 




103-1 




96-8 




131-2 




88-1 


Vancouver 


89-7 


93-4 


101-3 


100 3 


96-9 


100-i 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



23 



Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty- 


one Cities in 


Canada in 


rhousands of Dollars 


City 


1935 


1936 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Building Permits— 

Prince Edward Isd 
Charlotte town 


7 


20 


25 


42 


24 


5 


23 


15 


4 


2 


3 


11 




Nova Scotia 


26 


58 


114 


77 


65 


96S 


62 


85 


81 


32 


53 


33 


82 


Halifax 


25 


56 
2 

1 


104 
3 

8 


68 
2 
7 


50 

1 

15 


953 
1 
5 


52 
5 
5 


84 
1 


71 
2 
8 


32 


51 


33 


78 






Sydney 


1 




2 




4 


New Brunswick... 


15 


37 


40 


35 


35 


25 


29 


16 


20 


4 


11 


4 


18 


• 






1 
21 
18 


17 

18 


8 
13 
14 


1 
6 
18 


5 
8 
16 


2 
2 
12 










5 




4 
11 


18 
19 


io 

10 


4 


11 


4 


2 


Saint John 


12 


Quebec 


248 


1,806 


1.688 


1.497 


689 


331 


584 


1,257 


519 


928 


284 


203 


468 


Montreal and Mai- 
sonneuve 


192 
25 

2 
11 

6 
13 


1,681 

60 

1 

35 

5 

25 


5G7 
1,053 
14 
31 
12 
10 


1,408 
35 
3 

20 
14 
18 


547 

88 
3 

20 
5 

26 


257 

55 

1 

6 

1 

11 


360 

168 

1 

16 

2 

36 


675 

530 

27 

15 

2 

7 


428 
60 

"16 
1 
13 


740 

27 

1 

135 

3 

23 


2GG 
2 

io 

2 
5 


159 

8 
2 
5 
1 
28 


387 
45 


Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


ie 

5 
15 


Ontario 


1,725 


3,518 


2,152 


2,339 


1,610 


2.325 


1,616 


2,119 


2,306 


1,140 


457 


439 


1,151 


Belleville 


3 

28 

13 
8 
9 
4 

48 
1 

20 

100 

1 

1 

332 

5 

3 

3 

1 

5 

1 

3 

7 

1,022 

72 
11 
17 
2 

1 


14 
13 

7 
16 

6 

24 

916 

23 

55 

1,065 

1 

3 

6 
12 
28 

9 
23 

2 

9 

17 
616 

274 

12 
99 
3 

1 


11 
31 
14 

8 
11 
11 
109 
48 
95 
57 

5 

6 
259 

5 
15 
42 

2 
17 

3 

10 

15 

1,179 

141 

6 
33 


8 
33 

7 
43 
262 
158 
86 
24 
24 
62 

1 

15 
203 
13 
63 
20 

5 
25 

7 
15 

9 
1,027 

188 
5 

18 
2 
1 


10 
33 

6 
34 

7 
27 
100 
35 
91 
59 
10 

6 
100 

1 

15 
16 

8 
27 
60 
11 

9 
736 

173 
8 
15 
3 


86 

32 

9 

12 

42 

12 

142 

11 

106 

30 

1 

72 

753 

5 

38 
11 
5 
55 

9 

27 
702 

133 
4 

11 
1 
2 


1 

18 

4 

16 
44 
11 
143 
19 
16 
52 
43 
17 
63 

7 
13 
25 

5 
31 
14 

8 

10 
630 

126 

4 

286 


12 

35 

5 

11 

3 

14 

51 

37 

61 

89 

6 

2 

590 

1 

24 

11 

10 

8 

4 

7 

9 

783 

155 

22 
156 


ia 

2 
4 
2 
16 
142 
15 
78 
253 

2 

358 
4 

10 
5 
1 
41 
1 
5 
6 
1,098 

220 
3 

18 


1 
17 
22 


1 

17 
3 


4 
2 


17 


Brantford 

Chatham 

Fort William 

Gait 


6 
1 
10 


1 

1 

48 

32 

13 

1 

25 

1 

3 

1 

5 

5 

36 

3 

17 

740 

139 


2 

51 

3 
8 

17 

1 

1 

22 

3 

2 
1 


3 
7 
29 
10 
7 
13 

5 

19 
5 
5 

2 


3 


Guelph 


4 


Hamilton 

Kingston 


119 
13 

8 




28 


Niagara Falls 


3 

1 




201 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 

Stratford 


1 

16 
12 
3 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


4 


"a 

1 

201 

53 


""' 4 

16 

252 

19 

1 

30 


1 
10 


Sault Ste. Marie... 


4 
493 


York and East 
Townships 


151 
14 


Windsor 1 


9 


63 


25 


East Windsor- 
Riverside 

Sandwich 

Walkerville 

Woodstock 




1 


3 






















9 


8 

7 


6 
13 


3 
11 


4 
6 


2 
13 
















6 


8 


6 


20 


2 


""7 


5 


Manitoba 


1,523 


116 


181 


189 


158 


103 


117 


115 


56 


42 


34 


20 


45 


Brandon 

St. Boniface 

Winnipeg 


1 

2 
1,520 


53 
4 
59 


8 

4 

169 


3 
5 

182 


11 
27 
119 


27 

1 
74 


2 

30 
85 


1 

18 
95 


2 
55 


9 

33 


4 










30 


20 


45 


Saskatchewan 


45 


59 


143 


39 


25 


28 


491 


18 


30 


9 


5 


6 


3 


Moose Jaw 

Regina 


4 
21 

20 


21 
18 
20 


88 
18 
36 


31 

7 


1 

15 
10 


5 
7 
16 


5 

479 

7 


5 

7 
6 






4 
* "l 


5 
.... 




23 

7 


1 

8 


1 


Saskatoon 


2 


Alberta 


213 


409 


175 


312 


156 


122 


106 


84 


31 


20 


9 


12 


97 


Calgary 


181 
19 
11 

2 


108 

280 

16 

4 


72 
72 
28 
3 


238 

66 

8 


78 
63 
12 
3 


58 
53 
10 


55 

42 

9 


18 

50 

16 

1 


16 
6 
5 
4 


14 
11 
1 


7 
2 


8 
2 


50 


Edmonton 

T.ethbridge 

Medicine Hat 


27 
7 




1 


14 












British Columbia... 


222 


270 


307 


586 


1,505 


387 


294 


313 


268 


219 


428 


1,184 


497 


Kamloops 


2 
3 
6 
3 
168 

39 


3 
3 

33 

2 

199 

4 

28 


7 

4 
16 

3 
203 

5 
69 


29 
3 
18 

"""508 

1 
27 


6 

5 
27 

2 
1,377 

3 
84 


2 
1 

11 

22 

309 

1 

41 


5 
3 

9 

1 

246 

1 

27 


5 

3 
24 

3 
248 

1 
29 


3 
3 

16 
3 

217 

25 


3 

6 

20 

"'l64 

25 


1 

7 
17 

2 
359 

1 
40 


1 

1 

18 

'"U08 

56 


9 


Nanaimo 


22 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver 
Victoria 


33 

1 

356 

34 

44 


Total 81 oities... 


4,023 


6,292 


4,825 


5,117 


4,266 


4,293 


3,322 


4,020 


3,315 


2,402 


1,284 


1,912 


2,361 



1 Includes East Windsor, Sandwich and Walkerville, formerly shown separately, amalgamated with Windsor aa from 
September, 1935. 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



1935 



Mar. I April I May June July Aug. Sept. Oct 



Nov. Dec 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. 



Totals 

Component Material — 

Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose— Consumers' goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 
Field Origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Animal origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODUCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin — Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its oroducts 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton .raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Clay and allied material prod'ts 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



71-9 73 



81-3 
75 



SO 



81-3 
75-8 



71 5 



71-5 



71-6 



72 3 



67 



75-8 
75-8 



105 



75-8 
75 



75-8 
75-8 



73 



72 7 



72 6 



75-8 
75 



75-8 
75-8 



75-8 
75-8 



75-8 
75-8 



72 5 



72 4 



75-8 
75-8 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 



Description 1 



Wholesale Prices of Important 
Commodities— 

Oats, No 2C.W bush. 

Wheat, No.l Man. Northern " 
Flour, First Patent 2-98's 

jute 

Sugar, Br. West Indies, 

Montreal 2 cwt. 

Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 
Rubber, Ceylon, ribbed, 

smoked sheets, N.Y. 1 lb. 

Cattle, steers, good, over 

1,050 lbs cwt. 

Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 

Beef hides, packer hides, 

native steers lb. 

Leather, green hide crops... " 

Box sides, B, Oshawa ft. 

Butter, creamery, finest, 

Montreal lb. 

Cheese, Canadian, old, large, 

Montreal " 

Eggs, Grade "A", Montreal doz. 
Cotton, raw 1-11/16°, Ham- 
ilton lb. 

Cotton yarns, 10's white 

single " 

Bleached flannelette. 4-50 

yds. to lb " 

Gingham, dress, 6-50-7-75 

yds. to lb " 

Silk, raw, New York 1 " 

Wool.easfern bright \ blood " 
Wool, western range, semi- 
bright, i blood " 

Pulp, groundwood No. 1 ton 

Pig iron, malleable " 

Steel, merchant bars, mill 100 lb. 
Copper, electrolytic, domes- 
tic cwt. 

Lead, domestic, Montreal " 
Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto, lb. 
Zinc, domestic, Montreal. . cwt. 
Coal, anthracite, Toronto. . ton 
Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 

of-mine " 

Gasoline, Toronto gal. 

Sulphuric acid,66°Beaume,net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 
Other Countries 4 — 
United States— 

F-.sher.200: 1926 

Bureau of Labour, 784: 1925. 

Annalist, 72; 1913 

United Kingdom — 
Board of Trade. 150: 1930. . . . 

Economist. 58: 1927 

France, Statistique General, 

126: 1913 

Germany, Federal Statistical 

Office, 400: 1913 

Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 

130: 1914 

Netherlands, Central Bureau 

Statistics, 48: 1913 

Norway, Official, 95: 1913 

Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 

1913 

Italy, Bachi, 150: 1913 

Finland, Official, 139: 1926 

India, Dept. of Statistics, 72: 

1914 

Japan, Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 
Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 
tistician, 92: 1913 

New Zealand, Official, 180: 

1909-1913 

Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 
Cairo, 23: 1913-1914 



1935 



Mar. April 



$ 

•411 



5-400 



1-900 
4-895 



116 



170 



•259 

•160 
•239 

•134 

•300 

•484 

•959 

1-608 
•130 

•130 

19-688 
19-000 
2-250 

7-474 
3-321 

•525 
3-636 
11021 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



81-3 
79-4 
123-5 



66-1 

335 

100-7 

464 

75 
126 

115 

288 

90 

87 
138-6 

132.6 

136-5 



5-700 



1 940 

4-895 



7-110 
8 740 

•105 
•300 
•2,0 

•250 

•150 
•213 

•137 

•300 

•473 

•959 

1-738 
•130 

•130 

19107 
19-000 
2-250 

8-252 
3-426 
•565 
3-690 
10-730 

5-250 

•160 

16000 



125- 

87.5 
66-7 

336 

100-8 

531 

76 
125 

115 

296 

90 

88 
137-7 

132-7 

136-7 

92 



May 

% 

•40! 
•857 

5-300 

1! 

4-895 

•121 

7-200 
9-390 

•115 
•310 
•200 

•232 

•150 
•221 

•143 

•300 

•473 

•959 

1-720 
•140 

•140 

19-063 
19-000 
2-250 

8-718 
3-686 
•573 
3-943 
10-898 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



82-3 

80-2 

126-0 

88-2 
68-6 

340 

100-8 

552 



115 
302 



91 
137-8 

1340 

1371 

92 



June 



•398 
•817 

4-900 

1-900 

4-895 

-126 

6-7 

9-920 

•115 
•310 
•200 

•220 

•150 
•244 

•138 

•300 

•473 

•959 

1-644 
•150 

•150 

18-995 
19-000 
2-250 

8-221 
3-711 
•568 
3-816 
11-178 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



820 

79-8 

123-2 

88-4 
68-1 

330 

101-2 

555 

75 
126 

116 
308 
90 

91 
136-2 

134-7 

138-3 
94 



July 



•429 
•814 

5 100 

1-770 
4-895 

•121 

6-400 
9-660 

•120 
•310 
•200 

•219 

•150 

•268 

•143 

•300 

•473 

•959 

1-724 
•165 

•185 

18-434 
19-000 
2-250 

8-316 
3-882 
•570 
3-905 
11-469 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



82-1 
79-4 
123-6 

880 
68-1 

322 

101-8 

553 

74 
127 

116 

310 

90 

91 
136-2 

135-9 

139-5 
95 



Aug. 

$ 

•365 
•845 

5-300 

1-875 
4-895 

•120 

6-550 
9-920 

•120 
•310 
•200 

•226 

•140 
•304 

•139 

• 300 

•473 

•958 

2-008 
•165 



19-060 
19-000 
2-250 

8-677 
4-164 
•535 
4-i 
11-760 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



83-8 
80-5 
126-8 

88-4 
67-6 

330 

102.4 

552 

73 
128 

115 
323 



89 
138-2 



137-7 
140-3 



Sept. 



•360 
•903 

5-700 

1-850 
4-705 

•117 

6-800 
9-380 

•128 
•320 
•220 

•247 

•150 
•364 

•126 

•300 

•473 

•797 

2-090 
•160 



18-922 
19-000 
2-250 

9-129 
4-298 
•540 
4-224 
12-050 

5-250 

•160 

16-000 



851 
80-7 
127-6 



332 

102-3 

5C0 

75 
128 

115 

330 

91 

89 
142-7 

137-4 

143-0 

92 



Oct 
% 

•340 
•908 

5-800 

1- 

4-705 

•129 

6-010 
8-940 

•153 
•340 
•240 

•263 

•150 
•403 

•133 

•275 

•473 

•797 

2-337 
•160 

•180 

19 027 

19-000 
2-250 

9-540 
4-716 
•560 
4-467 
12-340 

5-250 

•150 

16-000 



85-4 
80-6 
129-2 

911 
71-5 

342 

102-8 

574 



117 



92 



93 
146-6 



137-8 
144-6 



Nov. 



•319 

•857 

5-700 

1-901 
4-7C5 

•133 

5-800 
7 990 

•153 
•360 
•240 

•274 

•150 
•435 

•145 

•290 

•473 

•797 

2-337 
•180 

•190 

20-653 
19-000 
2-250 

9-413 
4-740 
•570 
4-490 
12-340 

5-250 

•150 

16-000 



84-7 
80-6 
128-3 

91-2 
71-3 

348 

103-1 



118 



91 



92 
146-3 



142-8 



Dec. 



1936 



Jan. 



•298 
•84 

5-700 

1-950 
4-705 

•133 

6-330 
8-400 

•148 
•360 
•240 

•278 

•150 
•424 

•139 

•290 

•473 

•797 

2-208 
•180 

•190 

19-593 
19-000 
2-250 

9-407 
4-655 
•555 
4-364 
12-340 

5-250 

•150 

16-000 



84-2 
80-9 
129-4 



354 

103-4 

579 



93 
145 



94 



1-950 
4-705 

•144 

6-290 
8-450 

•153 
•370 
•240 

•277 

•150 

•319 

•136 

•290 

•473 

•797 

2-130 
•190 

•200 

20-485 
19-000 
2-250 

9-279 
4-362 
•528 
4-221 
12-342 

5-250 

•140 

16-000 



84-0 
i28-3 
91-8 



359 

103-6 

581 



92 



Feb. 



•355 
•821 

5-600 

1-950 
4-705 

•155 

6-290 
8-590 

•130 
•370 
•240 

•251 

•150 
•324 

•135 

•290 

•473 

•797 

1-899 
•200 

•210 

20-099 
19-000 
2-250 

9-452 
4-516 
•535 
4-400 
12-342 

5-250 

•150 

16-000 



83-5 



126-4 
91-7 



376 

103-6 

582 



Mar. 



•358 
•821 

5-700 

1-915 
4-610 

•160 

5-490 
8-500 

•120 
•370 
•240 

•244 

•150 
•315 

•133 

•290 



1-878 
•205 

•210 

20-018 
19-000 
2-250 

9-616 
4-614 
•540 
4-548 
11-020 

5-250 

•150 

16-000 



82- 



124-9 
91-7 



'For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. Appli- 
cation for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 
'For month of nearest delivery when spot quotations not available. 
'Canadian Funds. 
'The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



26 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 22. Total Value of Imports and Exports, by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 



Month 



1933 

July 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. 
December . 

1934 
January. . . . 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November 
December. . 

1935 

January 

February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November 
December 

1936 

January 

February . . 
March . 



Imports of Merchandise for Consumption in Canada 



Total 
Imports 



$000 

35,698 
38.747 
38,698 
41.070 
43.712 
35,368 

32,391 
33,592 
47,519 
34,815 
52.887 
46,186 
44.145 
43.507 
42.208 
47.229 
49.884 
39.108 

37.229 
37.014 
48.191 
30,637 
54,540 
46.732 
48.414 
49,560 
44,689 
52,751 
55,958 
38,569 

40,590 
41,597 
52,765 



Vege- 
table 
Products 



$000 

7.061 
7,676 
7,575 
8,329 
10.517 
8.215 

5.825 
7.429 
8.737 
7.528 

10,629 
9.141 

10.171 
8.970 
8.646 

10,632 

11.728 
9.766 

7.020 
6.791 
8,397 
6,427 
13,399 
10.405 
10.162 
8,949 
8,072 
9.292 
12.451 
8.334 



7.093 
9,564 



Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 



$000 

1.608 
1.979 
1,778 
1,934 
1.588 
1,351 

1.639 
1,538 
2.335 
1.646 
1,747 
1,678 
1.635 
1.716 
1.731 
1.606 
1.615 
1.350 

1,581 
1,574 
2.078 
1.600 
2.216 
1,707 
1.809 
2,070 
1,930 
2.061 
2,235 
1,766 

1,854 
2.241 

2,826 



Textiles 



$000 

6,452 
7.272 
6,749 
7,302 
7.241 
7,254 

6,521 
7,202 
9.928 
6,085 
8.140 
6.896 
6215 
6.620 
6,254 
6.254 
7.372 
6.387 

6.781 
6.250 
8 546 
6.293 
5,833 
6.197 
7.074 
9.163 
6,691 
7,350 
7,759 
7,261 

8,402 
8,195 
9,702 



Wood 
and 
Paper 



$000 

1,615 
1,743 
1,690 
1.933 
U903 
1,565 

1,536 
1,394 
1.981 
1.369 
1.878 
1.657 
1.668 
1.766 
1.852 
1,984 
2.027 
1,743 

1.584 
1.611 
2,061 
1,577 
1,974 
1,763 
1.819 
1.902 
1,963 
2,267 
2.301 
1,641 

1,783 
1,959 
2,323 



Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 



$000 

5,636 
6.046 
5,353 
5.328 
5,929 
5,228 

5.763 
5,804 
9,324 
7.800 
12.196 
9.368 
8.525 
7.138 
6.782 
6.770 
7.282 
6.864 

7.384 
8 322 

11.626 
9.192 

11,903 
9.421 
8.855 
9.389 
8.625 

10,556 

10.780 
6,084 

9,088 

8,666 

11,695 



Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 



$000 

1.307 
1,516 
2.117 
2.180 
2.091 
1.641 

1.571 
1.613 
2,235 
1.681 
2,478 
2.551 
1.936 
2.261 
1.851 
2,460 
2 745 
2,577 

2.454 
2.392 
3.110 
2.073 
3.226 
2.571 
3.684 
3.019 
2.340 
2,867 
3,307 
2,571 

2,487 
2.557 
2.983 



Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 



$000 

7.116 
7.753 
8.371 
9,013 
9,181 
6,351 

6.012 
5.423 
7.926 
4.760 
10.230 
9.881 
9.131 
10.357 
10.428 
10.546 
11.089 
6.207 

6.553 

6.299 

6.943 

5.411 

10.313 

9.946 

9.967 

9,472 

10,218 

11.479 

10.731 

6,504 

6,720 
6,525 
8,135 



Chemic- 


Miscel- 


als and 


laneous 


Allied 


Com- 


Products 


modities 


$000 


$000 


2,358 


2.545 


2,054 


2.708 


2,544 


2,523 


2,347 


2,704 


2,727 


2,538 


1,946 


1,818 


1,880 


1.644 


1.578 


1.612 


2.448 


2.606 


2,043 


1.903 


3,052 


2,537 


2.722 


2.292 


2.204 


2.660 


2.194 


2 485 


2.201 


2.463 


2,637 


4,341 


3,118 


2.907 


2.078 


2.135 


2,134 


1.740 


2.012 


1.793 


2.482 


2.933 


2,056 


2,008 


2,990 


2.693 


2,420 


2.310 


2,227 


2.817 


2.455 


3,140 


2,364 


2.486 


3,064 


3,814 


3,483 


2,911 


2,071 


2,338 


2,144 


1,910 


2,047 


2,313 


2,599 


3,199 











Exports of Merchandise from Canada 












Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 








Domest 


c Produce 








Balance 

of 
Trade 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron 
and 
its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 

Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1933 

July 


$000 

51,866 
45.135 
58.329 
61.035 
60,926 
51.624 

47,118 
38,365 
58.364 
32.047 
58.543 
58.643 
56. 787 
55.837 
58.815 
68.313 
65.677 
61.395 

44,374 
47.677 
59.026 
38,296 
62,947 
52,763 
57,786 
71,700 
66,152 
85,749 
85.317 
70,565 

54,417 
60, 198 
73.166 


$000 

51.345 
44,723 
57,785 
60,489 
60,385 
50,929 

46,652 
37,842 
57,637 
31,582 
57.900 
58.046 
56 121 
55.249 
58.135 
67,748 
65,125 
60.850 

43.902 
46,719 
58,098 
37,575 
62,101 
51,869 
56,239 
70,738 
64,565 
84,953 
84,115 
68,419 

53,538 
59,474 
72 030 


$000 

17,746 
12.386 
22,520 
25,348 
26.016 
20,628 

14,694 
11,903 
15,807 
6.866 
20,143 
19,743 
16.519 
19.197 
22.799 
29.950 
26.016 
25,743 

11.053 
12,609 
15,595 
9.389 
17,606 
11.819 
14,231 
23,159 
20,965 
35,943 
34,489 
22,963 

12,795 
19,659 

19,843 


$000 

6.816 
6,324 
7,326 
6,911 
6.679 
7,012 

8,272 
5,321 
8,064 
3.902 
5,815 
6,786 
7,719 
7.061 
6.617 
7,650 
7.517 
7.846 

9,159 
8,337 
8,440 
5.157 
7,820 
6,954 
7,408 
7,527 
8,551 
9,960 
9,614 
8,293 

10,249 
8,938 
10,462 


$000 

754 
783 
1,168 
859 
701 
488 

410 

428 
836 
303 
810 
823 
616 
601 
614 
799 
627 
468 

531 
556 
774 
366 
939 
838 

1.168 
883 
968 
982 

1,010 
626 

703 
849 
942 


$000 

13,000 
13,937 
13,567 
12,903 
11,935 
11.899 

11,567 
9,447 
15,596 
9.300 
13.773 
13,684 
15.013 
14.680 
13.879 
14.402 
14.444 
14,924 

11.685 
10.618 
14.104 
9.795 
15,360 
15.409 
15,092 
17,141 
15,667 
17,255 
16,578 
17,167 

12,362 
12,412 
17.594 


$000 

2.225 
1,750 
2.336 
2.901 
1,902 
2,032 

1.967 
2,505 
3,856 
2,581 
3,741 
3,909 
4.240 
2 926 
2,585 
3.950 
2.458 
2,683 

1.846 
3.861 
5.955 
4.362 
5,020 
3,742 
5,010 
4,091 
3,956 
3,911 
4,035 
4,238 

4,576 
3,460 
5,967 


$000 

7,343 
6.184 
7,291 
7.733 
9.056 
5.722 

6.861 
5,680 
9.455 
6,248 
9.298 
9,031 
8.395 
7.626 
8.203 
7.373 
10,142 
5.368 

6,628 
7.434 
8,873 
5,786 
10,810 
8,980 
9,649 
14,196 
10,358 
12,832 
13,681 
10,763 

8,993 
10,545 

12,540 


$000 

1,373 

1,232 
1,408 
1,647 
1.943 
1.466 

1,076 

836 
1.404 

766 
1,456 
1,612 
1.253 
1.245 
1,464 
1,390 
1.633 
1,623 

957 
1,068 
1,187 

803 
1,636 
1,592 
1,565 
1.665 
1,692 
1,734 
1.987 
2,013 

1,445 
1,360 
1,592 


$000 

1,059 
1,017 
1,142 
1,024 
1,224 
941 

1,147 

1.117 

1.682 

948 

1.473 

1.316 

1.082 

921 

870 

1.048 

1.361 

1.386 

1.436 
1.456 
1,974 
1,034 
1,550 
1,409 
960 
1,036 
1,185 
1,235 
1,682 
1,417 

1,436 
1,268 
1,808 


$000 

1,029 
1,111 
1.027 
1,162 
928 
741 

657 

607 

941 

667 

1.391 

1.141 

1.283 

993 

1.103 

1,186 

926 

809 

605 

781 
1,197 

886 
1,359 
1,127 
1,155 
1,039 
1,223 
1,100 
1,040 

941 

979 

982 

1,283 


$000 

(+)16,167 


August 

September... . 

October 

November 

December 

1934 

January 

February 

March 


(+) 6,388 
(+)19.630 
(+)19,965 
(+;i7.21fi 

(+)16,257 

( -r-)14,727 
(+) 4.773 
(-r-)10.845 

(-) 2.768 


May 


(+) 5.657 


Juno 


(-|-)12,457 


Juiy 


(-H12.642 


August 

September 

October 

November... 

December 

1935 

January 

February 

March 


(+)12.330 
(+)16.607 
f + )21.084 
(-r-)15,793 
f+)22,713 

(+) 7,144 
(+H0.634 

(+)10,835 
(+) 1,660 




(+) 8,408 
(+) 6,031 




July 

August 

September 

October 

November . . 

December... . 

1936 

January 

February 

March 


(+) 9,372 
(-B22.140 
(+)21,463 
(-t-)32,998 
(+)29.359 
(+)31,995 

(+)13,827 
(+)18,60i 
(-|-)20,401 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



27 



Table 23. Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living and Cost per Week of a Family Budget. 



Classification 



Exports of i Canadian Produce 
Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 

Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 
w hiskey) 

Fruits 

Grains (Total) 

Barley 

Wheat 

Rubber (chiefly tires and 
footwear) 

Sugar 

Vegetables 

Wheat flour 

Animals and Animal Pro- 
ducts— 

Cattle 

Cheese 

Fish 

Furs, (chiefly raw) 

Hides, raw 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Meats 

Fibres, Textiles and Pro- 
ducts— 

Binder twine 

Cotton 

Rags 

Raw wool 

Wood, Wood Products and 
Paper— 

Paper (chiefly newsprint) 

Planks and boards 

Pulp-wood 

Shingles 

Timber, square 

Wood-pulp 

Iron and Its Products— 

Automobiles 

Automobile parts 

Farm implements 

Hardware and cutlery 

Machinery 

Pigs and ingots 

Tubes and pipes 

Kon-Ferrous Metal Pro- 
ducts — 

Aluminium 

Copper, (chiefly ore and 
blister) 

Gold, raw 

Lead 

Nickel 

Silver 

Non-Metallic Mineral Pro 
ducts— 

Asbestos, (chiefly raw) 

Coal 

Petroleum and products 

Stone and products 

Chemicals and Allied Pro- 
ducts — 

Acids 

Fertilizers 

Soda and compounds 

Miscellaneous Commodities — 

Electrical energy 

Films 

Settlers' effects 



Indexes of Retail Prices, Rents 
and Costs of SerTlces— 

Total 1926=100 

Food 

Fuel 

Rent 

Clothing 

Sundries 



Cost per Week of a Family 
Budget- 
All foods $ 

Fuel and light $ 

Rent S 

Totali $ 



1935 



910 
1,182 
7,956 

144 
7.457 



1,045 
57 

1,741 

1,532 
227 
446 

2,601 



1,123 
131 

4,687 
234 

4,288 

962 

35 

108 

1,051 



1,067 
40 

1,010 

. 623 
117 
183 

1.561 



7,686 5,708 

1,822 

410 140 

314 41 

144 88 

2,798 1,669 



3,719 
323 
412 



414 

3,136 
321 
459 

2,314 
707 



78-8 
69 5 
88 7 
80-3 
70-3 
92-1 



7-63 
2-89 
5-54 
16-10 



2,774 

290 

501 

88 

326 

78 

47 



174 

LOT, 
125 
355 

2,724 
424 



306 



78-6 
68 6 
88 7 
80-3 
70-3 
921 



7-50 

2-88 
5-55 
15 97 



1,102 
222 

11.588 
865 

10.081 

885 

105 

394 

1.486 



1.337 

162 

1,289 

1.007 

237 

366 

2.365 



8.737 

2.337 

316 

327 

163 

2.620 

2,598 
306 
602 
217 

474 



49 



2,497 

2,546 
354 
636 

2,400 
565 



623 



78 6 
68-7 
85-9 
81 4 
70 3 
92 1 



7-52 
2 84 
5 57 
15 97 



June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept 


618 


964 


715 


908 


97 


151 


183 


586 


6,383 


8,257 


18.237 


15,091 


521 


502 


327 


104 


5,149 


7,214 


17,604 


14,670 


1,027 


1,119 


1,056 


1,022 


157 


170 


72 


43 


333 


394 


163 


408 


1,664 


1,460 


1,405 


1,489 


747 


365 


310 


342 


196 


582 


675 


1.745 


1,570 


2,082 


2.308 


2,514 


749 


835 


968 


720 


280 


251 


175 


383 


393 


336 


297 


324 


2,147 


2,114 


1.768 


1.462 


364 


321 


27 


22 


72 


211 


155 


181 


62 


56 


58 


49 


5 


131 


195 


220 


8,182 


7,911 


8,101 


7,737 


2,444 


2,249 


3.206 


2,263 


703 


948 


1,231 


942 


647 


964 


986 


928 


110 


115 


82 


118 


2,433 


2,128 


2,356 


2,221 


1,628 


1,732 


1,868 


1,670 


265 


276 


235 


319 


710 


1,124 


507 


419 


104 


200 


170 


166 


412 


563 


634 


503 


64 


212 


127 


299 


71 


72 


61 


61 


302 


363 


1,518 


667 


2,981 


2,541 


3.187 


2,636 


312 


525 


528 


525 


369 


529 


900 


566 


2,294 


3,309 


4.080 


3,676 


1,027 


855 


1,979 


752 


649 


517 


594 


688 


160 


185 


175 


161 


38 


130 


3 ; i 


125 


437 


543 


452 


482 


159 


98 


267 


259 


392 


171 


94 


102 


326 


320 


253 


341 


221 


266 


236 


205 


386 


315 


266 


279 


249 


327 


248 


387 


78 8 


78 8 


79-4 


79-6 


69-3 


69.3 


71-3 


70-9 


84-8 


84 7 


85-4 


85-4 


81-4 


81.4 


81-4 


81-4 


69 9 


69.9 


69-9 


71-6 


92-6 


92.4 


92-5 


92-6 


7 54 


7 53 


7-73 


7-74 


2-81 


2-80 


2-80 


2-81 


5-57 


5-57 


5-57 


5-57 


15 95 


15-94 


1615 


16-16 



1,512 
2,733 

26,277 
322 

25,474 

1,005 
HI 
771 

2,009 



1,630 

2,647 

343 

227 

375 

1,690 



232 



8.727 

2.842 

899 

957 

180 

2,269 

1,373 
186 
376 
178 
499 
267 
83 



744 



823 

3,641 

947 



448 



2,262 
2.803 

23.239 
437 

21,743 

1.121 
112 
984 

2,218 



250 
989 

3.266 
344 
302 
436 

2,424 



445 

658 

138 

2,651 

1.632 
162 
340 
274 
464 
472 



2,827 

2,246 

366 

797 

3,959 

1,363 



255 278 
150 403 
355 445 



323 
163 

299 



7-93 
2-83 
5-63 
16-42 



327 

174 
2S5 



80 6 
73-2 
870 
82-6 
71 6 
92-5 



8-04 
2-83 
5-63 
16-54 



1,641 
1.968 

14,298 
207 

13,672 

943 
101 
627 



150 

255 

1.898 

2,699 

433 

319 

1,616 



9,942 
2,129 

448 

669 

96 

2,426 

1,612 
257 
370 
163 
492 
365 
175 



60G 

2,572 

298 

781 

2.621 

2,497 



80-6 

73 

87-2 

82 

70-6 

92-5 



8-14 
2-84 
5-63 
16-65 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



1,195 
1,166 
6,636 
40 
6,497 

953 

45 

239 

1,311 



506 

139 

1,881 

3,947 

401 

304 

2,185 



6,949 

1,446 

303 

522 

137 

2,094 

2,304 
336 
416 
209 
431 
247 
59 



120 



73-9 
87-2 
82-6 
70-6 
92-4 



8-17 
2-84 
5-63 
16-68 



2,352 

634 

12,184 

73 

11,946 

1,084 
194 
138 

1,430 



637 

103 

1,730 

2,270 

349 

451 

2,267 



183 



6,745 

2,008 

315 

203 

85 

2,213 

1,747 
146 
392 
165 
411 
196 



136 

2,720 
352 
752 

4,120 

596 



108 

13 

344 



80-4 
72-9 
87-3 
82-6 
70-6 
92-5 



8-07 
2-84 
5-63 
16-58 



1,966 

584 

10,505 

43 

10,239 

1,725 
337 
302 

1,992 



1,160 
272 

2,260 

1,892 
300 
528 

2,621 



261 
68 
52 



9,514 

2,822 

253 

421 

168 

3,025 

2,945 
446 
586 
173 
596 
205 
104 



223 

2,982 
424 

887 

5,278 
858 



679 

194 

25 

392 



189 
787 
342 

235 
546 
175 



80-5 
73-4 
87-5 
82-6 
70-6 
92-5 



8-12 
2-84 
5-63 
16-63 



28 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 24. Summary of Canada's Imports, in Thousands of Dollars 















1935 












1936 




Classification 








Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


| July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Imports of Principal Commodi- 
ties— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 


776 
186 
328 
1,425 
146 
247 
947 
257 
857 
626 
614 

113 
594 
271 
272 

270 

244 

1,586 

249 

1,572 

782 

67 

89 

411 

151 

92 

189 

438 

197 

476 

759 

873 
541 

253 
263 
41 
73 

362 

3,692 

280 

1.078 

698 

267 

2,003 

42 

859 

599 

96 

179 

124 

119 

391 
222 
130 
62 
743 
512 
255 

556 
2,461 
475 
558 
1,347 
387 
327 

304 
407 
50 
40 
43 
203 


430 
67 
242 
1,086 
112 
166 
506 
235 
975 
571 
633 

53 
406 
306 
210 
177 

120 

1,134 

191 

1,133 

613 

55 

56 

303 

96 

58 

261 

489 

139 

327 

415 

633 
385 

237 

212 
57 
52 

337 

2,569 

183 

871 

692 

184 

1,742 

22 

827 

398 

91 

100 

73 

110 

124 

178 
121 
45 
597 
336 
143 

447 
1,937 
257 
456 
1,250 
132 
258 

249 
287 
88 
29 
35 
139 


623 
309 
346 

1,970 
134 
401 

1,221 
337 

2,041 
680 
865 

140 
522 
286 
230 
116 

128 
871 
211 
1.116 
599 
43 
183 
352 
109 
44 
139 
295 
198 
284 
436 

801 
489 

313 

212 

40 

88 

391 

2,678 

233 

958 

662 

211 

1,879 

50 

2,133 

710 

124 

208 

117 

137 

575 
215 

128 
47 
625 
754 
207 

598 
3,269 
311 
608 
3 491 
470 
382 

255 
477 
248 
32 
41 
206 


984 
157 
360 

2,050 

149 

277 

556 

73 

2,259 
576 
703 

108 
377 
195 
232 
72 

135 

976 

191 

971 

575 

19 

64 

387 

83 

24 

357 

472 

196 

269 

431 

755 

477 

220 

236 

25 

20 

244 

1,803 

167 

744 

642 

190 

1,676 

30 

1,507 

482 

118 

135 

103 

117 

271 

183 
130 
69 
674 
540 
146 

541 
2,952 
139 
436 
3,956 
501 
291 

242 
344 
111 
32 
43 
158 


520 
155 
227 

2,532 

164 

144 

529 

16 

2,165 
681 
271 

168 
379 
257 
284 
100 

139 
1,368 
199 
972 
704 

24 
175 
383 
186 

26 
201 
483 
222 
290 
657 

744 
489 

239 

212 

51 

47 

236 

1,159 

179 

602 

594 

158 

1,758 

41 

2,028 

421 

83 

127 

83 

119 

405 
196 
128 
60 
640 
1,454 
209 

488 
2,925 
116 
397 
3,931 
560 
495 

227 

402 

65 

46 

26 

212 


615 

106 

253 

1,940 

101 

155 

889 

26 

2,012 

2,915 

86 

172 
360 
240 
296 
200 

189 

939 

206 

1,232 

837 

75 

87 

1,772 

323 

62 

276 

548 

236 

432 

927 

799 
508 

242 

227 

48 

34 

193 
934 
180 
479 
740 
178 

1.661 
110 

2,493 
469 
103 
150 
149 
121 

689 
188 
126 
48 
815 
360 
156 

618 

2,737 

95 

422 
3,734 

251 

311 

221 
455 
170 
31 
52 
194 


584 
103 
221 

1,935 

123 

219 

641 

24 

1,613 
640 
80 

163 
375 
396 
240 
227 

192 

794 

191 

1,196 

788 

71 
193 
132 
213 

74 
186 
485 
196 
322 
739 

898 
479 

246 

210 

43 

61 

126 

1,385 

216 

576 

430 

215 

1,754 

22 

1,483 

493 

82 

133 

105 

109 

288 
187 
173 
57 
730 
159 
190 

474 
3,073 
128 
462 
3,889 
456 
469 

206 
478 
174 
35 
34 
211 


737 
128 
282 

1,520 
202 
411 
477 
128 

1,847 
804 
96 

187 
321 
446 
305 
206 

240 

1,334 

201 

1,203 

720 

28 

208 

323 

169 

89 

301 

638 

261 

258 

655 

981 

573 

293 
304 
51 
55 

140 

2,309 

201 

675 

179 

209 

1,818 

46 

2,020 

738 

118 

147 

161 

143 

262 
204 
208 
69 
919 
226 
195 

614 
3,817 
132 
520 
4,067 
587 
419 

275 
542 
403 
42 
53 
259 


1,086 
126 
324 

1,894 
208 
609 

1,383 
96 

2,602 
785 
246 

175 
326 
623 
290 
133 

157 

1.754 

229 

1,027 

887 

23 

93 

346 

116 

68 

357 

523 

232 

234 

629 

662 
949 

286 
277 
55 
63 

224 

1,868 

243 

578 

158 

270 

1,902 

163 

2,680 

641 

98 

150 

172 

115 

492 
223 
211 
79 
899 
396 
264 

746 
2,815 
197 
669 
4,139 
423 
484 

231 
652 
417 
47 
85 
276 


190 
114 
322 

1,609 

111 

373 

884 

79 

1,378 
557 
286 

137 
368 
586 
262 

87 

138 

2,869 

187 

718 

560 

19 

206 

193 

79 

45 

313 

479 

210 

212 

476 

718 
368 

247 
213 
47 
33 

165 

1,164 

189 

358 

114 

173 

1,086 

71 

982 

456 

65 

87 

95 

83 

238 
133 
187 
46 
595 
591 
199 

485 
2,442 
173 
363 
1,724 
145 
205 

177 
467 
145 
40 
37 
146 


616 
170 
284 
1,189 
136 
160 
714 
238 
565 
581 
339 

151 
651 
430 
259 
79 

165 

2,482 

230 

1,191 

589 

24 
226 
279 
153 

35 
346 
566 
245 
450 
705 

788 
457 

237 
212 
41 
44 

335 

2,398 

171 

777 

343 

172 

2,127 

42 

672 

448 

84 

101 

105 

106 

282 
205 
93 
55 
677 
423 
208 

498 
2,301 
334 
433 
1,835 
309 
422 

255 
497 
188 
22 
25 
173 


483 
185 
347 
1,077 
142 
298 
745 
236 
756 
697 
426 

139 
876 
294 
273 

188 

162 
1,470 
247 
1,224 
695 
57 
376 
275 
152 
49 
518 
583 
236 
515 
787 

825 
523 

250 

257 

63 

40 

263 
2,023 
182 
709 
464 
204 
1,986 

46 
659 
568 

91 
147 
128 

69 

252 
200 
103 
65 
688 
359 
202 

475 
2,889 

525 

446 

1,217 

84 

236 

253 
469 
71 
23 
37 
145 


525 
196 






366 

1,497 

176 


Fruits 






258 




855 




292 


Sugar, chiefly for refining 

Tea 


1,030 
972 




743 


Animal Products — 
Fish 


133 




1 061 


Hides 


461 


Leather, unmanufactured 


251 
314 


Textile Products — 


180 




1 656 




291 




1,468 
857 






78 




324 


Silk— Raw 


372 




151 




74 




716 


Noils and tops 


607 




267 


Worsted and serges 


436 




748 


Wood and Paper — 

Books and printed matter 

Paper 


992 
934 


manufactured wood 


288 
325 




59 


Other unmanufactured wood . 
Iron and Steel — 


70 
649 




2,417 




188 




914 




1,163 




249 




2,523 




18 




993 


Other rolling mill products 

Staniped and coated products. . 
Tools. 


502 
126 
162 




155 


Wire 


137 


Non-Ferrous Metals — 


347 




257 




136 




77 




898 




347 


Tin 


187 


Clay and products 


611 


Coal 


2,679 


Coke 


324 




587 




2,189 




380 


Stone and products 




Chemicals— 


417 

386 


Dyeing and tanning materials. . 


416 

67 




39 




37 




180 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 25. Banking and Currency, in Million Dollars Unless Otherwise Stated 



29 




Banking— 

Rbadilt Available Assets- 

Spacie 

Dominion note* 1 

Deposits with Bank of Canada 
In United Kingdom banks.. 

In foreign banks 

Foreign currency 

Government securities 

Call loans abroad 

Total quick assets 

Loans and Securities except 
Canadian Governments— 

Public securities 

Railway securities 

Canadian call loans 

Current 1 >ans 

Current 1 >ans abroad 

Provincial loans 

Municipal loans 

Total loans, etc 

Other Assets— 

Non-current loans 

Real estate 

Mortgages 

Premises. 

Letters of credit 

Loans to companies 

Other assets 

Note circulation deposits 

Inter-bank balances, notes of 

other banks 

Cheques of other banks — 
Balancesdueby other bank? 

Grand tot al assets 

Liabilities to the Public — 

Note circulation 

Dominion Government 

Provincial Government 

Government advarces 

Deposits by public — 

Savings deposits 

Demand deposits 

Tot al deposits 

Foreign deposits 

Due banks abroad, etc. — 

United Kingdom 

Foreign 

Bills payable 

Letters of credit 

Other liabilities 

Total public liabilities.. 

Due between banks 

Liabilities to Shareholders— 

Dividends $000 

Reserve 

Capital 

Grand total liabilities... 
Surplus of notice deposits over 

current loans 

Percentage of current loans to 

notice deposits, p.c 

All notes in hands of public , 
Security holdings 



Indci Numbers— 

(With ttasonal adjustment 
1996 = 100) 

Demand deposits 

Notice deposits 

Current loans 

Security holdings 

Call loans, Canada 

Call loans, elsewhere 

Notes in hands of public. . . 



1935 



Feb. | Mar. I April l May I June I July I Aug. I Sept. I Oct. I Nov. Dec. | Jan. | Feb. 



1936 



End of Month 



5111 


16 44 


15-83 


15-32 


14-02 


14-41 


13-84 


15-26 


16-53 


14-79 


15-80 


16-48 


178-45 


51-16 


43-47 


30-92 


28-38 


33-07 


30-58 


33-28 


38-66 


36-71 


40-58 


34-58 




149 03 


163-71 


166-97 


172-90 


169-92 


192-35 


183-83 


190-85 


186-72 


181-64 


178-74 


30-54 


29-61 


24-76 


22-48 


13-26 


14-39 


19-2!) 


20-55 


1901 


21-73 


17-20 


25-38 


61-82 


60-95 


71-59 


93-80 


88-52 


96-48 


93-62 


115-38 


99-31 


109-89 


94-52 


100-89 


20-89 


20-71 


20-52 


20-64 


21 02 


21-33 


22-63 


22-02 


22-91 


23-24 


24-29 


23-80 


807-09 


797-73 


825-70 


835-41 


838-74 


847-48 


$54-23 


910-87 


917-64 


945-30 


955-93 


993-55 


90-35 


94-12 


77-00 


71-21 


67-45 


59-93 


68-55 


60-01 


52-13 


59-71 


64-74 


59-40 


1,252 


1,220 


1.243 


1,257 


1,244 


1,257 


1,295 


1,361 


1,357 


1.39S 


1,395 


1,433 


137-36 


13207 


135-69 


129-52 


135-86 


136-63 


139-43 


140-55 


142-85 


138-91 


145-47 


152-32 


39-47 


40-31 


39 03 


39-58 


43-32 


46 67 


46-99 


51-79 


55-38 


52-79 


53-27 


60-83 


85-58 


80-52 


81-33 


81-98 


85-24 


77 04 


77-44 


75-62 


73-76 


95-90 


82-98 


77-49 


815 


819 


823 


824 


831 


813 


829 


839 


856 


857 


820 


756 


136-31 


137-53 


144-33 


147-81 


156-45 


154-26 


155-91 


147-02 


153-04 


138-97 


144-98 


144-61 


31-22 


28-19 


29-65 


26-87 


16-37 


17-82 


25-20 


28-52 


29-63 


22-59 


19-40 


18-08 


110-39 


117-43 


127-84 


120-43 


107-19 


107-18 


101-05 


97-48 


96-67 


100-20 


105-67 


99-74 


1,356 


1.355 


1.381 


1,370 


1,375 


1,352 


1,375 


1,380 


1,407 


1,406 


1,371 


1,309 


14-32 


14-52 


14-48 


14-46 


14-45 


14-50 


14-50 


14-45 


14-25 


13-47 


13 13 


13-56 


7-86 


7-90 


7-99 


8-64 


8-72 


8-67 


8-75 


8-8^ 


8-86 


8-61 


8-59 


8-64 


5-50 


5-51 


5-52 


5-52 


5-45 


5-46 


5-46 


5-4? 


5 45 


5-33 


5-31 


5-31 


77-73 


77-50 


77-40 


75-71 


76-61 


76-62 


76-47 


76-27 


76-39 


76-11 


75-96 


76-08 


54-52 


53-83 


52-46 


52-96 


52-65 


57-97 


55-78 


53-40 


54-33 


59-43 


58-19 


58-66 


12-75 


13-29 


13-27 


13-12 


13-10 


13 - 02 


12 -8-: 


12-96 


12-91 


10-98 


10-81 


10 77 


2-35 


2-75 


2-78 


3-16 


304 


2-60 


2-24 


2-32 


1-91 


1-71 


1-62 


1-94 


6 72 


6-72 


6-73 


6-73 


6-84 


6 91 


6-86 


6-87 


6-87 


6-87 


6-88 


6-88 


7-28 


6-36 


7-19 


5 97 


7-84 


6-90 


7-47 


9-?1 


5-71 


6-43 


7-86 


5-68 


78-07 


77-76 


112 97 


96-95 


96-82 


84-92 


96-90 


99-27 


102-80 


93-21 


119-49 


106-58 


5-17 


3-76 


4-22 


3-49 


4-22 


4-95 


5-89 


5-65 


5-23 


5-33 


5-27 


5-37 


2.880 


2,845 


2.92G 


2.915 


2,909 


2,892 


2,963 


3.036 


3,059 


3,092 


3,079 


3,042 


125 98 


124-68 


121-42 


122-45 


129-57 


121-26 


129-97 


131-7." 


126-47 


130-53 


118-93 


117-38 


25 08 


14-35 


15-34 


23-73 


3216 


1602 


38-85 


55-81 


12-91 


38-59 


11-87 


22-76 


33-73 


32-79 


37-06 


32-45 


35-52 


34-77 


38-19 


41-24 


47-10 


47-54 


40-72 


45-75 


34-84 
1,428 
























1,447 


1,452 


1.446 


1.426 


1,428 


1,434 


1,444 


1,465 


1,474 


1,486 


1,499 


516-24 


512-50 


581-86 


561-21 


545-41 


553-01 


553-82 


590-01 


625-21 


613-27 


640-92 


576-30 


1,945 


1,959 


2,034 


2,008 


1,971 


1,981 


1,988 


2.034 


2,091 


2,087 


2,127 


2,075 


321-87 


322-95 


328-41 


339-8G 


340-95 


338-25 


360-70 


370-41 


376-66 


382-66 


379-48 


381-05 


6-92 


6-64 


6-62 


8-04 


15-25 


12-72 


13-17 


11-44 


9-91 


12-30 


8-54 


8-28 


26-37 


26 00 


24-81 


24-28 


26-65 


24 03 


26-03 


27-71 


28 09 


27-73 


27-40 


27-25 


•67 


•47 


•73 


•89 


•75 


1-35 


1-62 


1-70 


2-06 


1-47 


1-46 


1-23 


54-52 


53-83 


52-46 


52-96 


52-65 


57-97 


55-78 


53-40 


54-33 


59-43 


58-19 


58-66 


2-54 


2-27 


2-39 


2-40 


2-40 


2-40 


2-38 


2-47 


2-34 


2-71 


3-13 


3-07 


2,577 


2,543 


2.623 


2,615 


2,607 


2,590 


2,655 


2.73C 


2,750 


2,790 


2,777 


2,741 


11-32 


10-03 


13-62 


11-61 


13-78 


12-56 


15-05 


13-67 


15 08 


12-25 


14-33 


13-08 


2,946 


807 


1,847 


2,946 


802 


2,541 


2,950 


811 


2.545 


2,950 


794 


2,541 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


132-75 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


145-50 


2,870 


2,832 


2.916 


2,908 


2,900 


2,883 


2,952 


3.033 


3,04li 


3,084 


3.070 


3,034 


+613 


+628 


+ 629 


+622 


+595 


+615 


+G06 


+605 


+610 


+617 


+666 


+742 


57-1 


56-6 


56 7 


570 


58-3 


56-9 


57-8 


58-1 


58-4 


58-1 


55-2 


50-5 


153-93 


164-23 


158 13 


160-39 


169-07 


158-43 


171-93 


174-31 


178-16 


182-65 


17014 


165-09 


984 


970 


1,000 


1,005 


1,018 


1,031 


1,041 


1,103 


1,116 


1,137 


1,155 


1,207 


95 3 


93-7 


105-4 


102-7 


98-3 


102-6 


103-8 


107-2 


109-6 


106-0 


112-2 


104-1 


106-3 


107-8 


107-9 


107-6 


106-5 


106-5 


105-8 


108-1 


109-9 


109-9 


111-2 


111-8 


88-9 


87-9 


86-6 


87-2 


88-4 


87-2 


89-3 


89-7 


90-5 


91-3 


88-4 


82-4 


184-6 


182 6 


187-2 


187-4 


188-6 


192 1 


194-9 


206-8 


207-9 


217-3 


219-3 


227-4 


61 


57-5 


58-5 


59-7 


61-3 


56-6 


56-4 


54-5 


52-5 


68-0 


57-8 


55-1 


351 


38 2 


3'-6 


28-5 


26-6 


24-4 


27-4 


24-8 


21-7 


22-6 


25-4 


23-7 


86-5 


90-6 


89 1 


90 8 


94-4 


90-9 


97-5 


95-7 


93-4 


96-6 


93-3 


94-4 



15-86 
30-88 

186-93 
44-16 
80-20 
2311 

1,041-28 
62-13 
1,485 



151-13 

72-71 

78-26 

742 

145-62 
22-38 

105-08 
1,317 

13-57 
8-61 
5-31 
76 13 
58-01 
10-68 
1-90 



6-49 
78-51 

5-61 
3,073 

124-39 
65-21 
35-73 



1.517 
533-78 

2,051 
396-28 

8-51 
26-82 

1-20 
58-01 

2-91 
2,770 
12-01 

2,949 
132-75 
145-50 

3,063 

+776 



171-02 
1,265 



98-5 
113-0 
80-9 
237-5 
55-8 
24-1 
96-4 



beginning with March, 1935, there is given in this line the amount of Bank of Canada notes in the hands of the 
chartered banks at the end of the appropriate month. The sum of this amount and the "deposits with the Bank of 
Canada" in the next line is approximately comparable with the previous figures of Dominion notes. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 31 

Table 26. Index Numbers of Security Prices, Foreign Exchange, and other Financial Factors. 















1935 












1936 






Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Security Prices— 




























Common Stock Prices — 




























Total (121) 


84 4 

125 6 


86 4 

130-8 


93 € 

144-4 


93-8 

145-2 


92 4 

143-8 


94 7 

146-1 


93 6 
147-1 


96 1 

152 9 


105-8 

170 3 


107-4 

178-2 


112 9 

187-7 


120 7 

200-0 


117*4 


Industrials, total (891 


194-8 




1170 
11-6 
56 

176 
74-1 


119-4 
111 
56-9 

178-6 
731 


121-9 
10-8 
59-9 

211-7 
70-3 


118-6 
10 5 
58-4 

217-9 
67-2 


122-2 
10 6 
57-4 

210-6 
66-7 


122-1 
12-0 
59-3 

2100 
65-5 


118-7 
12-4 
61-2 

206-6 
61-8 


123-0 
12 6 
60-9 

2151 
63-5 


127-8 
14-6 

66-9 

228-7 
690 


125-0 
15-9 

76-7 

214-8 

70-4 


130-3 
18-6 
800 

231-0 
75-5 


140-5 
20-2 
84-3 

246-5 
74-0 


136-5 




18-5 


Milling (5) 


88-7 


Oils (5) 


237-3 


Textiles and Clothing (11) 
Pood and Allied products (18 • 


73-1 


126-5 


125-1 


127-8 


1270 


128-5 


130- 1 


128-7 


134-4 


145-7 


148-5 


153-6 


158-7 


153-2 




101-6 

168-7 
451 
25-3 

100- 1 


99-6 
185-1 
43-8 
25-8 
94-8 


102-4 
200-0 
44-4 
270 
95-5 


104-7 
198-1 

45 
26-5 
97-6 


116-7 
195-4 
44-7 
25-0 
98-6 


122-9 
202-0 
47-7 
26-7 
99-9 


126-5 
209-6 
46-3 
25-7 
100-3 


133-2 
217-5 
45-6 
23-4 
100- 


157-3 

254-4 
50-9 
27-9 

105-1 


1610 

294-5 

501 

28-6 
108-0 


151-7 
307-1 
52-4 
29-8 
111-4 


151-7 
331-2 
570 
350 
112-3 


140-3 


Miscellaneous (20) 


329-7 


Utilities total (23) 


55-4 


Transportation (2) 


33-3 


Telephone and telegraph (2). 


110-4 


Power and traction (19) 


56-4 


53-9 


53-8 


55-3 


560 


60-8 


58-6 


59-G 


66-1 


62-7 


66-0 


71-1 


69-6 


Banks (9) 


76-8 


750 


731 


72 


71-7 


70-6 


65-9 


68-4 


730 


75-1 


78-6 


82-6 


79-6 


Mining Stock Prices— 




Total(23) 


128-2 


128-7 


128-3 


123-0 


117-9 


115-6 


1191 


118-6 


125-5 


133-6 


142-4 


149-8 


144-2 


Gold (20) 


127-5 
135-3 


124-5 
149 1 


121-4 
159-2 


116-3 
153-2 


1101 
151-9 


106-2 
155-4 


109-5 
159-6 


106-3 
169-7 


111-8 
181-9 


116-9 
201-7 


124-8 
214-8 


130-2 
230-4 


122-7 


Base Metals (3) 


232-2 


Financial Factors- 






71-2 


69-2 


68-4 


68-4 


69 6 


70-9 


69-2 


69-5 


72-5 


73-8 


74-9 


77-2 


76-3 


Long-term bond vields.l926=100 






71-4 
79-5 


72-2 

80-8 


71-4 
78-5 


73-4 

80 4 


72 1 

80-2 


71 G 
79-7 


79-8 
88-3 


78-9 
85-4 


74 5 
80-8 


75-5 

82-7 


72-4 
85-5 


70-8 
80-6 


69-9 




77-3 


Yield on Ontario Government 




bonds p.c. 

Shares traded. Montreal .No. 


3-81 


3-87 


3 76 


3-85 


3-84 


3-82 


4-23 


409 


3 87 


3-96 


4-10 


3-86 


3-70 


288. 


282, 


350. 


228, 


248, 


318, 


273, 


352. 


809, 


590, 


857, 


973, 


561, 




842 


672 


738 


433 


645 


960 


798 


172 


693 


284 


056 


102 


450 


Brokers' loans* $000. 000 


18-81 


18-24 


18-32 


17-70 


16-93 


17-33 


16-86 


16-76 


18-09 


18-59 


17-37 


17-84 


18-89 


New Issues of Bonds $000,000. 


16-38 


76-57 


70-54 


63 37 


63-20 


121-92 


194-63 


65-92 


147 73 


119-93 


136-66 


138-91 


122-85 


Sales on Toronto Stock Ex- 




























change — 




























Industrials 000 


457 


440 


761 


397 


537 


606 


578 


807 


1,590 


926 


1,431 


1,538 


868 


Values $000 


8.930 


10.440 


19,019 


8.893 


11,436 


12,414 


12,999 


17,351 


31,951 


29,555 


29,151 


36,399 


25,541 


Mining 000 


20.303 


20,977 


18,105 


8,240 


7,141 


10,218 


11,964 


9,179 


15,695 


19,530 


36,822 


48,768 


29,253 


Values $000 


20.28'*> 


15,222 


15,931 


8,457 


6,230 


8.870 


8,987 


10,728 


16,554 


24,503 


33.543 


28,109 


22,032 


Market values' $000 , 000 


3,663 


3,764 


3,908 


3,842 


3,880 


3,880 


3,858 


4,088 


4,366 


4,507 


4,933 


5,033 


4,896 


Foreign Exchange — 




























New York Funds in Montreal 




























High $ 


1-016 


1-008 


1005 


1 003 


1-004 


1-006 


1017 


1020 


1012 


1012 


1-004 


1-000 


1-006 


Low $ 


1003 


1-003 


1000 


1 001 


1-001 


1-001 


1002 


1010 


1-009 


1-006 


0-996 


0-996 


0-999 


Average $ 


1010 


1-005 


1001 


1 001 


1-002 


1-003 


1-008 


1014 


1-011 


1009 


1-000 


0-999 


1-001 


Close $ 


1-008 


1-005 


1-001 


1 002 


1-002 


1-006 


1012 


1-012 


1011 


1-006 


0-998 


0-999 


1,006 


London Sterling in Montreal- 




























High $ 


4-853 


4-875 


4-945 


4 955 


4-975 


4-998 


5 000 


4-993 


4-98S 


4-990 


4-994 


5-019 


4-990 




4-808 
4-825 


4-835 

4-862 


4-855 
4-896 


4 915 
4 943 


4-955 
4-967 


4-965 
4-985 


4-943 
4-970 


4-956 
4-978 


4-967 
4-978 


4-959 
4-976 


4-941 
4-966 


4-975 
4-994 


4-969 


Average $ 


4-978 


Close t 


4-825 


4-860 


4-935 


4-950 4-968 


4-993 


4-970 4-973 


4-988 


4-959 


4-993 


4-988 


4-980 



Table 27. Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Six Canadian Ports. 



Year and 
Month 



Saint John 



Halifax 



Quebec 



Montreal* 



Toronto 



Vancouver 



Entered | Cleared Entered | Cleared Entered | Cleared Entered | Cleared Entered | Cleared Entered 

000 Tons 



Cleared 



1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1 935 



1.918 
1,757 
1,639 
1,772 
1,827 
2,013 
2,083 
2.257 
2.502 
2.368 



1,930 
1,799 
1,592 
1,742 
1,865 
2,003 
2.040 
2,253 
2.462 
2,222 



3,659 
3,716 
4,333 
4,848 
4.971 
4,503 
4,221 
4.333 
4.407 
3,809 



3,603 


4,047 


3,800 


4,278 


4,429 


4,572 


4.896 


4,273 


4,918 


4,235 


4,480 


5,003 


4,159 


2.861 


4,306 


3,342 


4.362 


2.715 


3,797 


3,379 



3,205 
3,375 
3,792 
3,531 
3,474 
4.321 
2.868 
3.330 
2.831 
3,388 



4,222 
4,993 
5,493 
4.638 
4.436 
7,840 
8,013 
8,415 
7,856 
8,515 



4,017 
4,865 
5,460 
4,583 
4,417 
7,760 
7,993 
8.427 
7,819 
8,543 



1,753 
1,738 
1,765 
1,993 
2,100 
2,554 
2,678 
2,923 
3,362 
3,289 



1,739 
1,744 
1,750 
1,938 
2,017 
2,560 
2,683 
2,924 
3,382 
3,296 



9,866 
10,306 
11,743 
11,971 
12,606 
12,137 
11.083 
10.354 
11.487 
11,212 



9,872 
10,390 
11,729 
11,830 
12,588 
12,304 
11,172 
10.388 
11,467 
11,203 



Tons 



1935 

Mar 

April 

May 

June 

f uly 

August.. 

Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

Dec 

1936 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 



267.370 
187.976 
145,957 
150.963 
183,292 
188,876 
179,380 
155.315 
142,810 
270,966 

264,755 
272,597 
310,878 



248,779 
211,365 
152,934 
143,001 
184,719 
182.272 
174,571 
164,617 
123,008 
240,420 

276,517 
267,254 
277,122 



519,575 
322,870 
152,908 
180,318 
221,221 
255.954 
218,894 
229,988 
234,741 
463,768 

445,838 
472,151 
469,187 



519,075 
328,614 
151,634 
181.592 
217,995 
254,634 
218,684 
228.998 
233,179 
454,584 

442,139 
470,804 
451,967 



98.896 
633,926 
355,415 
350,111 
502,58- 
416,697 
339,132 
630,958 

51,284 



101.102 

636.888 
359,643 
339.530 
519,486 
412.089 
344,197 
632,390 
42,916 



266,480 
1,076,888 
1,149,237 
1,392,080 
1,330,599 
1,186,847 
1,076,378 

987,460 
48,938 



146,966 
1,102,976 
1,140,492 
1,331,383 
1,422,728 
1,099,401 
1,091,955 
1,130,575 
76,859 



110,087 
357,561 
507,570 
564,539 
604,873 
399,384 
310,299 
352,270 
81,994 



116,306 
351,118 
518,164 
568.687 
604.894 
405,364 
307,449 
343.246 
50,669 



905,380 
875,224 
934,847 
865,864 
1,121,992 
1,175,89'j 
974,870 
952,357 
861,926 
881,401 

795,728 
851,857 



890.642 
864,579 
945,453 
864,972 
1,115.755 
1,182,793 
987,101 
928,986 
878,269 
853,548 

810,106 
899,575 



'Last day of each month. 

'Month end values of all listed stocks. 



'Records of inland shipping unavailable from 1926 to 1930 inclusive. 



32 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 28. Economic Indexes and Components. 



Economic Conditions 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Canada 


1919 


- -401 


- -463 


- -514 


- -432 


- -175 


- 031 


+ -093 


+ -010 


+ 391 


+ -628 


+ -463 


+ -535 




1920 


+ 


648 


+ 


617 


+ 


506 


+ 


52.7 


+ 


545 


+ 


710 


+ 


741 


+ 


442 


+ 


412 


+ -185 


+ -021 


- -144 




1921 




22(i 


— 


278 


— 


545 


— 


700 


— 


782 




920 


-1 


089 


— 


830 


-1 


60S 


-1-111 


-1-008 


-1-070 




1922 


-1 


039 


— 


895 


— 


804 


— 


823 


— 


844 


— 


940 


— 


926 


— 


874 


— 


S13 


- -782 


- -782 


- -504 




1923 


— 


ooo 


— 


514 


— 


412 


— 


370 


— 


442 


— 


4S4 


— 


638 


— 


617 


— 


710 


- -751 


- -710 


-•597 




1924 


— 


4'J4 


— 


40! 


— 


566 


— 


669 


— 


710 


— 


782 


— 


741 


— 


751 


— 


720 


- -545 


- -350 


- -185 




1925 


— 


134 


— 


175 


— 


257 


— 


350 


— 


850 


— 


422 


— 


340 


— 


031 


+ 


01 


+ -144 


+ -257 


+ -237 




1926 


+ 


350 


+ 


370 


+ 


309 


+ 


123 


+ 


072 


+ 


113 


+ 


103 


+ 


494 


+ 


340 


+ -401 


+ -360 


+ -412 




1927 


+ 


473 


+ 


535 


+ 


628 


+ 


689 


+ 


823 


+ 


823 


+ 


535 


+ 


741 


+ 


820 


+1-132 


+ 1-265 


+ 1-533 




1928 


+ 1 


646 


+ 1 


708 


+ 1 


749 


+ 1 


934 


+2 


222 


+ 1 


630 


+ 1 




+ 1 


3S9 


+ 1 


461 


+2-232 


+2-706 


+2-047 




1929 


+3 


518 


+2 


325 


+ 2 


119 


+ 1 


770 


+ 1 


040 


+ 1 


235 


+ 1 


543 


+ 1 


955 


+ 2 


008 


+2-726 


+1-842 


+1-049 




1930 


+ 1 


214 


+ 


930 


+ 


916 


+ 1 


248 


+ 


805 


+ 


792 


+ 


220 


+ 


350 


+ 


609 


+ -586 


+ -132 


+ -021 




1931 




195 


+ 


041 


+ 


103 


— 


041 




000 




195 




319 


— 


391 


— 


545 


-1-039 


-1-060 


— 1-533 




1932 


-1 


646 


-1 


605 


-1 


553 


-1 


759 


-1 


842 


-1 


802 


-1 


780 


-1 




-1 


379 


-1-523 


-1-646 


— 1-770 




1933 


-1 


70S 


-1 


718 


-1 


749 


-1 


533 


— 


907 


— 


494 


— 


195 


— 


823 


— 


S64 


-1-029 


-1-091 


-1173 




1934 


— 


S23 


— 


772 


— 


514 


— 


504 


— 


829 


— 


391 


— 


442 


— 


210 


— 


298 


- -298 


- -144 


+ -123 




1935 


+ 


340 


+ 


144 


+ 


144 


+ 


195 


+ 


484 


+ 


216 


+ 


207 


+ 


453 


- 


041 


+ -206 


+ -761 


+ -535 


Great Britain 


1919 
1920 


+ 

+2 


723 
294 


+ 

+ 2 


612 
962 


+ 

+2 


751 

ooo 


+ 

+2 


598 
323 


+ 

+ 1 


695 

488 


+ 1 
+ 1 


015 

4S v 


+1 

+ 1 


182 
001 


+1 
+ 


280 
974 


+1 

+ 1 


669 
224 


+1-433 
+ -320 


+1-127 
+ -041 


+ 1-586 
- -598 






1921 




040 


-1 


488 


-2 


031 


-2 


44S 


-2 


837 


-2 


253 


-1 


580 


-1 


013 


-1 


127 


-1-140 


-1-057 


-1-015 




1922 


— 


737 


— 


620 


— 


020 


— 


042 


— 


204 


— 


028 


+ 


167 


— 


167 


— 


459 


- -250 


- -209 


- -223 




1923 


+ 


403 


+ 


195 


+ 


250 


+ 


489 


+ 


348 


+ 






085 


— 


709 


— 


612 


- -376 


- -250 


- -027 




1924 


+ 


02/ 




050 


+ 


334 


+ 


280 


+ 


292 


+ 


362 


— 


230 


— 


389 


— 


204 


+ -027 


+ -195 


+ -070 




1925 


+ 


375 


+ 


403 


— 


139 


— 


230 


— 


709 




264 


— 


020 


— 


515 


— 


292 


+ -181 


- -070 


- -473 




1926 




5X4 




403 


— 


751 


— 


4-15 


-1 


488 


_ 


723 


— 


S02 


— 


751 


— 


7 93 


- -654 


- -570 


- -501 




1927 


+ 


125 




000 


— 


070 


+ 


139 


+ 


300 




000 


— 


228 


— 


320 


— 


041 


+ -153 


+ -125 


+ -083 




1928 


4- 


302 


+ 


230 


+ 


300 


+ 


02;.: 


+ 


040 


+ 


807 


+ 


278 


+ 


204 


4 


334 


+ -431 


+ -403 


+ -431 




1929 


+ 


98 7 


+ 


153 


— 


189 


— 


028 


— 


125 


+ 


230 


+ 


181 


— 


028 


+ 


09, 


- -306 


- -236 


- -167 




1930 


+ 


388 


+ 


302 


+ 1 


HO 


+ 1 


015 


+1 


113 


+ 


932 


+ 


542 


+ 


389 


+ 


779 


+ -487 


+ -167 


+ -125 




1931 


+ 


181 




334 




529 




334 


— 


723 




27,n 




500 


-2 


250 


-2 


490 


-3-240 


-3-331 


-3-435 




1932 


-3 


420 


-2 


753 


-1 


474 


-1 


544 


-1 


280 


— 


598 


— 


445 


— 


020 


— 


4 73 


- -362 


+ -013 


- -348 




1933 


— 


612 


— 


348 


— 


389 


— 


584 


— 


223 


+ 


292 


4- 


445 


+ 


3 70. 


+ 


054 


+ -320 


+ -264 


+ -070 




1934 


+ 


764 


+ 1 


029 


+ 


570 


+ 


417 


+ 


250 


+ 


431 


+ 


195 


+ 


27S 


+ 


302 


+ -556 


+ 1-168 


+ 1-015 




1935 


+ 1 


252 


+1 


001 


+ 


821 


+ 


932 


+ 1 


108 


+1 


433 


+ 


974 


+ 


987 


+1 


071 


+1-140 


+1-405 


+1-433 


United States 


1919 
1920 


+ 

+ 1 


003 
471 


+ 1 


020 
352 


+ 1 


059 
505 


+ 

+ 1 


101 
775 


+ 
+ 1 


330 

70S 


+ 

+ 1 


372 
564 


+ 

+i 


710 
530 


+ 

+ 1 


7S6 
285 


+ 

+ 1 


405 
031 


+ -837 
- -498 


+ -921 
- -001 


+1099 
- -330 






1921 




997 


-1 


4 ',9 


-1 


504 


-1 


733 


-1 


733 


-1 


877 


-l 


910 


-1 


930 


-1 


S17 


-1-750 


-1-572 


-1-598 




1922 


-1 


615 


-1 


522 


-1 


403 


-1 


200 


-1 


014 


— 


904 


— 


845 


— 


845 


— 


769 


- -676 


- -702 


- -693 




1923 


— 


575 


— 


473 


— 


400 


— 


482 


— 


583 


— 


085 


— 


854 


— 


890 


— 


Sll 


- -811 


- -778 


- -744 




1924 


— 


583 


— 


583 


— 


051 


— 


741 


— 


778 


— 


752 


— 


558 


— 


380 


— 


355 


- -279 


•000 


+ -161 




1925 


+ 


270 


+ 


270 


+ 


254 


+ 


042 


+ 


152 


+ 


203 


+ 


321 


+ 


338 


+ 


347 


+ -482 


+ -55S 


+ -304 




1926 


+ 


507 


+ 


440 


+ 


397 


+ 


211 


+ 


22s 


+ 


400 


+ 


3/2 


+ 


423 


+ 


423 


+ -372 


+ -296 


+ -380 




1927 


+ 


321 


+ 


400 


+ 


431 


+ 


414 


+ 


450 


+ 


482 


+ 


482 


+ 


059 


+ 


778 


+ -744 


+ -811 


+ -955 




192S 


+ 


9.SS 


+ 


871 


+1 


158 


+ 1 


260 


+ 1 


301 


+ 1 


107 


+ 


904 


+ 1 


107 


-fl 


403 


+ 1-429 


+ 1-631 


+ 1-488 




1929 


+ 1 


so: 


+ 1 


547 


+ 1 


7 Si 


+ 1 


555 


+ 1 


572 


+ 1 


490 


+i 


802 


+3 


003 


+ 2 


105 


+2-130 


+1-158 


+ 1-226 




1930 


+ 1 


OS 2 


+ 1 


200 


+ 1 


488 


+ 1 


733 


+ 1 


361 


+ 1 


124 


+ 


820 


+ 


744 


+ 


879 


+ -676 


+ -380 


+ -251 




1931 


+ 


085 


+ 


338 


+ 


347 


+ 


118 


— 


101 




US 


— 


254 


— 


372 


— 


397 


- -820 


-1006 


-1175 




1932 


-1 


38i ; 


-1 


490 


-1 


48S 


-1 


015 


-1 


783 


-1 


792 


-l 


724 


-l 


099 


-1 


090 


-1-386 


-1-403 


-1-403 




1933 


-1 


48s 


-1 


70S 


-1 


784 


-1 


490 


— 


727 


— 


245 


+ 


025 


— 


575 


— 


516 


- -592 


- -626 


- -600 




1934 


— 


465 


— 


290 


— 


423 


— 


372 


— 


414 


— 


397 


— 


389 


— 


380 


— 


355 


- -313 


- -254 


- -296 




1935 


— 


109 


— 


178 


— 


21] 


— 


051 


+ 


085 


+ 


070 


+ 


152 


+ 


308 


+ 


355 


+ -499 


+ -710 


+ -693 


*Bank Deposits, 




























(1926 = 100) 


1919 


86-4 


85-4 


86 


87-2 


89 2 


92-0 


93-3 


940 


99 5 


102-4 


100-5 


990 




1920 


95-4 


97-2 


99-2 


980 


99-9 


100-2 


100-5 


100-5 


103-0 


101-9 


102 5 


101-0 




1921 


101-4 


1010 


100-5 


100- 


99-4 


98-6 


96-5 


95-4 


95-3 


94-8 


940 


92 4 




1922 


91-8 


92-3 


91-6 


91-2 


89-9 


88-8 


88-6 


86-5 


87-4 


87-9 


890 


89-4 




1923 


90-5 


91-6 


91-2 


93-6 


93-1 


92-0 


90-0 


90-2 


901 


88-2 


89-5 


90-2 




1924 


90-9 


90 4 


90-2 


911 


89 6 


90-4 


89-0 


87-8 


87-0 


89-1 


92-6 


950 




1925 


93-6 


931 


93-8 


94-4 


920 


89-6 


920 


990 


98-5 


97-9 


101-9 


99-4 




1926 


103-5 


98-6 


101-5 


100-2 


99-7 


991 


99-2 


103-5 


100-3 


100-3 


102-4 


103 




1927 


103-6 


103-4 


104-0 


104-5 


105-0 


104-1 


102 4 


103-2 


105 4 


107-0 


1111 


110-4 




192S 


110-2 


1131 


114-4 


116-5 


1180 


1151 


1150 


112-3 


113-2 


1160 


117-0 


1160 




1929 


117-5 


116-4 


114-5 


116-5 


114-4 


112-7 


1140 


106-5 


1180 


117-2 


118-5 


1120 




1930 


111-4 


110-6 


109-5 


110-0 


107-5 


107-5 


107-0 


107-0 


111-5 


108-5 


108-0 


108 




1931 


104 -C 


105-0 


107-1 


107-9 


107-5 


108-4 


1070 


108-0 


109-0 


106-6 


104-6 


1010 




1932 


98-9 


99-4 


99 9 


99 4 


99-7 


9S-4 


96-8 


980 


97-4 


97-8 


96-6 


96-8 




1933 


97-3 


97-0 


97-6 


97-6 


99-2 


100-2 


101-5 


99-9 


98-8 


98-8 


98-2 


96-8 




1934 


98-1 


96-8 


97-7 


97-2 


99-4 


100-5 


97-7 


990 


980 


100-7 


100-4 


102-4 




1935 


104-6 


103-0 


103 1 


103-7 


107-2 


106-1 


104-1 


105-3 


105-9 


107-8 


109-7 


108-7 


Shares traded, Montrea 




























and Toronto 




























(1926=100) 


1919 
1920 


21-9 
79-1 


24-3 
54-3 


22-5 
48-6 


21-8 
43-3 


02- 1 
36-2 


61 9 
73-9 


57-6 
80-4 


22-6 
39-4 


67-8 
36-7 


93-4 
35-4 


62-8 
44-7 


89-3 




40-9 




1921 


34-8 


42-5 


34-7 


330 


36-3 


34-2 


14-6 


16-4 


18-8 


24-2 


22 5 


21-6 




1922 


23-5 


28-5 


44-8 


73-9 


540 


31 3 


24-4 


47-7 


59-2 


46-6 


461 


491 




1923 


32-8 


62-5 


59-7 


37-7 


43-2 


36-7 


20-7 


19-2 


24-7 


26-9 


43-8 


400 




1924 


69-7 


60-8 


420 


29-3 


28-3 


24-7 


24-6 


30-3 


32-9 


52-1 


53-2 


520 




1925 


76-5 


62-7 


53-7 


39-5 


68-1 


48-6 


540 


72-7 


76-2 


122-3 


67-7 


87-0 




1926 


99-4 


140-3 


102-1 


56-3 


60-1 


53-4 


53-8 


162-3 


135-2 


118-4 


98 3 


120-4 




1927 


100-9 


125-7 


120-2 


161-8 


179-2 


173-1 


71-9 


110-5 


211-6 


228-9 


209-9 


236-8 




192S 


293-5 


272-0 


. 267-1 


281-4 


282 


199-6 


1181 


171-2 


169-6 


384-1 


527-2 


364-3 




1929 


S27-5 


422-8 


568 


288-7 


276-6 


151-6 


163-0 


334-3 


333-9 


625-2 


380 9 


208-5 




1930 


201-8 


1560 


213-5 


234-7 


277-5 


462-3 


90-3 


518-5 


152- 1 


234-3 


77-8 


97-5 




1931 


80-6 


130-4 


115-1 


920 


145- 1 


103-0 


50-5 


32-7 


85-4 


72-3 


95-3 


381 




1932 


29-4 


34-7 


42-1 


42-8 


43-7 


41-6 


56-5 


126-3 


113-8 


45-5 


450 


321 




1933 


37-9 


59-5 


500 


111-7 


278-3 


425-0 


578-4 


117-9 


1140 


121-3 


102-1 


121-7 




1934 


1921 


184-1 


164-9 


113-5 


90-2 


61-0 


6S-7 


62-7 


44-3 


65-6 


94-9 


86-7 




1935 


152-2 


80-8 


93-7 


90-8 


139-6 


78-6 


98-7 


116-2 


107-0 


145-6 


301-4 


190-5 






* Indexes of bank deposits are projected one month. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



33 



Table 29. Significant Statistics of the United Kingdom 



Classification 



Production— 

Iron 000 metric tons 

Steel 000 metric tons 

Coal 000 metric tons 

Electricity 

Generated mill, k.w.h. 

New orders received. 1920=100 

Copper Available 000 tons 

Raw Cotton Delivered to 

Mill mill. lb. 

Production, Artificial Silk 

Yarn and Waste. . .mill. lb. 
NaturalSilkDeliveriesOOO lb. 
Crude Rubber 

A vailable 000 tons 

Building Plans 

Approved 1930 = 100 

Other 1930 = 100 

Employment— 
Insured Workers in 

Employment 1 mill. 

Number Unemployed 1 000 

Percentage Unemployed 

Coal mining 

Iron and steel 

General engineering 

Electrical engineering 

Shipbuilding and marine en- 
gineering 

Base metal working 

Cotton 

WooIIpii 

Building 

Public works contracting 

Trade— 
Imports, Total £ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco£ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Total, net imports £ mn. 

Exports,Domestic,Total£ mn. 

Food, drink and tobacco £ mn. 

Raw materials £ mn. 

Manufactured £ mn. 

Bank Clearings — 

Provincial £ mn. 

Postal Receipts, Daily. . £ 000 
Transportation— 
Shipping — 

Entrances mill, net tons 

Clearances mill, net tons 

Index of shipping 

freights* 1924 = 100 

Railwa ys — 

Average weekly 
rail way receipts £000 

Freight traffic total. mill, tons 

Merchandise mill, tons 

Coal mill, tons 

Minerals and other 

merchandise mill, tons 

Prices— 
Wholesale Prices — 

Board of Trade 1930= 100 

Economist 1913 = 100 

Statist 1913 = 100 

Retail Foods 

Cost of living 

Banking— 
Bane or England— 

Private deposits £ mn. 

Bank and currency notes £ mn. 

Gold reserve £ mn. 

London Clearing Banks 2 — 

Deposits £ mn. 

Discounts £ mn. 

Advances £ mn. 

Investments £ mn. 

Treasury Bills £ mill 

Money— 

Day to Day Rate p.c. 

Three Months Rate p.c. 

Security Values— 

Fixed Interest 1921 = 100 

Variable Dividend .. 1921 - 100 

Total 1921-100 

Exchange, New York $ to £.... 
Exchange, France to £ 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



562 

855 

19,593 

1,507 

102 

201 

113 

10-73 

481 

8-26 

176-8 
132-7 



10-20 

2.154 

16-5 

18-5 

23-0 

140 

7-6 

41-3 
12 4 
21-8 

150 
170 



60-5 
28-6 
16-5 
15-2 
560 
360 
2-4 
4-6 
280 

108 1 
140 



4-71 
4-62 



92.6 



2,705 

22-3 

3-7 

14-6 

3-9 



86-9 

90-9 

97-5 

122 

141 



149 

379 
192 5 

1,954 
265 
756 
606 
788 

•75 
•50 

130-3 
1100 
123-7 
4-834 
72-71 



535 

822 

17,863 

1,330 

105 

23-8 

105 

9-79 
409 

7-22 

185-8 

117-2 



10-32 
2,044 
15-7 
18-7 
22-5 
13-9 
7-2 

40-2 
11-8 
21-4 
13-5 
15 2 
46-3 



271 
16-9 
15-5 

55-6 

330 

2-2 

4-0 

25-9 

97-7 
134 



5-06 
4-42 



950 



3,813 
220 
3-7 
14 

40 



87-5 
91-8 



140 

392 

192-6 

1,923 
207 
769 
614 
813 

•75 



131-3 
111-5 
124-9 
4-785 
72-53 



568 

867 

19,589 

1,326 

110 

20-4 

115 

1110 

449 



171-3 



10-33 
2,045 
15-6 
18-9 
23-5 
13-2 
6-9 

40-3 
12-6 
20-9 
13-6 
14-2 
44-9 

64-5 
30-1 
18-4 
15-8 
59-0 
35-2 
2-5 
4-7 
27-1 

103-0 
131 



5-55 
5-04 



93- 



2,769 

20-6 

3-7 

131 

3-8 



88-2 

94-3 

100-2 

118 

140 



141 

390 
192-6 

1,940 



131-3 
114-4 

125-8 
4-836 
73-28 



538 

782 

6,397 

1,147 

109 

251 

98 

9-95 
375 

7-79 

142-6 
102-8 



10-36 
2,000 
15-3 
18-8 
22-4 
12-8 
6-8 

38-9 
11-4 
21-0 
13-7 
140 
43 6 

57-8 
27-5 
15-7 
14-4 
52 6 
32-9 
2-4 
40 
25-5 

97-6 
136 



5-44 
4-71 



92-9 



3,013 
191 
3-5 
11-7 

3-8 



88-4 

93-7 

98-5 

120 

143 



138 

399 

192-7 

1,961 
218 
770 
620 
881 

•75 



130-3 
115-6 

125-5 
4-923 
74-72 



556 

816 

17,721 

1.216 

101 

15 9 

116 

10 91 

447 

6 72 

183-6 
134 1 



10 38 
1,973 
15-3 
17 6 
21-8 
12-6 
6 3 



61-8 
290 
170 
15 5 
57-9 
38-4 
2-6 
4-6 
28-4 

117-8 
129 



607 
5-20 



3.155 
19-8 

3-6 
12-3 



880 

93-7 

99-2 

126 

143 



142 

400 

192-7 

2,003 
244 
775 
624. 
887 

•75 
•63 

131-5 
115-6 

126-4 
4-942 
74-50 



552 

772 

17,165 

1,189 

85 

16-9 



7-54 
407 



10-52 



126-8 
98-0 



10-42 
1,948 
14 9 
17-9 
20-3 
121 
6-3 

371 
10-6 
21-2 
12-1 
14-4 
46-2 

59-1 
27-0 
160 
15-8 
550 
34-9 
2-5 
4-1 
27-2 

100-3 

140 



5-93 
5-31 



95- 



3,432 
19-8 
3-7 
12-2 



3-9 



93-0 

98-9 

126 

143 



123 

406 

192-8 

2,019 
274 
775 
615 
880 

•75 
•61 

129-8 

117-5 
125-8 
4-956 
74-91 



538 

870 

18,007 

1,320 

71 

17-3 

90 

9-74 

407 

10-97 

160-5 
165-9 



10-44 
1,959 
150 
18-6 
20-1 
12-4 
5 9 

38 
10-4 
220 
10-2 
14-5 
46-5 

60-8 
29-6 
15-3 
15-5 
57-0 
34-1 
2-8 
3-7 
26-7 

95-3 
144 



5-83 

4-88 

98-1 



3,074 
17-7 
3-5 
10-7 

3-6 



96-1 

100-1 

125 

145 



130 

398 

193-5 

2,013 
287 
765 
615 
893 

•75 



124-3 
112-7 

120-6 
4-956 
75-16 



553 

922 

20,152 

1,650 

70 

23-5 

120 

12-52 

508 

9-51 

185-6 
123-2 



10-49 
1,916 
14-6 
18-5 
200 
11-5 
5-6 

36-7 
11-2 
19-2 
7-9 
14 9 
46-9 

73-4 
37-5 
18-0 
17-6 
68-7 
39-9 
3-4 
4-7 
30 

110-9 
145 



5-61 

5-15 



1151 



20-3 
3-7 
12-9 



911 

98-5 

100-9 

128 

147 



117 

400 

193-7 

2,024 
299 
763 
618 
902 

•75 
•61 

125-5 

112-6 
121-3 
4-906 
74-47 



53 S 

918 
20,605 

1,758 

79 

12-3 

132 

11-80 
481 

7-18 

199-2 
129-3 



10-54 
1,919 
14-6 
18-2 
18-9 
11-1 
5-6 

33-9 

10-5 
17-5 
7-8 
16-7 
47-6 

71-5 
34-4 
19-7 
16-9 
66-9 
39-4 

3 

5 
29-3 



145 



5-24 
4-94 



109- 



2,831 



3 
13-2 



3-8 



91-2 

98-2 

101-5 

131 

147 



130 

401 

196-5 

2,036 
297 
774 
626 



•75 
•56 

128 

118-3 

125-5 

4-914 

74-53 



568 
S25 



1,929 

89 

19-4 

111 

9-96 
423 

6-63 

141 
133-3 



10-60 
l,8i 

14 

17 

17 

10 
5 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



33-3 

9-7 
16-6 

7-5 
17-9 
47-4 

74-5 
34-4 
23-6 
16-0 
69-0 
34 
2-7 
4-2 
26-2 

110-6 
190 



5-39 
4-38 



117-7 



2,753 
23-6 
4-2 
15-1 



4-3 



91-4 

98-3 
102-0 



147 



117 

419 

200-1 



129-5 



4-931 
74-84 



605 

927 

21,905 

1,970 

90 

20-2 

134 

11-94 
476 

7-09 

160-7 
129-6 



10-35 
2,160 
16-3 
17-6 
19-3 
11-3 
5-9 

32-7 
11-4 
17-6 
8-9 
27-9 
51-6 

70-0 
31-3 
22-4 
16-0 
65-7 
34-5 
2-8 
4-1 
26-6 

123-0 
139 



5-00 
4-56 



111-0 



2,675 

23-3 

4-2 

14-8 

4-4 



91- 



147 



148 

398 

200-2 

2,091 
322 
779 
605 
895 

•75 
•52 

130-1 
123-9 
128-1 
4-929 
74-44 



1,824 

97 

19-0 



11-70 
391 



6-45 



163-9 
160-0 



10-48 
2,025 
15-4 
17-1 
19-0 
10-8 
5-7 

31-6 
110 
17-0 
9-3 
20-0 
48-4 

62-3 

27-5 

18 

15 

56-7 

35-1 
2-5 
41 

27-6 

1150 
135 



102-9 



2,706 

21-9 

3-6 

14-4 



91-7 
97-4 



146 



140 

399 

200-5 

2,164 
346 
812 
630 
796 

•75 
•52 

131-0 
126-7 
129 
5-005 

74-84 



10-63 

1,882 



128 

404 

200-6 

2,123 
294 
824 
629 
762 

•75 
•53 



4-993 
74-70 



1 Number of persons on the Reeisters of Employment Exchanges in Great Britain only. 
2 Re vised, to include eleven banks. 



34 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 30. Significant Statistics of the United States 




Classification 



United States Statistics— 

Industrial Produc- 
tion 1923-5= 

Mineral Production. . 1923-5 

Manufacturing Pro- 
duction 1923-5=100 

Wheat, Visible Supply.MU. bush. 
Receipts, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Shipments, principal 

markets 000 bush. 

Exports, including 
wheat flour 000 bush. 

Wheat Flour Produc- 
tion OOObbls. 

Sugar Meltings, 8 
Ports 000 long tons 

Tobacco Consumption, 

Cigars Millions 

Cigarettes Millions 

Cattle Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Hog Receipts, Primary 
Markets 000 

Cotton Consumption . . . 000 bales 

Newsprint Produc- 
tion 000 s. tons 

Newsprint Consump- 
tion 1 000 s. tons 

Pig Iron Production.. 000 1. tons 

Steel Ingot Produc- 
tion 000 1. tons 

Automobile Produc- 
tion 000 cars and trucks 

Zinc Production s. tons 

Stocks b. tons 

Lead Production a. tons 

Petroleum Produc- 
tion 000 bbls. 

Consumption (to 
stills) 000 bbls 

Gasoline Production. .000 bbls. 
Consumption 000 bbls 

Contracts Awarded $000,000 

Carloadings 000 cars 

Electric Power Pro- 
duction mill, k.h 

Index Factory Employ- 
ment 1923-5=100 

Mail Order Sales, 2 cos $000 

Ten Cent Sales, 4 Chains. . . $000 

Imports $000, 000 

Exports $000,000 

F.R. Banks, Bills Dis- 
counted Mil. Dolls. 

Reserve Ratio p.c 

Total Loans Mil. Dolls 

Demand Deposits, 
adjusted 2 Mil. Dolls 

Interest Rates, Time Loans. p. c 

Call loans renewal p.c 

Prime commercial paper, 
4-6 months p.c 

Bond Prices High Grade 

Rails (10) 

Forty bonds 

Prices Common Stocks 
(421) 1926=100 

(Copyright Standard Statistics Co.) 

Industrials (351) 

Railways (33) 

Utilities (37) 

Automobiles (13) 

Tires and rubber goods (7) 

Chain stores (16) 

Copper and brass (8) 

Oil (15) 

Railway equipment (9) 

Steel and iron (11) 

Textile (28) 

Amusement (7) 

Tobacco (11) 

Stock Sales, N.Y Mil. Shares 

Bond Sales, N.Y Mil. Dolls. 

Brokers Loans Mil. Dolls. 

Bank Debits, N.Y....MH. Dolls. 

Outside, 140 centres.. .Mil. Dolls 



1935 



Mar. 



880 
970 



860 



6,355 

1,502 

7,986 

328 

352 
10,200 

1,470 

1,622 
481 

73-3 

171 1 
1,777 



2, 

429-8 
36,735 
111.806 
30,118 

81,488 

76,630 
35,314 
31,997 
123-0 
3,015 

8,012 

82-4 

54,763 

38,950 

177-3 

185-0 



72-3 
8,084 



11,688 
•88 

•00 



111-42 
79 00 

63-9 

75-4 

27-8 

53-2 

77-2 

30-7 

69-9 

49-4 

65-9 

40-4 

39-2 

43-4 

10 2 

1261 

15-9 

310-7 

773 

15,895 

15,849 



April 



860 
870 



86-0 
43 



6,390 
7,971 



1.281 

7,787 



1,630 

1,650 
463 

74-7 

1661 



2,641 

477-7 
35.329 

108,680 
29,857 

78,427 

75.066 
34,728 
36,076 
124 
2,303 

7,819 

82-3 

59.644 

43,368 

170-6 

164-4 

6 

73-0 

8,155 

12,231 
•63 



•75 

112-58 
78-37 

67-5 

78-9 

29-4 

591 

80-7 

31-2 

71-8 

56-6 

711 

41-2 

41-4 

42-8 

10-9 

127-2 

22-4 

266-0 

805 

15,905 

15,746 



May 



85-0 
890 

84 
32 



,298 



1,426 



437 



408 
[1,709 



1,551 



84-1 



2020 
1,727 



364-7 
34,572 
107,625 
33,202 

82.454 

80,412 

37,583 

39,0: 

126-7 

2,327 

8,021 

81-2 
58,105 
40,468 

170 

165-5 



73-3 
8,111 

12,556 
•25 
•25 

•75 

113-57 
79-60 

73-1 

85-5 

310 

64-5 

86-8 

31-9 

75-6 

68-9 

80-9 

40-8 

44-5 

450 

12-5 

136-5 

30-4 

284-2 

793 

14,551 

15,655 



June 



980 

84 
24 

10,024 

11.217 

1,195 

7,381 

323 

402 
12,120 

1,402 

1,301 



770 

161 

1,553 

2,231 

361-3 
34,637 
112,909 
29,332 

82,338 

81,724 
38, 180 
37,884 
1480 
3.035 

7.873 

79-9 
58,953 
40,678 

156 

170-2 



74-2 
8,037 

12,921 
•25 
•25 

•75 

11507 

81-08 

760 

880 

32-7 

70 4 

88-5 

31-3 

78-8 

65-7 

82-7 

43-9 

44-9 

450 

13 9 

140-5 

22-3 

263-4 

809 

15,667 

15,914 



July 



86-0 
84-0 



86-0 
37 



11.233 
1,231 



7,387 



414 



432 
13,138 



1,336 
392 

72-8 

153-8 
1.520 

2.27C 

337-0 
35. 120 
115,723 
30,488 

85,485 

84,903 
40,667 
41,203 
159-2 
2.22$, 

8.370 

80-4 

49,887 

38,550 

177-7 

173-4 

7 
74-5 
7,811 

12,962 
■25 

•25 

•75 

116-65 
81-95 

79-4 

91-7 

341 
73-fi 

101-9 
32-4 
80 
69-7 
80-5 
48 5 
53-3 
47 3 
14-7 

148-3 
29-4 

235-7 

769 

16.737 

16.657 



Aug. 



87-0 
810 



880 
64 



48,169 
14,997 



1,278 

8,082 

331 

422 
11,975 

1,943 

1,278 
408 

75 2 

148-1 
1,761 

2.919 

240-1 
35,547 
112,445 
30.807 

84,816 

84,584 

40, 

42,836 

168 

3,102 

8,573 

81-7 

52,402 

40,914 

1690 

172-2 

11 

74-9 
7.817 

13,263 
•25 

•25 

•75 



113-83 
81-90 



95-2 
35-9 
81-6 

117-6 
341 
81-7 
79-9 
80-8 
48-1 
60-4 
49-9 
150 

151-8 
42-9 

286-9 

772 

14,733 

15,643 



Sept 



90-0 
87-0 

91-0 
79 

42,289 

15,595 

1,324 

9,055 

302 

431 

10,774 

2,257 

1,220 
449 

71-3 

160 
1,776 

2,830 



36,221 
106,316 
29,358 

84,109 

83,347 

39,817 

37,862 

167-4 

2,632 

8.208 

81-9 

59,474 

39,008 

161-7 

198-2 

10 
75-3 
8,030 

13,246 
25 



113-83 
81-82 

85-0 

97-5 

37-0 

81-9 

127-3 

33-8 

81-5 

88-9 

77-2 

45-6 

64-2 

51-3 

17-8 

153-2 

34-7 

249-8 

781 

14,014 

15,127 



Oct. 



950 
93 

950 
82 

27,883 

14,695 

9,897 

314 

524 
12,711 

2,545 

1,652 
552 



179 
1,978 

3,146 

275-0 
36,716 
95,969 
37,844 

88,160 

85,132 
41,956 
41,401 

200 

2,882 

8,844 

83 

79,945 

44,911 

189-2 

221-2 

6 
76-4 



13,598 
•25 

■29 



112-55 
79-51 



99-5 
34-5 
821 

137-4 
31-7 
78-6 
920 
78-8 
41-7 
63-1 
54-8 
18-3 

153-0 
46-7 

275-7 

792 

15,733 

16,962 



Nov. 



980 
92-0 



98-0 



14,501 

12,403 

1.602 

8,274 

240 

457 
10,801 

2,037 

1,671 
508 



187-4 
2. 

3,153 



Dec. 



104-0 
101-0 

104-0 
75 

9,943 

7,181 



37,469 
85.266 
36,229 

86,476 

83,180 
40,260 
35,956 
188-2 
3,179 

8.693 

84 

71,777 

45,628 

169-4 

269-3 

6 
771 

3,152 

14,018 
•00 

•75 

•75 

114-32 
83-52 

94-2 

108-4 
38-3 
91-0 

159-9 
38-2 
791 

100-2 
86-7 
49-8 
71-2 
59-3 
20 6 

156-5 
57-5 

302 

846 

15,542 

16,802 



7,175 
242 



498 

79-0 

186-5 
2,106 

3,082 



Jan. 



9,277 
7,964 



1,132 1,202 



40,463 

83,758 
37,958 



88,711 



337 
12,725 



1,785 



2,524 
591 



74-3 



161-2 
2,026 



3,049 



407-8 367-3 



41,917 
79,207 
34,088 



84,99: 

40,667 

33,734 

264-1 

2,319 

9,139 

85-6 

90,813 

80,995 

186-9 

223-5 

5 

77-6 
8,249 

13,887 

1-00 

-75 

•75 

116-92 
86-50 

95-7 

109 
41-4 
92-0 

157-6 
43-4 
76-1 

109-2 
91-0 
52-3 
70-8 
62-2 
21-9 

150-2 
45-6 

314-4 

938 

17,684 

18,816 



2 85, 



776 

39,544 

32,553 

204-8 

2,353 

9,245 

84- 
46,180 



186-9 
198-0 



78-1 



14,017 

1-00 

•75 



120-77 
92-72 

101-7 

116-0 
45-2 
99-1 

159-1 
49-3 
74-0 

116-2 

104-0 
58-3 
730 
67-4 
23-4 

155-9 
67-2 

476-1 

925 

17,925 

17,499 



5,474 
6,782 



1,192 
8,934 



331 



357 

10,766 



1,817 
517 



79-4 



182-2 
1,824 



291-0 
36, 
75,517 
32,221 



9,788 



377 
11,193 



1,625 



2,045 
519 



81,523 
37,176 
27,401 
142-1 
3,135 

8,601 

84-0 
45,435 



187-4 
181- 

7 

78-1 

7,959 

14,090 

1-00 

•75 

•75 

123-69 
96-41 

107-5 

121-5 

49-6 

103-0 

169 

57-0' 

74-8 

135-3 

109-3 

65-0 

81-5 

66-6 

24-5 

153-7 

60-9 

175-1 

924 

15,806 

15,766 



2,040 

3,346 

424-6 
42,483 
79,841 



199-0 
2,419 



192-8 
195-3 



78-2 



•75 



106-8 

124-6 
49-2 
102-8 
182-2 
60-2 
710 
144-6 
112-7 
65-1 
85-6 
62-5 
24-2 



510 



19,629 
17,864 



1 Based on sample of 422 publishers. 

* Method of computing net demand deposits was changed by the Banking Act of 1935, approved Aug. 23, 
Consequently figures since that date are not comparable with those for earlier periods. 



1935. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION frONOMIQUE 



Vol. XI OTTAWA, AVRIL 1936 N° 4 

Statistician du Dominion: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.S.S. (Hon.), F.R.S.C. 
Statistiques Economiques: Sydne? B. Smith, M.A. 



STATISTIQUE COURANTE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE AU CANADA 

La situation economique de mars montre une faible regression. La plupart des facteurs 

majeurs ont touche des niveaux plus bas que le mois precedent. Les prix de gros se sont presque 

maintenus, Findice marquant 72-4 comparativement a 72-5. II y a eu reaction dans les valeurs 

| mobilieres, l'indice des actions ordinaires etant a 117-4 en mars comparativement a 120-7 en 

1 fevrier. L'avance des obligations du gouvernement federal s'est continuee au cours du mois 

sous revue, atteignant une nouvelle cime pour pres de trente ans. L'indice inverti du rende- 

ment des obligations du Dominion marque 143-1 comparativement a 141-2. Les depots ban- 

caires sont legerement plus bas au commencement du mois, leur abaissement etant du au change- 

ment dans les dep6ts a demande. Le gain dans les depots a terme est de $1,499,000,000 a 

i $1,517,000,000. 

Les operations commerciales montrent une recession mineure sur fevrier, apres ajustement 
saisonnier. Alors que plusieurs gains importants sont visibles dans les quarante-cinq facteurs 
servant a la compilation, la majorite est tout de meme a plus bas niveau qu'en fevrier. L'indice 
de la production minerale est a 158-2 comparativement a 186-2 en fevrier. Les exportations 
de zinc, les expeditions d'argent et les importations de bauxite montrent des gains sur le mois 
precedent. Les gains dans les exportations de cuivre et de nickel ont ete moins que normaux 
pour la saison. Les exportations de nickel, a 18,531,000 livres, sont plus grosses qu'en tout 
autre mois de mars. Les exportations de cuivre n'ont ete depassees que par mars de l'an dernier. 
Les exportations de zinc, a 31,184,000 livres, montrent un gain ajuste de plus de 43 p.c. Les 
i exportations de zinc ont done ete plus fortes qu'en tout autre mois de mars dans l'histoire. Les 
j expeditions d'or par les mines canadiennes ont ete a plus bas niveau qu'en fevrier, l'indice bais- 
sant de 206 a 176. Les exportations d'amiante des meilleures qualites donnent 9,645 tonnes 
comparativement a 9,250, mais ce gain est moins que normal pour la saison. Les importations 
de bauxite pour la fabrication d'aluminium montrent un gain ajuste de plus de 6 p.c. La producr 
tion de charbon montre un declin considerable, 1,026,000 tonnes comparativement a 1,449,000 
en fevrier. 

Les points brillants de la production manufacturiere se rencontrent dans les denrees alimen- 
taires et lindustrie du bois. L'indice de la production de denrees alimentaires a monte de 77-0 
a 84 • 7. La production de f arine, le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont etablies, est de 
1,000,000 de barils comparativement a 982,000. L'indice a monte de 59-4 a 69-7. Le gain 
dans la fabrication de sucre est moins que normal pour la saison et l'industrie fonctionne a bas 
niveau. II y a gain dans les abatages de pores, mais les autres classes de bestiaux donnent des 
declins apres ajustement saisonnier. Les exportations de fromage et de saumon en boite ont 
6te lourdes, donnant des gains depassant les tendances saisonnieres. Les exportations de fromage, 
a 2,065,000 livres, donnent une nouvelle cime pour mars depuis 1927. Les dedouanements de 
tabacs montrent des gains inferieurs a la normale de la saison. L'indice des dedouanements de 
cigares montrent un d6clin de 78-4 a 76 -9 ; et les dedouanements de cigarettes donnent 371,000,000 
comparativement a 358,000,000 en fevrier. 

Les importations de caoutchouc brut sont de 4,052,000 livres comparativement a 4,256,000, 
un declin contraire a la tendance saisonniere. La fabrication de bandages pneumatiques s'est 
presque maintenue le dernier mois sur lequel les statistiques sont connues. La chaussure en cuir 
montre un plus ample gain, l'indice avancant de 115-1 a 118-5. Les importations de matieres 
premieres par les industries textiles montrent des gains inferieurs a la normale pour la saison, 
l'indice reculant de 121-2 a 117-0. Les importations de coton brut sont de 13,558,000 livres 
comparativement a 11,724,000 en fevrier. Les importations de laine brute et de files de laine 
donnent 3,831,000 livres comparativement a 2,670,000. 

Le groupe papier et bois a fait excellente figure. La production de papier a journal a ete 
plus grande qu'en tout autre mois de mars. L'indice a avance de 151-6 a 152-9, la production 
de mars etant de 243,900 tonnes. Les exportations de madriers et de planches ont augmente 
de 95,357,000 pieds a 142,062,000. L'indice ajuste pour variations saisonnieres a, par conse- 



36 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 

quent, avance de 74 • 4 a 76 • 9. Les exportations de bardeaux ont ete de nouveau elevees, le total 
atteignant 158,862 carres. L'avance de l'indice ajuste est de 54-9 a 72-1. Comme rOsultat 
net, l'industrie forestiere montre dans ces indices une avance de 111-3 en fevrier a 114-4 en mars. 

Bien qu'il y ait eu une certaine recession dans les operations de l'industrie primaire du fer 
et de l'acier la production a 6te plus grande qu'en tout autre mois de mars de toute autre annee. 
L'indice de la production d'acier en lingot a decline de 149-4 en fevrier a 137-9 en mars et la 
production a depasse celle de tout autre mois de mars depuis 1931. La production de fonte en 
gueuse est de 55,000 tonnes comparativement a 55,751 en fevrier. L'industrie de l'automobile 
a ete plus active, la production etant de 17,974 unites comparativement a 13,268. L'indice 
ajuste a avance de 76-6 a 86-1. Les importations de petrole en mars donnent 65,388,000 gal- 
lons comparativement a 39,655,000 le mois precedent. L'indice, apres ajustement, a avance" 
de 124-2 a 141-3. 

Le volume de la construction, apres ajustement, s'est presque maintenu en mars compa- 
rativement au mois precedent. Les nouveaux contrats donnent une valeur de $10,289,000 com- 
parativement a $8,228,000 en fevrier. Le gain sur le mois correspondant de l'an dernier est 
d'environ $2,000,000. Pour le premier trimestre de l'annee la valeur totale est de $32,127,000 
comparativement a $29,391,000 la periode correspondante de 1935. Les materiaux de cons- 
truction montrent une hausse moderee comparativement au mois correspondant de Fan dernier. 
L'indice officiel, base sur 111 materiaux, a avance de 81-4 a 84-2 au cours des douze mois. II 
n'y a pas de changement entre fevrier et mars. A la suite d'un hiver exceptionnellement rigou- 
reux l'industrie de la construction semble favorisee par de meilleures perspectives. 

Le commerce exterieur montre une amelioration marquee sur mars de l'an dernier, mais 
il y a des reculs sur le mois precedent, apres ajustement pour variations saisonnieres. Les impor- 
tations donnent $52,900,000 comparativement a $41,597,000 en fevrier. L'indice ajuste a decline 
de 78-9 a 71 -6. La valeur des exportations est placee a $73,166,000 comparativement a $60,198,- 
000 en fevrier, mais l'indice ajuste donne 91 • en mars comparativement a 99 • 3 le mois precedent. 
Les exportations depassent celles de tout autre mois de mars depuis 1929. 

Situation economique 

L' interpretation de la situation economique est facilitee par l'analyse de six facteurs majeurs. 
Ceux-ci comprennnent la mesure en volume des prix dans les trois domaines importants: du 
commerce en general, de l'argent et de la speculation. Un composite des six facteurs majeurs 
au Canada a ete calcule pour la periode d'apres-guerre. La procedure consiste a ponderer inver- 
sement chacun des facteurs par la deviation standardised de la ligne a long terme. Le composite 
est exprime en multiples de la deviation de la tendance a long terme d'apres-guerre determined 
par la methode des carres de la moindre difference. Les facteurs employes a ce sujet et les poids 
qui leur sont affectes sont comme suit: volume physique des affaires, 14-62; prix de gros, 18-47; 
depots bancaires (indice ajuste saisonnierement des depots a terme et sur demande), 31-39; 
indice averti du rendement des obligations (la reciproque de l'indice du Bureau du rendement 
des obligations du gouvernement federal), 27-30; volume des operations aux bourses de Mont- 
real et Toronto, 2-47; et actions ordinaires, 5-75. Les indices des depots bancaires et des 
transactions ordinaires sont donnes a la page 32. L'indice inverti du rendement des obligations 
parait a la page 11 de la livraison d'aoiit de la Revue Mensuelle et les autres facteurs ont ete 
publics dans les supplements de novembre 1932 et mai 1934. 

D 'apres cette compilation les conditions de depression se sont manifestoes au Canada de 
1921 a 1925 et de 1931 a 1934. La plus grande periode de prosperity depuis la guerre commence 
vers la fin de 1925 pour se terminer avec 1930. La depression la plus recente a ete la plus rigou- 
reuse de la periode d' observation, les niveaux ayant ete extremement bas en 1932 et les premiers 
mois de 1933. Le relevement depuis a ete substantiel. L'indice economique est en consequence 
au-dessus de la ligne de tendance a long terme au cours de la plus grande partie de 1935. 

Le graphique de la page 15 montre la fluctuation cyclique de l'indice economique pendant 
l'apres-guerre. Les indices de la situation economique en Grande-Bretagne et aux Etats-Unis, 
parus dans les livraisons de fevrier et mars de la Revue Mensuelle, sont repetes sur une echelle 
permettant leur comparaison avec l'indice canadien. 

Cours des denrees 

Les prix des denrees ont ete stables en mars, l'indice officiel fluctuant de 72-4 comparative- 
ment a 72-5 le mois precedent. La plupart des denrees ont fluctue dans une marge 6troite avec 
des signes de faiblesse evidente la derniere partie du mois. 



REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUE 37 

L'indice du coiit de la vie, qui a fluctu6 dans de tres etroites limites au cours des six mois 
derniers, est a 80-5 comparativement a 80-4 en fevrier. Les prix de detail des denrees alimen- 
taires ont monte de 72 • 9 a 73 • 4 et l'indice des combustibles, de 87 ■ 3 a 87 • 5. Ce dernier indice 
est encore a plus d'un point au-dessus du niveau de Fan dernier. 

Progres a long terme et croissance de la population 

Le rapide developpement economique du Canada depuis le debut du siecle actuel est illustre 
dans le graphique paraissant a la page 30. Mesuree par un indice de Factivite economique en 
prenant 1913 comme base exprimee par 100, la croissance du Canada a ete lente au cours de la 
derniere partie du dix-neuvieme siecle. Vers la fin des 1890, partiellement a la suite de la coloni- 
sation intense des Provinces des Prairies, la courbe de Factivite a pris une rapide tournure a la 
hausse. Depuis cette epoque Fexpansion, malgre des reculs temporaires, a ete satisfaisante. 
Bien qu'il y ait eu declin de 1929 a 1933 la reaction a ete de nature cyclique, n'affectant pas 
necessairement les perspectives a long terme. 

L'indice a ete calcule sans ponderation des huit facteurs principaux ajustes, ou necessaire, 
pour changements de prix. 

Le gain en population correspond en grande partie avec la marche du developpement econo- 
mique. De 1871 a 1901 le gain en population a ete de 45-6 p.c. tandis que de 1901 a 1931 Faug- 
mentation est de 93-2 p.c. 

La correlation des facteurs significatifs 

La correlation des facteurs significatifs doit necessairement jouer un role important dans 
Interpretation economique. C'est ce qui est presente dans le graphique de la page 10, montrant 
les mouvements relatifs de cinq paires de facteurs essentiels au progres du Canada. Dans la 
premiere section, la correlation etroite de la production industrielle avec Femploiement dans 
les industries autres que Fagriculture est montree sur le long cycle de 1921 a 1933. Bien que 
l'indice de la production industrielle soit inferieur a celui de Femploiement en 1931 et 1932, la 
plus grande avance de ce dernier en 1933 les ramene en etroite proximite les trois annees dernieres. 
L'indice du cours des actions ordinaires a ete beaucoup plus haut que celui de la production 
industrielle de 1927 a 1930, mais un plus violent declin des actions ordinaires a place l'indice de 
de la production dans un etat de superiorite depuis les premiers mois de 1931 jusqu'a juillet 
1933. Vu la rapidite du relevement des actions ordinaires apres mars 1933, les deux indices 
sont tres peu eloignes Fun de F autre les derniers trois ans. 

De violentes fluctuations dans la valeur des importations et des exportations sont mon- 
trees. De 1921 a 1928 les lourdes exportations de cereales, specialement vers la fin de chaque 
annee, ont donne un excedent considerable des exportations sur les importations. De 1929 
a 1931 l'importance saisonniere des exportations de grain n'a pas ete si prononcee bien qu'elles 
aient donne vers la fin de 1931 une balance favorable du commerce et qu'elles aient continue 
les derniers quatre ans. 

La marche des prix courants montre trois mouvements distincts dans la periode d'apres- 
guerre. II y a eu declin de 1921 jusque vers la fin de 1925, suivi d'un gain prononce depuis cette 
date jusqu'au dernier trimestre de 1929. Ce declin a ete plutot violent les derniers six ans. 
Les depots a terme, d'un autre cote, ont atteint leur maximum en 1928 et subsequemment leur 
diminution a ete moderee, une augmentation considerable paraissant depuis Fete de 1934. Ceci 
laisse une grande disparite entre les depots a terme et les prets courants, une situation qui fortifie 
la position liquide des banques. 

La relation entre les debits des banques, illustrant le roulement des depots, est considered 
comme un excellent barometre des affaires en general. 

Production industrielle mondiale 

Le caractere mondial du relevement economique est indique par les gains des indices de 
la production industrielle les derniers douze mois. Des dix-huit pays principaux considered 
dans cette analyse, un seul montre des declins les derniers mois dont les resultats sont connus 
comparativement au mois correspondant de Fannee precedente. 

Alors que les methodes de compilation varient de pays a pays, l'indice de la production 
industrielle peut 6tre considere comme une mesure exacte des fluctuations cycliques. Le carac- 
tere presque general de Favance dans les operations productives est notable. 



38 REVUE MENSUELLE DE LA SITUATION ECONOMIQUR 

Le gain de l'indice canadien est de 8-6 p.c. au cours des douze derniers mois. L'indice du 
Royaume-Uni a monte de 7-3 p.c. et celui des Etats-Unis, compile par le Federal Reserve Board, 
montre une augmentation de 8-8 p.c. Des gains de 19 a 22 p.c. sont accuses par la Hongrie, 
la Belgique, l'Allemagne et la Tchecoslovaquie. 

Les indices sont exprimes en pourcentages de l'annee 1929 prise comme base ou 100 et il 
vaut de noter en passant que dans sept pays sur dix-huit les operations productives sont mainte- 
nant plus actives que l'annee de base. La reprise marquee dans la plupart des principaux pays 
au cours des derniers douze mois est un facteur constructif presentant une excellente fondation 
pour une plus ample avance. Le retour a des conditions plus prosperes dans les autres pays est 
un des elements les plus effectifs pouvant influencer les tendances au Canada. En consequence, 
la lecture de ces indices est evidemrnent favorable. 

Loyer de l'argent a breve echeance 

Le bas niveau du loyer de l'argent dans les principaux pays les derniers douze mois est une 
caracteristique de la phase actuelle du cycle economique majeur. La tendance a ete a la baisse 
depuis ciriq ans et les taux courants a l'heure actuelle sont aussi bas qu'avant la guerre dans la 
plupart des pays. 

Le bas loyer de l'argent est considere comme un facteur constructif, encourageant les opera- 
tions productives. Au cours d'une depression les activites financieres sont dirigees vers la crea- 
tion de conditions favorables a la facilite du credit et de l'argent. Une telle operation reussit 
quand elle est supplementee par des developpements normaux. Ainsi, la reduction marquee 
des operations productives et le plus bas niveau des prix, caracteristiques d'une periode de depres- 
sion, conduisent naturellement a diminuer l'emploi de fonds liquides. 

L'interet est generalement plus bas les premieres annees de relevement que les der- 
nieres annees de la depression, montant ensuite avant que ce relevement soit depuis longtemps 
en progres. La cause de cette avance du loyer de l'argent est evidente, mais il est necessaire 
d'expliquer la lenteur avec laquelle cette hausse se maaifeste. Les prets bancaires sont parmi 
les facilites dont presque toute entreprise ne peut se dispenser. Le volume des prets avance 
non pas avec le volume physique mais bien avec le volume pecuniaire des affaires et le dernier 
type d' expansion peut etre retarde par un changement relativement faible dans le niveau des prix 
pour un certain temps apres que le volume physique des affaires a commence son expansion. 
De plus, les banques ont des reserves a ce stage du cycle Economique leur permettant de satis- 
faire une demande grandissante pour un certain temps sans ebranler leurs fortes positions liquides. 
Les taux de l'argent a breve echeance a Londres en 1935 ont ete plus bas qu'a toute autre epoque 
en ces dernieres annees, les traites des banquiers a trois mois ay ant ete a 0-38 p.c; le niveau 
le plus eleve des derniers six ans, touche en octobre 1929, est de 6-13 p.c. 

Les effets de commerce a quatre et six mois a New- York ont ete en moyenne a 0-75 p.c. 
en ces derniers mois, le point le plus eleve depuis juillet 1929 ayant ete 6-13 p.c, en septembre 
et octobre de l'annee. 

Les taux prives d'escompte en Allemagne et Italie sont a des niveaux moderes tandis que 
ceux de France ont avance a 4-26 p.c. en Janvier. 

Le rendement des obligations au Canada, representant le loyer de l'argent a long terme, 
a ete recemment plus bas qu'en tout temps depuis 29 ans. Le rendement des obligations du 
gouvernement a donne en moyenne 3-39 p.c. en mars comparativement a 5-05, le maximum de 
1929. 

Operations bancaires 

La situation bancaire a ete caracterisEe en fevrier par une plus ample avance des depots 
a terme, du portefeuille et de l'actif liquide. L'indice ajuste pour variations saisonnieres des 
depots a demande a avance de 111-8 a la fin de Janvier a 113-0 le 29 fevrier. Le portefeuille 
et l'actif liquide ont atteint de nouvelles cimes dans l'histoire bancaire canadienne. 

La rentree des prets courants s'est continued, l'indice, sur une base de 1926, reculant de 
82-4 a 80-9. Les depots a demande sont plus bas qu'a la fin de Janvier mais encore plus elev6s 
qu'a la meme date de Fan dernier. 

II y a un signe favorable dans le gain des billets aux mains du public. La somme des billets 
des banques a charte du Canada en circulation, apres deduction de ceux gardes par les banques, 
est de $171,600,000 comparativement a $165,100,000 le 31 Janvier. 

Bureau Federal de^la Statistique, 21 avril 1936. 



PUBLICATIONS ISSUED BY THE DOMINION BUREAU OF STATISTICS 

1. ANNUAL OR SPECIAL REPORTS ISSUED DURING THE MONTH ENDED 

APRIL 16, 1936 

Administration. — Canada's National Wealth, 11 p. 

Population. — Divorces granted in Canada in 1935, 4 p. 

Production. — Agricultural Production. — The grain situation in the Argentine, March 16, 1936, 5 p. 
Stocks of grain at March 31, 1936, 4 p. Commercial tobacco production in Canada, 1935, 3 p. Seventh 

census of Canada, 1931, Saskatchewan, census of agriculture, 110 + 89 p. (Eng. and Fr.) 25 cents; 

Alberta, census of agriculture, 112 + 85 p. (Eng. and Fr.) 25 cents. Mineral Production. — Preli- 
minary report on the mineral production of Canada, calendar year 1935, 46 p. 

Manufactures.— Advance report on the manufacturing industries of Canada, 1934, 29 p. Vegetable 
Products. — Report on the flour and feed milling industries in Canada, 1934, 30 p. Report on the 
coffee, tea, spice and miscellaneous food industries in Canada, 1934, 26 p. Report on the bread and 
other bakery products industry in 1934, 16 p. Animal Products. — Ice cream production in Canada, 

1934, 2 p. Miscellaneous leather goods, leather belting, boot and shoe findings in Canada, 1934, 23 p. 
Chemical Products. — The fertilizer trade in Canada, July 1, 1934- June 30, 1935 (reprint from Monthly 
Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics, Feb. 1936) 14 p. Textile Industries. — Report on the dyeing, 
cleaning and laundry industries in Canada, 1934, 48 p. Report on the women's factory clothing in- 
dustry in Canada, 1934, 29 p. Report on the men's factory clothing industry and clothing contractors 
in Canada, 1934, 26 p. Report on the woollen textile industries in Canada, 1934, 55 p. Electrical 
Apparatus and Supplies. — Quarterly report, factory sales of electric storage batteries in Canada, 
fourth quarter, 1935, 4 p. Production and sales of radio receiving sets in Canada, fourth quarter, 

1935, 17 p. Non-ferrous Metals.— Manufactures of the non-ferrous metals in Canada, 1933-34, 94 p. 
25 cents. Iron and Steel and Their Products.— The castings and forgings industry in Canada 1934, 
22 p. 

Internal Trade. — Census of merchandising and service establishments: statistics for payrolls, stocks 
and gross margins of wholesale merchandising establishments, 1934, 6 p. Sales of motor vehicles 
and motor vehicle financing in Canada, 1935, 25 p. Farm expenditures in Alberta, 1934 (reprint from 
Monthly Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics, Feb. 1936) 14 p. map. 

Transportation, Communications and Public Utilities.— Index numbers of railway freight rates, 14 p. 

2. PUBLICATIONS REGULARLY ISSUED BY THE WEEK, MONTH OR QUARTER. 

Daily Bulletins.— The daily bulletin— SI. 50 per year. 

Weekly Bulletins. — Canadian grain statistics. Carloadings of revenue freight. Investors' indexes of 
security prices. Index number of 20 mining stocks. The weekly bulletin — $1.00 per year. Weekly 
index numbers of wholesale prices. 

Monthly Bulletins. — Agricultural statistics. The wheat situation: review; statistical supplement — $1.00 
per year. Canadian milling statistics. Cold storage holdings. Preliminary summary of price move- 
ments. Production of — (a) Flour, (b) Sugar, (c) Boots and shoes, (d) Automobiles, (e) Iron 
and steel, (f) Coal and coke, (g) Leading mineral products, (h) Asbestos, (i) Asphalt roofing, 
(j) Cement. (k) Clay products. (1) Copper. (m) Feldspar. (n) Gold. (o) Gypsum, 
(p) Lead, (q) Lime, (r) Natural gas. (s) Nickel, (t) Petroleum, (u) Salt, (v) Silver, (w) 
Zinc, (x) Concentrated milk products, (y) Creamery butter. Rigid insulating board industry. 
Building permits. Summary of the trade of Canada current month and 12 months. Summary of 
Canada's domestic exports. Summary of Canada's imports. Asbestos trade. Farm implements 
and machinery. Footwear trade. Exports: Fertilizers, Grain and flour; Hides and skins; Lumber; 
Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk, milk products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and smelter products; 
Paints and varnishes; Petroleum and its products; Pipes, tubes and fittings; Pulpwood, wood pulp 
and paper; Rubber and insulated wire and cable; Vegetable oils; Vehicles (of iron). Imports: 
Canada's imports from Empire and foreign countries. Coffee and tea; Fertilizers; Hides and skins; 
Lumber; Meats, lard and sausage casings; Milk and its products and eggs; Non-ferrous ores and 
smelter products; Paint and varnishes; Pulpwood, wood pulp and paper; Petroleum and its products; 
Pipes, tubes and fittings; Rubber; Stoves, sheet metal products; Refrigerators; Vegetable oils, 
Vehicles (of iron). Canada's monthly trade trends. Canada's monthly trade trends with Empire 
countries. Canada's monthly trade trends with foreign countries. Railway operating statistics. 
Traffic of Canadian railways. Canal statistics. Output of central electric stations in Canada. Prices 
and price indexes. Automobile financing. Bank debits. Changes in the value of retail sales. Com- 
mercial failures. The employment situation as reported by employers. New motor vehicle sales. 
Outstanding facts and figures gathered from reports, statements, bulletins and radio broadcasts. 
Review of business statistics — Price $1.00 per year. Sales and purchases of securities between Canada 
and other countries. Vital statistics, births, marriages and deaths, by provinces. 

Quarterly Reports.— Trade of Canada— Price S2.00 per year. Coal and coke. Factory sales of electric 
storage batteries. Galvanized sheets. Price movements in other countries. Production and sales 
of radio receiving sets. Stocks and consumption of unmanufactured tobacco. Vital statistics. 



For the publications listed above application should be made to the Dominion Statistician, Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. 

The complete service of all publications issued by the Bureau (with the exception of new bulletins) 
may be obtained for a special rate of $15 per annum. 




Volume XI Jqm&ms Num&o 4 



CANADA 

BUREAU FEDERAL DE LA STATISTIQUE 
SECTION DE LA STATISTIQUE G&N&RALE 



REVUE DE LA SITUATION EC0N0M1QUE 



AVRIL, 1936 



Publie par ordre de THon. W. D. Euler. MP., 
Ministre du Commerce 



OTTAWA 
J.-O. PATENAUDE, O.S.I. 
IMPRIMEUR DE 8A TRE8 EXCELLENTE MAJESTE LE ROl 
1936 



Priz: Un dollar par an 



V ^ -J THE LIBRARIAN. ^ 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO. 
D - 1 - TORONTO 6.0NT. 




Volume XI JVfflSms Number 5 



CANADA 

P OMl - N tON BUREAU OF STATISTICS 
GENERAL STATISTICS BRANCH 



Gww^ 3^ c % 



<2^> 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



MAY, 1936 




Published by Authority of the Honourable W. D. Euler, MP, 
Minister of Trade and Commerce 



OTTAWA 

J.O. PATENAUDE, I.8.O. 

FRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1936 



Price: One Dollar per year. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



//7<7/<~es t/e /<? /?roat/t://a'/7 /s7afys/r/<?//e comperes & afre/res /ec/et/rs S/?/?//'fe///s 




/see /J?^/ /9P# /j?^j? /3JO /SJ/ /9^ /S>JJ /9J4 /S35 /936 
' J 'months mov/r?g ai^eraae 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Vol. XI OTTAWA, MAY, 1936 No. » 

Dominion Statistician: R. H. Coats, LL.D., F.R.S.C., F.S.S. (Hon.) 
Business Statistician: Sydney B. Smith, M.A. 

THE CURRENT ECONOMIC SITUATION IN CANADA 

Economic conditions in Canada showed slight betterment in April over the preceding month. 
Three of the six major factors considered in this connection recorded gains. An outstanding 
development was the gain in high-grade bond prices to a new high point during the period of 
observation. An index of bond prices recently published by the Bureau was 115-7 in April 
compared with 115-5 in the preceding month. The standing in April was slightly higher than in 
any other month of the post-war period. Prices continued strong in the early weeks of May, 
extending the advance. 

The deposit liabilities of the banks showed an increase at the first of April, notice deposits 
reaching a new high point in history. It is a normal development during a period of depres- 
sion, when business operations and wholesale prices are at low levels, for money to be returned to 
the banks. Carrent loans in the meantime have continued to decline, leading to a considerable 
disparity between notice deposits and current loans. The surplus funds of the banks having 
been invested in high grade securities, results in an increase of cash in the hands of the public. 

The index of wholesale prices at 72-2 compared with 72-4 in March, recorded a minor re- 
cession. The fluctuation during the last two years has been of a minor character, and the zone 
of stabilization has been extended since the first of the year. Following the rapid advance from 
October to February, common stock prices showed reaction in March and April. The extent of 
the decline was moderate when considered in connection with the rapid advance culminating in 
February. Speculative trading on the Canadian stock exchanges was active during the first 
four months of the present year, reaching a higher level than at any time since July 1933. 

Following the recession during the first quarter of the present year, business operations showed 
expansion. Owing to the advance during the greater part of 1935, a higher level had been reached 
in the first quarter of that year. The recession in the first quarter of 1936 was relatively moderate 
and the rally in April counterbalanced a part of that decline. Many rapid advances occurred 
among the factors contributing to the physical volume of business. The external demand for 
copper resulted in a new high point, after seasonal adjustment, for any month of the post-war 
period. 

The forestry group expanded operations, the index moving up to a new high point for the 
last seventeen years. The power industry was also more active than at any other time, electric 
output, after the usual adjustments, reaching a new high point in the history of the industry. 
A contrary tendency was shown by the construction industry, the new business obtained in April 
being at a discouragingly low level. 

The index of the physical volume of business, which, on the base of 1926, had been 103-3 
in March, showed a considerable increase in the month under review. The export of copper was 
29,262,000 pounds compared with 16,259,000 in April of last year. The increase in the index 
over March, after seasonal adjustment, was 49 per cent. The export of nickel also continued 
heavy, the-total in April having been 10,967,000 pounds. The increase in. the adjusted index 
over the preceding month was 12 per cent. Lead production in the latest month for which sta- 
tistics are available, showed a slight increase over the preceding month. Zinc exports recorded 
decline in the same comparison, the index in April being 175 against 193-2 in March. The ad- 
justed index of gold shipments from Canadian mines reached a new high point in history at 243 • 1 
against 175-9 in March. Shipments were 305,110 fine ounces against 271,715 in the preceding 
month. Shipments of silver at 718,000 ounces recorded a considerable decline compared with 
the preceding month, but were slighly greater than in April, 1935. The exports of asbestos of 
the better grades w r ere greater than in any other April since 1930. A decline, however, was shown 
from March after seasonal adjustment. The imports of bauxite for the manufacture of aluminum 
were practically maintained after seasonal adjustment. Imports in April were in excess of 
11,000,000 pounds. 

18948— H 



/ 9 26= /OO 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

JVeefc/y fconom/c Factorr 

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fbcZ-eu/J" e'co/70/77/qi/es /?6>6£/0/77&c/(7/res 



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/3JS- /9J6 /33S~ /3J6 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 5 

Wholesale Prices 

The general level of wholesale prices receded slightly in April from the preceding month. 
Gains among the main groups were limited to wood and paper, iron and steel and chemicals. 
The index of Canadian farm products dropped from 65-5 to 65-0, while the downward trend 
in the general index was from 72-4 to 72-2. In general, price movements were upward for the 
greater part of the month but an easier tone was apparent in the final week. Copper prices 
advanced in the European market and were suppored by the official announcement of the 
continuance of the measures restricting production. 
Cost of Living 

A substantial reduction in food costs, and a slight recession in the price of fuel resulted in a 
decline in the general cost of living for Canada from 80-5 in March to 79-8 in April. Although 
retail food prices were considerably lower than in the month preceding, current prices remain 
3-5 per cent above the level of a year ago. The index for fuel moved down, a slight increase for 
coke being more than offset by a decline in the price of coal. 

Relation of Industrial Production to Other Factors 

A chart is presented on page 2 showing the relation of industrial production to six other 
significant factors from the beginning of 1926 to the present time. The index of industrial 
production is repeated in the six sections for the purpose of showing more effectively the correlation 
with other factors. The index of employment is not subject to such wide fluctuation as the 
index of industrial production, not rising so high in 1929 nor falling so low as industrial production 
during the depression period from 1930 to the early months of 1933. Overtime work in boom 
periods and short-time work in depressions may be a partial explanation. For about a year the 
industrial production line has been above employment, but on the whole, the two lines have 
shown marked correlation since the latter part of 1933. 

Wholesale prices were comparatively stable from 1926 to 1929, the aggregate recession 
being very moderate. This movement was contrary to historical precedent, as in most periods 
of the past there has been direct correlation between wholesale prices and industrial production. 
From 1930 to the early months of 1933, the downward trends of the two factors were roughly 
parallel. The lowest point of the depression for both industrial production and wholesale 
prices was reached in the first quarter of 1933, the recovery of industrial production in subsequent 
months being of considerably greater magnitude. Since the beginning of 1934 the general level 
.of wholesale prices has been remarkably stable, while the advance in industrial production has 
continued without important interruption. 

The index of common stock prices is subject to greater fluctuation than any other factor 
shown in this connection. The peak of the long cycle pictured here was reached in September, 
1929. From that month to June, 1932, the decline was more drastic than in any other period of 
similar duration in Canadian history. The recovery of 1933 approximately re-established the 
relationship existing in the base year of 1926. During the greater part of 1934 and 1935, the 
index of industrial production was higher, but this relationship was reversed in the first quarter 
of 1936 when common stocks advanced to a new high point for more than five years. 

The month-to-month fluctuation of bank debits was pronounced, but an obviously close 
correlation was shown with industrial production. 

The recovery in notice deposits since the summer of 1934 counterbalanced the decline of 
the five preceding years, a new high point in history having been reached at the end of the first 
quarter of the present year. The resistance of notice deposits to the influences of the depression 
was one of the reassuring features holding out hopes of the extension of the recovery. The 
liquid assets of consumers in the form of savings deposits are now greater than at any previous 
time. 

Long-term interest rates, as determined by the yield on government bonds showed a rise 
in the latter part of 1931, constituting one of the factors leading to the prolongation of the depres- 
sion. The rapid decline in high-grade bond yields from January, 1932, to the early months 
of this year was a constructive development of fundamental importance. 
Securities 

The most serious reaction in common stock prices since the summer of 1934 occurred during 
the final three weeks of April. A brief period of recovery from the initial March break ended 
during the first week of April, and was followed by sharp declines, which were still in progress 

18948—2 



6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

as the month ended. Losses were most severe among interlisted market leaders, including 
industrial mining issues, although iron and steel, oil, and beverage stocks also declined appre- 
ciably. The smallest losses occurred in the textile and food groups. A general index of common 
stocks fell from 123-1 to 115-7 during the month. Gold issues continued to show moderate 
strength, advancing from 121-4 to 123-3. 

Long-term Dominion of Canada bond prices also tended to be firmer, and an index of yields 
dropped fractionally from 69-7 to 69-2 during April. 

Weekly Factors 

In a period of rapid economic changes such as have occurred in the last fifteen months, 
weekly statistics are specially valuable for current interpretation. In the chart appearing on 
page 4, nine important factors are shown on a weekly basis from the beginning of 1935 to 
the present time. Carloadings in the first four months of the present year were practically 
maintained at the moderate level of the same period of 1935. A sharp gain was recorded in 
February of the present year. Total loadings in the first nineteen weeks of the year were 813,005 
cars compared with 806,951 in the corresponding weeks of last year, a gain of 6,054 cars. 

The price of wheat advanced in May and October, 1935, and deliveries at country elevators 
after adjustment for seasonal tendencies were relatively heavy in July and October. From 
September until the end of the year seasonally adjusted deliveries were by no means abnormal. 
The visible supply of wheat declined after the first week of November. The stock of wheat was 
117,400,000 bushels in the week ended May 8 compared with 211,300,000 in the week ended 
May 10, 1935. 

The weekly index of common stock prices reflected a low level in the first three and one-half 
months of 1933. The advance from the middle of April to the latter part of July was spectacular. 
Prices reached a temporary high point in February, showing recession in April and the early 
weeks of May. The advance in mining stocks in the first quarter of 1936 resulted in a high level 
for some years. 

Foreign Exchange 

The French franc continued to be the centre of interest in exchange markets during April. 
Although it fluctuated narrowly, the increased stream of gold exports from Paris, and a rise 
in the official bank discount rate from 3^ per cent to 5 per cent, revealed the strain which the franc 
is withstanding. Negotiations by the French government for a short-term loan in Amsterdam 
were not completed. Announcement was made early in April that the Russian ruble was to 
be maintained at a value equivalent to three French francs. Only a few weeks later, on April 27, 
Poland abandoned the gold standard but intimated that the value of the zloty would be main- 
tained at approximately its former gold parity. Strength returned to the Canadian dollar in the 
last two weeks of April and a considerable fraction of March losses were regained. 

Business, Wholesale Prices and Speculative Values 

The chart on page 10 shows the relationship of common stock prices to the trend of the 
product of the indexes of business and prices for different periods. The curves are shown by 
years from 1904, by months from 1921 and by weeks from the first of 1933. The composite 
index was obtained by multiplying the index of the volume of business by the index of wholesale 
prices. 

While in the post-war period the index of common stocks fluctuated to a greater extent, a 
significant degree of correlation was shown with the composite. In the preparation of the 
annual indexes shown in the first section of the chart, the composite index was computed by 
multiplying the indexes of long-term economic activity 1 and of wholesale prices. The heavy 
demand for munition and war supplies as well as inflated prices accounted for the high level of 
the composite index from 1916 to 1920. From 1921 to 1929, the index recorded repeated gains 
but the advance in common stock prices was relatively much greater. While both indexes 
declined from 1929 to 1932, the greater reaction in common stocks resulted in the close proximity 
of the two indexes in the latter year. The composite index computed in this way was lower 
than in any other year since 1915, while common stocks averaged lower than in any year since 
1913. 



iThe index of long-term economic activity is based on eight factors as follows: — Imports, exports, mineral production, 
bank deposits, notes in circulation, bank loans, imports of ire r ind steel and the index of wholesale prices. The first sevea 
of these are adjusted for price changes. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 7 

The monthly trends of two indexes since January, 1921, are shown in the second section 
of the chart. Except for the greater altitude for common stocks culminating in 1929, the correla- 
tion between the two indexes was relatively close. The product of the indexes of the volume 
of business and prices is a rough measure of the gross revenue of Canadian corporations. This 
explains the close relationship with common stock prices over a period. 

While the index obtained by multiplying the weekly index of economic conditions by the 
index of wholesale prices fluctuated less widely than the index of common stock prices, a consider- 
able similarity in the trends was evident from the beginning of 1933 to the present. The advance 
in common stocks during the seven months ended in April last was pronounced, far exceeding 
the upward trend of the index plotted for comparative purposes. 

Banking Operations 

The deposit liabilities of the chartered banks showed a considerable increase during March. 
The adjusted index of demand deposits advanced from 98 • 5 on February 29 to 104 ■ on March 31, 
practically offsetting the decline of the preceding month. Notice deposits showed further gain to 
a new high point for some years, the gain over the same date of last year having been six per cent. 

The decline in current loans was continued to a new low point at the end of March. The 
index of current loans was 78-6 against 80-9, a decline of nearly three per cent. Owing to the 
greater disparity between notice deposits and current loans, the security holdings of the banks 
recorded a further increase to a new high point. The total held at the end of March was no 
less than $1,315,000,000. The readily available assets also showed further increase to a new 
high point in the history of Canadian banking. 

Canada's Equation of Exchange 

The equation of exchange is a device for showing the relation between financial transfers, 
business operations and prices. The equation was developed from the quantity theory of 
money which postulated that one of the normal effects of variation in the amount of money in 
circulation is to produce direct changes in prices. Upon the increase of money in circulation, 
there is a tendency for the general level of prices to advance, while a decline in circulating media 
leads to a drop in prices. It was found that through the use of cheques bank deposits served 
the same purpose as money in the payment of accounts. 

Bank deposits showed gains in the last two years and notes and coin in the hands of the 
public have recorded increases since 1932. Bank debits increased in 1933 and 1934 but showed 
a recession in 1935. Advances were recorded in the general price level and in the physical volume 
of business since the low point was passed in 1932 and the first quarter of 1933. 

A bulletin recently published by the Bureau presents statistics illustrating the equation 
of exchange in Canada during the post-war period. 

CONDITIONS IN THE UNITED STATES 

Productive operations in the United States which had been maintained after seasonal 
adjustment during March showed a gain in April. Production in the iron and steel industry 
increased sharply after seasonal adjustment and constituted a major source of strength in the 
industrial field. The output of automobile factories was only slightly higher than in March 
after making allowance for a normal seasonal increase of about 22 per cent. The output of electric 
power increased substantially during April offsetting the decline in March. Reflecting enlarged 
production in Oklahoma and Texas, the output of crude petroleum increased markedly. Con- 
tracts awarded expanded somewhat more than seasonally, the gain over the same month of last 
year being more than 80 per cent. Freight car loadings increased moderately, the gain offsetting 
one-half the loss reported for March. 

Following the sharp reaction in the last three weeks of April, security markets turned stronger 
in May. Active business, large corporate earnings and a plethora of available investment 
funds were once again the dominant forces affecting price movements. 

Purchases of gold and silver abroad in 1935 were $1,741 million and $336 million, respectively. 
The favourable merchandise balance, exclusive of silver, was $234 million. Credit items included 
the sale of stocks and bonds to foreigners to the net amount of $442 million, the receipt of $970 
million short term banking funds from abroad and of $115 million in capital funds by concerns 
other than banks. 
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, May 21, 1936. 

18948— 2i 



a MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 1. Weighted Indexes of the Physical Volume of Business and Agricultural Factors in 
Canada, Based on the Monthly Average for 1926 and Corrected where Necessary for Seasonal 
Variation. 1 



Classification 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



Physical Volume of Business. . 

INDUSTRIAL PRODUC- 
TION 

Mineral Production 

Copper exports 

Nickel exports 

Lead production 

Zinc exports 

Gold shipments 

Silver shipments 

Asbestos exports 

Bauxite imports 

Coal production 

Manufacturing 

Foodstuffs 

Flour production 

Oatmeal production 

Sugar manufactured 

Cheese exports 

Salmon exports 

Tobacco 

Cigars 

Cigarettes 

Rubber imports 

Boots and shoes production 
Imports of Textiles 

Raw cotton imports 

* Cotton yarn imports 

Wool, raw and yarn 

Forestry 

Newsprint 

Wood pulp exports 

Planks and boards exports 

Shingles exported 

Iron and steel 

Steel production 

Pig iron production — 

Iron and steel imports.. . . 

Automobile production . 

Coke production 

Crude petroleum imports 

Construction 

Contracts awarded 

Building permits 

Cost of construction 

Electric Power 

DISTRIBUTION 

Trade employment 

Carloadings 

Imports 

Exports 2 



Agricultural Factors— 
GRAIN AND LIVE STOCK 

MARKETINGS 

Grain Marketings 

Wheat 

Oats 

Barley 

Flax 

Rye 

Livb Stock Marketings. . . . 

Cattle 

Calves 

Hogs 

Sheep 

ANIMAL PRODUCTS- 
Inspected Slaughterings— 

Cattle 

Sheep 

Hogs 

Cold Storage Holdings... 

Eggs 

Butter 

Cheese 

Beef 

Porx 

M utton 

Poultry 

Lard 

Veal 



98-7 

97-7 
156 4 

298-5 

451-5 

101-2 

217-8 

170-7 

52-5 

44-1 

105-2 

77-6 

940 

82 

72-2 
34-2 
63 
25 
74-8 
124-3 
81 
144 
64 
123 
101 
94 

1131 
134-8 
990 
140-3 
67- 
51-9 
122-5 
92-2 
99-5 
671 
56 

102-9 
112-2 
135-3 
35-6 
33-5 
40-9 
85-7 
195-9 
100- 
1210 
79-1 
71 
102-2 



91 
104 

15 

12-6 
1 
6-9 

92 

88 

79-6 

72 
299-3 

135-5 
131-3 
344-1 
120 
135-8 
125-5 
226-6 
105-3 
122-5 
93 
170-9 



134-4 



103-2 

104-4 

147-6 

361-8 

208-5 

115-4 

209-0 

200-5 

50-6 

63-9 

222-4 

81-3 

105-1 

88-2 

76-2 

46-9 

80-8 

35-4 

77-1 

143-5 

73 

174-2 
221-7 
121-5 
68-7 
65-7 
112-7 
68-6 
108-7 
148-8 
81-3 
68-4 
551 
83-2 
100-5 
66 

60-8 
87-0 
112 
237-7 
35 

38-5 
29-1 
85-7 
198- 1 
10^ -5 
121-2 
73-4 
840 



11-4 
90- 
90- 
88- 
75- 
215- 

129- 

127- 

285-6 

116-9 

123 

81 

229-0 
100-0 
120-5 

77-4 
169 
161 

59 
166 



99-2 

99-7 

138-4 

399-4 

157-3 

113.0 
96-9 

188-6 
88-4 
77-9 

122-0 
75-6 
98-4 
84-9 
74.0 
61.7 
83-1 
19-9 
48-8 

140-2 
68-7 

170-9 
860 

107 
99-7 
82-8 
90-3 

193 

105-7 

147-5 
70-9 
60 

107-4 
79-2 

103-2 
68 

53-2 
81-2 

114-2 

204 
41-3 
44-5 
33-2 
85- 

197-4 
97-8 

122-6 
70 
74-6 
69-9 



106- 1 
112-3 

126 
150 
270 
18-3 
26-3 
78 
761 

118-6 
64 



117 
125 
249 
101 
125-0 

78-9 
226-9 

96-1 
120 

91 

155- 1 
157 

73 
147-2 



103 

104.0 

135.3 

339 9 

176.0 

129 

139 

175 

62 

53 
259 



101.7 
89.6 
79-9 
56-8 
81 8 
23.1 

127.7 

134.0 
74.4 

160 
77.3 

1C4-3 

112.2 

115.2 

109 
97.2 

100 7 

147.2 
58.9 
47 4 

150.5 
86 

142.8 
81.3 
53 
82.2 

115.3 

247.5 
55-4 
64-6 
32-5 
85 

199 

100.2 

122 
75 

79.8 
78 



164.7 

183.4 

206.1 

105.2 

18.7 

9.0 

35.8 

80.4 

77.1 

132.8 

71.1 

137.0 

130.2 
132.2 
204.9 
122.5 
114.8 

75.3 
192.7 

86.5 
116.4 

89.2 
173.9 
163.0 

64.1 
157.7 



107 9 

110-3 

165-8 

418-7 

220-8 

119-3 

189-4 

220-2 

147-8 

65-0 

325-0 

76-9 

102-7 

900 

94-8 

52-5 

87-1 

29-9 

120-2 

145-8 

66-3 

179- 

177- 

114- 

97- 

86- 

123-4 

148 

111 

148 

59-9 

76-7 

138-3 

66-5 

133-5 

84-5 

560 

49-9 

113-7 

243-8 

66-5 

78 

37-5 
85-7 
206-2 
101-3 
122-8 
72-1 
80-5 
100-3 



163-9 
181-2 
202 

27 

74 

19 

57 

86-6 

83-3 
131-4 

82-8 
110-8 

118-9 
125-7 
162-4 
110-7 
117-0 

82-4 
182-8 

95-2 
114-2 

86-8 
238-1 
174-3 

66-8 
185- 1 



101 9 

102-5 
144-7 
341-2 
242-1 
117-4 
121-7 
192-9 
59-9 
73-9 
181-9 
84-1 
100-0 
96-6 
94-9 
70- 1 
85-8 
67-1 
98-6 
143-8 
62-1 
178 
116-7 
103-4 
90-2 
84- 
112-7 
110-9 
103-7 
147-5 
58 
57 
135 
62 
161 
93 
56 
34 
117 
225 
49-3 
56-7 
310 
85-8 
191-9 
100- 1 
123-6 
69-6 
77-6 
92-7 



114 
119 
128-0 

178-0 
39 

5 
27 
90-2 
92 

139 
79 



110-6 
1151 
120-0 
106-9 
117 

85-7 
188-0 

92 
112 

84 
234 



74- 
171- 



107-2 

109*5 

169-6 

472-6 

199-1 

139 1 

280-6 

199-7 

77-6 

68-3 

289-3 

94-4 

105-4 
100-5 
82-6 
67-5 
91-1 
49-4 
123-9 
144-0 
63-2 
178-9 
49-8 
92-6 
107 
104 
104-0 
121-9 
114-5 
164-8 
58-1 
64-3 
127-7 
76-8 
150 
74-0 
73-0 
60-2 
126-9 
224-3 
50-7 
56-8 
35-7 
85-6 



100-7 
122-8 

710 
85-4 
88-6 



86-6 
86-1 
90-5 

148-2 
35-2 
8-6 
32-3 
88-7 
88 

131 
82-6 
93-6 

123 

121 

125-9 

124-8 

119 

88-2 
195 

79 
125 

91 
216-5 
168-8 

95-7 
191-7 



110 

113-5 

146-3 

264-5 

218-8 

146-2 

140-f 

181-5 

1251 

72-1 

186-7 

95-4 

118-5 

97-1 

77-3 

62-8 

140-5 

41-3 

117-3 

151-9 

67-4 

188-5 

265-8 

931 

106-3 

990 

104-9 

1421 

114-8 

166-8 

68-4 

61-2 

112-8 

114-8 

148 6 

112-2 

801 

115-2 

130-2 

271-1 

37-0 

37-7 

35-5 

85-7 

199-0 

100-2 

124- 1 

66-8 

93-7 

77-1 



43-3 

36 4 
39 

38-9 
9-8 
10 
110 
74 3 
74-3 
135-3 
64-5 
80-6 

103 
104 1 
104 
102 
1271 

921 
193 

86-7 
148-7 
113 
149 
165 
104-3 
200-3 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April 



106 2 



306-6 

184-3 

122-7 

125-5 

216-9 

251-5 

126-2 

104-8 

85-2 

112-5 

93-1 

58-5 

33-1 

143-3 

18-5 

66-4 

152-2 

69-1 

187-9 

161-5 

97-6 

148 

152-1 

108-8 

145-5 

118-9 

163-6 

72-9 

70-9 

152-3 

128-6 

165-4 

127-1 

48-7 

138-9 

134-1 

120-5 

23-6 

21-8 

28-2 

86-2 

197-6 

99-3 

128-8 

66-5 

70-2 

69-5 



340 

27-4 
29-3 
280 

6-5 
19-8 

8-7 
63-5 
581 
115-9 
62-9 
82-5 

108-0 



128-9 

105-5 

133 

104 

207-2 

1000 

140-6 

111 

123 

174 

109 

194 



105 2 

107-0 
144-4 
199-6 
307-6 
122-8 
162-4 
191-4 
760 
96-2 
112-5 
89 9 
96-1 
76-9 
59 
25 
45-3 
31-6 
57-6 
126 
55-6 
158-5 
103-8 
115-1 
131-2 
130-9 
104-0 
143-0 
106-7 
147-5 
69 

59-5 
157 
100-9 
161 
107-0 
70-1 
92-6 
127-9 
149-9 
95-3 
122 
28-3 
84-2 
197-1 
100-3 
124-0 
72-1 
76-3 
84-3 



39-8 

29-5 

32-7 

24 
2 

5-3 
4-3 

85 

93 
147 

62 

94-3 

133-0 
150-7 
185-4 
107-5 
143-4 
126-6 
233-1 
103-7 
123-8 
115-7 
113-9 
187-4 
119-5 
167-4 



104-9 

104-9 

186-2 
424-4 
490-2 
122-1 
134-6 
206-2 
84-9 
100 
118-2 
109- 
96-2 
77-0 
69-7 
21-7 
28-7 
33-2 
81-7 
151 
78-4 
184-7 
118-5 
118-5 
121 
104 



214 
111 
151 

73-3 

74 

54 

87-6 
149 

98-4 

63 

76 

128-2 
124-2 

52-6 
61-2 
31-1 
84 

196-0 
104-8 
127-3 
78-4 
73-9 
99-3 



62-7 

53-9 

60-2 

40-3 

5-2 

31 

9-8 

102-2 

113-4 

137-2 

71-8 

144-4 

139-5 

164-1 

266-4 

112-2 

150-3 

169-4 

233 

125-7 

128-7 

100-9 

107-2 

187-1 

103-3 

177-6 



103 3 

104 1 

158-2 

360-5 

371-3 

123-0 

193-2 

175-9 

86-6 

81-3 

125-9 

780 

98-7 

84-7 

72-3 

41-3 

251 

102-3 

105 

131-2 

76 

1570 
70-4 
116-6 
1170 
102 
100-3 
203-5 
114-4 
152-9 
81-5 
76 
72 

890 
137-9 
84-5 
541 
861 
120 
141-3 
520 
631 
24-1 
84-5 



89-5 
88-3 
98-6 
38-5 
23-4 
21 
34-7 
950 

102-7 
97-7 
72-3 

163-5 

132-6 
135-3 
264-4 
119-6 
149-5 
150-9 
248-1 
131-4 
127-0 
97-3 
99-6 
184-2 
70-7 
172-9 



109-2 
187-2 
537-3 
416-2 



•Conault the supplements of the Monthly Review dated Nov. 1932, May 1934 and June 1935 for description and post- 
war data. 

2 Exports for April 1935 and 1936 are incomparable with other months as non-monetary gold is included. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 2. Trend of Business Movements 



Classi fication 



Production- 
Condensed milk output.OOOlbs 
Evaporated milk output.OOOlbs 

Creamery butter 000 lbs 

Newsprint production. .000 tons 

Shipments 000 tons 

Stocks 000 tons 

B.C. timber scaled Mil. bd. ft.. 
Pig iron production.. .000 1. tons 

Ferro-alloys production tons 

Steel ingots and cast- 
ings 000 1. tons 

Shipments: — 

Gold 000 oz 

Gold bullion, other 000 oz 
than monetary exports. $000 

Silver 000 oz 

Passenger automobile pro- 
duction No 

Truck production No 

Total cars and trucks No 

Coke production OOP tons 

Coal available 000 tons 

Gasoline sales 000 gal. 

Trade- 
Imports: — 

Cotton, raw •. ... 000 lbs 

Rubber, crude 000 lbs 

■ Wool, raw 000 lbs. 

Petroleum, crude.. 000,000 eal. 

Bauxite 000 lbs 

Exports:— 

Fish 000 lbs. 

Fish $000 

Cheese exports 000 lbs. 

Canned salmon cwt 

Planks and boards .. .mil. ft 

Wood pulp 000 cwt 

Shingles squares 

Auto complete or chassis. No. 

Copper 000 lbs. 

Nickel 000 lbs 

Zinc 000 lbs 

Transportation- 
Canal Cargo Traffic:— 

Sault Ste. Marie 000 tons 

Welland 000 tons 

St. Lawrence 000 tons 

Immigration- 
Total 

Returned Canadians from U.S. 

Labour Factors— 

Percentage unemployment in 

trade unions p.c. 

Employment: Applications No. 
Vacancies... .No 
Placements.. No 
Strikes and Lockouts' — 

Disputes in existence No 

Number of employees No. 

Time loss in working days — 

Industrial Production' [1929= 
1001- 

Canada 

United Kingdom: Board of 
Trade, Quarterly 
Economist 

United States 

France 

Germany 

Italy 

Japan 

Austria 

Belgium 

Poland 

Czechoslovakia 

Sweden 

Norway 

Chile 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



837 
7,379 
13,501 
222-24 
237-00 
63-55 
231-4 
43-39 
5,147 

68-53 

214-2 

279 
9,739 



20, 688 
3,435 

24,123 

180 

1,521 

39,052 



2,380 
1,865 
40-45 
9,211 

13,505 
1,020 
2,485 
15,802 
63-87 
769 
171,299 
6,356 
16,259 
11,895 
18,438 



830 



170 
52.397 
27,183 
24,641 

11 
2.952 
14,900 



745 

7,913 

23,140 

242-69 

251-01 

55-21 

252-4 

45-43 

4,978 

72-81 

278-7 

97 

3,398 

831 

17.093 
3,672 

20,765 

185 

2,386 

50,770 



6,316 

8,801 

902 

11313 

25,909 

19 061 

1,326 

1,204 

19,305 

129-52 

1,227 

135,974 

6,499 

34,597 

10,238 

26,337 



5,985 

1,122 

919 



1.030 
676 



15 9 
52.251 
30,847 
28,672 

22 

5,189 

32,357 



76-7 81-9 78-3 



8S4 
,985 
36.602 
232-02 
228-20 
57-77 
259-7 
44-56 
3,845 

73-45 

257- 

190 

6,636 

1,428 

12.276 
3,469 

15.745 

186 

2,398 

59,184 



7.397 
3,215 
2.498 
131-87 

15.866 

15.184 
1.578 
1.735 
9,103 

129-80 
1,209 

251,267 
4.829 

37.746 
9.951 

15.201 



7,058 

1,072 

882 



1,061 
601 



15-4 

51,129 
27,721 
25.889 

14 
4.997 
57.081 





103-9 


100-4 


101-3 


72-3 


71-4 


66-7 


660 


93-4 


95-2 


97-8 


104-1 


1430 


143-1 


73-8 


77*1 


71-8 


72-8 


66-6 


650 


66-1 


68-2 


107-3 


109- 1 


103-4 


105-5 


118-5 


119-6 



101-8 
72-3 
66-7 
92-4 
93-5 

137-2 
73-0 
700 
67-5 
68-0 



110-9 
123-8 



834 

7,230 

37,116 

234-27 

226-45 

65-71 

211-2 

50-51 

7,269 

86-1 

270-5 

202 

7,047 

1,263 

9,471 
3.598 

13,069 

176 

2,358 

67,158 



9.913 
2,955 
1,161 
133-65 
26,792 

22,697 

2,096 

5,361 

27,297 

101-93 

968 

355,60! 

5.070 

33,543 

12,222 

25,358 



7,503 
1,128 
1,007 



1,050 
521 



151 

55,778 
35.168 
33,043 

25 
7,355 

67,888 



81-6 



655 

820 

33,157 

235-57 

225-74 

75-31 

241-5 

54-41 

3,893 

82-49 

301-3 

142 

4,939 

2,999 

5,524 
2,168 
7,692 
175 
2,467 
54,427 



7,027 
6,304 
1,569 
126-73 
41,897 

27,171 
2,370 
6,480 
38,476 
164-45 
1,073 
339,300 
5,995 
42,408 
14,102 
28,481 



7.731 
1.334 
1.024 



100-4 
72-3 
66-7 
94-3 
850 

141-7 
79-6 
69-6 
65-9 
67-4 



860 
117-3 



i.324 
523 



14-2 

60,363 
40.164 
37,566 

20 

7.573 
49,429 



103-2 
100-9 
740 
66-7 
95-2 
87-2 
139-9 
85-3 
70-8 
671 
68 1 



755 

6,287 

27,598 

223-89 

225-40 

73-82 

241-4 

54-36 

4,513 

90-95 

282-3 

364 

12,694 



,504 



2,517 

70,585 



5.857 

3.594 

1.053 

12702 

26,409 

27,770 
2,591 
15,950 
63,571 
112-41 
1,113 
319.633 
4.777 
33, 
14.265 
19,477 



7,148 
1,180 



1,160 
485 



130 

60,496 
38.410 
35,775 

18 
5,691 
48,351 



100-3 
117-4 



103-1 
74-8 
67-4 

1020 



141-0 
81 -2 
73-3 

68-3 
72-6 



110-6 
121-5 



847 
5,267 
20,745 
•52 
266-68 
73-58 
264-7 
45-52 
9,653 

95 02 

294-9 

160 

5,574 

1,483 

7.128 
1,185 
8,313 
205 
2,933 
59,638 



10,770 

1,819 

1,636 

133-73 

30,288 

42,060 
2,733 
13.050 
98,585 
138-12 
1,093 
340,354 
3.931 
48.089 
13,558 
30,417 



7,454 

1,151 

992 



1,160 
449 



13-3 

65,300 
35,464 
33,737 

19 
3,566 
35,279 



84-1 



773 
3,469 
13.479 
262-85 
285-18 
50-99 
239-3 
64-56 
4,693 

94-07 

274-9 

296 

10,369 

2,120 

12,020 
1,454 

13,496 

208 

2, 

47,022 



13.814 
9,832 
1,857 
137-40 
20,896 

53,702 
3,372 
8,654 
87,939 
121-44 
1,338 
252,451 
5,576 
26,788 
14,857 
24,236 



4,087 

1,313 

865 



347 



13-3 

65,033 
32,196 
30,835 

13 

2,133 

24,733 



502 
2,930 
10,327 
244-73 
265-23 
30 14 
182-9 
70-65 
4.688 



285-4 

246 

8,681 

4,048 

11,370 
2,405 

13,775 

216 

2., 087 

37,158 



22,187 
5,746 
1, 
55-64 

13,421 

35,183 

1. 

2.070 
39.525 
111-52 

1,317 
261,189 

5,51 
30,202 
10,498 
22, 



14-6 
51, 
29,713 
28,144 



431 
3,152 



1 85-4 



103 1 

79-8 
68-1 
100-7 



148-8 
83-7 
77-8 
67-3 
75-3 



110 9 

129-9 



112-2 
104-5 
82-4 
68-1 
99-7 



147-8 
88-6 
81-7 
67-7 
78-5 



106-2 

87 



96-2 



152-8 
89-4 
78- 
68-6 
80-5 



115-2: 

129-2 



107-1 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April 



588 
2,709 
9,388 
227-96 
181-40 
76-66 
171-9 
61-34 
4,324 

100-23 

3111 

295 

10,327 

1,239 

11,261 
2,041 

13,302 

212 

1,794 

26,415 



3,938 
1,948 
61-13 

14,242 

36,147 
1,977 
10,155 
28,455 
72-24 
1,090 
206,039 
6,607 
19,182 
14,111 
18,452 



14 

,665 
29,270 
27,716 

4 

205 

1,105 



83-4 



104-5 
83-2 
69-5 
94-7 



88-6 
80-6 
67-5 
75-3 



109-3 
124-6 



531 
3,064 
7,895 
221-57 
106-08 
92-08 
279-4 
55-75 
5,114 

93-29 

283-4 

74 

2,660 

1,361 

10,853 
2,415 

13,268 

198 

1,953 

24.057 



11,724 

4,256 
2,670 
39-65 
13,547 

29, 

1, 

7,111 
34,096 

95-36 

1,019 
75,916 

4,573 
32,952 
17, 
18,202 



13 
49,618 
24,983 
23,68 



2,902 
18,987 



82- 



104-5 

*7i-6 



660 
4,470 
9,558 
243-90 
239-25 
96-25 
208-4 
55 01 
5,455 

101-09 

271-7 

40 

1,416 

1.958 

14,488 
3,486 

17,974 

202 

1,491 



13,558 
4,052 
3,831 
65-38 

18,887 



20,654 
50,567 
142 06 

1, 
158,862 

7,603 
35,307 
18,531 
32,184 



14-5 
51,395 
24,050 
22,181 

12 
1,274 
12,265 



81-7 
104-6 



580 
5,939 
14,348 
258-72 
267-30 
85-63 
234-4 
54-05 
4,437 

107-22 

305-1 

331 

11,624 

718 

20,247 

4,704 

24,951 

190 



7,123 
2,411 
1.670 
54 14 
11,005 

10,879 
922 

5,057 
20,112 
107-95 
884 
153,606 

3,726 
29,262 
10,967 
14,823 



37 
95 
18? 



15 
1,844 
17,790 



Source: Monthly Bulletin League of Nations, unless otherwise stated. 



10 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



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MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



11 



Table 3. Receipts and Visible Supply of Canadian Grain. Thousand Bushels. 





1933 


1936 




April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Receipts Country 
Elevators and 
Platform 
Loadings — 
Wheat 


6,280 

2,096 

333 

19 

8 

214,255 

9,447 

8,570 

409 

3,777 

5,027 

348 

312 

39 

20 


5,626 

1,532 

329 

17 

11 

202,120 

7,126 

6,608 

373 

3,659 

11,990 
1,593 
1,380 


9,334 

1,510 

243 

28 

14 

197,183 

5,772 

5,268 

288 

3,432 

6,494 

1,475 

970 


13,347 

1,296 

156 

31 

9 

196,984 

5,986 

3,856 

282 

2,946 

9,158 
1,070 
1,098 


12,494 

808 

1,123 

17 

368 

194,890 

5,750 

3,834 

197 

3,301 

21,698 
651 
721 


73,178 

6,211 

4,496 

169 

698 

246,109 

11,407 

8.719 

396 

3.913 

17,272 
820 
241 


60,000 

6,406 

2,913 

466 

538 

270,749 

13,925 

10,308 

795 

4,459 

28,919 

1,386 

159 

1 

9 

20 

•907 
•340 
•338 

1-411 
•422 


21.043 

2,215 

1,080 

84 

230 

265,823 

12,485 

9,054 

626 

4,585 

26,575 

2,961 

1,028 

4 

17 

127 

•857 
•318 
•332 

1-411 
•411 


14,217 

1,679 

629 

34 

127 

260,746 

12,433 

9,179 

474 

4,688 

17,044 

1,184 

486 

7 

28 
27 

•846 
•297 
•338 

1-457 
•416 


3,203 

1,169 

430 

10 

61 

244,540 

11,672 

8,838 

452 

4.662 

7,557 
261 
81 


2,093 

1,585 

525 

10 

54 

222,694 

10,986 

8,392 

421 

4,678 

14,241 

477 

155 

4 


7,169 

4,377 

1,581 

38 

156 

204,435 

12,504 

8,951 

435 

4,791 

13,146 
514 

86 

1 


4,620 

1,354 

650 


Oats 




Flax 


31 


Rye 


102 


Visible Supply 1 — 
Wheat 


185,219 

10,684 

8,617 

362 


Oats 


Barley 


Flax 


Rye 


4,808 

6.572 
194 


Exports — 
Wheat 


Oats 




20 


Flax 


19 


Rye 


17 


252 


215 


75 
26 

•845 
•363 
•338 

1-237 
•365 


52 

•902 
•360 
•357 

1-363 

•905 






20 

•847 
•336 
•342 

1,596 
•425 


8 

•821 
•355 
•361 

1-590 
•428 


15 

82/1J 
35/7 
37/6 

157/2 
43/3 


38 


Average Cash Price, 
dollars per bush. 

Wheat, No. 1 Nor. 

Oats, No. 2 C.W. . 

Barley, No.3,C.W. 

Flax, 
No. 1 N.W.C.... 

Rye, No. 1 C.W... 


•876 
•422 
•458 

1-408 
•516 


•857 
•408 
•422 

1-340 
•460 


•817 
•397 
•391 

1-213 
•411 


•813 
•428 
•355 

1226 
•361 


80/4 
33/5 
37/7 

150 

41/3 



1 First of following month. 

» For March and thereafter grain prices are given in cents and eighths of a cent per bushel. 

Table 4. Statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Bank of Canada, 1936. 



Classification of Accounts 


April 8 


April 15 


April 22 


April 29 


April 30 


May 6 


Liabilities— 


5,000,000 

173,092 

89,648,231 

23,358,316 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

92,943,526 

19,757,571 


$ 
5,000,000 
173,092 
92,642,393 

23,589,867 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

90,924,489 

21,670,692 


$ 

5,000,000 

173,092 

90,309,251 

23,914,637 


5,000,000 




173 092 




91,197,571 
21,273,188 


4. Deposits—; 






182,263,015 
1,762,525 


188,823,751 
534,300 


184,921,882 
663,497 


187,415,370 
354,543 


187,446,607 
326,532 


194,826,024 


(d ) Other 


764,911 






Total 


207,383,856 


209,115,621 


209,175,246 


209,440,605 


211,687,776 


216,864,123 








1,625,738 


3,964,488 


1,672,269 


1,178,385 


1,880,417 


3,241,519 






Total 


303,830,917 


311,196,727 


308,663,001 


306,716,571 


309,050,537 


316,476,305 






Assets— 

1. Reserve-^ 


180,298.589 

1,636,496 

930,699 

10,598,617 

3,010 


180,581,739 

1,636,496 

956,833 

9,481,870 

5,245 


180,349,169 

1,662,827 

1,963,429 

11,132,710 

5,857 


179,935,609 
1,636,496 
1,684,511 
9,836,025 

.5,602 


179,951,005 
1,636,496 
1,681,137 
7,699,282 

3,563 


179,647,980 




1,682,678 




1,875,630 




9,258,799 


Reserve in funds of other countries 
on a gold standard 


11,482 


Total 


193,467,412 


192,662,183 


195,113,992 


193,098,244 


190,971,484 


192,476,569 


2. Subsidiary coin 


294,131 


271,578 


317,775 


295,034 


293,534 


305,747 






4. Advances to— 
























2,000,000 


2,000,000 


(c) Chartered Banks 












Total 










2,000,000 


2,000,000 
















6. Investments — 

(a) Dom. Govt, short securities 


26,973,664 


27,799,677 


27,923,044 


28,541,893 


28,602,220 


28,757,764 


(e ) Other Dom. Govt, securities 


80,931,628 


82,743,924 


82,902,331 


82,371,532 


82,322,783 


82,418,314 


(e) U.K., other British Dominions 
or U.S.A. securities more than 
three months 














Total 


107,905,292 


110,543,600 


100,825.376 


110,913,425 


110,925,002 


111,176,078 


7. Bank Premises 


119,477 
2,044,605 


120,685 
7,598,681 


121,054 
2,284,804 


121,054 
2,288,814 


121,054 
4,739,462 


122,709 


8. All Other Assets 


10,395,202 






Total 


303,830,917 


311,196,727 


308,663,001 


306,716,571 


309,050,537 


316,476,305 






Ratio of Net Reserve (Item 1 of Assets less 
Item 5 of Liabilities) to Notes and 
Liabilities 


p.c. 
65 13 


p.c. 
63-78 


p.c. 
64-64 


p.c. 
64-28 


p.c. 
63-23 


p.c. 
62-48 



12 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 5. Consumption of Grain and Production by the Milling Industry 



Year 

and 

month 



Mill grindings 



Wheat 



Oats 



Corn 



Barley 



Mixed 
grain 



Mill production 



Wheat flour 



Percent- 
age of 
operation 



Quan- 
tity 



Oatmeal 



Rolled 
oats 



Corn 

flour and 

meal 



Wheat 

flour 

exported 



1933 
November. 
December.. 

1934 

January .... 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October. . . . 
November. 
December . 

1935 
January . . . 
February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. 
October.... 
November. 
December , 

1936 

January 

February. . 
March 



Bushels 

8,158,446 
4,327,524 

4,676,474 
4,887,102 
4,740,844 
4.866.537 
5,258,707 
5,066.622 
4,815,792 
5,749,909 
6.202,164 
7,426,566 
7,659.805 
4,360,882 

4,622,088 
4,220,917 
4,675,022 
4,313,600 
5,188,296 
4,431.823 
4,460.608 
5,230,795 



7,262 
4,358 



4,460,277 
4,614,569 
5,322,155 



Bushels 

1,262,294 
631,497 

844,482 

786, 180 

694,721 

681.909 

578,306 

713,298 

782.307 

783,208 

1,024.845 

1,260,471 

1,162,272 

715,529 

754,909 

744,621 

618,422 

621,952 

699,498 

823,174 

656.006 

733,282 

1,151,068 

1,543.665 

1.513,259 

1,026,706 

924,352 
933,981 
906,013 



Bushels 

168.662 
124,216 

143,794 
157,303 
156,800 
152,057 
144,344 
189.875 
225.727 
235,382 
156,337 
152,965 
149,553 
111,141 

120,984 
172,875 
166,872 
148,932 
241,095 
204,197 
235,119 
229,976 
218,914 
218.229 
166.813 
174,963 

175,800 
214,960 
232,960 



Bushels 

81,383 
59.925 

78.195 
99,837 
80,562 
62.432 
47,978 
43.865 
47.291 
51,325 
71.113 
75,673 
60,079 
62,243 

73,467 
74, 196 
55,325 
57,588 
44,710 
42,455 
47.758 
59,523 
68,880 
99.278 
128.150 
98,350 

104,313 
87,505 



Bushels 



1,588,189 
1.501.845 



68-8 
37-7 



Barrels 



1,827,340 
967,284 



1,259,377 


39-5 


1,379,894 


470 


1,154,072 


42-4 


1,092,036 


47-4 


726,298 


47-9 


552,371 


47-7 


490,552 


45-1 


713,438 


53-3 


1,035.672 


61-7 


1,330,138 


66-8 


1,473,878 


68-7 


1,636,179 


41-2 


1,512,919 


42-4 


1,937,664 


41-7 


1,355,148 


43-5 


1,401,247 


41-2 


1,066,167 


48-4 


793.098 


44-7 


736.232 


41-9 


913,719 


48-9 


1,134,815 


68-3 


1,627,948 


750 


1,778,718 


68-3 


1,969,230 


41-6 


1,837,890 


40-8 


1,668,912 


44-5 


1,666,692 


49-6 



042,505 
102,043 
064.428 
088,785 
175,433 
127,477 
072,747 
282,214 
383.205 
654,189 
703,831 
969,482 



1,024 

941 

1,046 

965 

1.164 

991 

992 

1.161 

1,535 

1,824 

1,603 

957 



,958 
,417 
,087 
,765 
,322 
,559 
.340 
.389 
,189 
,754 
,803 
.219 



1,019.017 
1,171,741 



Pounds 

927,171 
441,557 

803.504 
558,853 
569,533 
629,032 
614,693 
319,089 
553,201 
416,383 
717,964 
1,065.990 
1,119,776 
458,890 

649,896 
636,312 
533,046 
531,438 
816,112 
871,222 
491,472 
493,528 
902,388 
1,700,720 
1,549,038 
692, 

652,865 
495 
669! 324 



Pounds 



16,416,025 
7,468,493 



10,261, 
9,338, 
7,866, 
6.397, 
6.132, 
9.556, 
10,292, 
10,644, 
13,521, 
16.697, 
14.345, 
7.587, 



Pounds 

2.109,060 
1,347,928 

1,428,968 
1.447,127 
881,990 
1,141,966 
1.398,166 
1,726,506 
1,748.106 
2.215,458 
1,894.880 
1.725.600 
1.570,810 
1,036,210 



379,451 
739,753 
424,542 
513,572 
538,950 
223,425 
650,617 
977.920 
911,445 
488,481 
448.402 
375. 644 



894,306 
491,528 
560,504 
448.836 
013.518 
914,815 
182,370 
321,082 
312,180 
842,570 
944,746 
543,590 



9,098,636 
10,642,544 
10,411,490 



1.772,118 
1,607,494 
2,304,980 



Barrels 

547.602 
418.183 

448,498 
328,376 
493.327 
340,621 
481,725 
441,064 
408,028 
412.089 
389,320 
485,549 
504,384 
340,751 

346,099 
309,729 
497,468 
276.907 
383,221 
429,561 
395,232 
376,562 
395,640 
501,442 
525.368 
443,828 

314.311 

340,102 
476,773 



Table 6. 


Receipts, Manufactures and Stocks of Sugar in Thousand Pounds 






Raw Sugar 


Refined Sugar 


4-week period 


Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Re- 
ceipts 


Melt- 
ings 
and 
ship- 
ments 


Stock 
on hand 

at be- 
ginning 
of period 


Manu- 
factured 
granu- 
lated 


Manu- 
factured 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 

manu- 
factured 


Total 
domes- 
tic 
ship- 
ments 


Ship- 
ments 
granu- 
lated 


Ship- 
ments 
yellow 

and 
brown 


Total 
ship- 
ments 


1933 
November 4 


132,530 
130,616 
91,959 

84,383 

82,635 
103,160 

91.390 
101.951 
124.747 
131.708 
121.490 
105. 652 
103,510 

84.266 
102,119 
126,718 

132,212 
119,318 
141,712 
150,238 
117,702 
145,413 
115,797 
146,970 
113,989 
102,057 
97,747 
85,022 
86,410 

79,673 
89,098 
91,174 
113,947 


63,618 
55,801 
26,830 

14,873 
40,595 
10,714 
57,294 
65,605 
97,455 
72,327 
84,535 
88.921 
68.649 
106,111 
83.713 
53.971 

4.240 
43.027 
35,548 
19,998 

107, 883 
63.993 

122,344 
66.816 
62.292 
69,367 
73,374 
98,491 
56,903 

30,480 
22,511 
45,709 
29,544 


65,532 
94,458 
34,406 

16,621 
20,070 
22,484 
46,733 
42,809 
90,495 
82,544 
100,373 
91.064 
87.893 
88.258 
59,114 
48.476 

17.134 
20,633 
27,020 
52,534 
80,171 
93,608 
91,171 
99,798 
74,223 
73,677 
86,100 
97,102 
63,640 

21,055 
20,435 

22,936 
50,095 


94,814 
140,587 
207,044 

214,486 
189,945 
161,406 
135,848 
135,013 
114,921 
113,663 
102,391 
109.420 
99,569 
87, 142 
134.432 
173,898 

173,253 
156,031 
129,023 
105,374 

94,349 
103,253 
122,289 
116,100 
117.050 
103,912 

66,987 
108,403 
157,222 

189,289 
174,659 
146,598 
114,503 


105,177 
126, 137 
50,117 

20,545 
17,269 
18,407 
35,730 
34,371 
70,923 
72,892 
85,557 
78.190 
76,926 
109.378 
94.646 
47,231 

25,546 
22,631 
21,094 
42,156 
68,455 
77,490 
78,954 
85,009 
65,085 
63,827 
116,294 
122.616 
77,429 

21,410 
17.753 
19,320 
40,073 


7,356 
12,864 
6.852 

2,112 
2,575 
2.953 
7.575 
7.260 
13,142 
10,652 
9,484 
10.489 
10,008 
17.044 
10,660 
8.646 

4,255 
3.048 
3.321 
7,457 
9,065 
9,874 
11,012 
10,065 
6,098 
10,230 
13,531 
14,823 
11,251 

2,635 
3,017 
3,011 
6,382 


112,533 
139,001 
56,968 

22.657 
19.845 
21,360 
43,305 
41,631 
84,064 
83,544 
95,042 
88,679 
86.934 
126,422 
105,306 
55.877 

29,801 
25,679 
24.415 
49.613 
77.520 
87,364 
89,976 
95.074 
71.183 
74,056 
129,825 
137,440 
88,680 

24,045 
20,770 
22,331 
46,455 


63,462 
70,342 
48,728 

46,593 
47,686 
46,246 
43,000 
60.349 
84,018 
93,754 
86,828 
95.281 
97,025 
78,247 
64,997 
56.1U 

46,756 
52,531 
47,758 
60,443 
68,377 
67,676 
95,670 
93.131 
81,727 
109,879 
87,194 
87.756 
56,397 

38,559 
48,695 
56,130 
58,665 


59,040 
62,004 
43,021 

41,336 
42,370 
40,730 
37,980 
54,434 
76,550 
86.799 
81,038 
88,784 
86,729 
68,057 
55,572 
48.674 

41.561 
45.916 
41,097 
52,772 
60,611 
60.817 
88,151 
87.671 
76,010 
99,353 
77.298 
73,417 
48.459 

33.585 
42,003 
48,595 
51,551 


7,720 
10,541 
6,505 

5,862 
6,014 
6,188 
6,164 
7.407 
8.822 
8,018 
6,977 
9,749 
12,634 
11.099 
10,273 
7.847 

5.462 
6,816 
7,036 
7,867 
8,106 
7,515 
8,014 
6.454 
8.313 
11,641 
11,112 
15,204 
8,154 

5,090 
6,890 
7,651 
7,355 


66,761 


December 2 


72,544 


December 30 

1934 
January 27 


49,526 
47,198 


February 24 


48,384 


March 24 


46,918 


April 21 


44.144 


May 19 


61,842 


June 16 


85,373 


July 14 


94,817 


August 11 


88,015 


September 8 


98,532 


October 6 


99.363 




79,158 


December 1 


65.846 




56,521 


1935 
January 26 


47,024 


February 23 


52,731 


March 23 


48,133 


April 20 


60,639 


May 18 


68,617 


June 15 


68.332 


July 13 


96,166 




94,125 




84,323 


October 5 


110,994 


November 2 


88,409 


November 30 


88. 621 


December 3] 


56.613 


1936 


38,674 


February 22 


48,893 


March 21 


56,245 


April 18 


58,905 







MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 13 

Table 7. — Tobacco, Cigars and Cigarettes Entered for Consumption 



Year and Month 



Tobacco, 
cut 



Tobacco, 
plug 



Cigarettes 



Tobacco, 

Snuff 



Cigara 



Foreign 
raw leaf 
tobacco 



1933 

September 

i October 

November 

December 

1934 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July , 

August 

September 

October , 

November 

December 

1935 

January 

February , 

March 

April 

May , 

Tune , 

July 

August 

September 

October , 

November 

December , 

1936 

January , 

February 

March 

April 



Pound 

1,329.411 

1,473,910 

1,561,675 

1.223,930 



1,156,731 
1,380,982 
1,529,343 
1.456,045 
1,731,922 
1,585,094 
1,495,730 
1,590,786 
1,514,766 
1,702,791 
1,533,982 
1,321.349 



1,324,374 
1,333,114 
1,396,416 
1,438,868 
1,647,792 
1,675,696 
1,644,869 
1,671,995 
1,557,787 
1,586,753 
1,694,618 
1,301,415 

1,326,050 
1,446,655 
1,511,704 
1,624,841 



Pound 
357,519 
350,617 
364,839 
290,671 



321,339 
306,407 
326,628 
353,109 
415,972 
381,019 
367,317 
380,339 
329.761 
370.555 
338,851 
284,916 



308,664 
285,667 
303,003 
336,628 
351,975 
338,704 
366,413 
323,818 
317,774 
356,978 
299,100 
300,057 

304,983 
250,528 
291,352 
304,280 



Number 
401,231,720 
379,614,915 
374,490.820 
355,920,395 



267,435,575 
312,784,585 
325,042,310 
348.658.920 
431.667,650 
468,990,240 
472,025,100 
509,045,040 
429,906.595 
448,758,930 
435,078,600 
373,011,520 



360,016,140 
337,960,370 
342.829.010 
367.428,910 
478,376,670 
479,028,135 
515,995,050 
517,502,390 
486,470,185 
463,276,145 
495,019,898 
461,468,601 

316,533,632 
357,942,801 
371,089.599 
420,753,320 



Pound 
74,667 
67,643 
68,499 
55,299 



64,245 
55,248 
56,870 
57,078 
74,322 
69,113 
65,246 
74,667 
67,601 
71,610 
67,503 
58.790 



66,773 
56,605 
58,274 
59.742 
67,429 
63,892 
63,881 
71,645 
68,061 
73,172 
67,131 
56,608 

66,328 
58,044 
54,187 
66,820 



Number 
11,506,697 
14,202,255 
13,935,402 
8.721,959 



5,069.776 
4,448,840 
6,711,960 
8,744,376 
10,325,277 
11,510.609 
10.773,621 
12,349.405 
9,890,762 
14,358,520 
15,480,850 
10.014,125 



6,789,935 
6,901,967 
8,378,494 
9,385,800 
11,030,725 
11,098,617 
11,751,025 
11,424,735 
11,504,975 
13,276,725 
13,492,260 
10,389.598 

4,953,520 
7,394,735 

8,868,155 
8,804,058 



Pound 
880,042 
838,879 
893,718 
635,474 



630,982 
621,222 
716,938 
731.018 
869,923 
868,269 
776,670 
817,495 
774,128 
783,839 
744,894 
538,257 



632,502 
545,650 
544.890 
649,987 
684,557 
669,217 
685,684 
660,925 
610,444 
535,016 
544,321 
521,489 

304,722 
436,195 

406,822 
431,967 



Table 8. — Production of Boots and Shoes in Pairs. 



Boots and shoes with leather or fabric uppers 



Welta 



McKays 

and 

all 

mitation 

welts 



Nailed, 
pegged, 
screw 
or wire 
fastened 



Stitch- 
downs 



Total 



Total footwear 



Men's 



Boys' 

and 

youths' 



Women's 



Misses' 

and 
childrens 



Babies' 
and 

infants' 



Total 



1933 

August , 

September.. 

October 

November. , 
December.., 

1934 

January 

February... 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September., 

October 

November. , 
December.., 

1935 

January 

February..., 

March , 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 

October 

November.. 
December. . 

1936 

January 

February... 
March 

18948—3 



363,232 
311,182 
257,370 
200,583 
147.622 

172,192 
216,094 
283,532 
263,511 
281,021 
239,527 
243,867 
323,442 
278.570 
242,808 
212,427 
238,238 

272,610 
288,265 
343,710 
346.346 
333,834 
301,746 
335,872 
401,446 
350,264 
331,647 
293,146 
287,180 

338.803 
350,494 
323,923 



1,007,916 
942,552 
712,195 
470,711 
329,554 

451.121 
685,693 
907,542 
890,772 
1,022,979 
903,804 
595.268 
980.677 
796.344 
707,633 
416.798 
416,502 

632,884 

821,770 

1,013,566 

1,049,365 

1,041.300 

826.313 

709,529 

1,007,599 



677,857 
509,734 
534,393 

669,563 

898.858 

1,110,452 



227,428 
159,127 
117,437 
88.699 

100.757 
122,254 
116.220 

97.129 
137.581 
135,140 
101,228 
146.229 
164,952 
163,530 
107,421 

90,887 

126,909 
153,222 
171,798 
159, 769 
148,123 
141,613 
159,274 
193,793 
165,558 
170,650 
122,546 
102,887 

149,690 
155,110 
165,898 



210,696 
182,023 
202,590 
195,675 
141.100 

178.045 

201.233 

257,724 

266,910 

292,018 

280,461 

165,815 

161.' 

169,725 

205,207 

166,578 

127,350 

186,101 
207,598 
253,267 
304,889 
316,095 
295,873 
224,426 
157,390 
149,349 
185,925 
184,940 
176,866 

237,601 
283,918 
331,624 



1,919,069 
1,729.685 
1,388,574 
1,020,654 
731.474 

934,606 
1.257.824 
1,607,076 
1,569,912 
1,778,700 
1,608,131 
1.152,142 
1,672,013 
1,460,998 
1,420,320 
964,078 
911,919 

,254,078 
,520,012 
,844,805 
,912,398 
,899,077 
,619.932 
,488,628 
,826,595 
,604,476 
,447.039 
,168,136 
,154,631 



1,430,971 
1,730,870 
1,986,047 



659,556 
583,038 
484.141 
391.663 
299.534 

294,330 
367,456 
433.720 
414,050 
497,158 
509,337 
423,022 
541,093 
487,584 
503,290 
405,870 
425,074 

413,686 
465.240 
567,637 
588,324 
577,122 
527,336 
568,016 
619,319 
579,213 
552,372 
501,224 
504,713 



544,063 
596,557 



133,747 
138,087 
146,894 
112,024 
59,553 

42,529 
79,586 
75,023 
80, 184 
102,058 
85,297 
53,584 
98,513 
111,681 
131,669 
88.522 
67, 190 

55,159 
75,213 
98,521 
119,623 
120,009 
104,186 
95,099 
123,479 
115,297 
131,243 
105,951 
80,337 

94,367 
92,338 
97.144 



1.085,425 

1,003,719 

870,948 

572,204 

403,164 

467,609 
637,047 
846,800 
814,106 
929,823 
845,128 
648,401 
980,634 
832,734 
801.952 
536,304 
488, 128 

619,293 
759,011 
946.195 
985,026 
984,808 
797,640 
754,084 
1,093,443 
992,901 
863,081 
758,389 
741,227 

639,393 

892,693 

1,050,562 



263,552 
218,096 
232,164 
203.292 
132,344 

160,666 
160,198 
232,597 
271,414 
266,661 
204,527 
154,707 
177.839 
189,107 
259,002 
220,878 
143,954 

186,011 
206.465 
243,249 
256,370 
269,737 
250,740 
228,332 
236,522 
218,887 
273,186 
268,495 
165,889 

225,124 
235,172 
289,728 



95.299 
92,585 
99.624 
92,070 
50,221 

65,533 
79,761 
98,095 
72,736 
89,296 
82,240 
54,093 
79,582 
83,571 
86,259 
64,544 
45,664 

55,731 
74.112 
83,198 
77,121 
81,075 
76,402 
82,661 
81,192 
76,153 
91,831 
72,090 
73,820 

68,687 
70,974 
76,607 



2,237,179 

2,035,525 

1,833,771 

1,371,253 

944.811 

030,906 
326,216 
686,235 
652,490 
884,998 
726,528 
333,807 
877,661 
704,677 
782,172 
316,118 
170.010 



329.880 
580,041 
938,800 
026,464 
032,751 
756,304 
728,192 
153,955 
982,451 
911.713 
706.149 
565,986 

1,513,959 
1,835,240 
2,110.598 



14 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 9. — Sales and Slaughterings of Live Stock, Retail Food Prices, and Cold Storage Holdings. 



Classification 










1935 










1936 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Sales on Stock Yds: 




























(Current month 




























prelim.) 


























•^ 


Cattle 


64,114 


56,948 


44,195 


58,158 


74,229 


101,949 


122,298 


94,010 


59,926 


64,496 


60,436 


61,785 


76,683 


Calves 


41,444 


40,880 


39,968 


41,840 


33,859 


41,602 


43,075 


35,009 


20,991 


19,133 


19,844 


31,347 


41,027 


Hogs 


81,331 


68,159 


57,513 


60,430 


49,536 


50,115 


74,847 


68,228 


80,835 


78,446 


74,918 


77,526 


74,990 




23,060 


13,572 


27,163 


43,217 


49,524 


62,488 


95,248 


49,626 


28,771 


16,833 


13,502 


13,844 


12,755 


Inspected Slaugh- 
























terings: 




























Cattle 


57, 189 


63,713 


52,063 


56,047 


66,679 


72,313 


92,844 


88,942 


62,570 


69,810 


62,097 


61,927 


66,816 


Calves 


72,252 


76,381 


65,056 


57,360 


47.505 


46,007 


49,115 


39,515 


26,325 


27,060 


29,099 


48,588 


67,583 


Sheep 


42,006 


30,630 


13,911 


8,292 


6,799 


8,276 


13.213 


12,943 


8,084 


9,365 


9,845 


5,451 


31,031 


Lambs 


1,302 


7.080 


40.097 


65,176 


90,391 


96,807 


157,324 


95,532 


45,744 


39,069 


33,553 


37,112 


1,281 




255,666 


244,893 


194,613 


191,088 


175,542 


176,786 


262,599 


256,361 


268,824 


275,775 


245,049 


262,531 


266,855 


At. Retail Prices, In 
























cents, of Food In 




























Canada: 




























Beef, chtick... lb. 


12-6 


13-4 


14-0 


14-0 


13-2 


12-8 


12-7 


12-3 


12-1 


12-6 


12-9 


12-9 


12-6 


Veal, roast " 


12-7 


12-6 


12-7 


12-8 


12-7 


12-9 


13-4 


13-4 


13-4 


14-1 


14-7 


15-2 


13-8 


Mutton, roast. " 


21-5 


21-6 


21-5 


21-4 


211 


20-9 


20-3 


19-9 


20-2 


21-6 


22-0 


22 3 


22-3 


Pork, fresh.... ■ 


200 


20-4 


21-3 


22-4 


22-6 


231 


22-7 


21-9 


20-8 


21-1 


21-3 


21-1 


21-0 


Bacon, break- 




























fast " 


31-2 


30-3 


30- 1 


30-1 


30-5 


31-6 


31-6 


312 


29-9 


29-3 


29-1 


29-0 


28-7 


Lard, pure u 


15-2 


15-2 


15-3 


15-5 


15-9 


17-2 


18-1 


18-3 


18-3 


17-9 


17-2 


16-6 


16-0 


Eggs, fresh doz. 

Milk qt. 


24-3 


220 


22-6 


24-7 


27-7 


31-2 


35-8 


41-5 


43-4 


41-5 


33-8 


381 


28-1 


10-5 


10-5 


10-5 


10-3 


10-3 


10-4 


10-6 


10-6 


10-6 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


10-7 


Butter, cream- 




























ery lb. 


28-1 


28-6 


26-3 


24-8 


250 


25-4 


27-1 


28-6 


30-3 


30-6 


30-1 


28-7 


27-6 


Cheese " 


20-0 


20-2 


200 


19-9 


19-7 


19-6 


19-9 


20-5 


20-5 


20-6 


20-5 


20-6 


20-6 


Bread " 


5-7 


5-6 


5-7 


5-7 


5-7 


5-6 


5-7 


5-7 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


5-8 


Flour " 


3-3 


3-4 


3-4 


3-3 


3-3 


3-2 


3-3 


3-5 


3-4 


3-4 


3-4 


3-4 


3-4 


Rolled oats... " 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-2 


5-1 


51 


Rice " 


7-8 


7-8 


7-9 


7-8 


7-8 


7-9 


7-9 


7-8 


7-9 


7-8 


7-9 


7-S 


7-8 


Beans " 


5-2 


5-2 


5-3 


5-4 


5-3 


5-2 


5-3 


5-3 


5-4 


5-4 


5-4 


5-4 


50 


Apples, evap.. " 


15-3 


15-6 


15-9 


16-0 


161 


15-7 


15-4 


15-4 


15-7 


15-4 


16-0 


15-8 


15-8 


Prunes " 


12-3 


12-3 


12-4 


12-3 


12-3 


121 


120 


11-6 


11-3 


11-4 


11-2 


10-9 


110 


Sugar, gran... " 


6-4 


6-4 


6-5 


6-4 


6-4 


6-4 


6-3 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


6-2 


6-1 


Tea " 


51-8 


52-2 


52-0 


51-8 


61-5 


52-4 


51-8 


52-3 


51-9 


52-2 


51-9 


51-9 


51-8 


Coffee " 


37-7 


37-3 


37-6 


37-1 


37-5 


37-1 


371 


36-6 


36-7 


36-6 


36-3 


36-2 


35-7 


Potatoes peck 


16-9 


16-6 


16-7 


16-3 


27-5 


20-4 


22- 1 


220 


23-6 


I 24-2 


25-4 


26-2 


260 





1935 


1936 


Cold Storage Holdings as at 
First of Month: 

(000 lbs. or dot.) 
Butter— 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dee. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


May 


3,674 

206 

3,876 

11,216 

2,238 

655 

1.625 

17,632 
3,972 
16.104 
37,707 
3,853 

6,722 

5,240 

518 

259 

12.739 

780 

864 

1,644 

3,103 

203 
3.306 

6,742 

6,807 
3,714 

1,750 


5,785 

153 

5,938 

11,685 

6,237 

588 

2,785 

16,188 
3.27e 
16,449 
35,912 
3,688 

5,631 

5,120 

349 

214 

11,314 

1,039 

594 

1,633 

1,539 

208 

1,746 

4,275 

7,666 
2,649 

2,150 


22,344 

285 

22,629 

18,836 

7,858 

614 

3,733 

13,501 
2,691 
15,949 
32,141 
3,400 

4,200 

4,466 

299 

209 

9.174 

1,294 

550 

1,844 

705 

332 

1,037 

3,538 

9,826 
3,347 

3,833 


40,129 

540 

40,669 

29.410 

9,797 

355 

4,216 

9,657 
2,586 
14.571 
26.813 
3,699 

3,331 

4,975 

298 

207 

8,811 

1,467 

716 

2,183 

569 

332 

901 

2,901 

16,301 
4,908 

8,499 


51.271 

868 

52,139 

34,626 

10,076 

427 

4,221 

6,812 
2.105 
12,964 
21,881 
3.198 

3,968 

5,097 

253 

237 

9.555 

1.604 

483 

2,087 

546 

279 

825 

2.213 

20.162 
5,356 

5,448 


54,820 

362 

55,182 

29,431 

9,430 

542 

3,946 

5,181 

1,820 

13,027 

20,028 

3.068 

5.700 

6.137 

190 

255 

12.282 

1.992 

562 

2,553 

1.081 

449 

1,530 

1,983 

21,312 
4,717 

3,950 


47,474 

367 

47,841 

28,237 

6,458 

243 

3,383 

5,334 
3,159 
14,575 
23,069 
2.435 

11,611 

7,544 

180 

214 

19.549 

2.358 
1,033 
3,391 

3,890 

620 

4,510 

2,630 

25,913 
5,585 

5,870 


39,236 

437 

39,673 

25,052 

3,404 

285 

2,994 

7,708 
3,149 
15,168 
26,026 
2,598 

17,377 

6,986 

264 

203 

24,829 

3,123 

489 

3,612 

5,633 

249 

5,881 

5,941 

23,580 
5,516 

2,672 


31,751 

219 

31,970 

23,472 

1,252 

316 

2,543 

12,576 

2.740 

15,120 

30,436 

3,387 

16,719 

4,658 

283 

272 

21,933 

2,615 

244 

2,858 

5,314 

263 

5,577 

12,036 

16,369 
4,826 

1.627 


24,251 

121 

24,372 

21,957 

526 

424 

2,093 

13,430 

3,409 

15,973 

32.813 

3,609 

13.32J 

6,272 

371 

265 

20,237 

1,851 

329 

2,180 

4,507 

268 

4,775 

11,095 

16,679 
3,869 

1,876 


16.190 

92 

16.282 

19,038 

6 

87 

1,641 

14,921 
3,414 
17,326 
35.660 
2,792 

9,963 

6,226 

444 

277 

16,910 

1,127 

498 

1.626 

3,379 

241 

3,621 

9,973 

12,780 
3,154 

1,262 


8,512 

53 

8.564 

16,640 

63 

320 

1,234 

15,198 

3,544 

17,892 

36,634 

2.913 

10.119 

5,704 

396 

352 

16,571 

921 

558 

1,478 

2,604 

218 

2,822 

8,708 

11,024 
3,325 

3,045 


4,497' 




35 


Totals 


4,532 


Cheese 


13,774' 


Eggs— 


2,219 


Fresh 


584 




1,326 


Pork— 


16,811 




4,087 


Cured or in cure 

Totals 


16,871 
37,769 




3,445 


Beef— 


9,173 




5,412 


Cured 


270 




528 


Totals 


15,382 


Veal— 
Freeh, frozen 


1,225 




704 


Totals 


1,930 


Mutton and Lamb — 
Frozen 


1,461 




184 


Totals 


1,645 


Poultry 


6,705 


Fish— 
Fresh frozen 


9,301 
3,719 


Fresh frozen during preced- 


1,796 







1 This figure includes approximately 255,000 pounds of butter reported by creameries added to the list in the provinces 
f Quebec and Ontario since June 1, 1935. 

2 This figure includes approximately 160,000 pounds of cheese reported by firms added to the list since January 1, 1936. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 9a. Canadian Public Finance. Revenue and Expenditure in Dollars. 



15 



Classification 


April, 1936 
(unre vised) 


April, 1935 




5,386,144 
3,223,484 
3,984,197 
6,940,490 


5,598,470 




3,019,458 




3,711,927 




4,829,834 


Gold Tax 


574,593 




2,400,000 
979,282 


2,200.000 




839,123 








22,913,597 
2,969 


20,773,405 




2 




6,667,784 






90,800 










22,916,566 


27,531,992 






Ordinary Expenditure — Agriculture 


545,344 

34,215 

21,645 

51,396 

13,662,357 

3,354 

198 

134,798 

30,019 

120 

32,389 

46,975 

38,634 

94,763 

6,615 

93,863 

176,821 

9,747 

179,263 

30.589 

142.035 

22,927 

300,275 

2,840 

308,220 

33,050 

63,150 

320 

870,413 

28,386 

870,761 

4,445,336 

1,415,399 

3,495 

10,847 

5,352 

390,339 

155,748 

1,280 

490,381 

45,463 

73,155 

353,075 


557,794 




32,997 




18,871 




53,651 




14,624,469 




3,288 




113 




127,978 




31,545 




86 




33,202 




61,404 




22,898 




95,969 




6,374 




96,402 




193,089 




9,252 




185,802 




29,197 




135,446 




22,014 


Legislation — 


276,262 




29,642 




272,513 




87,315 




65,516 




1,298 




822,040 




24,302 




836,394 




4,287,533 




1,372,455 




3,527 




11,525 




5,826 




348,857 




120.505 








507,560 




43,645 




75,444 




326,585 








25,225,353 


25,860,588 






Special Expenditure- 


102,887 


2,163,908 








102,887 


2,163,908 






Capital Expenditure and Non-Active Loans — Marine 


31,903 


28,193 


Public Works 


227 




4,191 
150 000 


6,580 












186,095 


35,000 








25,514,335 


28,059,496 
















9,545,879 




1,000 000 

24,674 

4,345 

2,000 000 


60,271 








-49 








4,751,000 




3,029,019 


14,357,102 








221,635 

1,029,996 

29,794,985 






1.935,992 




44,352,580 



T6 MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 

Table 10. Output of Central Electric Stations and Railway Operating Statistics 



OUTPUT OF CENTRAL 
ELECTRIC STATIONS 
000 KILOWATT HOURS 

Monthly Data 
Totals for Canada- 
Water 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water 
Maritime Provinces 

§uebec 
ntario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

Provincial Consumption- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Total 

Deliveries to Boilers- 
New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia 

Total 

Daily Average 

Totals for Canada— 

Wnter 

Fuel 

Total 

Generated by Water- 
Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Generated by Fuel- 
Prairie Provinces 

Other Provinces 

Exports 

RAILWAYS 

Car loadings 000 ears 

Operating Revenues — 
Canadian National .... $000 
Canadian Pacific 1000 



Canadian National- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No of tons carried .000 tons 
No. of tons carried 

one mile. .. 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass. 

Total pay roll .$000 

Number of employees. .000 
Canadian Pacific- 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 

Operating Income $000 

No. of tons carried 000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 pass 

Total pay roll. $000 

Number of employees. .000 
All Railways- 
Operating Revenues. .. $000 
Operating Expenses. . .$000 
Operating Income. . . .$000 
No. of tons carried.000 tons 
No. of tons carried one 

mile 000,000 tons 

Passengers carried 000 

Passengers carried one 

mile 000,000 p^ss 

Total pay roll $000 

Number of employees. . 000 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Dec 



1854252 
26,777 
1881029 

53,065 
1028940 
533,740 
118,689 
119,818 

12,755 
14,022 
97,475 

65,564 
805,219 
661,467 
133,026 
118,278 
1783554 

3,775 

372,817 

114,637 

24,184 

365 

515,778 



61,808 

893 

62,701 

1,769 

34,298 

17,791 

3,956 

3,994 

425 

468 

3.249 



184-61 



11,566 
9,957 



1896121 
26,950 
1923071 

57,830 
1061757 
535,894 
113,655 
126,985 

13,143 
13,807 
94,256 

70,173 
835,323 
669,512 
128,295 
125.513 



5,867 

383,242 

117,389 

16,934 

493 

523,922 



61,165 

869 

62,034 

1,866 

34.250 

17,287 

3,666 

4,096 

421 

445 

3,041 

188-35 

11.696 

9,886 



1788045 
28,205 
1816250 

57,871 
982,233 
530,315 

97,157 
120,469 

12,863 
15,342 
107,994 

71,962 
772,604 
633,155 
111,311 
119,224 
1 708256 

6,180 

339.864 

110,351 

5,879 

324 

462,598 



59.601 

941 

60,542 

1,929 

32,741 

17,677 

3,239 

4,015 

429 

512 

3,600 



185-88 



11,273 
10,162 



1762747 
28,796 
1791543 

56,564 
979,105 
499,736 
102,789 
124,553 

12.936 
15,860 
93,348 

70,773 
765,661 
621,431 
117,108 
123,222 
1698195 

5,642 

310,078 

90,637 

14,645 

326 

427,328 



56,863 

928 

57,792 

1,825 

31,584 

16,121 

3,316 

4,018 

417 

511 

3,011 



194-98 



12,527 
11,119 



1820892 
30,261 
1851153 

49.761 
1003785 
529,590 
107,891 
129,865 

14,154 

16,107 

130,305 

64,160 
766,772 
637,955 
123,618 
128,343 
1720848 

1,892 

304,742 

96,263 

10.903 

338 

414,138 



58,738 

976 

59,714 

1,605 
32.380 
17,084 
3,480 
4,189 

457 

519 

4,203 



196-92 



12,006 
10.924 



1888013 
31,201 
1919214 

44,442 
1045369 
546,865 
124,220 
127,117 

14,849 
16,352 
142,177 

59,125 
801,002 
650,675 
140,719 
125,516 
1777037 

1,419 

337,569 

99,256 

21,149 

331 

459.724 



62,934 

1,040 

63,974 

1,481 

34,846 

18,229 

4,141 

4,237 

495 

545 

4,739 



220-58 



13,i 
13,296 



2122992 
39,577 
2162569 

46,811 
1176353 
626,559 
137,698 
135,571 

21,149 

18,428 

146,530 

63,761 
940,676 
717,072 
160,457 
134,073 
2016039 

445 

445,043 

123,501 

30.716 

438 
600,143 



68,484 

1,277 

69,761 

1,510 

37,947 

20,212 

4,442 

4,373 

682 
595 

4,727 



251-08 



15.124 
14,115 



2217404 
,121 
2156525 

44,149 
1100864 
681,644 
156,681 
134,066 

21,452 
17,669 
112,838 

60,536 
925,472 
745,410 
179,643 
132,627 
2043688 



1,036 370 
449,528 380 
132,113 
49,549 
364 
632.590 



68.303 

1,262 

69,565 

1.424 

35,512 

21. 
5,054 
4,325 



570 
3,640 



173-53 



12,305 
11.581 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April 



2051660 
39,381 
2091041 

38,572 
1045702 
675,429 
159,899 
132,058 

21,051 
18,330 
118,050 

55,234 
865,741 
738,665 
182,485 
130,865 
1972990 



,020 

,023 

128,894 

51,586 

345 

557,845 



66,182 

1,270 

67,452 

1,244 

33,732 

21,788 

5,158 

4,260 

679 
591 



172-90 



10,153 
9.323 



1899821 
37,729 
1937550 

34,049 
984,744 
612,932 
151,637 
116,459 

19,713 
18,016 
110,684 

49,622 
795,547 
692,905 
172,983 
115,808 
1826865 

352,795 
355,538 
123,733 
50,226 
486 
527,240 



65,511 
1,301 

66,812 

1,174 

33,957 

21,135 

5,229 

4,016 



3,817 



180-23 



10,618 
9,280 



2101192 
34,268 
2135460 

47,439 
1101617 
667,679 
149,202 
135,255 

18,879 
15,389 
125,921 

60,954 
907,738 
737,446 
169,628 
133,772 
2009538 

4,092 
439,412 
130,016 
45, 

472 
619,901 



67,780 
1,106 



1,530 

35,536 

21,538 

4,813 

4,363 



497 
4,062 



192- 12 



11,847 
10.680 



2130970 
32.747 
2163717 

59,288 
1139601 
663,6*84 
136,632 
131,765 

17,393 
15,354 
125,497 

73,064 
958,895 
720,314 
155,381 
130,567 
2038221 

7,538 
506,214 
128,984 
40,223 
358 
683,317 



71,032 

1,091 

72,123 

1,976 

37,987 

22,123 

4,554 

4,392 



511 

4,183 



193-07 



12,136 
10,580 



Mar. 



10, 828 

385 

2,424 

894 



7,022 



8,119 
1,047 
1,986 

759 
817 

62 

5,058 

44 

23,847 

20,865 

2,114 

5,836 

1,858 
1, 

133 

12,928 
116 



April 



10,452 

823 

2.252 

860 
863 

60 
6,716 



8,223 
1,413 
1,958 

743 



53 

5,047 

45 

24,482 

20,563 

2.990 

5,725 

1.797 
1,674 

125 

12,590 

111 



May 



11,433 
16 

2,290 

794 
642 

61 

7,493 

64 

8,419 
1,144 
1,966 

746 
522 

54 

5.527 
49 

24,529 

21,839 

1,781 

5,822 

1,720 



June 



12,163 
1.168 1 
2,227 

873 
657 

59 

7,459 

67 

8,434 
1,404 
1,897 



554 

62 

5,423 

49 

24,049 

22,455 

691 

5,796 

1,860 
1,396 



124 134 

13,900 13,749 

1201 123 



July 



11,676 

503 

2,400 

1,002 
792 

74 

7,944 

69 

9,254 
1,526 
2,036 



654 

70 

5,808 

50 

26,187 

22,754 

2,442 

5,975 

2,341 
1,644 

157 

14,682 
127 



Aug. 



11,596 
91 

2,279 



834 

81 

7,970 

70 

10,097 

508 

2,025 

799 
683 

87 

5.884 

51 

25,520 

23,435 

1.134 

5,703 

2,101 
1,741 

185 

14,781 

129 



Oct. 



12.018 
2.823 
3,382 

1,386 
558 

50 

8,091 

70 

9,621 
4,249 

3,258 

1,351 
454 

47 
5,737 



32,279 

23,598 

7,730 

8,349 

2.937 
1,150 

119 

4,751 

124 



Nov. 



10.958 
1,406 
2,767 



44 

7,514 

65 

8,074 
3,455 
2,554 

993 
487 

47 

5,278 

44 

27,154 

20,854 

5,290 

6.876 

2.240 
1,295 

101 
13,655 
1 



Dec. 



10,866 

2,340 

925 
881 

64 

7,370 

63 

7,948 
3,306 
2,057 

814 
672 

62 

5,039 

43 

26,656 

21,333 

4,289 

5,876 



1,732 

140 

13,262 
113 



Jan. 



11,280 
1.523' 
2,275 

815 
926 

53 



8,355 

613 

1,956 

759 
719 

51 

5,474 

46 

22,234 

21,440 

205i 

5,740 

1,763 
1, 

117 

14,037 

121 



Feb. 



11,285 
1,077' 
2,394 

846 
992 

52 



8,054 

867 

2,051 

773 
779 

53 

5,563 

49 

22,597 

21,187 

339 

6,016 

1,814 
1,940 

117 

14,149 

131 



Mar. 



8,973 
1,348 
2,227 



57 

5,573 

47 



'Deficit. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 11 — Railway Revenue Freight Loaded at Stations in Canada in Tons. 



17 



Commodities 


1935 


1936 


Feb. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Feb. 


Railway Freight Loaded— 

Agricultural Products— 
Wheat 


366,433 

1,655 

58,952 

27,692 

863 

610 

1,548 

80,256 

71,035 

102,128 

1,023 

25,114 

627 

33,399 

7,757 

16,653 

3,184 
29,093 

1,427 
18,193 

9,967 

7,181 

3,717 
528 
600 

1,667 
425 

3,959 

3,477 

2,903 

502,704 

191,623 

88,529 

111 

170,049 

62,271 

23,427 

1,733 

997 

1,023 

11,269 

122,378 

284,386 

1,046 

408,706 

165,483 
22,299 

[76,296 

15,034 

8,839 

984 

30,821 
3,261 
6,830 
3,336 

11,744 
436 

5,144 

32,529 

964 

1,798 

10,916 

37,817 

152,273 

56,093 

7,127 

10,852 

176,055 

118,109 

1 3,710 


503,979 

4,956 

87,761 

21,469 

584 

975 

2,401 

79,027 

73,951 

54,309 

738 

5,759 

790 

32,328 

6,155 

20,273 

9,601 
37,479 

1,594 
16,644 

8,924 

6,621 

5,032 
353 

1,334 

1,869 
362 

4,005 

3,157 

801 

404,213 
111,740 
50,767 
480 
188,904 
53,722 
41,313 

4,870 
1,091 
3,732 
17,077 
153,165 

190,289 

3,056 

160,567 

210,628 
15,842 

122,759 
19,266 
12,220 
2,589 

34,869 
5,512 

28,936 
7,231 

18,832 
808 

10,660 

45,056 

9,362 

1,762 

15,457 

77,276 

187,609 

66,785 

3,365 

13,324 

194,378 

149,260 

3,634 


525,595 

98 

65,844 

22,272 

1,499 

863 

1,628 

78,759 

80,714 

23,409 

1,083 

1,685 

840 

30,597 

3,251 

17,272 

3,497 
32,534 

1,055 
15,141 

8,318 

8,250 

5,987 
199 

2,151 

1,684 
498 

5,595 

3,717 

1,129 
576,742 
55,691 
40,073 
451 
175,263 
57,842 
133,873 

12,198 
1,841 
9,602 

19,622 
186,364 

174,086 

5,525 

128,260 

224,488 
18,881 

165,947 
18,476 
15,115 
20,340 

37,507 
4,796 
46,095 
10,003 
18,510 
2,626 

8,841 

34,706 

3,786 

1,686 

15,913 

105,313 

160,299 

65,956 

2,355 

13,752 

210,233 

134,897 

3,863 


586,688 

21 

38,178 

17,843 

2,259 

1,624 

1,691 

74,528 

67,053 

9,621 

736 

478 

762 

15.009 

3.499 

13.152 

2,337 

23,884 

862 

12,931 

7,401 

6,001 

4,877 
142 

1,678 

3,738 
485 

4,810 

3,370 

1,800 
698,768 
45,593 
43,868 
1,472 
155,342 
62,234 
191,999 

9,696 

1,404 

25,833 

14,509 

167,963 

164,866 

5,011 

127,887 

259,509 
27,063 

154,199 
16,734 
8,455 
11,715 

28,086 
4,387 
55,675 
13,154 
18,044 
3,241 

10,300 

26,110 

1,707 

1,501 

15,919 

23,729 

150,734 

54,378 

2,713 

12,338 

225,027 

123,426 

3.874 


888.457 

466 

59,497 

15,082 

2,724 

2,571 

786 

76,394 

72,263 

4,396 

678 

50 

2,243 

8,005 

5,289 

17,410 

5,075 
29,070 

1,716 
11,157 

8,208 

6,515 

5,287 
85 
1,333 
5,445 
2,696 
4,685 

3,802 

1,318 
656,113 
42,051 
48,845 
2,244 
133,447 
59.767 
204,900 

12,557 
1,768 
28,298 
17,622 
189.628 

124,111 

7,521 

136,552 

270,889 
25,524 

175,398 

26,954 

12,326 

9,003 

29,748 
5,186 
53,683 
13,605 
18,826 
2,585 

16,341 

21,093 

1,946 

2,509 

18,908 

14,858 

149,026 

59,388 

2,455 

13,373 

255,524 

123,793 

4,226 


660,405 

1,859 

20,558 

25,372 

3,717 

354 

1,323 

81,963 

77,589 

8,630 

495 

1,554 

7,445 

2,352 

9,375 

16,867 

3,707 
42,317 

2,768 
10,745 

7,393 

5,021 

5,669 
150 
864 

4,343 
723 

3,725 

5,484 

2,691 
573,495 
89,157 
40,544 
1,111 
146,004 
59,523 
230,587 

10,172 

1,857 

32.678 

14.219 

218.253 

147,184 

8,100 

110,042 

251,046 
21,274 

201,074 

21,950 

11,263 

5,529 

32,289 
5,940 
53,383 
16,929 
17,829 
2,720 

11,462 
13,832 
1,395 
2,024 
16,983 
13,580 
148,847 
61,817 
2,779 

12,897 

257,623 

130,939 

4,015 


1,314,096 

2,316 

71,110 

91,860 

11,982 

705 

634 

109,849 

100,34? 

15,665 

1,973 

28,589 

23,122 

9,911 

13,406 

15.118 

3,253 
53,984 
3,423 
9,734 
8,357 

3,864 

5,228 
119 
830 

5,062 
738 

4,407 

4,974 

5,040 

514,687 
203,834 

68,836 

969 

142,815 

66,326 
264,586 

12,288 
3,271 
29,583 
14,088 
205,795 

173,411 

5,114 

109,021 

231,313 
21,111 

187,978 

24,732 

14,177 

2,613 

35,234 
5,558 
58,627 
15,667 
16,665 
3,068 

4,899 
10,009 

2,127 

2,197 
14,230 
20,974 
145,389 
60,314 

3,912 

16,005 

232.527 

130,057 

4,995 


765,425 

7,458 

77,629 

30.810 

3,355 

5,569 

3,523 

119,589 

106,078 

15,912 

1,125 

51,396 

863 

32,579 

11,877 

103,703 

4.185 
58,814 

5,929 
15,850 

9,325 

6,135 

6,382 
519 
750 
2,933 
1,013 
4,801 

4,463 

1,896 

595,021 

515,685 

86.872 

327 

158,920 

67.850 

131,897 

8,176 

1.411 

5,638 

18,181 

212,501 

246,803 
15,482 
59,141 

210,156 
16,565 

133,366 

19.652 

19,494 

1,960 

46,574 
5,580 
25,336 
11,060 
14,784 
1,620 

3,517 
24,448 

5,172 

2,369 
19,356 
42,746 
165,379 
72,929 

6,903 

24,055 

186,621 

107,849 

3,781 


520,368 

10,300 

46,826 

31,464 

2,450 

4,376 

1,077 

89,465 

85,864 

15,256 

488 

24,329 

1,034 

20,476 

8,349 

57,760 

3,669 
30,687 

1,822 
17,207 
10,600 

5,792 

5,825 
4,787 

358 
1,964 

601 
4,998 

3,965 

1,866 

484,524 

304,302 

101,952 

327 

148,976 

57,956 

61,856 

4,645 

1,347 

1,937 

14,247 

174,525 

200,756 

1,152 

121,231 

180,666 
39,578 

96,298 

21,456 

8,456 

1,627 

34,696 
4,968 

10.756 
5,968 

14,072 
464 

4,270 

22,592 
3,288 
1,406 

18,164 

35,067 
204,660 

65,491 
7,607 

11,090 

186,621 

107,849 

3,781 


397,988 




11,422 


Oats 


46,998 




23,398 


Rye 


880 




642 




1,271 




82,250 




81,914 




20,915 




891 




16,039 


Other fruit (fresh) 


674 




27,797 


Other fresh vegetables 

Other agricultural products . . 
Animal Products— 


9,597 
19,288 

4,188 




37,014 


Sheep 


1,497 




18,168 


Dressed meats (fresh) 


9,494 
5,927 


(edible) 


7,357 




357 




273 




2,803 


Wool 


566 




4,591 


Other animal products (non- 


3,897 


Mine Products — 


2,787 




550,416 




429,877 


Coke 


97,098 




205 


Other ores and concentrates. . 

Base bullion and matte 

Gravel, sand, stone (crushed). 
Slate — Dimensions or block 


159,384 
68,723 
20,536 

2,038 




1,529 




1,090 


Salt 


10,190 




171,995 


Forest Products — 
Logs, posts, poles, cordwood. . 
Ties 


209,352 
1,089 




215,768 


and cooperage material 


165,277 
13,175 


Manufactures and Miscellan- 
Gasoline, petroleum and its 


74,088 




15,021 




9,089 


Rails and fastenings 

Iron and steel (bar, sheet, 


1,009 
35,159 


Castings, machinery & boilers 


5,040 

9,797 


Brick and artificial stone . . . 


2,856 
13,877 


Sewer pipe and drain tile 

Agricultural implements and 

Automobiles and auto trucks. 


202 

6,963 

24,869 

1,273 




1,912 




13,732 




27,894 




170,976 
62,846 


Fish (fresh, frozen cured, etc.) 
Canned goods (all canned food 

products, except meats) 

Other manufactures and mis- 


8,030 

11,557 

181,836 




131,172 


Grand Total, 000 tons. . 


3,769 



18 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 12. Indexes or Employment by Industries, Year 1926 = 100 



Industries — First of Month 



Indexes of Employment Un- 
adjusted— 

All Industries , 

:Mandfactuhino 

Animal products — edible. . . . , 

Fur and products 

.Leather and products 

ILumber and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Other lumber products 

Musical instruments 

Plant products — edible 

Pulp and paper products 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Garments, and personal fur 

nishings 

Other textile products 

Plant products (n.e.s.) 

Tobacco 

Distil ledand malt liquors. . 
Wood distillates and extracts. 
Chemicals and allied products 
Clay, glass and stone products 
Electric light and power.. . 

Electrical apparatus 

Iron and steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged 

products 

Machinery (other than ve- 
hicles) 

Agricultural implements. 

Land vehicles 

Automobiles and parts. 
Steel shipbuilding and re- 
pairing 

Heating appliances 

Iron and steel fabrication 

(n.e.s.) 

Foundry and machine shop 

products 

Other iron and steel pro- 
ducts 

Non-ferrous metal products. 

Mineral products 

Miscellaneous 

Logging 

Mining 

Coal 

Metallic ores 

Non-metallic minerals (ex 

cept coal) 

Communications 

Telegraphs 

Telephones 

Tbanbportation 

Street railways and cartage. 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Services 

Hotels and restaurants 

Professional 

Personal (chiefly laundries) 

Tbade 

Retail 

Wholesale 



1935 



May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



95-2 
956 
1111 
84-8 
108-8 
67-2 
56-3 
70-9 
98-2 
290 
92 
93-4 
81 

108-0 
104-1 
91-2 
111-9 
124-2 
117-1 

102-9 

95-2 
109-7 

94-1 
130-4 
111-8 
130-6 

69-4 
109-0 
106-0 

86-0 

98-7 

88-7 
61-2 
89 
154-6 

691 
94-3 

72-1 

92-7 

80-2 
119-0 
129-3 
118-7 

93-9 
116-2 

82-2 
211-0 

85-4 

77-5 

85-5 

75-4 

801 

109-8 

69-8 

90-3 

84-7 

47-2 

154-5 

580 

116-4 

110-9 

127-3 

122-7 

119-3 

126-0 

104-0 



97-6 
98-4 

120-6 
990 

108-1 
75-6 
68-1 
72-4 

101-6 
27-4 
98-9 
96-7 
86-7 

109-7 



1010 
94-3 

115-5 

104 

130 

118-8 

131-0 
77-9 

1110 

108-1 
86-2 

104-0 

901 
61-8 
86-9 
145-8 

64-2 
97-4 

760 

92-9 

83-7 
121-3 
134-6 
123-5 

96-0 
119-2 

83-2 
216-7 

92-8 

79-2 

89-4 

76-6 

79-9 

111-3 

70-4 

83-6 

89-5 

540 

146-1 

72-9 

118-5 

113-5 

125-5 

125-1 

119-9 

128-2 

105-5 



101-1 

99-8 

142-3 

100-3 

107-4 

82-6 

78-6 

76-6 

99-7 

411 

114-3 

98-3 

90-3 

110-4 

104-8 

88-2 

109-9 

1280 

117-1 

94-3 
92-7 
117-9 

103-3 
135-4 
101-2 
128-7 

83-6 
115-4 
118-6 

81-0 

100-6 

92-6 
591 

77-6 
109 2 

62-5 
99-6 

76-3 

87-2 

80-9 
122-3 
140-3 
119-3 

790 
125-2 

83-6 
2300 

106-5 

81-6 
93 
78-6 
85-4 
1171 



179 
80 
127 
129 
126-9 
125-7 
120-7 
126-4 
107-5 



106- 1 
103-3 
124-6 
103-2 
1101 
79-9 
72-5 
82-0 
101-1 
50-1 
136-2 
98-5 
89-1 
115-9 
105-0 
92-3 
116-9 
131-7 
123-5 

105-6 
97-2 
120-8 
107-2 
138-4 
139-0 
132-0 
84-5 
119-6 
128-4 
84-7 

112-0 

94-9 
53-0 
79-0 
110 



68-0 
112-1 

83-9 

97-1 

86-4 
125-8 
142-7 
130-2 
115-8 
129-5 

89-0 
230-3 

113-1 

82-1 

93-6 

790 

86-4 

118-7 

75-8 

94-0 

117-4 

67-2 

213-3 

79-3 

120-5 

117-3 

123-5 

125-1 

123-8 

128-9 

112-2 



104-6 
101-4 
15-4 
101-5 
103-8 



57-2 
85-4 
96-2 
51-8 
114 7 
98-7 
87-4 
118-1 
106-9 
98-3 
1170 
136-9 
127-6 



Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr. | May 



99-4 

94-5 
143-8 
144-1 
141-0 
140-01 127 



135-5 

75 

116-2 
124-5 

86-8 

115-7 

93-6 
52-5 
83- 
120-0 

51-5 
105-3 



94-8 

87-2 
125-8 
137-5 
125-0 
183-5 
131 - 1 

93-7 
230-3 

104-8 
810 
91-7 
78-1 
84 

115 2 
731 
93 7 
95 9 
67-3 

1710 
55-3 

116 3 
1120 
122-4 
122 
131 
140- 0] 
110 



92 



138 



98 



Cargo Tonnage of Vessels Entered and Cleared from Five Canadian Ports 




1935 


Saint John 


Halifax 


Quebec 


Toronto 


Vancouver 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


Entered 


Cleared 


July 


39.434 
51,571 
54,183 

44.082 
48,267 
69,407 

58,072 
82,431 
78,931 
55,375 


19,860 
29,183 
25.353 
37.491 
12.355 
105,553 

193,404 
172,355 
192,674 
110,038 


100,307 
81,796 
62.555 
130.561 
100,591 
117.985 

137.815 
67,324 

106,541 
74.298 


55,658 
64,160 
54,925 
58,502 
63.768 
93,087 

105,039 
88.683 
109.366 
102,390 


83,660 
144,579 
91.144 
92,492 
124,831 
1,602 


14,867 
21,087 
15,879 
18,172 
69,181 
24,358 


363,215 
337,330 
365,002 
334,955 
423,247 
73.903 


30,748 
30,623 
25.792 
21.143 
26,171 
6.434 


281,992 
318,651 
298,404 
340,129 
278,738 
256,331 

265.480 
246,800 
303,244 
322.309 


236,554 




215,554 




236,849 


October 


244.024 




288,326 


December 


268,020 


1936 
January 


302,496 


February 










469,704 


March 










288,441 


April 










346,723 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



19 



Table 13. 



Indexes of Employment with Seasonal Adjustment, Indexes of Retail Sales 
and Automobile Financing. 



Classification 



1935 



May | June | July | Aug. | Sept.! Oct. | Nov. | Dec. } Jan. I Feb. | Mar. | April | May 



1936 



First of Month 



Seasonally Adjusted Indexes of 
Employment— All Industries. 

Manufacturing 

Leather and products 

Rough and dressed lumber 

Furniture 

Musical instruments 

Pulp and paper 

Paper products ^ 

Printing and publishing 

Rubber products 

Textile products 

Thread, yarn and cloth 

Hosiery and knit goods 

Clay, glass and stone products. . 

Electric current 

Electric apparatus 

Iron ar A steel products 

Crude, rolled and forged pro- 
ducts 

Machinery other than vehicles 

Agricultural implements 

Automobiles and parts 

Logging 

Mining 

Metallic ores 

Non metallic minerals (except 
coal) 

Telephones.. 

Transportation 

Street railways and cartage 

Steam railways 

Shipping and stevedoring 

Construction and Maintenance 

Building 

Highway 

Railway 

Hotels and Restaurants 

Trade 

Retail 

Wholesale 

Economic areas and cities — 

Maritime Provinces 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Prairie Provinces 

British Columbia 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Toronto 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 

Windsor 

Winnipeg 

Vancouver 



Indexes of Retail Sales— 

1930=100 

Boots and shoes (16) 

Candy (6) 

Clothing, men's (15) 

Clothing, women s (12) . . .. 

Departmental (37) 

Drugs (23) 

Dyers and cleaners (8) 

Furniture (7) 

Groceries and meats (34).. 

Music and radio (9) 

Restaurants (14) 

Variety (9) 

General index (206) 

Automobile Financing— 

Total new and used cars— 

Number 

Percentage change 1 

Financing in dollars $000... 
Percentage change 1 



97-9 

951 
109-9 

58 

69 

29 

82 
107 
104 



•9 
•4 
•8 
•0 
•7 
•6 
90-2 
109 
123 
115-8 
700 
112-5 
106-5 
83-8 

931 
86-6 
58-4 
1251 
1240 
119-3 
215-3 



121 
121 
127-8 
105-9 



99-4 
92-8 

103-6 
93-2 
92-8 
87-4 
99-9 
97 

101-9 
900 

121-4 
88-6 
93-1 



96 2 


95-9 


96-8 


98-5 


101-1 


103-5 


102 4 


106-1 


103-9 


103 7 


103 2 


95-7 


95-9 


970 


98-1 


100-6 


102-5 


102-4 


104-9 


102-4 


101-3 


102-3 


111-0 


104-9 


109-9 


112-3 


109-6 


104-6 


101-2 


98-5 


102-7 


108-6 


109-2 


57-7 


59-4 


60-5 


61-3 


60-5 


64-6 


68-9 


73-8 


76-1 


73-7 


72-0 


71-8 


73-3 


77-5 


78-1 


81-2 


84-5 


82-8 


87-7 


78-6 


76-5 


75-7 


28-8 


36-9 


43-4 


48-4 


47-9 


47-1 


47-1 


51-4 


42-6 


42-5 


36-5 


83-5 


84-9 


86-3 


85-9 


87-0 


87-9 


89-1 


90-5 


87-7 


88-1 


88-9 


109-5 


109-8 


112-2 


112-9 


112-6 


114-6 


113-4 


118-3 


114-2 


1151 


1171 


105-8 


104-5 


105-2 


105-6 


106-0 


105-0 


106-4 


104-7 


105-1 


105-1 


107-1 


89-1 


90-5 


88-2 


93-5 


94-8 


98-2 


97-7 


99-4 


91-7 


92-5 


93-3 


112-3 


112-1 


112-6 


114-8 


116-6 


116-7 


116-2 


118-9 


114-3 


114-5 


115-7 


127-3 


127-5 


129-9 


132-2 


131-8 


133-5 


134-9 


135-6 


134-4 


129-8 


132-0 


117-9 


120-5 


120-1 


120-4 


123-1 


122-9 


122-2 


130-8 


120-2 


121-5 


123-5 


73-8 


75-5 


76-b 


74-8 


80-2 


76-7 


74-8 


760 


73-1 


76-2 


76-3 


109-6 


109-3 


109-1 


112-1 


114-9 


114-5 


116-3 


1160 


117-1 


118-3 


118-8 


109-0 


111-9 


123-5 


123-2 


126-5 


126-9 


120-6 


120-8 


115-6 


115-3 


117-1 


82-9 


82-2 


80-4 


80-3 


85-6 


89-6 


87-5 


92-6 


91-6 


87-8 


91-4 


98-2 


100-0 


100-0 


102-0 


112-6 


118-4 


117-9 


117-8 


120-7 


107-9 


109-6 


90-8 


90-7 


91-2 


91-0 


94-2 


96-4 


94-3 


98-1 


95-8 


97-9 


98-4 


59-1 


57-2 


59-2 


58-3 


59-2 


580 


52-3 


65-5 


64-2 


62-1 


620 


122-3 


124-4 


124-5 


103-2 


115-2 


145-5 


142-2 


171-3 


144-1 


119-7 


127-8 


117-2 


123-8 


134-1 


115-1 


137-2 


137-0 


126-9 


130-7 


115-9 


106-9 


131-9 


121-6 


122-9 


126-3 


128-6 


127-3 


128-6 


127-8 


127-2 


127-7 


130-7 


1320 


215-2 


219-9 


223-1 


226-9 


224-5 


228-0 


228-0 


232-9 


234-8 


243-7 


246- 1 


88-4 


93-5 


96-6 


102-9 


102-5 


103-9 


103-7 


111-3 


108-4 


103-7 


104-2 


76-3 


76-8 


771 


77-1 


77-7 


77-6 


77-9 


77-8 


77-4 


77-1 


76-9 


79-1 


80-7 


82-8 


82-7 


82-1 


80-2 


80-9 


80-6 


82-8 


84-4 


83-4 


110-2 


112-1 


113-5 


114-5 


113-2 


112-8 


113-7 


115-6 


118-0 


120-0 


119-8 


71-2 


71-4 


72-9 


73-1 


73-0 


71-3 


71-4 


72-1 


73-7 


76-0 


75-7 


71-8 


79-2 


84-3 


81-7 


81-4 


77-8 


82-8 


80-2 


85-0 


84-6 


79-1 


83-9 


79-8 


76-6 


83-2 


92-2 


101-8 


99-2 


105-6 


110-2 


118-3 


106-3 


53-4 


51-5 


49-8 


50-8 


54-9 


600 


64-8 


69-8 


69-9 


70-8 


66-4 


161-4 


110-9 


99-7 


111-4 


135-4 


169 


179-2 


198-0 


263-9 


338-1 


327-2 


59-9 


61-2 


60-8 


68-7 


69-6 


68-1 


65-6 


71-4 


88-1 


98-4 


74-9 


111-4 


107-0 


109-9 


110-6 


109-2 


1181 


1261 


125-7 


117-8 


1300 


130-8 


121-2 


122-6 


122-3 


122-8 


123-6 


122-8 


124-1 


128-8 


124-0 


127-3 


124-2 


128-3 


130-9 


129-6 


130-5 


1310 


129-2 


129-3 


135-7 


129-3 


135 


130-2 


106-7 


106-5 


106-6 


107-8 


108-6 


108-5 


108-2 


108-6 


109-0 


109-5 


109-7 


100-4 


100-9 


101 


102-0 


108-8 


111-2 


110-5 


112-3 


107-2 


105-8 


106-2 


910 


91-9 


92-2 


94-8 


97-6 


1000 


101-8 


104-3 


101-5 


101-0 


97-4 


99-9 


99-9 


99-8 


100-8 


103-8 


104-9 


105-1 


109-8 


106-3 


107-0 


107-9 


91-8 


91-7 


92-8 


95-4 


98-2 


101-5 


97 3 


99-3 


99-2 


102-6 


100-2 


94-2 


95-3 


99-9 


100-9 


100-4 


98-4 


99-8 


102-7 


102-7 


98-7 


100-3 


84-5 


83-7 


83-8 


85-3 


87-3 


87-7 


891 


92-4 


95-5 


95-3 


92-5 


99-6 


96-8 


97-1 


98-6 


95-7 


94-6 


96-4 


95-7 


97-5 


112-7 


95-2 


97-8 


97-4 


96-7 


97- 


98-2 


98-6 


970 


102-0 


100-6 


102-2 


101-2 


98-4 


99-3 


97-8 


98-2 


98-7 


101-6 


105-6 


110-3 


109-0 


111-3 


111-5 


92-4 


92-2 


93-4 


93-6 


97-9 


99-2 


98-7 


98-8 


101-7 


100-7 


98-6 


1111 


1111 


1040 


101-5 


107-9 


121-9 


122-0 


155-8 


117-8 


109-4 


137-5 


88-5 


89-1 


89-6 


87-3 


87-5 


87-9 


89-9 


90-5 


95-1 


98-6 


92-6 


96-8 


98-9 


97-4 


100-8 


99-5 


99-3 


98-8 


101-5 


104-9 


101-7 


102-2 



102-4 

102-2 
113-8 
67-7 
750 
37-6 
89-2 
118-7 
106-5 
95-0 
115-9 
131-4 
122-5 
80-4 
117-2 
117-9 
91-7 

108-7 
98-5 
64-3 
124-7 
117-0 
130-8 
248-9 

95-2 
76-6 
86-0 
117-0 
75-5 
97-7 
95-3 
62-7 
255-7 
66-3 
131-9 
125-1 
131-5 
110-8 



105-5 
99-7 

105-3 
98-3 
99-2 
93-9 
99-0 

100-6 

108-4 
97-7 

123-7 
90-5 

101-6 



1935 



Mar. 


April 


May 


Juno 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


61-2 


83-1 


80-9 


109-8 


70-0 


62-6 


68-7 


70-7 


79-6 


52-2 


78-9 


60-8 


471 


440 


59-2 


52-6 


57-4 


52-3 


53-2 


84-9 


71-4 


75-3 


57-7 


50-3 


59-5 


88 


94-1 


51-6 


70-6 


60-9 


69-5 


56-3 


50-5 


52-1 


62 1 


62-9 


611 


72-3 


70 8 


70-8 


56-9 


59-5 


71-8 


88-4 


88-1 


76-8 


71-7 


72-0 


70-7 


71-4 


74-2 


69-8 


74-4 


76-8 


641 


96-3 


93-7 


900 


77-6 


76 5 


83 2 


88-1 


71-1 


63-7 


74-8 


77-4 


70-8 


59-2 


78-6 


850 


93-6 


84-7 


75-2 


73-9 


74-8 


71-4 


69-9 


71-5 


69-6 


77-3 


75-4 


39-7 


35-5 


430 


301 


26-6 


35-2 


52 3 


66-6 


660 


51-4 


50-7 


51 6 


49-8 


51-2 


55-4 


530 


54-3 


52-5 


67-5 


77-9 


79-5 


88-6 


82-8 


83-7 


77 9 


90-4 


91-3 


64-8 


72-9 


72-4 


71-6 


63-0 


64-9 


69 7 


81-2 


80-0 


7,185 


12,749 


14.736 


12,821 


11.965 


9,081 


7.285 


6,323 


5,849 


+38-9 


-r-50-1 


-4-24-8 


+22-2 


+27-6 


+21-0 


+21-9 


+15-7 


+40 


2,981 


5,373 


6,147 


4,956 


4,641 


3,405 


2,806 


2,364 


2,293 


+39-3 


+53-7 


+27-9 


+16-1 


+28-0 


+18-8 


+ 17-2 


+ 17 8 


+54-1 



117-2 

116 

100 

122-7 

116-3 

87-9 

56-7 

85 

80-3 

67 

55-7 
164-0 



5,206 
+84-7 
2,2 
110-2 



1936 



Jan 


Feb. 


40-8 


41-7 


44-7 


61-6 


47-1 


41 8 


40-2 


41-3 


54-4 


57-8 


72-6 


73-7 


51-9 


48-8 


48-1 


59-6 


75-2 


74-3 


43-3 


40-3 


50-4 


490 


53-4 


60-9 


59-4 


60-8 


4,796 


4,593 


+75-7 


+8-1 


2,011 


1.914 


+72-7 


-3-6 



62-2 
46-8 
551 
46-7 
62-5 
72-9 
67-0 
63-0 
74-9 
35-8 
52-5 
64-7 
65 1 



9,377 
+30-5 

3,899 
+30-8 



>To same month in preceding year 



20 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 14. Trend of Business in the Five Economic Areas 1 



Areas and Items 



Business in Five Economic 
Areas— 

Canada— 

Contracts awarded S000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . . Number 
Liabilities $000 

Maritime Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 

Quebec — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. . Number 

Ontario— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment. Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures .. Number 

Prairie Provinces— 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000,000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures . . Number 

British Columbia — 

Contracts Awarded $000 

Building Permits $000 

Employment.Average 1926=100 

Bank Debits $000, 000 

Sales of Insurance $000 

Commercial Failures. .Number 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec, 



11,379 

6,292 

95-2 

2,367 

28,649 

107 

1,685 

795 

116 

97-4 

42-4 

1,849 

7 

2,402 

1,806 

89-7 

656 

8,520 

35 

5,079 
3,518 
101-7 
1,043 
12,646 
40 

2,473 

583 

87-9 

486 

3,312 

18 

630 

270 

92-6 

140-1 

2,322 

7 



16,302 

4,825 

97-6 

3,132 

27,141 

101 

1,295 

1,987 
178 
101-6 
47-5 
1,639 
4 

2,418 

1,6 

93 

858 

8.195 

52 

6,166 
2,152 
101-6 
1,360 
11.974 
30 



499 

92-2 

730 

3,497 

12 

3,087 
307 
96-6 
136-7 
1,836 
3 



18,521 

5,117 

99-5 

2,710 

31,810 

109 

1,879 

3,447 

154 

106-7 

52-6 

1,762 

6 

3,935 

1,497 

94 

8 

9,020 

50 

8,137 
2,339 
102-7 
1,264 
14,559 
32 

1,347 

541 

96-3 

451 

4,230 

19 

1,656 

586 

99-5 

136-5 

2,21 

2 



18,549 
4,266 
101-1 
2,545 

31,832 

110 

1,638 

1,464 

124 

106-7 

51-5 



5,123 

689 

97-2 

740 

9,738 

54 

8,819 
1,610 
102-4 
1,118 
13,385 
38 

2,454 

338 

98-7 

492 

4,454 

11 

690 
1,505 
106-8 
143-7 



23,837 
4,293 
102-7 
2,498 

26,639 

94 

1,255 

2,973 

998 

107-0 

48-5 

1,895 

8 

11,314 

331 

99-3 

677 

8,552 

41 

6,763 
2,325 
103-9 
992 
10,841 
30 

1,337 
253 

100-5 
638 

3,341 
13 

1,451 
387 
108-0 
141-9 
2,010 
2 



14,743 
3,322 
106- 1 
2,426 

26,442 

98 

1,565 

1,111 
114 
112-9 
46-7 
1,827 
4 

4,682 
584 

103-1 
702 

7,721 
50 

6.383 

1, 

10 

982 

11,454 

33 

1.8 

714 
102-7 

564 

3, 

8 

740 

294 

106-0 

131-4 

2,171 

3 



14,925 
4,020 
107 7 
2,908 

30,184 

115 

1,859 

624 

115 

111 

50-7 

1,844 

10 

6,712 
1,257 
105-0 
788 
8,594 
48 

4,967 
2,119 
110-0 
1,102 
13,269 
37 

2,000 
217 



313 
101 

147-3 

2,209 

2 



8,291 
3,315 
104-6 
3,022 
34,767 
107 
1,501 

376 

105 

107-5 

62-5 

2,300 

4 

2,231 
519 

103 
878 

9,540 
57 

4,063 
2,306 
107 
1,301 
15,599 
28 

1,132 
117 

101-3 
630 

4,708 
16 

490 

268 

99-3 

149-9 

2,620 



4,365 

2,402 

99-1 

2,932 

36,134 

112 

1,291 

305 

39 

108 1 

51-3 

2,761 

3 

1,08 

928 

85-5 

813 

9,836 

56 

1,854 
1,140 
102 
1,301 
15,487 
29 

768 

77 

951 

606 

4,995 

21 

358 
219 
92 

161 

3,055 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar. April 



13,610 
1,284 
98-4 
2,492 
34,051 
104 
1,558 

150 

67 

102-2 

50-4 

1,970 



4,660 

284 

95-2 

829 

8,869 

42 

5,741 
457 
102-4 
1,312 
16,746 
38 

975 

48 

93-7 

635 

4,012 

15 



428 
94 
165 
2,454 
3 



8,228 

1,912 

98-9 

2,767 

30,310 

131 

1,573 



48 

101-7 

43-8 

2,093 

1 

3,679 

203 

95-1 

866 

8,452 

77 

3,376 
439 
103-8 
1,258 
13,742 



495 

38 

95-1 

428 

3,532 

18 

396 

1,184 

92-4 

171-8 

2,491 



10,289 

2,361 

97-4 

2,599 

31,514 



249 

101 

101-8 

46-4 

1,917 



3,735 

468 

91-4 

823 



4,384 
1,151 
103-4 
1,152 
14,251 



1,464 
145 

90-5 
413 

1,125 



456 

497 

95-9 

165-0 

2,413 



4,492 
1,330 
103-4 
1,134 
13,542 



Employment indexes apply to first of following month. 



Table 15. Mineral Production by Months 



Minerals 



Mineral Production— 

Metals — 

Gold OOOoz. 

Silver 000 oz. 

Nickel tons 

Copper tons 

Lead tons 

Zinc tons 

Fuels — 

Coal 000 tons 

Petroleum 000 bbls . 

Natural Gas 000 M cu. ft 

Non-metals— 

Asbestos tons 

Gypsum 000 tons 

Feldspar tons 

Salt (commercial) tons 

Structural Materials— 

Cement 000 bbla. 

Clay products. ... $ 000 
Lime..... tons 



1935 



Mar. April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



249-5 
1,279 
5,309 
18,914 
15,786 
13,468 



120-5 
2.666 



11,816 
4-5 
778 

13,794 



131 

137 

32,616 



245-7 
1,014 
5,918 
19,424 
12,406 
11,806 



113-7 

2,282 



14,702 

26-5 

492 

21,407 



244 

191 

35,149 



269-2 
1,613 
5,665 
17,886 
13,389 
13,694 



925 
123-8 

1,666 



18,562 
58-3 
1,013 

22,748 



260 
34.214 



285-8 
1,505 
5,833 
17,807 
13,677 
14.082 



929 
120- 1 
1,178 



15,316 

75-5 

1,700 

16,432 



431 

288 

32,451 



285-4 
1,163 
5,095 
15,483 
14,552 
13,784 



980 
118-8 



15,398 
91 5 

2,371 
23,728 



453 
317 
,126 



294-4 
1,585 
5,435 
16,302 
13,235 
14,419 

987 
117-7 
1,020 



23.119 

81-2 

1,714 

15,711 



475 
311 
32,597 



280-4 
1,312 
6,448 
16,971 
13,161 
13,519 



1,117 
123-9 
1,176 



20,344 

48-1 

1,042 

18,139 



477 

311 

34.471 



301-7 
1,300 
6,679 
17,717 
16,400 
13,743 



1,555 
122-5 
1,830 



27,105 

59-3 

1,517 

20,303 



513 

340 

38,263 



293-2 
1,614 
6,072 
17,270 
16,181 
14,409 



1,618 
116-8 
2,247 



25,528 

67-7 

2,822 

26,379 



1936 



Jan. Feb. Mar 



307-3 
1,700 
7,499 
18,278 
15,284 
14,155 



1,287 
125-7 
2,983 



15,924 

21-2 

1,072 

13,260 



277-6 
1,213 
7,' 
17,145 
14,053 
13,580 



1,382 
121-2 
3,499 



17,016 
4-9 
901 

11,013 



117 97 
117 

32,338(130,206 



266-4 
1,235 
8,076 
16,456 
13,575 
10,339 



1,449 
107-9 
4,012 



17,038 
2-9 
937 

11,662 



102 
28,133 



299-1 
1,460 
7,833 
18,239 
15,647 
13,144 



16,225 
5-3 
878 

13,411 



32,929 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



21 



Table 16. Weekly Indicators of Economic Activity 


in Canada, 1936 






Items 


Feb. 
29 


Mar. 


April 


May 


7 


14 


21 


28 


4 


11 


18 


25 


2 


9 


Statistics of Grain Trade— 

Receipts Country Elevators— 

Wheat 000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 

Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 


608 

577 

178 

3 

16 

222-9 
10,924 
8,424 
420 
4,677 

•825 
•365 
•373 
1-586 
•428 

5,745 

1,660 

7,262 

695 

1,327 

1,610 

2,190 

1,740 

1,503 

12,648 

8,883 

45,263 

24,737 

73-18 
85-39 
123-88 
148-19 
40-58 
33-15 
85-02 
43-10 
101 08 
80-22 
76-28 
76-43 
72-39 
85 01 

72-5 
66-6 
71-7 
69-3 
67-8 
87-3 
69-1 
85-9 
77-2 

201-1 
143-0 
20-0 
85-6 
245-2 
74-3 
160-0 
152-5 
335-5 

58-5 
37-6 

1110 
72-4 

126-7 

129-6 
234-8 
150-2 

70-7 


1,272 

949 

256 

7 

29 

219-3 
11,028 
8,375 
417 
4,685 

•819 
•369 
•376 
1-583 
•433 

6,325 

1,194 

5,531 

589 

1,423 

1,690 

2,535 

2,454 

1,123 

13,178 

9,368 

45,410 

24,900 

84-31 
58-10 
103-19 
145-43 
42-13 
36-97 
98-22 
62-71 
76-97 
81-00 
80-56 
76-90 
73-17 
85-26 

72-5 
66-5 
71-9 
69-3 
67-8 
87-3 
69-2 
85-9 
77-2 

202-2 

141-3 

19-9 

85-7 

247-9 

75-4 

158-5 

149-1 

337-5 

580 
36-6 

111-6 
72-0 

127-0 

127-7 
234-5 
148-6 

700 


2,085 

1,543 

480 

12 

41 

214-3 

11,448 

8,513 

418 

4,678 

•832 
•366 
•378 
1-584 
•442 

5,837 

1,400 

4,348 

469 

1,275 

1,579 

2,509 

2,398 

1,479 

13,032 

9,497 

43,823 

23,469 

75-96 
67-28 
82-04 

121-19 
35-53 
35-35 
97-78 
62-03 

101-02 
80-00 
77-29 
72-94 
69-67 
80-47 

72-5 
67-0 
70-8 
69-5 
67-8 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-2 

195-2 

138-0 

19-6 

89-6 

237-9 

73-7 

154-8 

141-6 

327-5 

55-7 
33-9 

111-3 
69-7 

122-5 

123-8 
230-9 
144-8 

70-2 


1,548 

1,042 

399 

13 

31 

212-3 

11,983 

8,722 

430 

4,718 

•825 

•356 

•389 

1-580 

•437 

5,941 

1,778 

4,654 

455 

1,519 

1,712 

2,274 

2,187 

1,331 

12,628 

9,580 

44,069 

22,263 

82-66 
80-74 
95-98 
128-53 
41-61 
40-24 
91-77 
58-59 
90-24 
75-08 
73-75 
73-38 
69-45 
82-36 

72-4 
66-8 
70-4 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-3 

192-8 

133-3 

17-7 

92-5 

234-7 

71-9 

151-6 

134-5 

327-0 

54-2 
32-9 

110-1 
67-5 

120-6 

119-6 
226-1 
140-5 

70-4 


1,746 

783 

337 

9 

31 

209-3 
12,344 
8,998 
420 
4,760 

•811 
•348 
•379 
1-560 
•427 

5,467 

2,000 

4,136 

407 

1,534 

1,518 

2,524 

1,740 

1,465 

13,461 

9,797 

44,049 

25,303 

83-11 
86-62 
88-97 

111-81 
41-97 
40-03 

102-23 
50-07 
99-80 
78-76 
76-76 
74-97 
71-77 
82-44 

72-2 
66-4 
69-4 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-3 
85-9 
77-2 

197-4 

135-8 

18-5 

91-7 

242-9 

71-3 

151-2 

139-2 

331-4 

54-5 
32-6 

110-1 
68-5 

123-0 

121-2 
233-5 
143-2 

69-2 


1,146 

437 

303 

9 

31 

205-5 

12,499 

9,036 

422 

4,777 

•820 
•336 

•377 

1-497 

•411 

5,491 

1,976 

4,613 

387 

1,628 

1,229 

2,430 

1,729 

1,354 

13,255 

10,253 

44,345 

25,287 

89-15 
87-82 
106-54 
101-84 
45-20 
39-89 
98-90 
53-60 
90-81 
76-31 
80-33 
77-13 
75-15 
82-29 

72-1 
65-9 

69-8 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-2 
85-9 
77-2 

197-9 

134-6 

18-6 

91-2 

242-5 

71-0 

150-1 

139-4 

334-7 

54-3 

32-4 
110-4 

68-1 
123-1 

121-4 
236-0 
143-8 

69-7 


1,260 

405 

197 

6 

23 

200-3 
12,329 
9,056 
438 
4,805 

•795 
•341 
•380 
1-485 
•417 

4,714 

1,640 

3,623 

408 

1,546 

1,235 

2,441 

1,541 

1,250 

12,188 

9,649 

40,235 

24,411 

82-60 
83-55 
90-35 

138-78 
44-11 
47-66 

101-58 
52-17 
86-99 
78-03 
78-78 
76-06 
72-74 
81-00 

72-0 
65-6 
69-7 
69-7 
67-9 
87-3 
69-1 
85-9 
77-2 

202-6 

137-7 

18-6 

93-2 

254-5 

71-8 

151-5 

134-2 

334-7 

54-7 
33-1 

109-9 
68-4 

125-5 

122-2 
245-9 
146-3 

69-7 


777 

249 

104 

4 

21 

197-8 
11,932 
9,174 
427 
4,816 

•815 
•334 
•383 
1-523 
•426 

6,385 

2,112 

3,856 

346 

1,579 

892 

2,415 

1,362 

1,459 

13,420 

10,707 

44,533 

24,970 

97-81 
99-67 
84-30 

110-54 
42-20 
36-26 

100-29 
46-31 
94-86 
76-79 
79-62 
76-39 
73-36 
82-54 

72-2 
66-6 
69-8 
69-5 
68-0 
87-4 
68-8 
85-5 
77-4 

198-7 

134-7 

18-1 

91-8 

247-0 

71-7 

152-7 

130-3 

332-8 

54-0 
32-6 

110-3 
67-5 

123-3 

122-5 
247-2 
146-8 

69-7 


1,058 

265 

78 

9 

25 

191-3 
10,976 
9,023 
378 
4,476 

•818 
•336 
•383 
1-513 
•416 

7,963 

1,831 

4,140 

378 

1,793 

765 

2,341 

1,649 

1.593 

13,189 

11,586 

47.228 

26.755 

114-74 
92-15 
99-52 

114-89 
46-96 
40-56 
97-79 
56-11 

10101 
74-53 
83-36 
80-52 
76-94 
87-23 

72-3 
67-3 
68-9 

68-0 
87-4 
68-9 
85-5 
77-4 

193-8 

130-8 

17-4 

90-3 

241-6 

71-8 

151-4 

126-5 

323-0 

530 
30-6 

110-3 
670 

120-4 

123-2 
241-3 
146-2 

69-1 


1,048 

260 

143 

8 

21 

185-2 
10,560 
8,733 
367 
4,809 

•793 
•334 
•373 
1-476 
•393 

7,075 

L,891 

5,017 

273 

1,797 

859 

2,217 

1,638 

1,786 

13,328 

11,381 

47,262 

26,651 

98-54 
96-73 

109-57 
81-98 
46-23 
54-33 
94-10 
53-79 

112-82 
75-38 
77-74 
79-33 
75-82 
83-99 

72-1 
66-4 
69-5 
69-3 
68-0 
87-4 
68-6 
85-5 
77-4 

186-2 

124-0 

16-5 

86-0 

233-5 

70-6 

148- 1 

122-8 

307-4 

50-9 
28-6 

108-9 
64-6 

115-7 

123-3 
230-1 
144-1 

69-2 




Rye 000 bushels 

Visible Supply — 

Wheat 000,000 bushels 

Oats 000 bushels 


177-4 
10 161 


Barley 000 bushels 

Flax 000 bushels 


8,621 
353 


Rye 000 bushels 

Aver . Cash Price Ft. William and Pt. 
Arthur — 

Wheat No. 1 Nor $ per bush 

Oats No. 2 C.W " 


4,738 

•776 
•330 


Barley No. 3 C.W " 


■374 


Flax No. 1 N.W.C 

Rye No. 2C.W " 


1-451 
•402 




6 073 




1 635 


Coal 


4 770 




283 




1,732 
839 






2 260 




1 375 


Ore 


1 346 


Mdse. L.C.L 


13,252 
11 586 




45 144 


Total cars received from connections 


25.063 
77-19 




85-60 


Coal 


96-66 




82-27 




44-98 




56-06 




91-93 




46-30 


Ore 


82-63 




75.9? 




76-46 




74-45 




73-40 




76-83 


Indexes of Wholesale Prices — 

Total 


71-9 




65-8 




69-4 


Textiles 


69-3 




68-0 




87-4 




68-1 




85-5 




77-4 


Indexes of Common Stock Prices— 

Industrials— 
Total (89) 


188-0 




125-9 




16-9 




86-4 


Oils (5) 


236-1 




67-4 


Food and allied products (18) 


146-4 


Beverages (8) 


123-5 




3110 


Utilities— 
Total (23) 


514 




30-3 


Telephone and telegraph (2) 


109-4 




63-9 


Grand total (1 12) 


116-8 


Mining Stocks— 
Gold (20) 


127-4 




235-9 


Total Index (23) 


148-5 


Dominion of Canada long-term bond yields 
(1926= 100) 


68-9 







22 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 17. Bank Debits to Individual Accounts in the Clearing House Centres of Canada 
Millions of Dollars, with Annual Totals for Leading Cities and Economic Areas 



Year 


Canada 


Halifax 


Saint 
John 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Vancou- 
ver 


Maritime 
Provinces 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Provinces 


British 
Columbia 


1924 


27,159 


249 


262 


7.502 


7,659 


3.793 


1,410 


585 


8,133 


11,209 


5.507 


1.725 


1925 


28.126 


292 


208 


7,766 


7.588 


4.183 


1,475 


573 


8.475 


11 236 


6.000 


1,842 


1926 


30.358 


310 


215 


9,133 


8.210 


3.877 


1,553 


605 


9.910 


11.998 


5.886 


1.960 


1927 


36.094 


325 


219 


11,780 


10,537 


4,005 


1,596 


628 


12.644 


14 042 


6.127 


2.053 


1928 


43 477 


405 


249 


13,962 


12,673 


5,188 


1,982 


745 


14,913 


17.313 


8.007 


2,499 


1929 


46.670 


425 


273 


15,558 


13,714 


4,789 


2,366 


798 


16,484 


18.543 


7.923 


2 923 


1930 


37.491 


302 


246 


12,271 


10.655 


3,712 


1,813 


708 


13,137 


15.044 


6.279 


2.323 


1931 


31.586 


330 


235 


9,757 


9,512 


3,280 


1.416 


653 


10,550 


13.377 


5.201 


1.806 


1932 


25,844 


258 


188 


7,136 


8.066 


3,138 


1.190 


519 


7,766 


11.259 


4.797 


1.503 


1933 


29,981 


254 


154 


7,944 


10,222 


4,798 


1,207 


481 


8.567 


13.027 


6.414 


1.492 


1934 


32,867 


276 


171 


8,835 


11.389 


4,682 


1,321 


534 


9,450 


14.920 


6.337 


1.626 


1935 


31,546 


310 


173 


8,307 


10.643 


4,633 


1,350 


574 


8,978 


13,877 


6,445 


1.672 



Clearing House 


1935 


1936 


Centres 


April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec 


Jan. 


Feb. 


March 


April 


Kank Debits 

Maritime Provinces 


S 

22-5 

6-8 

13-2 


S 

23-4 
7-6 
16-4 


$ 

26 2 

8 8 

17-6 

52-6 


* 

29-1 
7-9 

14-5 


$ 

26-2 
.7-5 
14-8 


S 

25-6 
7-3 
13-8 


$ 

28 
8-0 
14-7 


% 

37-9 
8-3 

16 3 


$ 

28-3 
8-6 
14-4 


S 

29-5 
7-3 
13-6 


S 

21-7 
7-3 
14-9 


$ 

25-2 
7-1 
14-1 


$ 

24-2 




81 


Saint John 


15-5 


Totals 


42-4 


47-5 


51 5 


48-5 


46-7 


50-7 


62-5 


51-3 


50-4 


43-8 


46-4 


47-8 






Quebec — 


609-6 

41 2 

4-7 


808-4 
44-8 
5-3 


733-6 

66-6 

60 


685-7 
48 6 

5-2 


625-7 

46-1 

5-3 


652-3 
44-4 
4-9 


732-0 

49-3 

6-5 


801-9 
70-2 
6-1 


757-2 

50-5 

5-7 


780-9 

42-8 

5-3 


808-7 
52-3 
4-8 


769-9 
47-8 
50 


878-8 




42-9 


Sherbrooke 


5-3 


Totals 


655-5 


858-5 


806-2 


739-5 


677-1 


701-6 


787-8 


878-2 


813-4 


829-0 


865-8 


822-7 


927-0 


Ontario— 


7-5 
5-4 
3-9 

41-5 
41 
8-6 

27-4 

108-0 

4-7 

4-8 

43 

800-3 

22-3 


8-4 
6-4 
3-7 

49-5 
4-5 

10-6 

320 
140-5 
50 
60 
4-8 
1,062-3 

261 


8-7 
8-6 
4 8 

52-6 
4-8 
9 9 

39 4 

134-3 

4-9 

6-6 

4-8 

962-8 

23-5 


9 3 
70 
3 9 

46 8 
4-8 
9-6 

31 6 
129-8 
6 5 
6-4 
4-5 
838-3 

200 


6-7 
5-4 
4-7 

42-9 
4-3 
8-9 

281 

89-2 
4-5 
60 
4-5 
770- 

17-2 


7-4 
5-7 
4-2 

46-8 
4-3 
8-7 

27-1 

92-8 
51 
5-7 
4-7 
751-6 

18-4 


8-4 
6-2 
4-4 

50-3 
5-5 

10-9 

29-2 

117-7 

5-5 

61 

4-8 

823-8 

290 


7-9 
101 

4-5 

58-4 

5-2 

10-2 

35-5 

121-7 

6-6 

6-0 

5-6 

999-2 

30-9 


9-7 
90 
4-9 

51-7 
6-1 

11-3 

34-3 

129-7 

6-3 

6-4 

5-5 

986-3 

39-4 


7-9 
11-3 

3-9 

49-9 

50 

9-9 

360 

108-6 

51 

6-6 

4-8 

1,017-7 

45-6 


70 
6-8 
3-8 

46-7 
4-5 
9-7 

310 

90-9 
4-6 
5-3 
4-8 
1,012-6 

30-6 


7-1 
6-9 
3-6 

43-8 
4-6 
9-3 

28-0 

88-3 
4-6 
5-4 
50 
909-5 

360 


80 




7-4 


Fort William 


3-7 

48-4 


Kingston 


4-8 
10-6 




31-7 


Ottawa 

Peterborough 

Sarnia 

Sudbury 

Toronto 

Windsor 


123-7 
5-2 
5-9 
5-5 

843-3 
35-7 


Totals 


1,042-8 


1,3600 


1,263-7 


1,118-4 


992-4 


982-4 


1,101-8 


1.300-9 


1,300-6 


1,312-4 


1,258-2 


1,1520 


1,133-6 


Prairie Provinces- 


21 

49-8 

43 1 

3-5 

1-9 

3-6 

2 2 

31-5 

8-8 

339-5 


22 

46-6 

34-7 

3-7 

20 

41 

2-2 

72-5 

9-6 

552-2 


21 

48-6 

34-6 

4-2 

21 

4-3 

2-3 

33-7 

8 8 

310 5 


20 

49 1 

33-7 

4-6 

2-2 

4 6 

2-2 

39-5 

9 6 

344-6 


1-9 

48-2 

310 

4-4 

2-3 

4-5 

1-9 

38-0 

8-6 

497- 


21 

49-2 

29-6 

5-3 

31 

5-0 

1-9 

45-6 

9-8 

412-2 


2-5 

82-8 

35-2 

50 

3-4 

5-8 

2-4 

65-2 

13-2 

604-3 


25 

63-9 

31-8 

4-5 

2-5 

5-5 

2-1 

48-1 

10-6 

458-4 


2-2 

69-5 

32-6 

4-4 

2-6 

5-4 

2-2 

46-6 

100 

440-4 


21 

49-3 

37-6 

3-6 

21 

4-5 

1-9 

33-5 

8-5 

491-9 


1-8 

44-7 

24-3 

30 

1-7 

3-5 

1-7 

30-5 

70 

3100 


1-9 

47-3 

31-3 

3-2 

20 

3-9 

20 

33-5 

7-9 

279-7 


21 




47-7 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 

Moose Jaw. 

Prince Albert 


33-8 
3-7 
2-5 
4-2 
20 

29-7 




8-8 




3630 






Totals 


485-9 


729-8 


451-3 


492-0 


637-8 


563-8 


819-9 


629-9 


605-8 


635-0 


427-8 


412-7 


497-4 


British Columbia- 
New Westminster 
Vancouver 


4-6 
114-2 
21-2 


4-7 
113 
190 


4-8 
106-9 
24-8 


5 4 
113 7 
24-5 


5-3 
116-3 
20-3 


5-4 
104-1 

21-8 


61 
118-1 
231 


5-7 
121-5 
22-7 


5-5 

129-8 
25-9 


50 
137-7 
22-6 


4-6 
139-8 
27-4 


51 
135-7 

24-2 


5-6 
140-7 
21-6 






Totals 


140- 1 


136-7 


136-5 


143-7 


141-9 


131-4 


147-3 


149-9 


161-2 


165-3 


171-8 


1650 


167-9 


Totals Canada 


2.366-7 


3.132-2 


2,710-3 


2,5451 


2,497-6 


2,425-9 


2,907-5 


3,021-5 


2,932-3 


2,992-1 


2,767-4 


2,598-8 


2,773-8 


Bank clearings 


1,252 


1,654 


1.561 


1.380 


1,376 


1.334 


1.583 


1,695 


1.516 


1,551 


1,462 


1,390 


1,435 



Table 18. Indexes of Employment by Cities, 1926 = 100 













1935 














1936 






1st of Month 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


Employment- 
Montreal 


83-8 
93-4 
94-8 
99-3 
87-7 
132-6 
83-5 
89-7 


86-3 
96-7 
96-7 

101-3 
90-3 

133-5 
85-5 
93-4 


87-2 
95-8 
97-9 

103-5 
93-5 

123-5 
870 
96-5 


86-8 
99-0 
97-7 

106-2 
93-9 

113-4 
89-1 
99-9 


87-2 
100-9 

97-2 
104-3 

95-4 
106-6 

90-6 
101-7 


88-7 
102-8 

98-7 
103-9 

95-2 
105-2 

90- 1 
105-7 


91-5 

101-8 
101-1 
105-6 
1001 
106-8 
911 
103-5 


91-7 
100-5 
101-7 
1040 
101-4 
115-4 

91-4 
101-3 


91-9 
99-0 
100-8 
103-6 
100-4 
118-7 
94-1 
100-3 


86-4 
93-5 
100-6 
103-2 
95-7 
116-4 
919 
97-2 


87-6 
92 
96-4 
99-5 
96-8 
120-0 
91-2 
97-8 


87-3 
93-6 
97-8 

101-4 
97-1 

117-7 
94-1 
96-9 


88-3 
91-7 
98-7 

103-1 
96-8 

131-2 
88-1 

1001 


92-7 


Quebec 


95-8 


Toronto 


100-2 




107-7 




981 




136 1 




87-3 


Vancouver 


101-9 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 23 

Table 19. Building Permits Issued by Sixty-one Cities in Canada in Thousands of Dollars 



City 










1935 








J 


1936 




April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Building Permits— 

Prince Edward Isd 
Charlotte town 

Nova Scotia 

Halifax 


13 


25 


42 


24 


5 


23 


15 


4 


2 


3 


11 




12 


58 


114 


77 


65 


969 


62 


85 


81 


32 


53 


33 


82 


109 


56 
2 

1 


104 
3 
8 


68 
2 
7 


50 

1 

15 


963 
1 
5 


52 
5 
5 


84 
1 


71 

2 
S 


32 


51 


33 


78 


102 


New Glasgow 

Sydney 






2 




4 


7 


New Brunswick... 
Fredericton 


37 


40 


35 


35 


25 


29 


16 


20 


4 


11 


4 


18 


14 


is 

19 


1 
21 
18 


H 

18 


8 

13 
14 


1 
6 
18 


5 

8 
16 


2 
2 
12 










5 
2 
12 


3 

10 


10 
10 


4 


11 


4 


Saint John 

Quebec 




1,806 


1.688 


1,497 


689 


331 


584 


1,257 


519 


928 


284 


203 


468 


445 


Montreal and Mai- 
eonneuve 


1,681 

60 

1 

35 

5 

25 


567 
1,053 
14 
31 
12 
10 


1,408 
35 
3 

20 
14 
18 


547 

88 
3 

20 
5 

26 


257 

55 

1 

6 

1 

11 


360 

168 
1 

16 
2 

36 


675 

530 

27 

15 

2 
7 


428 
60 

16 

13 


740 

27 

1 

135 

3 

23 


266 
2 

10 

2 
5 


159 
8 
2 
5 

28 


387 
45 


305 
36 






Sherbrooke 

Three Rivers 

Westmount 


16 
5 
15 


23 
32 
41 


Ontario 


3,527 


2,152 


2,339 


1,610 


2,325 


1.616 


2,119 


2,306 


1,140 


457 


439 


1,151 


1,330 


Belleville 


14 
11 

7 
16 

6 

24 

926 

23 

55 

1,065 

1 

3 
250 

6 
12 
28 

9 
23 

2 

9 

17 
616 

275 

12 

109 

3 

1 

8 

7 


11 
31 
14 

8 
11 
11 
109 
48 
95 
67 

5 

6 
259 

5 
15 
42 

2 
17 

3 

10 

15 

1,179 

141 

6 
33 

1 

6 

13 


8 
33 

7 
43 
262 
158 
86 
24 
24 
62 

1 
15 
203 
13 
63 
20 

5 
25 

7 
15 

9 
1,027 

188 
5 

18 
2 

3 

11 


10 
33 

6 
34 

7 
27 
100 
35 
91 
59 
10 

6 
100 

1 
15 
16 

8 
27 
60 
11 

9 
736 

173 
8 
15 
3 
1 
"*4 

6 


86 

32 

9 

12 

42 

12 

142 

11 

106 

30 

1 

72 

753 

5 

38 

11 

5 

55 

9 

27 
702 

133 

4 

11 

1 

2 

'"2 
13 


1 
18 

4 

16 
44 
11 
143 
19 
16 
52 
43 
17 
63 

7 
13 
25 

5 
31 
14 

8 

10 

630 

126 

4 

286 


12 

35 

5 

11 

3 

14 

51 

37 

61 

89 

6 

2 

690 

1 

24 

11 

10 

8 

4 

7 

9 

783 

155 
22 
156 


"'io 
2 
4 
2 

16 

142 

15 

78 

253 

2 

358 
4 

10 
5 

41 

5 

6 

1,098 

220 
3 
18 


1 
17 
22 


1 

17 
3 


4 
2 


17 

6 
1 

10 

3 

4 

119 

13 
8 

28 

3 

1 

201 

1 

16 

12 
3 
4 
1 

10 

4 

493 

151 
14 
25 


5 




6 


Chatham 

Fort William 

Halt 


38 
24 

17 


1 

1 

48 

32 

13 

25 

3 
1 
5 
5 

36 
3 

17 
740 

139 

9 


2 
5i 

3 

8 

"1 

1 
22 

3 

2 
1 


3 

7 
29 
10 

7 
13 

5 

19 
5 
5 
2 
2 


Ouelnh 


4 




107 




13 




27 




59 


Niagara Falls 


9 
16 


Ottawa 


71 


Owen Sound 

Peterborough 

Port Arthur 

Stratford 


6 
27 
13 

1 


fit. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


16 
4 

6 






4 

1 

201 

53 

" ' ' 63 


4 

16 

252 

19 

1 

30 


Sault Ste. Marie... 


28 
531 


York and East 

Townships 

Welland 


240 
8 


Windsor 1 


40 


East Windsor.... 

Riverside 

Sandwich 

Walkerville 

Woodstock 




* 


3 


























6 


8 


6 


20 


2 


7 


5 


10 


Manitoba 


116 


181 


189 


158 


103 


117 


115 


56 


42 


34 


20 


45 


68 




53 

4 
59 


8 

4 

169 


3 

5 

182 


11 
27 
119 


27 

1 

74 


2 
30 
85 


18 
95 


2 
"55 


9 

33 


4 






1 


St. Boniface 

Winnipeg 






1 

66 


30 


20 


45 


Saskatchewan 


59 


143 


39 


25 


28 


491 


18 


30 


9 


5 


6 


4 


56 


Moose Jaw 


21 
18 
20 


88 
18 
36 


1 
31 

7 


15 
10 


5 

7 

16 


5 
479 

7 


5 
7 
6 






4 


5 


2 


1 

41 


23 

7 


1 
8 


8askatoon 


14 


Alberta 


409 


175 


312 


156 


122 


106 


84 


31 


20 


9 


12 


97 


654 


Caleary 


108 

280 

16 

4 


72 
72 
28 
3 


238 

66 

8 


78 
63 
12 
3 


58 
63 
10 


55 

42 

9 


18 
50 

16 

1 


16 
6 
5 
4 


14 
11 

1 


7 
2 


8 
2 


50 

27 

7 

14 


214 


Edmonton 

Lethbridge 

Medicine Hat 


408 
32 




1 










' 


British Columbia... 


276 


307 


586 


1,505 


387 


294 


313 


268 


219 


428 


1,184 


497 


496 




3 

3 
33 

2 
199 

4 
28 


7 

4 
16 

3 
203 

5 
69 


29 
3 
18 

""508 
1 

27 


6 

5 
27 

2 
1,377 

3 
84 


2 

1 

11 

22 

309 

1 

41 


5 
3 

9 

1 

246 

1 
27 


5 
3 

24 

3 

248 

1 

29 


3 
3 

16 

3 

217 


J 

164 


1 

7 
17 

2 
359 

1 
40 


1 

1 
18 

"i,'io8 

"'56 


9 
22 
33 

1 
356 
34 
44 


19 




6 


New Westminster. 

Prince Rupert 

Vancouver 

North Vancouver. 
Victoria 


25 
1 

396 

2 

47 


25 


25 


Total 81 oi ties...' 


6,300 


4.825 


5,117 


4,266 


4,2931 


3,322 


4,020 


3,315 


2.402B 


1,284 


1,912 


2,362 


3,183 


1 Includes East W 
September, 1935. 


ndsor, 


Sandwic 


h and V 


falkervi 


lie, forn 


lerly sh 


own sep 


arately 


amalga 


mated 


with Wi 


ndsor a 


s from 



24 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 
Table 20. Index Numbers of Wholesale Prices: 1926 = 100 



Classification 



Totals 

Component Material- 
Vegetable products 

Animal products 

Textiles 

Wood and paper 

Iron and its products 

Non-ferrous metals 

Non-metallic minerals 

Chemicals 

Purpose — Consumers' goods 

Foods, beverages and tobacco. . 

Producers' goods 

Producers' equipment 

Producers' materials 

Building and construction ma- 
terials 

Manufacturers' materials 

Origin— Raw and partly manu- 
factured 

Fully and chiefly manufact'd 

Field Origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

A NIMAL ORIGIN— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Canadian farm PRODtJCTS-Field 

Animal 

Totals 

Marine origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Forest origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Mineral origin— Raw 

Manufactured 

Totals 

Commodity Groups- 
Fruits 

Grains 

Flour and milled products 

Rubber and its Droducts 

Sugar and its products 

Tobacco 

Fishery products 

Furs 

Hides and skins 

Leather, unmanufactured 

Boots and shoes 

Live stock 

Meats and poultry 

Milk and its products 

Eggs 

Cotton .raw 

Cotton yarn and thread 

Knit goods 

Silk, raw 

Artificial silk and its products. . 

Wool, raw 

Wool yarns 

Newsprint 

Lumber and timber 

Pulp 

Pig iron and steel billets 

Rolling mill products 

Scrap 

Aluminium 

Brass, copper and products 

Lead and its products 

Silver 

Zinc and its products 

Clay and allied material prod'ts 

Coal 

Coke 

Petroleum and products 

Lime 

Cement 

Asbestos 

Fertilizers 



1935 



April May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec 



81-3 

75 



72 3 



75-8 
75-8 



71 5 



75-8 
75 



71-5 

66 
68 
70 
64 

87 



75 

75-8 



71-6 



80 



75 
75-8 



72 3 



84 



105 



75 8 
75 8 



73 



75-8 
75-8 



72 7 



75-8 
75-8 



72 6 

67 
72 
69 

65 
87 
71 

85 

77 



92 
93 
73 
99 
105 

75-8 
75-8 



Jan. Feb. Mar. | April 



75 
75-8 



72 5 

60 

72 
69 
67 
87 
68 
85 
77 

73 
71 

69 
90 
67 

84 
64 

67 
72 
55 
71 
64 
75 
70 
72 
58 
77 
66 
63 
70 
6S 
79 
57 
67 
79 
84 



75-8 
75-6 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 25 

Table 21. Prices of Representative Commodities, and Wholesale Prices in Other Countries. 





1935 


1936 


Description* 






April 


May 
S 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Wholesale Prices of Important 


S 


$ 


1 


S 


$ 


s 


5 


$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 


Commodities- 




























Oats, No. 2 C.W bush. 


•422 


•408 


•39S 


•429 


•363 


•360 


-340 


•319 


•298 


•337 


•355 


•358 


•337 


Wheat, No.l Man. Northern " 


•876 


•857 


•817 


•814 


•845 


•903 


•908 


•857 


•847 


•848 


•821 


•821 


•805 


Flour, First Patent 2-98'a 






























5-700 


5-300 


4-900 


5-100 


5-300 


5-700 


5-800 


5-700 


5-700 


5-800 


5-600 


5-700 


5-500 


Sugar, Pr. West Indies, 




Montreal 2 cwt. 


1-94C 


1-980 


1-900 


1-770 


1-875 


1-850 


1-968 


1-901 


1-950 


1-950 


1-950 


1-915 


1-950 


Sugar, granulated, Montreal " 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-895 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-705 


4-610 


4-610 


Rubber, Ceylon, ribbed, 




























smoked sheets, N.Y.* lb. 


•116 


•121 


•126 


•121 


•12C 


•117 


•129 


•133 


•133 


•144 


•155 


•160 


•161 


Cattle, steers, good, over 




























1,050 lbs cwt. 


7-110 


7-200 


6-760 


6-400 


6-550 


6-800 


6-010 


5-800 


6-330 


6-290 


6-290 


5-490 


5-510 


Hogs, bacon, Toronto " 


8-740 


9-390 


9-920 


9-660 


9-920 


9-380 


8-940 


7 990 


8-400 


8-450 


8-590 


8-500 


8-370 


Beef hides, packer hides, 




























native steers lb. 


•105 


•115 


•115 


•120 


•120 


•128 


•153 


•153 


•148 


•153 


•130 


•120 


•120 


Leather, green hide crops... " 


•300 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•310 


•320 


•340 


•360 


•360 


•370 


•370 


•370 


•370 


Pox sides, B, Oshawa ft. 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•200 


•220 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


•240 


Butter, creamery, finest, 




























Montreal lb. 


•250 


•232 


•220 


•219 


•226 


•247 


•263 


•274 


•278 


•277 


•251 


•244 


•238 


Cheese, Canadian, old, large, 




























Montreal " 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•140 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


•150 


-150 


•150 


Eggs, Grade "A", Montreal doz. 


•213 


•221 


•244 


•268 


•304 


•364 


•403 


•435 


•424 


•319 


•324 


•315 


•229 


Cotton, raw 1-11/16', Ham- 




























ilton lb. 


•137 


•143 


•138 


•143 


•139 


•126 


•133 


•145 


•139 


•136 


•135 


•133 


•138 


Cotton yarns, 10's white 




























single " 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•300 


•275 


•290 


•290 


•290 


•290 


•290 


•290 


Silk, raw, New York 1 " 


1-738 


1-720 


1-644 


1-724 


2-008 


2 090 


2-337 


2-337 


2-208 


2-130 


1-899 


1-878 


1-825 


Wool, eastern bright i blood " 


•130 


•140 


•150 


•165 


•165 


•160 


•160 


•180 


•180 


•190 


•200 


•205 


•200 


Wool, western range, semi- 






























•130 
19039 


•140 
19-063 


•150 
18-995 


•185 
18-434 


•180 
19-060 


•180 
18-922 


•180 
19-027 


•190 
20-653 


•190 
19-593 


•200 

20-485 


•210 
20-099 


•210 
20-018 


•210 


Pulp, groundwood No. 1 ton 


19-674 


Pig iron, malleable " 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


19-000 


Steel, merchant bars, mill 100 lb. 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


2-250 


Copper, electrolytic, domes- 




























tic cwt. 


8-252 


8-718 


8-221 


8-316 


8-677 


9-129 


9-540 


9-413 


9-407 


9-279 


9-452 


9-616 


9-760 




3-426 


3-686 


3-711 


3-882 


4-164 


4-298 


4-716 


4-740 


4-655 


4-362 


4-516 


4-614 


4-368 


Tin ingots, Straits, Toronto, lb. 


•565 


•673 


•568 


•570 


•535 


•540 


•560 


•570 


•555 


•528 


•535 


•540 


•523 


Zinc, domestic, Montreal., cwt. 


3-690 


3-943 


3-816 


3-905 


4-080 


4-224 


4-467 


4-490 


4-364 


4-221 


4-400 


4-548 


4-235 


Coal, anthracite, Toronto . ton 


10-730 


10-898 


11-178 


11-469 


11-760 


12-050 


12-340 


12-340 


12-340 


12-342 


12-342 


11-020 


9-990 


Coal, bituminous, N.S. run- 






























5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•160 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•140 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 
•150 


5-250 


Gasoline. Toronto gal. 


•150 


Sulphuric acid,66*Beaume,net ton 
Indexes of Wholesale Prices In 


16 000 


16 000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16 000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 


16-000 




























Other Countries 4 — 




























United States— 




























F.sher, 200: 1926 


81-6 
801 


82-3 
80-2 


820 

79-8 


82-1 

79-4 


83-8 
80-5 


851 

80-7 


85-4 
80-6 


84-7 
80-6 


84-2 
80-9 


84-0 


83-5 


82-6 




Bureau of Labour, 784: 1925. . 




Annalist, 72; 1913 


125-8 


1260 


123-2 


123-6 


126-8 


127-6 


129-2 


128-3 


129-4 


128-3 


126-4 


124-9 








Board of Trade, 150: 1930. . . . 


87.5 


88-2 


88-4 


880 


88-4 


89-6 


91-1 


91-2 


91-4 


91-8 


91-7 


91-7 






66-7 


68-6 


68-1 


68-1 


67-6 


69-9 


71-5 


71-3 












.France, Statistique General, 












126: 1913 


336 


340 


330 


322 


330 


332 


342 


348 


354 


359 


376 






Germany, Federal Statistical 






Office, 400- 1913 


100-8 


100-8 


101-2 


101 8 


102.4 


102-3 


102-8 


103-1 


103-4 


103-6 


103-6 






Belgium, Ministry of Labour, 






130: 1914 


531 


552 


555 


553 


552 


560 


574 


582 


579 


581 


582 






Netherlands, Central Bureau 






Statistics 48* 1913 


76 
125 


75 
125 


75 
126 


74 
127 


73 
128 


75 

128 


78 
130 


78 












Norway, Official, 95: 1913 












Sweden, Commerce Dept., 160: 




























1913 


115 
296 
90 


115 

302 

90 


116 
308 
90 


116 

310 

90 


115 

323 

90 


115 

330 

91 


117 


118 


118 










Italy, Bachi, 150- 1913 










Finland, Official, 139: 1926 


92 


91 


91 


90 


91 






India, Dept. of Statistics, 72: 




























1914 


88 
137-7 


91 

137-8 


91 

136-2 


91 
136-2 


89 
138-2 


89 
142-7 


93 
146-6 


92 

146-3 


93 
145-0 


92 








Japan. Bank of Japan, 56: 1913. . 








Australia, Commonwealth Sta- 






























132-7 


134 


134-7 


135-9 


137-7 


137-4 


137-8 














New Zealand, Official, 180: 














1909-1913 


136-7 


1371 


138 3 


139-5 


140-3 


143 


144-6 


142-8 












Egypt, Dept. of Statistics, 












Cairo, 23- 1913-1914 


92 


92 


94 


95 


96 


92 


96 


94 


94 





















'For full description see the report on Prices and Price Indexes published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, 
cation for this publication should be made to the Dominion Statistician. 

'For month of nearest delivery when spot quotations not available. 

•Canadian Funds. 

'The description includes the authority, the number of commodities and the base year. 



Appli- 



26 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 



Table 22. Total Value of 


Imports 


i and Exports, 


by Groups, in Thousands of Dollars 








Imports of Merchandise for Consumption in 


Canada 






Month 


Total 
Imports 


Vege- 
table 
Products 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Textiles 


Wood 

and 

Paper 


Iron and 
its Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 

Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Minerals 


Chemic- 
als and 
Allied 

Products 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modities 


1933 

August 


$000 

38,747 
38,698 
41,070 
43.712 
35,368 

32,391 
33,592 
47,519 
34.815 
52,887 
46.186 
44.145 
43.507 
42,208 
47,229 
49,884 
39,108 

37.229 
37,044 
48,191 
36.637 
54,540 
46.732 
48.414 
49,560 
44.689 
52.751 
55,958 
38,569 

40,590 
41,597 
52.765 
42,223 


$000 

7,676 
7,575 
8,329 
10.517 
8,215 

5.825 
7,429 
8,737 
7,528 

10,629 
9.141 

10.171 
8.970 
8.646 

10,632 

11,728 
9,766 

7.020 

6,791 
8.397 
6,427 
13,399 
10.405 
10.162 
8,949 
8,072 
9,292 
12,451 
8,334 

6,203 
7.093 
9,564 

7,745 


$000 

1,979 
1,778 
1.934 
1,588 
1,351 

1,639 

1,538 

2,335 

1,646- 

1,747 

1,678 

1,635 

1.716 

1,731 

1,606 

1,615 

1,350 

1,581 
1,574 
2,078 
1,600 
2,216 
1,707 
1,809 
2,070 
1,930 
2,061 
2,235 
1,766 

1,854 
2,241 

2,826 
1,914 


$000 

7,272 
6,749 
7,302 
7.241 
7,254 

6,521 
7.202 
9,928 
6,085 
8.140 
6.896 
6.215 
6.620 
6,254 
6.254 
7.372 
6.387 

6.781 
6,250 
8.546 
6.293 
5,833 
6.197 
7,074 
9,163 
6,691 
7.350 
7,759 
7,261 

8,402 
8,195 
9,702 
6,378 


$000 

1,743 
1,690 
1,933 
1,903 
1,565 

1,536 
1,394 
1,981 
1,369 
1,878 
1,657 
1,668 
1,766 
1,852 
1,984 
2.027 
1,743 

1,584 
1,611 
2,061 
1,577 
1,974 
1,763 
1,819 
1,902 
1,963 
2,267 
2,301 
1,641 

1,783 
1,959 
2,323 
1,897 


$000 

6,046 
5,353 
5,328 
5,929 
5,228 

5,763 
5,804 
9,324 
7,800 
12,196 
9.368 
8.525 
7.138 
6,782 
6.770 
7.282 
6,864 

7.384 
8.322 

11.626 
9.192 

11,903 
9,421 
8.855 
9,389 
8,625 

10,556 

10.780 
6.084 

9,088 

8,666 

11,695 

11,180 


$000 

1,516 
2,117 
2,180 
2.091 
1,641 

1,571 
1,613 
2,235 
1,681 
2.478 
2.551 
1.936 
2.261 
1.851 
2,460 
2.745 
2,577 

2.454 
2,392 
3,110 
2,073 
3,226 
2,571 
3,684 
3,019 
2,340 
2,867 
3,307 
2,571 

2,487 
2,557 
2.983 
2,544 


$000 

7,753 
8.371 
9,013 
9,181 
6,351 

6,012 
5.423 
7.926 
4,760 
10.230 
9,881 
9.131 
10.357 
10.428 
10.546 
11,089 
6.207 

6.553 

6.299 

6.943 

5,411 

10,313 

9.946 

9.967 

9,472 

10,218 

11,479 

10,731 

6,504 

6,720 
6,525 
8,135 
6,180 


$000 

2,054 
2,544 
2,347 
2,727 
1.946 

1,880 
1,578 
2.448 
2,043 
3,052 
2,722 
2.204 
2.194 
2.201 
2,637 
3,118 
2,078 

2,134 
2.012 
2,482 
2.056 
2.990 
2,420 
2,227 
2.455 
2,364 
3,064 
3,483 
2,071 

2,144 
2,047 
2,599 
2,115 


$000 

2,708 
2,523 
2.704 
2,536 
1,818 

1 644 






December 

1934 




1.612 
2.606 
1,903 
2.537 
2,292 
2 660 


March 


May 




July 




2 485 


September 

October 


2,463 
4,341 
2.907 

2 135 






1935 

January 

February 


1 740 
1,793 


March 


2,933 
2 008 


May 


2 693 




2 310 


July 


2.817 
3,140 
2,486 






3 814 




2,911 




2,338 


1936 


1,910 


February 


2,313 




3,199 


April 


2,269 











Exports of Merchandise from Canada 












Total 
Exports 

of 
Mdse. 


Domestic Produce 


Balance 

of 
Trade 


Month 


Total 
Exports 
of Can- 
adian 
Produce 


Vege- 
table 
Pro- 
ducts 


Animal 
Pro- 
ducts 


Tex- 
tiles 


Wood 
and 
Paper 


Iron 
and 
Its 
Pro- 
ducts 


Non- 
Ferrous 
Metals 


Non- 
Metallic 
Miner- 
als 


Chemi- 
cal and 
Allied 
Pro- 
ducts 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Com- 
modi- 
ties 


1933 

August 

September 

October 

November. . . . 

December. . . . 

1934 

January. .. 

February 

March 

April 


$000 

51.559 
67,259 
68,579 
70,451 
54,841 

56,116 
52,919 
70,337 
38,747 
67,445 
65,423 
65,064 
65,917 
64,246 
77,824 
73,131 
68,493 

55,209 
54,438 
68.348 
48,035 
66,345 
59,399 
64,833 
76.638 
78.846 
91,323 
95.685 
79.245 

64,744 
62,798 
74,582 
57,964 


$000 

51,148 
66,715 
68,033 
69,909 
54,146 

55,650 
52,396 
69,611 
38,282 
66,802 
64,826 
64,398 
65.330 
63.566 
77.259 
72.579 
67,948 

54,737 
53,480 
67,420 
47,314 
65,498 
58,505 
63,286 
75,676 
77,259 
90,526 
94.484 
77,099 

63.865 
62,074 
73,445 
57,424 


$000 

12.386 
22.520 
25.348 
26,016 
20,628 

14,694 
11,903 
15.807 
6,866 
20,143 
19.743 
16.519 
19.197 
22.799 
29.950 
26.016 
25.743 

11.053 
12.609 
15.595 
9.389 
17.606 
11,819 
14,231 
23,159 
20,9*55 
35.943 
34,489 
22,963 

12,795 
19.659 
19.843 
10,061 


$000 

6.324 
7,326 
6.911 
6.679 
7,012 

8.272 
5.321 
8.064 
3.902 
5.815 
6 786 
7.719 
7.061 
6.617 
7,650 
7.517 
7.846 

9.159 
8.337 
8.440 
5.157 
7,820 
6.954 
7.408 
7.527 
8.551 
9.960 
9,614 
8,293 

10,249 
8.938 

10,462 
7,112 


$000 

783 
1,168 
859 
701 
488 

410 

428 
836 
303 
810 
823 
616 
601 
614 
799 
627 
468 

531 

556 
774 
366 
939 
838 

1,168 
883 
968 
982 

1,010 
626 

703 
849 
942 
497 


$000 

13,937 
13,567 
12,903 
11,935 
11,899 

11,567 
9,447 
15,596 
9.300 
13,773 
13.684 
15.013 
14.680 
13,879 
14.402 
14,444 
14,924 

11.685 
10.618 
14.104 
9.795 
15.360 
15.409 
15,092 
17,141 
15,667 
17,255 
16,578 
17.167 

12,362 
12,412 
17,594 
13,104 


$000 

1,750 
2,336 
2.901 
1.902 
2,032 

1,967 
2.505 
3.856 
2.581 
3.741 
3.909 
4.240 
2.926 
2.585 
3.950 
2.458 
2,683 

1,846 
3,861 
5.955 
4.362 
5,020 
3.742 
5.010 
4,091 
3,956 
3.911 
4.035 
4.238 

4,576 
3,460 
5,967 

2.885 


$000 

i 
12,608 
16,222 
15,277 
18,580 
8,939 

15,859 
20,234 
21,425 
12,948 
18,200 
15,811 
16,672 
17,706 
13,634 
16,884 
17,596 
12.041 

17,463 
14.195 
18,194 
15.524 
14,208 
15,616 
16.696 
19.135 
23,052 
18,406 
24,049 
19,443 

19.320 
13,144 
13.955 
20,157 


$000 

1,232 
1,408 
1.647 
1,943 
1.466 

1,076 
836 
1.404 
766 
1.456 
1,612 
1.253 
1.245 
1,464 
1.390 
1,633 
1.623 

957 
1.068 
1.187 

803 
1.636 
1.592 
1.565 
1.665 
1,692 
1,734 
1.987 
2,013 

1,445 
1,360 
1,592 
1.391 


$000 

1,017 
1,142 
1,024 
1,224 
941 

1,147 

1,117 

1,682 

948 

1.473 

1.316 

1,082 

921 

870 

1,048 

1,361 

1,386 

1.436 
1.456 
1.974 
1,03* 
1,550 
1,409 
960 
1,036 
1.185 
1.235 
1.R8? 
1.417 

1,436 
1.268 
1,808 
1.334 


$000 

1.111 

1 027 

1.162 

928 

741 

657 

607 

941 

667 

1.391 

1.141 

1.283 

993 

1.103 

1,186 

926 

809 

605 

781 
1.197 

88^ 
1.359 
1,127 
1.155 
1.039 
1,223 
1.100 
1.010 

941 

979 

982 

1,283 

882 


$000 

i 

(-R12.813 
(4-)28,561 
(-H27.509 
(+)26,739 
(4-H9.474 

(+)23.725 
(-R19.327 
(+V22.817 
(+) 3,932 


May 


(-H14.559 


June 


(+)19,237 


July 


(+)20.919 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1935 

January 

February. . . . 

March 

April 


(+)22.410 
(+)22.038 
(-H30.595 
(4-)23,247 
(-H29.386 

(-T-H7.979 
(+H7.395 
( + V20.157 
r + H1.398 


May 


(4011. 805 


June 


(4-M2.667 


July 

Augu't 

September 

October 

November . . 

December 

1936 

January 

F ebruary 

March 

April 


f+)16.419 
(+)27.078 
(4-)34.156 
(+)38.572 
(+W9.727 
(4-U0.675 

(+)34,1M 

(+V21.200 
(+V21.901 

(-R15.741 



1 Revised, due to the addition of non-monetary gold. 



Table 23. 



MONTHLY REVIEW OF BUSINESS STATISTICS 27 

Canada's Domestic Exports in Thousands of Dollars, and Indexes of the Cost 
of Living and Cost per Week of a Family Budget. 



Classification 










1935 












1936 




April 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April 


Exports of Canadian Produce— 

Agricultural and Vegetable 
Products— 
Alcoholic beverages (chiefly 


1,123 
131 

4,687 
234 

4,288 

962 

35 

108 

1,051 

1,067 
40 

1.010 
623 
117 
183 

1,561 

9 
69 
36 
12 

5,708 

1,199 

140 

410 

88 

1,669 

2,774 

290 

501 

88 

326 

78 

47 

174 

1,066 
125 
355 

2,724 
424 

306 
59 
11 

299 

204 
308 
288 

252 

244 
167 

78-6 
68-6 
88-7 
80-3 
70-3 
921 

7-50 
2-88 
5-55 
15-97 


1,102 
222 

11,588 
865 

10,081 

885 

105 

394 

1,486 

1,337 
162 

1,289 

1,007 
237 
366 

2,365 

311 
185 
39 
57 

8.737 

2.337 

316 

327 

163 

2,620 

2,598 
306 
602 
217 
474 
199 
49 

2,497 

2,546 
354 
636 

2,400 

565 

023 

96 

213 

439 

221 
469 
397 

196 
575 
289 

78-6 
68-7 
85-9 
81-4 
70-3 
92-1 

7-52 
2-84 
5-57 
15-97 


618 

97 

6,383 

521 
5,149 

1,027 
157 
333 

1.664 

747 
196 

1,570 
749 
280 
393 

2,147 

364 
72 
62 
5 

8,182 

2,444 

703 

647 

110 

2.433 

1,628 
265 
710 
104 
412 
64 
71 

302 

2,981 

312 

369 

2.294 

1,027 

649 

160 

38 

437 

159 
392 
326 

221 
386 
249 

78-8 
69-3 
84-8 
81-4 
69-9 
92-6 

7-54 
2-81 
5-57 
15-95 


964 
151 

8,257 
502 

7,214 

1,119 
170 
394 

1,460 

365 
582 

2,082 
835 
251 
336 

2,114 

321 
211 
56 
131 

7.911 

2,249 

948 

964 

115 

2,128 

1,732 
276 

1,124 

200 

563 

212 

72 

363 

2,541 
525 
529 

3,309 
855 

517 
185 
130 
543 

98 
171 
320 

266 
315 
327 

78.8 
69.3 
84.7 
81.4 
69.9 
92.4 

7-53 
2-80 
5-57 
15 94 


715 
183 

18,237 
327 

17,604 

1,056 

72 

163 

1,405 

310 

675 
2,308 
968 
175 
297 
1,768 

27 
155 

58 
195 

8,101 
3,206 
1,231 
986 
82 
2,356 

1,868 
235 
507 
170 
634 
127 
61 

1.518 

3.187 

528 

900 

4.080 

1.979 

594 
175 

36 
452 

267 
94 
253 

236 
266 
248 

79-4 
71-3 

85-4 
81-4 
69-9 
92-5 

7-73 
2-80 
5-57 
16-15 


908 
586 

15.091 
104 

14,670 

1,022 

43 

408 

1.489 

342 

1,745 

2.514 

720 

383 

324 

1,462 

22 
181 

49 
220 

7,737 

2,263 

942 

928 

118 

2,221 

1,670 
319 
419 
166 
503 
209 
61 

567 

2,636 
525 
566 

3,676 
752 

688 
161 
125 
482 

259 
102 
341 

205 
279 
387 

79-6 
70-9 
85-4 
81-4 

71-6 
92-6 

7-74 
2-81 
5-57 
16-16 


1,512 
2,733 

26,277 
322 

25,474 

1,005 
111 
771 

2,009 

488 

1,630 

2,647 

343 

227 

375 

1.690 

12 
106 

89 
232 

8,727 

2,842 

899 

957 

180 

2,269 

1,373 
186 
376 
178 
499 
267 
83 

744 

3,892 
586 
823 

3,641 
947 

747 
82 
89 

448 

255 

15C 
365 

323 
163 
299 

80-4 
72-4 
86-5 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

7-93 
2-83 
5-63 
16-42 


2,262 
2,803 

23,239 
437 

21,743 

1,121 
112 
984 

2,218 

250 
989 

3,266 
344 
302 
436 

2,424 

5 

120 

93 

270 

8,882 

2,660 

445 

658 

138 

2,651 

1.632 
162 
340 
274 
464 
472 
88 

2,827 

2,246 

366 

797 

3,959 

1,363 

777 
184 
203 
562 

278 
403 
445 

327 
174 
285 

80-6 
73-2 
87-0 
82-6 
71-6 
92-5 

804 
2-83 
5-63 
16-54 


1.641 
1,968 

14,298 
207 

13,672 

943 

101 

627 

1,867 

150 

255 

1.898 

2,699 

433 

319 

1,616 

"i04 

76 
116 

9,942 

2,129 

448 

669 

96 
2,426 

1,612 
257 
370 
163 
492 
365 
175 

606 

2.572 

298 

781 

2,621 

2,497 

976 

246 

39 

432 

250 
383 
356 

297 
207 
214 

80-6 
73-7 
87-2 
82-6 
70-6 
92-5 

8-14 
2-84 
5-6